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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, July 09, 1915, Image 1

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GERMAN REPLYpUSES
RENEWAL OF CRISIS
WITH THAT COUNTRY!
1 -
? +
+ GERMAN NOTH COMING. +
? T +
+ Berlin. Jul)* 9. ? The final +
+ section of the Gtrman reply +
? will be put on the wire this af- +
? ternoon The note is not dif- +
? ferent from the ottlino already +
+ sent to Washington. *
? *
BERLIN, July 9.?The German re
ply to the last American note on the
Lusitania case and submarine war
fare question was delivered to Amer
ican Ambassador James W. Gerard
late last right.
Washington. July 9.?It is expected ,
by the State Department here that <
the German reply to the last Amen- i
can note will be received here tomor- ,
row or Saturday, and laid before the
Cabinet next Tuesday. All the offi- .
dais here realize that probably there (
has been no essential change from
the form in which the German reply
was outlined by Ambassador Gerard. ;
On the basis as outlined the Amer
ican government declined to engage
in any supplementary negotiations'
Meanwhile there is a marked re-j
newal of tension over what will be
the next step. i \
h
WASHINGTON DISAPPOINTED. ,
J
(NOTE?This ?l spatch was 1
written before the lecelpt of
advice that the German reply
had already been delivered to
Gerard.?Editor.)
Washington, July 9.?Notwithstand-1,
ing the optimistic reports from Ber- ,
lin to the effect that Germany is try-'
ing hard to meet ths American re
quirements in regard to the submar
ine warfare being car- ed on in Brit
ish waters, there is a general under
tone of disappointment in official
quarters here-on acctunt of the ten
or of the latest German note. What
the President's course may be no offi
cial would predict, bat It is plainly
evident that another critical stage in
the relation* between the United
States and Germany is at hand.
One course which some well in
formed officials consider probable
would be for the United States to an
ticipate the German proposals, and
notify the Berlin go\ ernment in ef
fect that the United States intends to
.insist upon the principle that an un
armed ship of any nationality carry
ing America is must tx visited, search
ed and the sifety of tfe American cit
izen* care's for before she is sunk,
and that specific violations of these
rights would determine the next step
in the American policy.
FAILS TO ADMIT RESPONSIBIL
ITY FOR LUSITANIA.
The Lisltania case however. In
which th< German note fails to admit
responsib tity for the loss of the more
than 100 American Uv:s that perished
when she was torpedoed, presents a
phase in American and German dip
lomatic relations concerning which
there are today few suggestions as to
what the courso of tb: United States
might be. Some of the President's
advisers have repeatedly counselled'
that the breach of international law j
in that Instance was io flagrant that >
It remained only for the United,
States to have no d ptomatic inter-:
course with the German government,
unless intent for the net were denied
and reparation promiied.
LUSITANIA CASE AT FRONT
AGAIN.
Negotiations over the general sub
marine warfare question have of late
overshadowed the Lusitania case of
late, but there are indications today
that the new German note, which ig
nores that incident, would cause a
return to it as the foremost Issue be
tween the two countries.
The continuing loss of American
lives, the last of which were on the
. AnglOf-Callfornlan. is se-ving to in
crease the Irritation I hat exists at
Washington.
BERNSTORFF ALARMED.
The gathering clouds are reported
to have alarmed Count von Bernstorff,
German ambassador, and it is said
that he has cabled his government
that American lives \*)ll be protected
In the future?that vessels carrying
Americans must be visited and
searched and the Americans on board
cared for?will serve to allay Ameri
can feeling.
WOULD MAKE WAR IMPRAC
I HT,CA8LE
Experts here admit '.hat the ins) st
ance upon visiting vei.jels that carry
American:! would poetically mean
that all merchant ships would have
to be searched, and that the result '
would be to make the submarine war
fare impracticable.
WILSON'WON'T SUGGEST.
WASHINGTON. July 9 ?President .
Woodrow Wilson last ulgbt notified
Secretary of State Robert Lansing
that he will refuse to make any sug
gestions with reference to the Ger
man attitude concerning the submar
ine warfare "as indicated in the rough
draft of the German reply to the sec
ond American Lusitania note. The ten
tative draft of the German reply wis
delivered to Ambassador James W.
