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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, July 08, 1915, Image 1

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Vol. v., no- 612. - juneau, alaska, Thursday, july 8, 1915. " J PRICE TEN CENTOS.
Italian Armored Cruiser Sunk In Adriatic!
AUSTRIAN SUBMARINE
SINKS BIG ITALIAN
CRUSER IN ADRIATIC
ROME, July J.?While reconnolter
ing In the upper Adriatic sea this
morning the Italian cruiser Amalfi
was sink by an Austrian submarine.
Moet of her crew was rescued.
The official statement given out to
day of the sinking of the Italian crui
ser Amalfi says:
"As soon as he realized that his
ship had been fatally struck, the
commander of the Amalfi cried 'long
live the King of Italy.' and then or- '
dered his crew to jump clear of the :
ship for their lives. <
"The officers and members of the ^
crew were drawn up along the stern |
of the ship, and when the commander
shouted 'long livs the King,' the shout
was repeated w th enthusiasm. The 1
officers and crew gave a remarkable 1
exhibition of courage and discipline, t
"The comander, who was the last j
man to leave the ahlp, slipped over
board shortly before the Amalfi sank. (
"Nearly all of the officers and crew s
were saved."
The Amalfi W8S a modern armored |
cruiser, and was regarded as one of
the strong fighting ships of the Ital
ian nary.
AUSTRIANS USE
ASPHYXIATING GAS '
^ i
ROME. July 8.?The Austrians have 1
introduced the use. along the Isonzo 1
river front, of shells charged with as- :
phyxlating lumen. Floods in the Is- -
onzo, north and *outh of Gorlzetaoin
onzo, north and sjath of Gorlzia. have
begun to subside, but fresh storms
have broken over the Carnlc Alps. r
The War Office says the Austrian (
officers have been circulating false
information among the troops. One j
batch of Austria. i prisoners express
ed surprise wheo they learned that
Italy had not been visited by u devas-;
tating earthquake.
Making Vfar Material
Italian military authorities assert
that all arms, a nmunltion and ex
plosive factories in the kingdom arc
working day and night.
Not To Bombard Rome. j
PARIS. July !>.? Dispatches from
Rome says that Pope Bvnedlct XV has
received a letter from Emperor Fran- f
cis Joseph, promising that Austro
Hungarian aviators will not bombard
Rome.
N'aby Bey, Turkish ambassador to '
Italy, has dematded his passports, 1
according to a Rome dispatch. No de- 1
claration of war bntwen Italy and Tux- '
key has as yet bten Issued by cither c
country"- 1
- - ^ s
RECRUITING WONT
BE PERMITTED IN
THE UNITED STATES t
WASHINGTON. July 8.?The gov
ernment of the United States will not c
permit agents of European countries t
to recruit soldiers in the United t
States, and It is to break up a sus- i
pected concerted movement toward 1
that end by Montenegrin agents that j
several arrests acre ordered this I
week. Citizens of foreign countries (
will not be inte-efered with when
they leave for Hbeir home countries f
or Canada at their own risk, but or
ganized recruiting will not be allow
ed.
t
Matanovich Oenies Charges. t
PORTLAND. Ore.. July 8.?Jovan I
Matanovich denies that he has been c
recruiting soldier) In the United
States, but admits that he has urged f
countrymen to go to Canada at their i
own risk and expanses and there to t
enlist for the war. 1
> ?? ? ^
GERMANS PREPARE t
FOR WINTER CAMPAIGN f
'1 t
LONDON. July :t.? A Milan dis
patch says that th; Germans have al- I
ready ordered 500.(i00 sheepskin coats
and specially invented stoves will be
constructed in the trenches for the
second winter canpaign.
BULGARIA TO HAVE
BIG A)?MY MANEUVERS
?1
ROME. July 8.?The Bulgarian ar
my maneouvers on a large scale will 1
begin July 12 according to recent In
formation.
-AH the News All the Time"
? ? + + +** +)?++ + <??>** + c
? WEATHEl TODAY ? c
?? Maximum?65. + I
? Minimum ?17. y \
+ CLEAR ( +
U. S. TO RUN
WIRELESS AT
SAYVILLE, N. Y.
WASHINGTON. July S.?The Unit
:d States government took over th<
Bayville. L. I., wireless station to
lay and will operate it hereafter
Violation of the neutrality of the
[Inked States is assigned as the rea
ion for taking over the plant. Prool
was presented to the government
that the station was being used foi
he purpocs of dissemination of in
ormation for military purposes.
