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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, May 28, 1915, Image 2

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* ARPHEUjtf !
WT H B A T R Eg;
Return of Alaska's Favorites
The Famous JUVENILE
BOSTONIANS
Tonight, May 28
The Up-to-the-Mlnute Musical
Comedy
"Tipperary Mary"
Introducing the Tipperary Trot
SATURDAY
"King Dodo"
Raymond Hitchcock's Greatest |j
Success
Matinee Tomorrow 1
AT 3:00
"My Tango Maid" |
SUNDAY NIGHT
"The Cabaret Girl" i
Prices?50c, 75c and $1.00
Matinee 25c and 50c
Reserved Seats at P . 0. Store i
Today
WHITE PASS LOOKS
FOR BIG TRADE
???
WHITEHORSE, May 22.? General
Manager Wheeler, who returned this
week from the Outside, having left
Chicago on April 19. stopping three
weeks in Seattle after reaching the
coast, says the outlook for tourist trav
el to Alaska and the Yukon is very
encouraging?that hundreds who come
west to visit tho Panama Exposition
at Frisco, will roako the northern trip
and that a large number of those who
come up tho Alaskan coast will visit
tho Yukon before returning to their
homes in the east.
Mr. Wheeler has been busy since
his arrival but says he his found all
departments In just as go>>d condition
as though he had been right here all
the time, the various superintendents
each being "Johnny on the spot" in
his respective department. He also
spoke of the successful work being
carried on at the shipyards where the
various steamers are being overhauled
before being placed in commission and
of how the big lower river steamers.
Alaska and Yukon, have been succes
fullv changed fiom wood into oil burn
ners.
Mr. Wheeler will probably be here
for some time but in the event of
anything developing in mining circles,
will leave at once for the outside on
important business* ? (Whitehorse
Star.)
COPPER OUTLOOK
FOR WHITEHORSE
WHITEHORSE. May 22 ?The lat-i
est reports from the outside are that j
copper Is now selling at-22 cents per ;
pound and will probably reach thirty |
cents within the next six weeks or two
months, the supply of all Europe be]
ing exhausted and the United States
and Canada being practically the on
ly countries where it can be produced
at present.
In connection with the above, it iaj
in order to mention that General Man
ager Wheeler of the W. P. & Y. R..
and General Manager Greenough of
the Atlas Mining Company, both of
whom returned Tuesday from the out-;
side. have, as yet nothing definite]
to announce about the resumption of
work at the Pueblo but. like President
Wilson in connection with the Europ
ean war. are "watching and waiting"
while hopeful that "the cat will Jump."
In the meanwhile, there are several
copper properties in this locality that
could be very profitably operated with
copper at even much less than the |
price quoted.?(Whitehorse Star.)
? ? ?
SEATTLE ASKED
TO AID LIBRARY
SEATTLE, May 21.?From Council.
Alaska. 100 miles northeast of Nome,
on the Seward peninsula, comes an ap
peal to the Alaska bureau of the Seat
tle Chamber of Commerce for help In
restocking the library of the Arctic
Brotherhood, which was. destroyed by
fire last winter. The letter says:
"Camp Council. No. 11. Arctic Bro
therhood, has just experienced the
misfortune of having a fire in its li
brary. whfch destroyed the entire col
lection of about 1,000 books.
"The Arctic Brotherhood is the one
fraternal organization of the little
: mining camp of Council upon which
devolves the duty of caring for the
social and lterary needs of its people.
I Good books and good magazines are
; needed very much during the long
winter months and the A. B. library
i lias heretofore supplied the need. Now
' it is gone and the scanty funds of the
| camp will all be required to make the
necessary repairs on the building its
; self, leaving very little, if anything, to
provide a new kapply of books.
"We know there must be hundreds,
perhaps thousands of people who prob
ably would only be too glad to 'con
tribute good books from their own .11
| brary if only they knew our need. The
difficulty is to get in touch with the
ones who would help."
The Alaska bureau submits this ap
peal to the people of Seattle. The bu
reau will be glad to receive books
and magazines at its headquarters in
the Chamber of Commerce on the
eighth floor of the Central building,
and will forward them to the Alaska
mining camp near the Arctic Circle
with Seattle's compliments.?(Seattle1
Post Intelligencer.)
