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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, June 18, 1915, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. v., NO. 596. JUNEAU, ALASKA, FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 1915. PRICE TEN CENTS.
WATERLOO CENTENIARY SEES BIG BATTLE IN FRANCE
BRITAIN TO ANSWER
WILSON BEFORE HE
WRITES SECOND NOTE
WASHINGTON. June 18.?England
hopes to "beat America to it" by re
plying to the original protest of the
United States to the English order in
council regarding to the Interference
with neutral trade and thus forestall
the American note of protest that is
in course of preparation.
Together with intimations coming
from London that the Allies are pre
paring a note to the United States
came the information that Great Brit
ain will attempt to dispute the con
tention that the British order is in
terfering with American trade, and
will point to the $1,000,000,000 bal
ance of trade in favor of the United
States as the evidence to sustain her
contention.
No intimation as to the time of the
receipt of Great Britain's reply to the
long unanswered American note has
been received, but enough is known
to make it certain that it will be very
unsatisfactory.
PRESIDENT PREPARING TO
ANSWER.
The President today directed the
State Department to prepare figures
showing the number of American car
goes that have been held up by Great
Britain. While the President will use
these figures to show that America
has really lost by the operation of the
Brittish illegal interference with
trade, he will insist that the question
as to whether the United States has
lost or made money by it is not the
issue, and that it is unimportant as
compared with the right of Ameri
cans to the freedom of the high seas
whether the transportation of freight
or passengers is involved.
LANSING CLOSES
DR. GERHARD CASE
WASHINGTON. June IS. - Acting
Secretary of State Robert Lansing au
thorized the announcement late to
day that as far as the State Depart-;
meat is concerned the incident- re^
yarding the identity . of Dr." Meyer!
Gerhard is closed. The State Depart
ment is convinced that there is little
? no foundation for the New York
Tribune's statement as to his dual
identity.
Bernstorff Denies Gerhard Story.
WASHINGTON. Juno IS.?German
Ambassador Count Von Bernstorff
personally assured Acting Secretary
of State Robert lamsing today that
neither he nor any member of the
German embassy staff had any knowl
edge of Dr. Alfred Meyer, said to have
been secretly in the United States
buying war supplies and spying upon
th" preparedness of the United States
for war. and the business relations be
tween American citizens and agents
of the Allies in this country.
Wilson Disputes German Position.
WASHINGTON. June IS. ? The
American reply to the last German
note concerning the sinking of the
William P. Fryc is practically com
pleted.
It will not admit that the German
contention that any American ship
containing contraband of war may be
destroyed provided It is paid for.
Gerhard Does Not Stir Berlin.
BERLIN. June IS.?The effect of
the arrival of Dr. Meyer Gerhard is
not thus far perceptible. He has
been in consultation with Foreign
Minister Von Jagow several times
since his arrival.
SWEDES MAKE CHARGE
OF MAIL TAMPERING
WASHINGTON. June IS. ? The
Swedish government protested yes
terday evening to the State Depart-!
ment against the opening of United
States mail pouches destined for
Sweden by British officials while the
mails were in transit through Great
Britain. It was stated that the con
tents of the mail in the pouches had
been tampered with.
SWEDEN AND RUSSIA
AGREE TO TREATY
COPENHAGEN. June IS.?A treaty
has been ratified between Russia and
Sweden mutually acknowledging the
financial, commercial and industrial
interests of the two countries. The
treaty is significant because of Swed
en's contiual fear of Russian aggres
sion. Sweden was strongly pro-Ger
man when the war started.
KETCHIKAN WANTS LICENSES
OF TWO SALOONS REFUSED
KETCHIKAN, June 18.?The Ket
chikan council has adopted resolu
tions asking Judge Robert W. Jen
nnings to refuse to Issue licenses to
two saloons at this place which Is
is represented are not conducted in
orderly manner.