The Sayvilie station has been op
?rated between the United Statei
ind Germany.
DEADLOCK ON
EAST WAR FRONT
LONDON, July 8. ? Advices frorr
Berlin and Vienna agree that the
irmies along the eastern front arc
leadlocked. .It is admitted at Vienna
hat Russians have made gains in
he vicinity of Krasnik and elsewhere
n southern Poland.
The Austrian explanation of the
hauge in the situation along the
tussian front is due to the reinforce
acnt of the Russian lines and the ad
[ition of great quantities of field and
teavy artillery.
Reports from Petrograd say thai
he Russian railroads operating be
ween the big centers and the fronl
lave greatly increased their capacity.
NONTHING DOING
ALONG WEST FRONT
LONDON. July 8.?Beyond the con
tnuous artillery duels along the west
ront, and the trench attacks at var
ous points, there is little war news
torn France and Belgium today.
FRENCH ATTACKS IN
ARRAS REGION FAIL
AMSTERDAM. July S.? Although
lerce fighting is still in progress tc
he north and south ot Arras, the cli
nax of. the French attempts to smasti
he German line there hits been pass
(d, according to reports from Gorman
nilitary authorities In Belgium. They
ay that the French, on account ol
errlfic losses, are on the point of giv
ng up the offensive, and resuming
rench warfare. German sources es
imate the French casualties in the
ightlng around Arras at 100,000.
Half a million French were massed
m the line between La Basse and He
lutterne. where for 50 days there hat
teen continuous action. Since early
n May approximately 1.800 heavy
French guns have been hurling pro
ectlles against the German positions
n a single artillery action the Freed
Ired more than 300.000 shells.
BULGARIAN TERMS ARE
REJECTED BY ALLIES
BUCHAREST, July 8.? Bulgaria's
leuiamis conditional to its particles
ion (n the war on the side of the A1
ies hare been rejected by the entente
iccording to advices received here.
Shortly after the receipt of the un
avorablc reply M. Tochcff, Bulgaria!
ninister to Turkey, left for Constan
inopla He had been summoned by
lis government in anticipation of a fa
rorablo reply from the Allies. It i<
lelieved he would have stayed at So
ia. if the Allies had accepted th<
ems of Bulgaria.
TALIAN BANK IN
CHICAGO TO QUIT
CHICAGO. July 8.~The State .Ban!
if Italy, in Chicago, with a capital ol
!200,000 and deposits of $375,000, wil
ioit business, chiefly on aedbunt o
vithdrawals of deposits due to the
var.
WAR ORDERS CAUSE
ANOTHER SHOP THAT
WAS IDLE TO RESUME
PITTSBURGH. July 8.?Nine hun
Ired employees of the H. K. Portei
?ompany who had been laid off at th?
leginning of the war returned to wort
yesterday as the result or orders thai
vere received traax the Russian :ov
irnmeat for 33 'occmoth cs.
TWO MORE
! AMERICANS
| ARE KILLED
WASHINGTON, July 8.?Two Am
ericans, members of the crew of the
Anglo-Californian, were killed when
that ship was shelled by a German
submarine off the Irish coast.
The matter was reported to the
, State Department by Ambassador
Walter H. Page, to whom the facts
were made knewn by the British gov-|
ernment.
i Secretary of State Robert Lansing >
. would not be quoted as to what effect!
the loss of these additional American
lives may have on the negotiations
between tho United States and Ger>
? many.
r
l FALABA NOT ARMED.
. LONDON. July 8.?Tho Falaba. the
destruction of which caused the death
of F. C. Thresher, the first American
to lose his life in the war zone which
surrounds Great Britain, was not
' armed and carried no greater cargo
of munitions than in ordinary peace
times, according to the official finding
of Lord Mersey today.
Lord Mersey conducted the investl
. gations that were made by the admir
alty.
. RENEW FIGHTING
AT DARDANELLES
LONDON July 8. ? The reinforce
; ments of the Allies forces at Galli
poli has been reported from Athens,
and renewed activity has been report
i|?d for the last two days. The Turk
? ish troops broke a period of Inactivity
? j outside of the artillery engagements
?; Tuesday when thov attacked the Brit
[ ? ish front. Tho assaults were easily
rcpuscd. and further assaults were
; repustd yesterday. Minor gains
were made by the British today.