? ?
+ ? ? + ?? + ? + ???!? ? ?!? + ?!? -!?
41 v
?> HAINES ITEMS ?>
? ?
? ? + ? + + 4t^4,4i + ?!? ?t> <? 4- +
HAINES. May 22.? United States
Commissioner J. J. Kennedy has had
two gangs of men out fighting fire for
the greater part of the last week; one
over on-the Katzlbene river, and the
other on the Haines peninsula below
Mud Bay, and reports that now they
have the fire under control.
E. P. Wood, who has been up to
the westward as far as Seward, where
he went with a view of obtaining em
ployment on the government railroad.'
has returned to Haines, and says that
in his opinion those In charge of the
construction work are going at it in
the right manner, and In the interests
of the laboring man; that -they are
not giving out any large contracts,
but only small ones, which one. two
three or four men can do by their
own labor, by that means eliminating
all chances for graft and the oppres
sion of the men who do the work.
Some one who did not have the fear
of the law before his eyes, stole Mr. s
Winterberger's bulletin off of the l
church door. Mr. Winterberger 13
under the impression that some per- I
son in favor of the saloons did it. but ;
It matters not who the guilty one is. 1
it was wrong, and no fair minded '
person in Haines will uphold any such I
work. Nothing is ever' gained by :
wrong doing.
H. O. Banta has gone up to his: <
homestead to. establish actual resi-i
clence. and will only be in Haines j (
from now on as a visitor. 1
E. A. Adams has sold his home- t
stead claim on the west side of Chil- t
kat inlet to J. E. Reynolds. Consid- />
^ration $2,500. \
ESS KIDS
DELIGHT AUDIENCE
Having had but five hours of sleep
in sixty hours, but with their facos
wreathed in smiles that have made,
them favorites wherever they have
appeared in thq golden north, the
dainty little members of the Juvenile
Bostonlans reached Juneau at 7:45
last night, on the Mariposa and an
hour later were captivating tho large
audience that gathered in tho Or
phcum to see them in "Fnntana." To
night they play "Tipperary Mary," and
tomorrow night their bill will bo King
Dodo." The Sunday night bill has
not been announced.
This is the "wliylVfor their insom
nia?Tuesday night they played in
Prince Rupert, B. C.V and an hour af
ter the show they were aboard the
gasoline launch El Paso, bound for
Kotchlkan. to fill an enegagemcnt at
that place in time to catch the steam
ship Mariposa on to Juneau. No time
slept on the launch ride, according to
"Mother" I-ang, guardian of tho flock,
and when the boat finally reached
Ketchikan it was almost time fop the
curtain to rise on their performance.
So on the stago they went and played
and laughed and sang, while Tongass
residents applauded and encored. Im
mediately after the show they were
hustled aboard the Mariposa and dis
covered that the boat was crowded
with passengers for the interior and
the westward. Accordingly all but a
few of tho kiddies slept in the socinl
hall, or tried to sleop. Last night it
was the same performance hero, rush
ing to the theatre from the boat.
Reports this morning from their ho
tel say the kiddies lallcd to respond
to the ringing of alarm clocks, and at
noon several of them were still in
Dreamland.
GERMAN-AMERICANS
BACK UP WILSON
The New York World of May 17th
contains the following:
What would your organizations do
If America and Germany became In
volved In war?
This question was put yesterday by
The World to officials of German
shooting societies In several of the
larger cities. They replied that they,
naturalized Americans, would stand
by their adopted country, even to the
point of bearing arms against their
Fatherland. Their statements fol
low:
SIOUX CITY.. Ia.. ?"We will stand
by the President to the last ditch, al
though it should neccesitatc our tak
ing up arms against our beloved Fa
therland," Rudolph Beerend, Presi
dent of Deutscher Kriegerbund von
Nord Amerika, tho American branch
of tho Sons of German Veterans-, who
in their loyalty to Germany have been
prominent features of the European
war. made this statement today. He
was speaking for more than 9,000
prominent German-Americans.
"All of our members able to bear
arms will enlist under the banner of
our adopted country In case war is
declared," he concluded.