<r <' ? ??* + ? ? ? ? ?>??>
? WEATHER TODAY +
-5* Maximum?75. . ?>
? Minimum?44. +
? CLEAR ! ! +
? ? + *t + 4' + 'H'tt4' + 444
BRYAN WANTS
! NEUTRALS TO
STOPJTHE WAR
WASHINGTON. June IS.?William
|j. Bryan save oui the third and con
cluding statement concerning tho
war. Its cause and the peace remedies
that he would apply. He suggests
mediation by the neutral nations as
the proper way out of the dilllcultles
that confront Europe.
As a preventive of war, Mr. Bryan
suggests the universal extension of
his investigation commission peace
treaty plan. He says If tho differenc
es between Austria and Serbia had
been submitted to an international
commission for an investigation and
report, and one year allowed the com
mission in which to make the investi
gation and report, there would have
been no war in Europe.
In part Mr. Bryan's statement said:
"Great nations cannot be extermin
ated. Predictions made at the begin*
; ning of the war have not been ful
; filled. The British did not destroy the
German Heet in a month. Germany
did not take Paris in two months.
; The Russians did not eat Christmas i
dinner in Berlin.
"But evon if extermination were
: possible, it owuld be a crime against
i civilization which no nation or group
[ of nations could afford to commit.
"When can peace be restored in
Europe? Anytime?now?if the par
ticipants are really weary of this war.
and ready for it to end. If any nation
is not ready for peace, let its ruler
j or ruling authority state in clear and
distinct and definite manner the
I terms upon which it is willing to
j agree to peace. Then, if an agree
i ment is not reached, blame for a con
' tlnuance of the war will be upon those,
: who make unusual and unduly hard
demands."
Labor Working for Peace.
NEW YORK. June IS.?Plans have
been perfected in this city for 50 la
> bor leaders to go to Washington and
i lay before President Wood row Wll-.
; son proposals which, they claim, if!
| followed will not only prevent this j
| country from becoming involved, but
: will end the European war.
The leaders made it known that
; they hoped to have William J. Bryan:
j head the delegation, and that plans!
looking toward that end are already;
! being worked out.
WILLIAM H. TAFT
HEADS PEACE LEAGUE
PHILADELPHIA. Juno 18.?Form
er President William H. Taft was
chosen as permanent president of a
! pence league that was formed here
last night at the conference held in
Independence Hall. Many promi
nent citizens were made vice-presi
dents.
The purpose of the league is to
create a league of nations that will
work for permanent peace in the
| world. An attempt will be made to
j secure the interest of European na
i tlons. and a convention of the nations
| is among the plans.
The idea of an international investi
I gat ion before declaring war. provided
for in the Bryan peace treaties, is
: favored, though it is prepared to work
it out unofficially.
PRESIDENT RECEIVES
PEACE DELEGATION
WASHINGTON. June 18?President
Woodrow Wilson received today a del
egation from the National Women's
Trade Union League presenting reso- ;
I lutions opposing war and advocating
tin embargo on war exports.
The President experessed great in
| tercst. "Of course," he said, "wo are
all in favor of peace."
CHARLES BECKER MUST
PAY DEATH PENALTY
ALBANY, N. J.. Juno 18. ? The
! New York court of appeals today re
affirmed its decision that Charles
Becker, former lieutenant of police
! in New York, must die in accordance
: with his sentence during the week
beginning July 12. The court again
declined to hear arguments in the
; case.
EA9RTHQUAKE SHAKES
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
LOS ANGELES. June 19.?An earth
! quake "at 7:30 o'clock this morning
, shook this city and the surrounding
? sections. Windows and movable ar
: tides were 3haken. and. in some in
stances building beams and joints
were cracked.
ONE CONCERN HAS WAR
ORDERS FOR $200,000,000
PHILADELPHIA. June IS?It is es
timated that war orders aggregating
$200,000,000 have been placed with
the Lehigh Valley. Pa., plants, where
about 15.000 men are employed.
BIG DAM
FULFILLS
ALLHOPES
For the first tlmo 6inco it was com
pleted tn August. 1914. when water
was turned into it. tho Salmon creek
i dam of the Alaska Gastlneau .Mining
company is full of water, tho over
flow through tho spillway having
started at 11 o'clock this morning.