BRITISH SUBMARINE
SUNK SEVEN SHIPS
ATHENS, July 8.-?The British sub
marine that penetrated the Sea of
. Marmora sunk seven Turkish mer
chant vessels carrying food supplies
for the Gallipoli ;irmy. Most of the
i i Turkish warships have sought shelter
in the. Golden Horn.
The resumption of aeroplane activ
ity on Galllpolt peninsula indicates
a renewal of the Allies' assaults.
i ITALY CANNOT HELP
) GALLIPOLI FORCES NOW
i LONDON*. July 8.? Reports from
? Rome by Italy cannot at the moment"
i afford to dispatch troops to aid the
? Allies in forcing the Dardanelles. Italy
: has offered France and Great Britain
? free use of one or more ports In the
; Adriatic heel of Italy as a more ad
- vantageous base than Alexandria,
s i Further than that, Italy will send cer
; tain warships to the Dardanelles.
? BRIDGEPORT TO
SURPASS ESSEN
FOR AMMUNITION
NEW YORK. July 8.? Within a
| few months, when 58,000,000 worth of
new ammunition plants are completed
Bridgeport. Conn., will have at work
from 60 to 75 per cent, more mea mak
.: ing arms and ammunition than the
Krupp works at Essen, which employ
80,000. Since August, over 200 ma
[ chino shops, foundaries and the like
have been converted into factories
for making war supplies.
Duponts Make Fortune
An advance in Dupont Powder stock
to $700 a share means a profit of &1
1 most $50,000,000 for the syndicate of
. Dupont officials, headed by President
Pierre Dupont, who purchased the
j holdings of General T. Coleman Du
_ pont in February. The price paid
, for the stock was $200 a share, or ap
proximately $20,000,000.
Westinghouse Increases Plant
PITTSBURGH. July 8.?The West
inghouse Electric Conipnav has com
, pleted the details for the construe
f Hon of a 1000-foot buttding to manu
I facturc cartridges, turning out 200,000
. every 24 houru. The company bas al
, so taken the contract for $4,000,000
worth of shells. This company is at
, present running 20 hours each day.
RUSSIA PLACES ONE
ORDER FOR $83,000,000
; ??
NEW YORK. July 8.- Vice-Presi
: Foundries"Company, of Montreal, ar
> rived in New York Sunday from Pet
t order for ammunition over placed by
- the Russian government. It 'talis for
5,000,000 shells to cost 583,000,000.
BURNING
SHIP RUNS
fOR SHORE
NEW YORK, July 8.?The 13,000
ton liner Minnehaha is In the Atlantic
today racing toward Halifax with *
fire in her hold, threatening an enor
mous cargo of war munitions which
she has aboard.
The Are was caused by an explo
sion on board according to a wireless
dispatch received this afternoon.
She sailed from here for Great Brit
ain last 8unday.
HOLT MAY HAVE BEEN
I CAU8E
The circumstance that the Minneha
ha was set on fire by an explosion
which presumably occurred yester
day, corresponding with the intiumtion
by Holt that he had placed bombs on
board an Atlantic liner., that- was
timed to go off on July 7th, has lead
the authorities to suspect that the
dead assailant of J. Plerpont Morgan
may have been responsible for the
disaster which has overtaken that ves
sel.
HOLT'S WIFE TOLD
THAT STEAMER WAS
TO BE DYNAMITED
WASHINGTON. July 8.? Frank
Holt in a letter to his wife intimated
that lie bad placed dynamite aboard
an Atlantic liner, and that the bomb
was timed to explode July 7th. The
letter was received by Mrs. Holt at
Dallas. Tex., and tlie authorities of
that city forwarded the letter to the
State Department hero,
g Tho letter contained the following
statement:
"A steamer leaving New York for
Liverpool should sink, God willing, on
the seventh.. It is the Philadelphia
or the Saxonla, but T am not quite
sure as these left the second and tho
third."
On the margin of the letter was
written :s
"Tear this off until after this hap
pens."
HOLT AINU MUfclNlfcK
WERE THE SAME
CHICAGO. July 8.?Positive identi
fication or Frank Holt, who attempt
ed to kill J. Pierpont Morgan last
Saturday and who committed suicide
Tuesday night, as Prof. Erich Muen
ter, of Harvard, who was Indicted
nine years ago for poisoning his wife,
Leola Muentcr, was made yesterday
by Prof. Chester N. Gould, of the
University of Chicago.