Philadelphia ? Emii Guenttier
President of the Guenther Lumber
company, a member of the Union
league and a leading spirit in the
Sclieutzen Verein, said today:
"Expressions of loyalty to the Pres
ident by citizens of German birth arc
neither new nor unexpected. From
the day that Pastor Muhlcnburg laid
aside his clerical robes and stood forth
in the full uniform of the Continental
army, throughout the Civil War. when
men of Gorman extraction were%found
among officers and privates, to the
present day?wherever our govern
ment has been in need, there has nev
er been a call unanswered by the
former sons of the Fatherland and
their descendents."
"Let us not speak of war," said
Franz Ehrich, jr., counsel for the
Pennsylvania branch of the German
American Alliance, which in this city
has a membership of 45,000. "I do
not believe the United iJtatos will be
come involved in war, but it it does,
German-Americans will be found fight
ing for the land of our adoption, shoul
der to shoulder with every true citi
zen of the United States.'
"Every American should heartily
support the President's declaration,"
Mr. Ehrllch continued.
CINCINNATI, O.?-Herman Rocick
er laughed when asked what he
though the attitude of the German
shooting societies of the city would ;
be in case of a war with Germany. j
Mr. Roeinker is "king" of ono of ]
the largest of tlicso organizations and i
1 member of four others, one of these ,
being composed of former soldiers, :'j
?We arc all America now," said Mr. i
Roeickcr. "We have been naturalized i
md have sworn to uphold America, i
rhat is what we would do, stand by "
jur country. j
"We have nothing to do now with I
Scrmany. There are at least 1,000 >
nembers of German shooting socie
les in this city, and i know all of I
hesc men are loyal Americans, who (
vould aid this country in case of a 1
var with Germany." (
CHICAGO?Officors of tho Chicago
Schuetzcn Verein, the only German
shooting corps in Chicago, said it
would he absurd to suppose that their
organization would not support the
United States to a man in the ovent
of difficultly with Germany. Circuit
Judge Gcorgo Kersten. President of
tho club, said that numorous enlist
ments might bo expected among the
younger members.
"Above all," said Emil Dcmme, the
treasurer of tho organization, "wo are
Americans. The United States Btands
first in our hearts, for it is the land
we have chosen as our home. To a
man wo will support Prcsidont Wilson
in whatever ho does."
Similar opinions were expressed by
Police Lieut. Max Heidclmcir, Comp
troller of the organization, and former
Sheriff Zimmer, who was an official
of the Scheutzen Verein.
MALTED MILK FOR
MADISON SCHOOL MAIDS
MADISON. "Wis., May 22.? About
141,200 malted milks are consumed
annually by the Btudonts of tho Uni
versity of Wisconsin, at a cost of
$14,120, enough money to buy a good
meal for 56,480 people. This is not
a mere guess, but the carefully com
piled figures submitted by dealers in
the University district.
The straws used in the malted milk
if placed in a direct line would roach
13 miles. The malted milk consumed
would fill a reservoir of 13,000 gal
lons Over three tons of the dry pow
der is consumed in a year.
Figures show that 1,040,000 cigar
ettes are consumed annually by stu
dents, at a cost of $7800. Tho cigar
ettes, if placed in a direct line, would
reach around Lake Mondota twice.
Thero is enough paper in the cigar
ettes consumed to make a library of
1300 books of pages each. _
PANAMA'S INFLUENCE
ON TRADE R6UTES
It Is impossible to forenst definitely
what will be the changes in trade
routes mado by the opening of the
Panama Canal, the event which is now
being celebrated by the Panama Pa
cific Exposition at San Francisco, cer
tain factors may be outlined, howev
er. which will operate to the great ad
vantage of commercial Interests.
It may bo that our greatest return
from the canal will then bo found in
a rapid development of the western
and mountain states, or Increased mil
itary effectiveness, rather than in a
capacity traffic through the waterway.
On the other hand, when wo strike a
balance to show the "net" of a de
cade's expercince, our foreign trade
may havo found the shorter route a
key to long desired markets in Asia,
Western South America and Oceania;
the trade of Western Europe and Eng
land may have paid us an attractive
toll in order to roach, by way of tho
canal; Canada, the Pacific States and
points in tno rar East.
It 1b true that distances by water ?
between many important markets are
shorter than before the canal existed.