The stability of tho dam is absolute
ly assured, as it has now boon thor
oughly tested to its full pressure. Ac
curate measurements have been made
of the deflection of the arch, as it
rose, and these have been in accord
ance with the calculated stresses and
have indicated that the concrete Is of
very good quality and of high
strength.
Tho Salmon creek impounding dam.
which is 165 feet in height, was de
signed by Harry L. Wollenberg, chief
engineer of the Gastinoau company,
and was built under his personal su
pervision. The type of structure is
tho multiple radius arch dam, as de
veloped by I^ars Jorgenson, of the
firm of F. G. Brown & Company, San
Francisco. Mr. Jorgenson made a
special trip to Juneau during the
dam's construction and approved the
plans, and the work.
Nine and one half months was actu
ally consumed in constructing the
dam. which is a speed record seldom
equalled, as the period includes the
time spent in excavation. Work was
; started on May 1. 1913, and was sus
pended pn November 1. 1913, for the
winter. Construction was resumed
May 1. 1914. and the water was flow
into it on August 24, although the
dam was completed early in that
month.
The total volume of 54,000 cubic
yards of concrete: about 20,000 cu
bic yards of rock was removed to
provide tho foundations.
Today the project is developing
what the original estimates provided
?6,000 continuous horsepower.
HARRY THAW WILL
HAVE JURY TRIAL
AS TO SANITY;
ALBANY, N. Y? June IS. ? Tho
New York State court of appeuls to
day tqpk final action in tho case of
Harry K. Thaw, sustaining the dccis
sion of Justice Poter A. Hendricks
which granted him a trial by a jury
as to his sanity.
Trial To Be Soon.
NEW YORK. June IS.- It was stat
ed by counsel for Harry K. Thaw to
day that an early trial will be asked
for on the question as to whether or i
not Thaw is sane.
? ??
STORMS DEVASTATE
MIDDLE WEST
AND KILL SIX
?*2-??
KANSAS CITY. Juno IS.?Six peo
ple were killed as a result of rain- I
storms that prevailed in this section
and southwest of here last night. The
storms diminished the violence today. 1
I
Storm Extends to Iowa.
CHICAGO, June 18. ? The storm
that prevailed In the southwest last 1
night has extended today over Cen
tral Iowa, and has occupied a district
covering S00 square miles. Many I '?
miles of railroad track have been :
swept away.
? i!
CABINET DISCUSSES
MEXICAN AND
OTHER MATTERS!
WASHINGTON, June IS.?The Cab-'
inct held a two-hour session today. A I
great deal of its time was devoted to ,
a discussion of the Mexican situation.
The charges of British espionage of (
malls between the United States and l
Europe were also discussed. ,
German Situation Marking Time.
It is admitted here that the Ger
man situation Is now marking timo,
and that it Is not likely to come to
the front again until after the Ger
man reply to the second American
note shall have been received.
? ? ?
C A RR ANZ 1ST AS TO
OCCUPY MEXICO
GALVESTON, Tex.. June 18.?Gen.
Gonzales expected to occupy Mexico
City within a few hours after sending
a telegram that was received hero to
day by ahe Constitutionalist consul
from Vera Cruz. The dispatch an
nounced the capture of Texcoco. 15
miles from the capital.
Carranzistas claim that their chief
will occupy most of Mexico within a
tow weeks.
CANADIAN BUSINESS
IS NOW IMPROVING
OTTAWA. June IS.?A survey of
business conditions in Canada made
i by Canadian Northern Railway offic
ials shows that business, as a whole.
Is between 15 per cent, ond 20 per
cent, below normal. Orders for mu
nitions of war from Great Britain
alone, amounting to $156.00,000. have
already been given to Canada. The
output of shells is 10,000 a day, and
within a month is expected to be 50,
000 a day.
KNEEBONE
CASE OUT
OF COURT
Judge Robert W. Jennings thia
morning granted the motion of Attor
noy Lewis P. Shackleford, for a non
suit In the W. J. Knoebono $75,000
damage suit against the Alaska Gob
tlncau Mining company, and the case,
which has been trying for two (lays,
was suddenly terminated. The Jur
ors were dismissed, J, H. Cobb, at
torney for Kneebone, filed an ex
ception to Judge Jennings' doclslon
but has not yet announced what
course he will now take.