Gerard at Berlin and the latter cabled
it to the State Department, which
transmitted it to President Wilson at
Cornish. N. H. The latter communi
cated with Secretary of State Lansing
yesterday, saying that he would make
no reply.
However, it Is believed that the
reply will not be satisfactory to the
President, and. while the State De
partment refuses to make any state
ment concerning the mater beyond
that already has been stated. It Is
thought that German Ambassador
Count Von Bernstorff has received
an intimation that the note will be
unsatisfactory.
GERMANY TRIES HARD
TO PLEASE AMERICANS
BERLIN. July 9.-? Germany will ?
modify her submarine warfare to meet
the demand of the United States,
provided she is given assurances
that merchant ships will not attempt
to sink the underwater craft which
hall thorn. This Is one of the chief
points in preliminary draft of the re
ply being drawn up by Foreign Sec
retary Jagow
Assurances tbat tbo Lusitania was
not carrying ammunition for the al
lies are accepted by Germany has hav
ing been sent in good faith, and it
may recede .from Its position that the
liaer was in reality a criuser, express
ing its regret for the "deplorable trag
edy."
Humanity Plea Wins
General Impressions here Is that the
American plea for humanity will find
a ready response in the German re
ply. It will make certain* suggestions
according to reliable reports, that will
serve to protect neutral lives if ad
opted. These suggestions as formu
lated in conferences between the of
ficials of the foreign office are expect
ed to prove ihat Germany is desirous
of maintaining all the mandates of
Paper Resumes.
Th? Tageszeltung, which was sus
American not< has again becu per
mitted ?o appear, its editor has been
more serious.
ADD 13,000,000 j
TO 1915 WHEAT
CROP'SBUSHELS
WASHINGTON, July 9.? The De
partment of Agriculture yesterday es
timated the wheat crop of the United
States for the year 1915 at 963,000,000
bushels. This is 13.000,000 bushels
greater than last year's record break
ing crop. It Is 1*00,000,000 bushels
greater than any wheat crop of the
country prior to last year.
The Department says the favorable
weather in June has increased the
crop outlook in all cereals throughout
ihe United States. A continuation of
the favorable weather will further In
crease the output for the year.
The acreage is larger in wheat this
l^ear than ever before, and the pro
duction will be above the average.
The increase In the "acreage in gen
eral farm crops has .been greatly
stimulated by the prospect for good
prices and the agitation by the De
partment of Agriculture, the press
and other sources.
CORN CROP ALSO LARGE.
Tho Department of Agriculture es
timates the corn crop at 2,800,000,000
us against 2,634,000.000 bushels last
/ear, and making this year's crop the
argest since 1906 when It amounted
to 2.909,000000 bushels.
Kansas Wilt Lead
The wheat crop bulletin shows that
Kansas will again rank first among
tho wheat producing states with a
yield of 13S.700.000 bushels, a decrease
of nearly 25.000,000 from last year's ?
crop.
'
RESERVES
OEFEOR
THE WAR
Twenty-five reservists in the Mon
tenegrin army, nearly all of whom
have been working In the mine? in
this district, left this morning Tor
Vancouver, B. C? to Join the contin
gent of 15,000 men which the Mon
tenegrin government has been rais
ing in America and Canuda as the
nucleus of King Nicholas' newest
irmy. The local warriors sailed on
:he steamship Princess Alice, and
frill arrive in Vancouver early Sun
lay morning.
Nearly a hundred local Monteneg
rins were unable to make the trip, be
cause they lacked the monay neces
sary to purchase their passage Last
tight only twelve had raised the price
>f a ticket, but when the Princess
Mice sailed this morning this number
sad been doubled. It was the soc
>nd contingent to leave Juneau with
it two weeks, the Princes Sophia on
ter last trip having taken u number
>f fighters.
A refund of their transportation is
jxpected to made the men, when th$y
?each Vancouver, as a fund was
wrought to Canada by Jovan Matano
rich, secretary to Kjng Nicholas, to
pay the expenses of the recruit s.
Matancvlch was arrested in Portland
i few days.ago on the chrrge of vio
lating the neutrality of the United
3tates, but was released c,n bail.