Prof. Gould in a statement made
yesterday admitted tbut he had Iden
tified Muenter, who was a former
pupil at the University of Chicago,
while at Cornell University last No
vember. Prof. Gould thought the man
was doing good work and that there
would be no danger of his ever com
piiting crime again
Saxonla Is Safe Yet.
NEW YORK, July 8.?Wireless dis
patches from the Cunard liner Sax
onla today said that she is alt safe
so far, and that search had failed to
reveal an Infernal machine or danger
ous explosives of any kind.
No word was received from the
Philadelphia yesterday afternoon, but
no foars as entertained as to her
safety.
JAPANESE TO RUN
STEAMSHIP LINE
THROUGH CANAL
NEW YORK. July 8.?The Nippon
Yuson Kaisha has decided to estab
lish a steamship line betweon New
York and Japan, to operate through
the Panama canal, at once.
The Nippon Yuson Kaisha is the
strongest Japaneso steamship com
pany. It has been operating steam
ships between Japan and the Ameri
can Pacific ports for more than 20
years arid they have proved very
profitable.
AUSTRIAN WAR LOAN
PROVES SUCCESSFUL
WASHINGTON,' July 8.?The suc
cess of the second Austro-Hungariau
war loan Is assured, according to the
announcement made by Alexander
tria-Hungarv. Subscriptions already
amount to $900,000,000 which provide
tal Indebtedness of Austria-Hungary
which previous to the war amounted
to $3,800,000,000. has been rained to
55,300,000,000. The wealth of An.:
tria-Hungnry Is estimated at 525,
OOOftOO.bOti The Increase- of Indebted
ueMj therefore, amount;* to rj* per
cent, of the r.atlcma wealth.
U. S. TO AID
SETTLERS
ON LAND
WASHINGTON, July 8.?An inter ft
: departmental committee named by ^
Secretory of the Interior FVanklln K.
Lane and Secretary of Labor William
B^WIIson is at work 011 a plan to re
lievo unemployment in the United
States through a scheme under which
the Federal* government would fl
1 nance workers desiring to take up
farm lands. The committee will com
' plete the proposed program with the
necessary drafts of the legislation
which would be necessary to bo fram- P
ed before Congress meets in session t<
next December. p
Secretary of the Interior Lane n
says It would bo possible for the p
United States to locute thousands of s
her citizens on agricultural lands and
thus Increase tho agricultural product tl
of the Nation, and thus add to Its n
wealth yearly and at the same time c
reduce the tenseness of the competl- P
tion for place In the large cities and o
industrial centers. a
Secretary of Labor Wilson and Sec- li
rotary of Agriculture Houston also fa- t<
vor the plan, and tt Is said that It has 4i
been submitted to and approved by "I
President Wood row Wilson. tl
?>?? >> ? a
FALCON JOSLIN TO
LOOK FOR GOOD J
QUARTZ PROPERTY J
SEATTLE,. July 8-Falcon Joslin
is going back North to look for a R
good gold <iuartz mine, or a tract of c
dredging ground. Incidentally ho will
Install n wireless station. at Tolo- t(
vana which will work In connection 0
with the wireless station at Fair- ri
banks and other points in the Alas
kan Interior. The station will be in- a
stalled by C. L. Stevens, who will Z(
go North with Mr. Joslin. I g
| FOREIGNERS URGED ?!
TO LEAVE MEXICO t(
- ? Hi
WASHINGTON. July 8.?'The Unit- w
ed States is making renewed efforts r<
to get foreigners to leave Mexico, and r<
the State Department has been prom- v<
Ised the assistance of Gen. Carranza. cl
The American consulate at Monte
| rey Is feeding C.OOO refugees from the N
northern war zone. At Vera Cruz
1.500 arc receiving aid at the Ameri
can consulate, and at Mexico City n
large .number are being assisted. ?i
ti
Huerta To Return North. tl
ED PASO, Tex.. July 8.?It is re- A
ported here that Gen. Huerta lias oi
promised to return north on condi- S
tion that the government will cease r<
its persecution against him. Tho of
fer was made to Huerta. it is said, F
and accepted by him.
CITY OF SEATTLE TO
SAIL WITH 120 PASSENGERS F
SEATTLE. July 8.?The City of &
Seattle will sail for the North tonight H
with 120 passengers. Among thoso ?
on hoard will he the following bound H
for Juneau: b
M. G. Burch and C. Mallette. ti
Physicians Coming.