In discussing the testimony Judge
Jennings held the law to be that the
case hinged on the question of the
employer's negligoncc and stated thnt
the plainttlf had failed to establish
proof of negligonco on the part of the
Alaska Gastlneau company.
Plaintiff's Wife Last Witness.
J. H. Cobb, counsel for Kneebone,
rested the plaintiff's case at 2:30 o'
clock yesterday afternoon. Photo
graphs showing Kneebone as ho ap
peared bofore he was hurt, and in his
present condition were introduced as
evidence, over the protest of Mr.
Shackleford. Mrs. Kneebone. wife
Gt the plaintiff, was the last witness
on the stand for the plaintiff. A mild
sensation was caused when she told
Mr. Shackleford. when under cross
examination that she would not an
swer his questions. She had been
asked it she recalled a conference in
General Manager Thane's offlce, when
Mr. Shackleford was present, where
she had told Mr. Thane she was a
niece of Jacob Schiff, a New York
banker. Judge Jennings sustained
Mr. Cobb's objection to the question,
and it was a moment later that Mr.
Shackleford moved for a non-suit.
In arguing the motion for nonsuit
the defense contended that the plain
tiff had failed to establish the fact
that the Injury was caused by the
negligence of the defendant: that the
evidence showed the plaintiff to bo
an experienced miner and not an in
experience' one as alleged: that the
plaintiff asruBieu a known risk: that
the neglect of the plaintiff, if any, as
compared with the neglect of the de
fendant, if any, does not come within
the exceptions of the statutes relating
to the liability of employees in Alas
ka; that the means at hand were am
ple to protect the plaintiff if ho had
used ordinary care. The defense cit
ed in further support of Its motion the
UWl tliut IMIWUUUO Ullllov 11 MUlt'W
through a deposition that the ground
after the blasting showed no appar
ent danged. This was corohorated by
expert witness, Magnussen who was
on the stand Thursday morning. At
torney L. P. Shackelford argued the
case for the defendant company.
Answering the argument, J. H. Cobb
attorney for the plaintiff, stated that
Kneebone was all the time acting un
der the specific orders and instruc
tions of his superior officer, a shift
boss, and that he had no choice but
to do as he was told.
Injured Man Expert Miner.
Kneebone is one of the best-known
and expert miners in the Juneau dis
trict. He was a shift boss during
the driving of the 10-000-foot bore
from Sheep creek to the Persever
ance. Two years ago he married Miss
.Mildred Sweigert, the ceremony be
ing performed aboard the steamship
Spokane, by Capt. Harry Cann, as the
Spokane was crossing Queen Char
lotte Sound, on one of her voyages
two years ago. Mr. and Mrs. Knee
bone went to San Francisco on a wed
ding trip and the picture of Kneebone,
introduced yestorday, was taken at
that time. The second photograph
was taken last Saturday, at Knee
bone's home on Fourth street, whero
ho has slowly been sinking for sov
eral weeks.
Kneebone sustained a broken back
on February 5, this year. He had
been sent Into No. 7 level, west drift,
of the Perseverance, to timber a sec
tion where the overhanging rock had
become loosened. It was after blast
ing, and after the rock had been
"barred down." that he was hurt.
Rock fell on him as he was bending
over to place a post in position. Ho
was removed to St. Ann hospital, and
two or three weeks later, when it was
certain ho could not live, he was ta
ken to his home.
Kneebone is 2S years old, and was
born in Hancock, Michigan, whore he
has relatives.
NEW PAY GROUND
LOCATED IN CHISANA
11
DAWSON. Juno IS. ? Now pay
ground, making a considerable exten
sion of that mining district, has been
reported here. Tho output of the
camp this year, it is claimed, will
probably exceed $200,000.