He will head the troop that will leave
Montreal sometime this month, tor
Liverpool. At the latter port they
will Join the Allies on the Western
'ront if needed, or be sent to their
>wn country.
The fighting strength of the Mon
:cnegrin army at the outset of the
European war was lOd.OOfl men. The
irmy aided the Serbs in driving the
Austrian? back, and the Invaders
were repulsed after bloody hattleS" on
Montenegrin soil, although the Mon
tenegrins lost heavily in men that
:ould not be replaced, owing to the
small population of the Kingdom.
GREAT BRITAIN PROTESTS
AGAINST U. S. POLICY
WASHINGTON. July 9 ?The Brit
ish ombassy questioned the State De
partment last night upon the at-,
tempt of the United Spates to prevent
the encouragement of reservists to
leave the United States to Join their
colors in Europe.
RAILROAD TO MATANUSKA
READY BY END OF YEAR
ANCHORAGE, via Soward. July 9.
-Lieut. Frederick Mears. of the rail
roud engineering commission, said ?
yesterday that the railroad will be
completed from Anchorage to Mata
nuska by the end of the present year.
Lot Sales to Start.
The sale of town lots in the new
townsite of Anchorage will begin to
day. Those occupying lots on the
government railroad reservation have
been notified to vacate as soon as
they can prepare places In the new
townsite.
Mt. Katmai In Eruption.
SEWARD, July 9.?The Santa Ana
reported hero that ML Katmai is still
in eruption, and worse than it has
been for two months. It belched a
large column of flame June 17th.
? ? ?
CHICAGO SUBSCRIBES
$100,000 FOR OPERA
CHICAGO, July 9.? Subscriptions
for $100,000 have already been receiv
ed fir the grand opera Reason In
Chicago next year.
SOUTHERNERS ACKNOWLEDGE
BROTHERHOOD WITH NEGRO
CHICAGO, July 9.?The delegates
from the Southern States to the C.
E. convention today acknowledged
brotherhood with the Negro race, and
agreed to extend the hand of fellow
ship.
NEW TENDER ARRIVES
KETCHIKAN. July 9.?Tho new light
house tender Tern has arrived here,
and is outfitting for a cruise of the
waters of Southwestern Alaska.
ADMIRAL EVANS SAILS.
SEATTLE July 9. ? The Admiral
Evans sailed for Ala3ka last night
with the following named for Juneau:
\Y. J. Mansfield. K. Murphy. Cdna
Lets, Irene Comer ar.<! one f.tecr
commission mar. sailed for Juneau
on the City of Seattle last night.
BLETMEN'S
END DRA
VERY NEAR
SEATTLE, July 9.?That Col. Aid
on J. Blothen, principal owner and ed- 1
itor-ln-chlef of the Seattle Times is '
dying, was announced today by his <
physicians. Their statement this of- 1
tornoon said that he cannot survive '
the night. Only the remnant of his '
powerful physical constitution is keep- '
ing alive the spark of llfo today, and;
frequout sinking spells tell the story: j
of the ravages that disease have made [
in Its attack upon his heart.
Relatives Gave Up Last Night.
SEATTLE," July 9.?A bulletin Is- !
sued by Joseph Blether nnd Clarence
B. BHthen, sons of Col. Alden J. '
Blethen, lost night said:
"The family and physicians of Col.
Alden J. Blothon are compelled to ad- 1
mlt that there seems no possible (
chance of saving the veteran editor's
CINCINNATI STORM
TOLL MAY RE 10
CINCINNATI, 0.. July 9.?The loss
or life from the territic , norm that ,
more than $1,000,000, i
Loss of Property $3,000,000.
property ,as a result of tornadoes and
West Wednesday night nd Thursday
morning may reach $3,000,000.
THAW TELLS STORY
OF LIFE ON STAND
NEW YORK. July 9. ? Harry K. J
Thaw yesterday and today retold the
story of his life on the witness stand, j
He was dragged by his cross-examiner
all through- his life with his wife la
Paris, the killing of Stanford White,
capo from that place and subsequent
experiences In the courts. His views
on social questions, the relations of
the sexes, religion, citizenship, and all
manner of other questions were elic
ited. The changes from one thing to
another were often abrupt, and the i
testimony frequently conflicted.