Among the excursionists on the N
City of Seattle will be a party of four- a
teen Pennsylvania physicians. ^
h
FORMER PRESIDENT TAFT ri
TO VISIT EXPOSITION h
n
SAN FRANCISCO. July 8 ? For
mer President William H. Taft will G
visit tho Panama Pacific Exposition
about the middle of next month. He
j will address the peace society, and
; for a part of tho day while hero he A
will be the guest of the Ohio Society. c
I<
To Address Press Club In Portland Tf
^ PORTLAND. Ore.. July 8.?Former 11
President Taft will be tho guest at a K
breakfast of the Portland Press Club
August 22. according to prosent plans. G
Ho will deliver a speech to the -club
on a subject to bo chosen later.
EUROPEANS SELLING ti
AMERICAN SECURITIES n
NEW YORK. July 8.? There hus n
been a stondy selling of American o
stocks on the Now York exchange c
for several weeks, and it is estimat- g
ed that they amount to large sums.
There has also been a lively sale of C
American bonds -fur future delivery.
These sales have been caused by
the low price of exchange. \
? ? ?? : t
STOCK QUOTATIONS h
closed yesterday at 38?<,; Chino, 44%
Bjaj. Jfei; Utah Copper lit!; Butte I
iVOULD CLOSE
THANE ROAD
TO MOTORISTS
General Manager B. L. Thane, Of
lie Alaska Gastlneau Mining com
any said today that lie would close
j general traffic the Sheep Creek
lanked road unless automobiles and
lotorcycles observed the tegulations
rescribing u speed of not more than
Ix miles au hours, on the road.
Mr. Thane was an eye-witness tc
ic accident on the roadway la*
ight at 9:30 o'clock, when a motor
ycle driven by C. E. Franzen e
ersoverance. ran over the two-yeai
Id Raymond Gerrizen, son of Mr.
nd Mrs. Joseph Gerrizen, who live
l a cottage on the road. "The mo
jrcycle waB not going at the rate of
} miles an hour," Mr. Thane said,
hut it was going much too fast, and
mt the boy was not killed Is a mlr
ele. The planked road is the prl
ate property of the Gastlneau Co.
is not a speedway. Those families
ho live along the road have children
ho have no other playground, and
ie exercise of good judgment by au
lists and motorcyclists In their
peed-will minimize the daiigor of ac
IdenL"
Chief of Police E. J. Sliter stated
iday that within ihe city limits the
rdlnancc against speeding will be
gldly enforced.
The Garrctson child was uninjured.
Ithough one of ihe wheels of Fran
jn's motorcycle passed over him.
r. Is. 0. Sloane examined him to
ay. The child was brought to Ju
eau last night, but was later taken
> his home. After Franzen had
ruck the child, he stopped and did
hat ho could for him, and expressed
? ;ret that the accident had occur
td. The father of the child was pre
L'nted from assaulting the motorcy
Ist, hy bystanders.
tew MEMBER or
ROAD COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, July 8?MnJ. Pet
r W. Davidson, Twenty-sixth Infan
y, has been appointed a member of
te board of road commissioners for
laska, and designated as disbursing
(llcer. He will report at Valdez on
eptember 15, and on October 1 will
jileve First Lieut. Louis A. Kunzig.
ORMER GOVERNOR FOSS
SPEAKS FOR PROHIBITION
ATLANTIC CITY, N. V., July 8,?
ormer Governor Kugcnc N. Foss, of
[ussachuactts. who sometime ago an
ounced his candidacy for the Repub
can nomination for Governor of Mas
lchusetts on a prohibition platform,
'e said prohibition will be one of the
ig Questions in the National conven
ons next year.
Foss was three times Governor of
lassachusctts. having been elected as
Demgcrat In 1910, 1911 and 1912,
hen Gov. Walsh succeeded him. He
ad been a former Republican and
:-turncd to that party in 1914 when
e was defeated for the Republican
ominatlon for Governor,
OLLAR STEAMSHIPS
SOLD TO ENGLISH
SEATTLE, July 3.?Claiming that
raerlcan steamers cannot be operat
d at a prollt undor the new LaFol
>tte bill, the Dollar Steamship Co.
csterday consummated the sale of
ie steamships M. S. Dollar and Mac
Inaw to British concerns.
iREAT BRITAIN'FORBIDS
EXPORTATION OF METALS
, ?