PARIS WANTS $200,000,000
CREDIT IN NEW YORK
PARIS, Juno IS.?French bankers
have suggested to the finance minis
ter that the Bank of France pay off
$200,000,000 of advances on securities
which have been tied up since last Ju
ly. The securities thus released would
bo repledged in New York and the
proceeds used to effect the French
war purchases in the United States
without disturbing the exchange sit
uation.
AUSTRIANS
READY FOR
DEFENSE
ROME, June 18. ? A refugee has
come Into Rome from I'oln, the Aus
trian naval base on the Adriatic, and
reports that the Austrians have 200,
000 men In storngly entrenched posi
tions at that place.
The opinion provalls here that
Trieste will not be difficult to cap
ture, and there will be no movement
against Pola rcntll after the capture
of the first named place shall have
been accomplished.
Italians Nearlng Trieste.
UNDINE, Italy, June 18.?The ad
vance of the Italian forces which arc
moving ngalnst Trieste and are with
in eight miles of tli&t city report tho
city plainly within sight.
Prisoners report that people arc
leaving Trieste for the Interior and
for neutral ports ns fast as they can
arrange to get away.
Airship Damages Austrian Rail
roads.
ROME, Juno 18. ? An Italian air
ship did considerable damage to an
Austrian railway station and . several
trains near Dlvaca by dropping bombs
on them yesterday evening. Lnter
they destroyed a railroad bridge.
Italians Lose Submarine.
LONDON, June IS.?Tho sinking of
the Italian submarine Mcdusn by an
Austrian submarine has been report
ed here today.
ITALIAN ARTILLERY
IN RANGE OF TRENT
ROME. June 18.?Italian troops ad
vancing in the Adigc valley are with
in range of their big artilery of Trent
according to dispatches from Bolog
na. the present headquarters of the
general staff. Owing to storms,, the
moving of heavy artillery in the moun
tainous district east of I-ake Garda
has been greatly hampered.
ASQUITH PRAISES ITALY
LONDON, June 18.?Speaking In ap
preciation of Italy in the Commons,
Premier Asquith said:
"For half a century there has not
been a shadow of discord between
England and Italy. We warmly grasp
the hand of Italy, and welcome her
gallant soldiers and sailors as our
fellow comrades in this struggle, upon
which depends the liberty of the en
tire world."
GERMANS ARE WORKING
OVERTIME ON ZEPPELINS
GENEVA, June 18. ? A news dis
patch reaching Geneva from Fried
richshaven set forth that double shifts
arc now working in the Zeppelin air
ship factories, which arc now turn
ing out a completed Zeppelin airship
every twenty days.
ROUMANIA ORDERS
HER TROOPS MOBILIZED
???
ATHENS, June 18.?King Ferdi
nand of Roumania is reported to have
signed a decree ordered a general
mobiliation. This indicates that Rou
mania is preparing to enter the war
very soon.
RECRUITING SATISFACTORY
TO BRITISH GOVERNMENT
LONDON. June 18.?Speaking of
the increase in the enlistments. Pre
mier Asquith declared that the calls
for volunteers have been answered
in a manner satisfactory to the gov
ernment.
BONAR LAW'S NEPHEW
KILLED IN DARDANELLES
LONDON, June 18.?Lieut. Robley
of the British navy, a nephew of An
drew Bonar Law, has been killed in
the Dardanelles, according to advices
received here. Bonar law Is the Con
servative leader in Parliament.
MYSTERY SURROUNDS
DEATH OF U. S. OFFICIAL
SEATTLE. Juno 18.?The body of
Deputy United States Marshal Jorn
J. Powers was found In Elliott bay
this morning under circumstances
that indicate either murder or sui
cide.
Friends of the dead man can as
sign no cause for suicide.
SENATOR WEEKS LEADS
IN PRESIDENTIAL RACE
?*5*?
CHICAGO. Juno 18.?Senator John
W. Weeks, of Massachusetts, appears
to be at present the man on whom
the most potent Republicans have
tholr eye for the Republican Presi
dential candidate. (
SALEM BUILDING UP
HER DESTROYED BUILDING3
BOSTON, June 18.?Within the past
year $5,500,000 Salem fire building
permits have been issued for new
buildings. By January 1. 1916, it Is
estimated the total proporty valua
tion of the city will exceed the total
before the fire.