Eight thousand miles have heen"Top
ped from the coast-to-coast voyage.
China is now about equidistant from
New York and London by sea. Port
In south eastern Australia, New Zea
land and Japan are nearer New York
than London. With African, Wost In
iian and Carribean ports can bo
reached mqre quickly by vessels sail
ing from the Pacific coast. Nearly six
thousand miles have been clipped off
the water route from Liverpool to
Vancouver. The Atlantic Coast ship
pers can make now records to cer
tain trade contcrs in Asia and on the
ivestern coast of South America.
But the workday buslnoss of carry
ng the world's goods is not concorn
?d alone with the shortest distance
PCtwoen two points and the making of
;imc records. A good freighter usual
y costs more than half a million dol
ars. Interest on this investment is
jarned by keeping the holds full of
'reight?arfd often the longest way af
ords the most opportunities to pick
ip cargoes.
There may be moro profit gained in
he end when the sailings orders spe*
:ify Aden, Calcutta, Titlcorin. Colom
)o, Madras, Karlkai, Pondicherry,
jingapore, Manila and Hong Kong
han when they name only Hon? Kong,
t is the comparative profitableness of
he alternative routes under working
:onditions which must finally dccido
iow the trade routes will be shifted
>y the Panama Canal.
Changes arc already under way, |
lowever. During August, September I
nd October of 1913 fifty-six per cent,
f the freight that left California for s;
he Atlantic Coast went by rail. Sta
isticsjindicate that a year later, dur
ng the same three months of 1914,
he railroads obtained but thirty-nine
er cent of this trade. Already sail- j
to Shanghai and Yokohama by way of
the Panama Canal.
KETCHIKAN HAS
TWO NEW COUNCILMEN
Old facia# disappeared and new ones
took their places at the councH ckam
wns unanimously elected by the Conn
J. Henoglmn's fnlluro to qualify. When
Mr. Walkor had been sworn in, Geo.
M. Chesnoy tendered his resignation
an councilman owing to the fact that
he had moved to Goorgo Inlet and
was thus unable to continue in the
office. The resignation was accepted
and an advisory ballot taken to select
his successor. Fivo votes were cast,
P. 0. Shark receiving two. Mrs. W.
A. Bryant, one, W. C. Strong one, and
W. H. Patching one. A discussion fol
lowed, on who could bo considered as
available timber for the ofllcd, after
which a second ballot was taken, that
resulted In the unanimous choice for
Mr. Patching, and lie wns declared
elected.?(Ketchikan Miner.)
WHITEHORSE LOOKING
FOR A BIG CROWD
Prospects for a good crowd here on
tho 20th, the dato of the International
Baseball tournament, arc very flutter
ing, letters having been received from
a number of baseball teams accepting
tho Invitation to be present. People
from points on Lynn Canal and Gas
tlneau Channel enjoy coming tho
Whltohorse and getting a fow days
sunshine just as we of Whltohorse
and other interior points enjoy a trip
to the coast for a "sniff of salt wa
ter.?(Whltohorse Star.)
SHRINERS.
S. E. Alaska Shrino Club will en
tertain Its morabers In Odd Fellows'
hall this evening at 8:30 o'clock, May
28. All Masons and their families on
Gastineau channel, and visiting Ma
sons arc invited. Refreshments, and
a general good time for all. Nobles,
don't forget your Foz.
D. J. KINZIE, Scc'y.
? e
STRAWBERRIES! STRAWBERRIES!
??
Special for Saturday two boxes for
25c at Sanitary Grocery It
Mrs. S. J. Freiman and young'son
Jack will be home tomorrow on the
Humboldt Thoy havo been spending
soveral months in California.
A. A. Maltby loft yesterday for Daw
son, Y. T., and may go on into the
Tana after a visit with a brother in
the Yukon capital.
Dr L. 0. Sloanc and bride will leave
Seattle on the 5th of June, according
to advices received from the Sound
today. The doctor is in Providence
hospital, and not In the Seattle Gen
eral, aB previously reported.
E. Altmuellcr. of St. Louis, arrived
here last evening and will make his
homo in Juneau. He is a brother of
William Altmculler.