LONDON, July 8.- -Further expor
itlon of lead, spelter, antimony and
Sckel from Great Britain liar been
srbidden by the government. The
letals are all required in the making
f ammunition, and the supply in the
ountry is not sufficient to meet the
overnment demands.
?; ?
IREGON MAN KILLS j
SELF ON WEDDING DAY
OREGON CITY. July 8.? Herbert
Varner, Who was to be married yes
erday at noon to Mrs. Ella Delanoy,
ting himself at 8:30 o'clock yester
ay morning to an old Oak tree.
? ??
E. S. Hewitt, the- L. C- Smith and
ewriter man. returned ou the
efferson from a business trip to Kat*
l-lkoii, Wrangeii and other points.
ffllRTY-THREE KILLED
BY WORST STORM IN
CINCINNATI'S HISTORY
CINCINNATI, 0., July 8?The
known dead as a result of the
tornado and rainstorm which
prevailed here fo many hours is
now known to number 33 per
sons ? including 18 deckhands
on Ohio river steamers.
CINCINNATI, O., July 8.?A terrific
tornado struck Cincinnati last night
and within ten minutes brought upon
the city the worst disaster in its his
tory. The storm grew In Its ferocity
hourly until today.
Large parts of the city are In ruins,
and It Is estimated that 40 persons
have been killed. The known dead
at noon today wae_15, but the loss of
life on the river front Is believed to
have been greater.
The debris of wrecked buildings is
being searched and the Ohio river
dragged for victims.
In sections of the city there was not
a building left standing, and the loss
of river craft along the banks of the
Ohio has been very large. It Is fear
ed that the river loss will extend to
other points between hare and Wheel
ing, W. Va.
BIG TORNADO COVERS
ALL MIDDLE WEST
Chicago, July 8.? It is estimated
that 60 persons were killed and over
100 wounded by tornadoes and rain
storms that have swept over Ohio, In
diana, Illinois, Missouri and Nebraska
iast night
The damage to property will amount
to several millions. Ohio was the
heaviest sufferer. The loss of life
was greatest at Cincinnati, where the
storm reached its highest point.
The extent of the property loss and
its nature will not'be known for a
day or two, and It will take several
days to make an accurate estimate of
the damage to the crops.
UNKNOWN MAN
SUICIDES NEAR
ALASKA-JUNEAU
An unknown man was found dead
in a gully about 80 feet above the A1
aska-Junoau trail this afternoon at
2:30 o'clock ty Mrs. Axel Hoimqulst,
who was picking salmon berries.
Mrs. Hoimqulst immediately report
ed the discovery to U. S. Commission
er B. Marshall, who empanelled a
coroner's jury and proceeded to the
spot. Mrs. Hoimqulst stated that
she almost stepped on the man be
fore she saw him and that she was
bo frightened that she didn't exam
ine the body but came down the hill
as quickly as possible.
The body was found in a sitting pos
ture leaning against the side of the
hill and a 38-callbrc six shooter with
one empty chamber was found be
tween his feet. He was Well dress
ed and had an overcoat which was
neatly folded under him. Death evi
dently took place a week or ten days
ago as the body is In a very bad
state of preservation. Mrs. Hoim
qulst stated that she was over the
same ground two weeks ago and that
places the death shortly after that
time.
The body was brought to tho Young
undertaking parlors where tho cor
oner's jury, composed of John Mu
setli, E ? LaBounty, Arvld Lund
quist, L. J. Allen. E. H. Sherman and
A. M. White held an inquest
The verdict returned by the Jury
at four o'clock was that "the deceased
came to his end by a gunshot wound
inflicted by himself."
The only means of identification
were the letters "C.S.S." on the In
side of a ring.
There was $12 on tho body.
The suicide was a men well into
middle age. presumably about 55, and
; weighed about 150 pounds, as near
as could be judged.
ALAMEDA SAILS WITH
250 PASSENGERS
SEATTLE. July 7.? The Alameda
? sailed for Alaska last night with 250
uasscngers with the following nam
led for Juneau:
Hugh C, Wallace, Melville Wallace,
IH. G. Dier-tcr, Miss Hickey. E. Y.
! Malany. F. Ardner, Mn?. F. W. Ma'son,
IJohn Murphy, Mrs. Frost. Mius An
jderson, W. f. Lass, arid W. R. Moore.

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