You saw it tlrat In The Empire.
HERO Of AIR
BATTLE VICTIM
Of ACCIDENT
PARIS, June 18. ? Lieut. Warnc
ford, the young Canadian who recent
ly destroyed a German Zeppelin in a
battle in the air near Ghent and waa
granted a Victoria cross, was killed
through a fall of his aeroplane early
last night in North France.
Henry Beach Needham, an Ameri
can writer who was a passenger with
him during his flight, was also killed.
Since the spectacular battle In the i
air in which Lieut. Warneford dc- i
stroyed a Zeppelin and .its ofllcers, i
crew and observers, he had been ]
most noted among the army heroes. I
TURKS GO DOWN ?
ON TRANSPORTS 1
LONDON, June 18. ? Most of flic
troops and members of the crows on j
the three Turkish transports which ,
were torepdoed and sunk by a Brit- ]
ish submarine in the Dardanelles ,
Wednesday wcro drowned. ]
The transports were torpedoed i
above Nagnsa, nnd went down quick- ,
ly after they were struck in rapid |
succession. :
MAN WHO SAW I
LUSITANIA GUNS
IS NOW INDICTED
NEW YORK, June IS. ? Gusiuv
Stahl, German reservist who swore
in an afil davit submitted to the State
Department at Washington by the
German embassy that ho saw suns on
board the Lusltania before she sailed
on her fatal trip, was indicted for
perjury today by the grand Jury in
the United States district court.
Lusltania Hearing Ends at London, j
LONDON, June 18. ? The oflicinl
inquiry into the loss of the Lusltania ,
closed today. When the decision will
ho rendered is not known.
ENGLAND TO
INVESTIGATE
WAR CONTRACT
LONDON. June 18. Minister of
Munitions David Lloyd-George is ar- 1
ranging to send a prominent mun to
the United States and Canada to dis
cuss the whole question of the Am- 1
erican and Canadian contracts for mu- I
nitions of war with the manufacturers. 1
Lloyd-Georges' statement was made 1
in the Commons in answer to criti- 1
cisms that the Canadian manufac
turers were required to denl with the '
Imperial government through the ?
house of J. I?. Morgan and company, '
and that some Canadian Arms refused '
to transact business through an '
agency In the United States. '
? ? ]
GERMANY PLANNING
FOR PEACE AGAIN |
NEW YORK. June 18.?A Herald 1
Washington special says that when '
the question of peace between the bel- 1
ligercnts in the European wnr is tak- 1
on up. Germany's principal demand '
will be one in which the United States
will be in complete accord with her, |
and which this government will be 1
just as interested in bringing about.
This Is the freedom of the seas, for
the lack of which the United States
now has several issues pending with
Great Britain. The fact that the day 1
will come when the two governments
will be Interested in obtaining the 1
same guarantees is suggested as a 1
reason why a break between the Unit
ed States and Germany should not be
permitted to occur. Autliorative in
formation Is thnt the United States,
on friendly terms with all the bellig
erents will be called on within thrco
months to sound out the terms of -
peace. 1
SERVIAN TROOPS HAVE 1
INVADED ALBANIAN TERRITORY ,
NISF, Sorbin, Juno 18.?A Serbian '
army bas invaded Albania and Is ]
marching down the Drlna valley, to
ward Scutari, to obtnln supplies di
rect from the Adriatic and to protect t
the main Serbian army from attack i
by Albanians when It renews the of- 1
fenslve against the Austrlans.
GERMANS CLAIM
VICTORY AT LABASSEE
BERLIN June 18.?It was officially
announced today that an allied force
that attacked the German positions
north of Labassce, in northwestern
Prance, was destroyed yesterday. The
statement did not pretend to give the
numbers that were included in the
force.
ALL WORK IN ENGLAND
LONDON, June 18.? The percent
age of unemployed in Great Britain
is the lowest in 25 years.