Dr. TO G. Casscls, a Fairbanks phys
isian, is returning to Fairbanks on
the Mariposa. He will go in over the
trail, from Chitina.
DID YOU SEE THE
LATEST
[FASHIONS
AND
PATTERNS
FOR MAY?
Did You Compare our
Work and Our Prlcos?
Did You Visit the
Ladles Paradise?
Our Work Is Best.
Our Prices are Right.
Our Shop Is
Juneau Tailoring
Company
Phone ISO
Rooms 410-415 Goldstein Block
? 4- * + + ?
?s>
* AMONG THE THEATRES. *
* <?
* * * * * * * ? .+..? ? ? *
WAR PICTURE VERY GOOD?
AT THE GRAND.
?*??? .
The second Strand war picturo, In
1000 feet Is ono big interest, showing
the J>nttl08hlp power of all nations,
and the actual scenes from the front.
You will surely like it; come nnd see
your countrymen on the march.
"The Secret Marriage," a clever, 3
part story, depicting the cruelty in a
woman's Jealousy, another story that
will interest you.
Cartoons by Hy Mayer, and "Blnks
Advertises for a Wife"' finish a good
show. ***?
? ? 4- * * * * * ? * * * * 4- * ?
\ *
? MARINE NOTES ?
4- ?
?J ?;< 4* 4* 4- 4* ?> 4* 4* 4- + 4* 4" 4' 4* 4- 4* 4*
The Admiral Kvans is due from Se
attle early tomorrow morning, west
bound. f
Tho Northwestern is due here
southbound, Sunday.
The steamship Admiral "Watson is
duo from the "West on her way south,
Saturday evening.
The Jefferson is due from Seattle
ftonday.
The Spokane leaves Seattle tonight
at 9 o'clock.
The Mariposa arrived from Seattle
last evening, on her way West.
Tho Despatch is sell iluled t<? sail
south Sunday.
The Humboldt will be due from the
South at 2:30 a. m. tomorrow, and
will sail for Skagway two hours lat
er.
Mrs. M. H. Marston, wife of a mil
lionaire mining man of Idltarod, was
a passenger for Skagway on the Mar
iposa, enroute to tho Interior.
STRAWBERRIES! STRAWBERRIES!
?-I-?
Special for Saturday two boxes for I
25c at Sanitary Grocery It
Manolin, guitar and banjo lessons,
Alice M. Jordlson, studio, E and 6, Gar
side Building. 3-4-tf.
The Empire will make advertising
contracts subject to proof of largest
Ircutatlon of any newspaper in Alaska.
COMPLETELY FURNISHED, first
class seven-room boarding and lodg
ing house for rent on purchasing the
furnishings. Phone 79.
5-20-Ct PETTIT & HARVEY.
DON'T forget the Names?
OLTS & GILPATRICK,
Contractors
Concrete or frame construction.
(5-17-tf.)
CLOSING NOTICE.
In order to observe Decoration Day,
our storo will be closed all day Mon- '
day, May 31st 26-lt
,B. M. BEHRENDS CO., Inc
-flOTICE OF CLOSING
The Charles Goldstein Emporium
will be closed all day Monday, May
31, for Decoration day.
Ask for Ardncr's?that good Havana
cigar. 5-26-tf.,
7oxaSZ (SidexRie^,
Sick headache, biliousness, piles and
bad breath ore usually caused by inac
tive bowels. Get a box of Rexall
Orderlies. They act gently and effec
tively. Sold only by us at 10 cents.
Wm. Britt, Junoau.
Elmer E. Smith, Douglas.
I The Sanitary Grocery |
G. BLCMGREN'. Prop.
PHONE S-5
We will be closed oil day Dec- f
oration Day?So get your orders
In early.
A big shipment of fruit and f
vegetables on the Mariposa and
Evans.
Strawberries Our
Specialty
Try our "Cascale Butter and
Hollyhurst Eggs."
"Best is none to good."
The Sanitary Grocery
Phone 85
GUNNAR BLO.MGREX, Prop.
RAYMOND'S -- PHONE 28
The largest stock of fresh fruits and Vegetables is at this store
If you are going on a picnic, let us put up your lunch?
We can suggest LOTS OF GOOD THINGS TO EAT.