- .?
"BOBBY" GUGGENHEIM'S
GRASS WIDOW MARRIES
NEW YORK, July 9. Nr.- Grace
Bernhelracr Guggenheim. who was ;
granted a final divorce Wednesday
from M. Robert Guggenheim, son of
Daniel 'Guggenheim, was married yes
terday to Morton E. Snellenbtirg, of
Philadelphia, where he Is a member
of the dry goods firm of Snellenburg
and Company.
ARRANGE STILL
MORE CREDIT FOR
FRENCH MUNITIONS
NEW YORK, July !). ? J. Pierpont
Morgan's group of banks and other
bankers hare virtually completed ne
gotiations for commercial purposes.
It is understood that the oaln will be
secured by American stocks, bonds
and other securities to be deposited
with Paris bankers for delivery to the
American banks in the event of fail
ure to meet all the conditions of the
loan.
FRENCH OBTAIN MORE
NEW YORK CREDIT
NEW YORK. July 9.?Another in
stalment of the loan arranged by" the
Paris house of Rothchlld through J.
i Now York was placed to the credit
of French bankers Thursday. The
money Is, to be available for the pay
MAY HAVE NEW LINE
OF STEAMERS FOP. WEST
steamships for ^he Alaskan West
ward lino is proposed by Seward and
Seattle capitalists. It is understood
that Brown and Hawkins, the Seward
merchants and bankers, no lntorcst
?
?> 'f* -v- v <*? -> v ?;> -b ??* ->
+ BRITISH MAY BUY *
SEATTLE FACTORIES ?
Seattle. Jui> 9, ?British -5*
attic machinery houses for the *
:- purpose of manufacturing war 4,
TURKS KILL <
100 GERMAN
OfflCERS
?*?
ROME, July 9. ? A growing anti
German feeling among the Constan- j
tlnople garrisons broke Into open re
volt tooay, ana more than 100 Ger
man officers were killed, according to
Jispatchea from the Constantinople
:orrospondent of the Trlnbuna. Hun
dreds of the mutineers were killed,
though the rioting has not been stop
sed. Grave fears are felt at Con
stantinople lest the outbreak will v
spread, and result in a reign of terror, v
The irritation over the development (.
}f the anti-German sentiment has .
seen increasing for weeks. The
Turks resent the domination of all '
mattore of government by the Ger
man officers in the army, according to 0
the reports, and the outbreak while ''
jreatly feared, was not a surprise. r
The terrific loss of life and the re- *
turning thousands of wounded from h
the front have added to the exasper- 2
ition of the people.
MEN AT DARDANELLES fl
f C
ATHENS July 0?Reports from the
Allies* field headquarters estimate
the TurkiBh losses in killed, wounded
irul prisoners since the fighting be- *
MAN WHO CAUSED *
EXPLOSION AT j
SEATTLE SUICIDES
SEATTLE. July 9.?Emll Marker,
alias Prof. Hugo Toepfel, a disgraced ;
Germah army reservist, member of t
tho German espionage crops in the j
United States who committed suicide
Iiere Tuesday, Is declared to' bo the t
man who set off the Seattle dynamite j
explosion May 30th which shook up ,
tho city. fl
Marker, was run to earth by Lieut.
T. E. Sweene and British Consul t
Agusfiiz. r
? * ? f
W. J. BRYAN LIKES
APPOINTMENT OF t
ROBERT LANSING r
LINCOLN, Neb.. July 8.~Bryan'? <
Commoner for July wfll express grat
ification over the appointment of Rob
ert Lansing to succeed William J. Bry
an us Secretary of State. It will con- e
tain the letter of congratulation sent t
by Mr. Bryan to Secretary of State i
Lansing congratulating him .upon hiH t
appointment and expressing great j
pleasure on account of Ic.