GREAT BATTLE RAGES ON
100TH ANNIVERSARY
Of WATERLOO BATTLE
PARIS, June 18.? The centeniary
anlversary of the battle of Waterloo
wae celebrated today by one of the
severest battles that yet has occur
red In the western arnea of the great
war. The fighting waged furiously
along an eight-mile front north of Ar
ras and swayed back and forth over
shell-wrecked trenches and hill-sides
strewn with dead and dying.
The advantages of the contest at
nightfall were with the Allies.
UPRISING IN WHICH 700
WERE KILLED WAS TUESDAY
LONDON, June 18. ? The Central
News company's report of the up
rising In Mnlines says that dispatch
es Amsterdam say that a traveler
from Ghent, Belgium, brings the re
port of the revolt on the part of the
inhabltnants at Mallnes last Tuesday.
The traveler says German soldiers
Bred Into the crowds, and that 700 ci
vilians wcrp killed.
GERMAN SUBMARINE
GETS TWO VICTIMS
LONDON, Juno 18.?A German sub
marine sunk the British coasting
itcamcr Trafford yesterday, abandon
ing and uncompleted attack on the
eoastlng steamer Turnwell to accom
plish It. The latter surrendered be
fore she could be torpedoed. Her
:rcw was removed and bombs set off
in her hold. The bombs failed to
sink her, and tho crew returned to
the steamer and took her to Mllford
in a damaged condition.
BOTH WIN AND
LOSE IN GALICIA
PETKOGHAD. June 18.?It was of
ficially stated today that Austro-Gcr
man forces were repulsed east of
Stry after severe fighting In tho
course of which the "enemy lost tens
of thousands of men."
It was also officially admitted that
the Au8tro-German forces have cross
ed the Dniester river 15 miles north
of Stanilau.
RUSSIAN PLANS IN
THE GALICIAN WAR
A
PET HOG RAD, June 18.?While Gen.
von Llnsengen is hammering at the
Russian right along the Dniester, the
Russian center is fighting to got into
position to strike a flank blow against
Mackensen's main army.
A regrouping of Russian forces to
the south of the Stryja-Tvsmionica
front is in progress. Russians who re
treated from Pryzemysl arc making a
stand northeast of Mosciska and to
the northwest of Grodck, along the
Przcraysl-Lcraburg railway. Artillery.
fuelling Is in progress there. Thurs
lay night the Russians withdrew the
remaining troops from the forts east
of Przemysl and began retiring to
wards Medyka. The Germans bom
barded the retreating columns but did
little damage.
Russian experts declare the main
oontcst is now taking place on the
flanks, along the San and Dncister
rivers. These widely separated plac
08 compel the Germans to longthcn
and weaken their front. The Russians
ire preparing to make great sacrific
es to hold their positions upon the
Dnoistcr, so as to stem Von Llns
ongon's advance against Lemburg
from the South.
Germans Near Lemburg.
COPENHAGEN. June 18.?The Aus
Iro Gorman army is only about ten
miles from Lemburg. according to ad
vices received here from Berlin. The
capture of Lemburg is expected in
the Immediate future.
BRITISH NAVY
IS INCREASED BY
LEAPS AND BOUNDS
LONDON, June 18?The British na
vy has been Increasing in strength
by leaps and bounds since the begin
ning of the war. This was borne out
by known additions to the fleet of su
perdroadnaughts which were not com
pleted when tho war was declared.
Tho list of ships completed in the
past ten months include the Barbara.
Malaya, Ramilies, Resolution, Revenge
Royal Oak, Royal Sovereign, Valiant
ind Warspitc, each displacing 27.500
tons and carrying in their main bat
teries eight 15-inch guns.
ENGLAND PREPARING FOR
1916 FOOD SUPPLIES
LONDON, June 18. ? The British
board of agriculture is taking stops
to increase the present production of
food in England on the assumption
that the war will be prolonged beyond
the harvest of 1916.
MINING STOCK QUOTATIONS.
h?
NEW YORK. June 18. ? Alaska
Gold closed today at 37%; Chino at
45%; Ptah Copper at 67%. Butte and
Superior, 70%.
Copper was quoted today at 20%.

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