We will observe Decorate Day by remaining dosed
alt day Monday. GIVE US YOUR ORDERS EARLY
Tracts
We are placing on gale twen
ty nice lovel tracts of acreage
located at Klrkland, clowr to
schools, stores, docks and lots ; j
! j of neighbors. These tracts
are fine soil and Ideal foj j j
garden truck and chicken yj
ranches. They are nicely lo
cated close In and are a gilt ! j
edge Investment. .Prices run i'-i
|i from $350 to $450 a tract.
Terms $25 cash, $5 monthly. r|
We still have a few close
j. j in business lots left at^$375
|| on easy terms. Call at our
office for full particulars. We
are open until 9 p. m.
I JUNEAU BEALTY
COMPANY
122 Front St.
JUST RECEIVED!
Balinaean Rain Coats, Children's Rain Coats and
Capes. >
UNDERWEAR SPECIAL?Ladies, Children's and
Grown-Ups Union Suits, at 50c Per Garment.
MRS. BERRY'S STORE
THIRI) AND FRANKLIN STREETS
.AAAA.A AAAA.* A AAA A A A A A A A AAAAAAA A A A/L\A A ^ ^ ^ A
/
Instruction on Violin and Band Instruments ?
Walter A. Coleman
Formerly musical director for fivo year* at the
Orpheura Theatre, and at moat of the leading
Cafe# in Scnttlo
.1 'Phone 5-9. P* O. Box 673 jfl
I NEW YORK
EXCHANGE
Henry Olson, Prop.
WINES, LIQUORS AND
CIGARS
I Front and Seward Streets
JUNEAU, ALASKA
NU-BONE CORSETS
Ladles, I will be in Juneau for a
short time only. Those desiring cor
sets should make as early appoint
ments as possible. Call up or ad
dress MRS. T. R. NEEDHAM
New Cain Hotel Juneau, Alaska
I When in Sen!'.! - Stop
?t the Piece for
ALASKANS
It'? Firo-I'roof, Modern nnd Convenient
RATES $1.00 Per Day and Up
HOTEL BARKER
CornerPlfce and Sixth
Free Auto Bua Meets all Boots and Tralnii j
C. O. Wnlston & Conrad Frecdinjf^Props.
ALASKAN SOURDOUGHS Q
MADE IN JUNEAU
Concrete Dry and Watertight Floors nnd Cel
lar*. Concrete plain and ornamental Walls
and Fences. Concrete ribbed or travel finish
ed Sidewalks nnd Steps. All work irunrantced.
ESTIMATES AND PLANS FREE.
H. D. BOURCY,
Box 344 Contractor
i Ih?MeKannaTransfcr 1
j 'FREIGHT?COAL?BAGGAGE f,
SADDLE HOUSES FOR RENT
j Light and Ilcary Hauling of <11 Kindt j t
| Offlcc 127-129 Front St, phono 55 y
William Pallister, M. D.,
Specialist in tlio treatment of diseases
and deformities of tho cyo and car.
nose and throat
Offices: Fourth Floor. Goldstein Building
Office Phone 150. RciWencc Phono 151.
DELMONICO
BEST PLACE IN THE CITY FOR GOOD
Oyster*, Crab* and Fish of all Kinds
GOOD STEAKS AND CHOPS
Dinner at Rcasonnblo Price* "H'
R. D. PICKETT
U. >S. Mineral Surveyor
U. S. Deputy Surveyor
514 GOLDSTEIN BLDG., Junead
C. Petievlch J. R. McNeil
Old Kentucky Bar
Hotel In Connection
Steam Heated
Family Orders Delivered Free
P. 0. Box 577, Phone 91
Front St. Juneau, Alaska
Moose Charter Open
Large class' was initiated last night, another big class is
forming for next Thursday.
File your application NOW with Doctor
M'aRpne, 4th Floor Goldstein Building, or
with District Director, MOOSE CLUB.
Iniation fee $5.00, which entitles you to doctor's services
and $9.00 a week benefit in case of sickness, $100.00 in
case of death. Club rooms in every city in the United
States and Canada. Join now.
Brothers--- isitinfj Srotfiers, Invited. ,
GASSIE SECREST, J. FREDERICK JOHNSON, ALERBD BOAS,
Dictator National Organizer Dist. Director

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