The Commoner generally will be t!e- i
voted to peace propaganda- 1
CANADA MAY MmKE ALL
AMMUNITION 3HE IS ABLE i
MONTREAL, July 9.? President (
Shaughnc8sy of the Canadian Pacific 1
is expected to bring home practically j
a "carte blanche'' order for the man- t
ufacture of shells, cartridges, and all (
other war materials In Canadian Pa- i
ciflc Machine shops and elsewhere as i
fast as they can be made and in any t
amount. <
SCANDINAVIAN MAIL (
MUST GO DIRECT
WASHINGTON, July 9.?The Post
offlco Department has ordered that 1
all mall from tho United States des- <
tlned to Norway, Sweden, Denmark i
and the Netherlands be dispatched In [I
steamers sailing direct to those coun i
tries- and not touchng at belligerent j
ports, following complaints that cen- :
sors tamper wlti. the mail while pass- '<
Ing through Great Britain.
ITALY WANTS TO
STRENGTHEN U. S. TRADE
. NEW YORK, July 9.?A Milan spec
ial says-that Italy Is anxious to de
velop its business with the United '
States. Italy cannot make machinery.
Last year 51.000.000 of machinery ?
camo from Austria. Raw cotton and i
imported from Germany and Austria
STOCK QUOTATIONS
NEW YORK, July 9.?Alaska Gold
closed yesterday at 37%; Chino. 44%;
Ray. 23; Utah ^.Copper, 05%; Butte
and Superior. 70.
Copper unchanged.
Alaska Gold closed today at 39,* Chi
no, 14%: Ray, 22%: Utah Copper, <55.
Minnehaha Still Burning.
discovered this afternoon thajt <!ie*
VTTENTION NOW
TURNING TO
WESTERN ERONT
LONDON, July 9.?The center of
var Interest Is turning toward thej
vest front with the news coming frornj
tolland that Germany Is crowding re
nforcements through Belgium to re
nforce their lines along the French
lorder. However, the only newu of j
perations is contained in brief Par-;
s reports which say that the Ger-1
nans directed a ferocious assault
gainst trenches which the British;
lud captured southwest of Pitken, i
nd that the attack was broken by
he British artillery and French ma
hine guns with heavy losses.
The report admits that the Ger
nans made gains in front of Sou
hez.
RUSSIAN SITUATION IS EASY.
Reports from Petrograd say that
he Russian position in Southwest
vestern Poland is very hopeful, and
hat the possibility of the Austro-Ger
nan army's carrying Warsaw by sud
len assault has been obviated.
.ONDON EXPECTS!
GERMAN OFFENSIVE
LONDON, July 9.?There are very
videsprcad complaints at the front of
he unaccountable Inactivity of the
fritish urmy In Flanders, The French
ire "carving their way dally through
ho German defenses, slowly prepar
ng for the promising big offensive
novement, but nothing Is heard of
my advance by the British. It iooks
,b though another great German at
empt for (Calais In at hand which
nust involve the British forces, but
>n the defensive. That is the only
ixplanatlou offered for the failure of
hie expected British offensive to
nateylallze.
BjERMANY LOOIKS
FOR RESISTANCE
BERLIN, July 9. -German rallftury
ixperts believe the Russians will try
o concentrate fresh forces behind
mother lino of defense considerably
lack of Lehmberg and to hold Wnr
law If possible.
Gen. Von Mackenseu, who has been
nade a field marshal b,v Emperor Wll
iam. Is now the hero of the hour.
No Peace Overtures
Rumors that Russia had sued for
leace as a result of the reverses suf
ered In GaHcin led the official North
lerman Gazette to publish the follow
ng yesterday. "Notwithstanding ro
iorts to the,, contrary during the em
Ire war no hostile government has
lirectly or Indirectly approached Ger
uany with peace offers. The im
jerial government knows nothing of
ho preparedness of any hostllo gov
ernment. vO make peace."
GERMANY IS SEEKING
a - CABLE COMMUNICATION
BERLIN, July 9.?Foreign Minister
Von Jagow announced today that the
German governments Is seeking to re
store direct .-cable service with the
[Jnited States. Hee stated that Ger
many haB offered to agree that the
President of the United States shall
ippoint a censor to serve at the Am
srlcan end of the line.
GERMANY TRYING TO . ,
MAKE FAMILY TROUBLES
LONDON, July 9.? The London
Morning Post's Budapest's correspon
dent says he htjs received informa
tion of an Austro-German diplomatic
campaign against Italy, the ultimate
lita of which Is to play Scr'tla against
Italy In connection with the Albanian
question and problem of the Adrlttc.
MORGAN GETS TWO
PER CENT, RAKE OFF
LONDON, July 9.?It was announc
ed by Lord Curzon In the rfouse of
Lords that the banking firm of J. P.
Morgan & Co., agents for the British
government lu America, received a
commission of 2 per cent, and all ex
penses.
t t
1 * m
ENGLISH NATIONAL RESOURCES
MAY HAVE TO BE REGISTERED
LONDON July 9.?A bill has been
introduced requiring the registration
of alt nation-*! restfcrces. ?' ?
GEN. BOTHAICOMPLETES I
CONQUEST OE GERMAN
SOUTHWBT AERICA
PRETORIA, South Africa, July 8.?
The Qerman possessions of South
west Africa have been surrendered to
the British. The surrender was ac
cepted by Gen. Louis Botha, comman
der of the British forces, today when
all the German military forces capi
tulated, and the German flag was low
ered from all public places.
After suppressing a rebellion In the
Union of South Africa, which termin
ated with the surrender of Gen. Chris
tian De Wet, Gen. Botha was given su
preme command of the British opera
tions against German southwest Af
rica, and headed an Invasion of that,
territory. The invasion was carried
to a successful consummation when
the German forces gave up the un
equal contest and surrendered today.
It is expected here that German
Southwest Africa will be added to the
Union of South Africa.
Gen. Botha has received telegrams
from Premier Asqulth, conveying the
thanks of the King and the govern
ment for his glorious achievement,
and from other sections.
ITALIANS CLOSE
ADRIATIC SEA
WASHINGTON, July 9.?The clos
ing>of the Adriatic sea tf> merchant
vessels of all nations, except when
bound for Montenegrin orlp Italian
ports under convoy to be furnished
by the Italian ministry of war, was
announced today in a cablegram re
ceived by Secretary of State Robert > 3
Lansing from American Ambassador
Thomas Nelson Page at Rome.
ITALY USES BIG GUNS
ROME, July 9.? The War Office
sayB: "Artillery duels In which gum
of medinm and large calibre are being
used are itensificd along the whole
front/*" ^
BRITISH WANT
150 SUBMARINE
CHASERS OP U. .S
NEW YORK, July 9.?The G. 8.
Smith Boat and Engines company an
nounced today that representatives of
the British and French governments
have asked that that company sub
mit es'iraates for the construction of
150 powerful speed motor boats for
war purposes. The crafts are requir
ed to bo strong enough to carry two
guns, and are to bo used In seeking
out and attacking German submar
lnos
BRITISH POWDER
MILLS DESTROYED
BY EXPLOSION
LONDON, July 9.?The big Curtis
powder mills at Hounslow and Mid
dlesex were destroyed by a series of
explosions last night. It Is snspetc
ed thnt German spies were responsi
ble for the net
Submarine Sinks British Steam
ship.
LONDON, July 9.?Tho Wilson
Line steamship C-uldo, bound from
Hul lto Archangel, Russia, was sunk
off the coaat of Scotland by a Ger
man submarine. The crew was saved.
The ship was loaded with war sup
plies for Russia. f
-? ? ? I
GERMANY SECURITIES ARE I
BRINGING 9MALL PAY
GENEVA, (via Parish July 9.?Ger
man 3% per cent, bonds, which on
August 1 wore 85.50 are now 59; Im
perial 4s, thon 94, are now 54; while
Austria's 4%8. quoted at 95.50 In
1914, are now 44. ...il
BRITISH CANNOT TRADE
WITH GERMANS ANYWHERE
LONDON, July 9.?Lord Robert Ce
cils in the House of Commcns has
announced that the government will
Issue a proclamation prohibiting the
trading with persons of hostile na
tions In China or other countries:
LORD CECIL SAYS SHIPS
OF COMMERCE MAY ARM
??
LONDON, July 9.?In last night's
session of the Commons, Lord Cecil
contended that merchant ships have a
right to carry' arms under internation
al law and usage.
+ WEATHER TODAY +
+ Maximum?64. +
+ Minimum?(9 ?
* CLEAR ! ! +

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