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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, July 27, 1915, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. V.. NO. 628. JUNEAU, ALASKA, TUESDAY, JULY 27, 1915. PRICE TEN CENTS.
GERMAN WARSAW ATTACK MOST GIGANTIC IN HISTORY
Continue Undersea War On Passenger Ships
BRITAIN DECIDES TO CHANGE NOTE TO U. &
BRITAIN
CANCELS
HER NOTE
WASHINGTON. July 27.?Secreta
ry of State Robert Lansing thia morn
ing received a cable from Sir Ed
ward Grey, Britiah mlniater of for
eign affairs, asking that he not per
mit the publication of the Britiah
note in anawer to the American pro
teat againat the enforcement of the
Britiah orders in council restricting
the trade of neutrals. The cablegram
said that Great Britain ia preparing a
new note which will be substituted
for the one delivered to the United
States yesterday.
The substance of the British note
had already been given to the Ameri
can press before the receipt of the
British cablegram. However, the
United States will not act now until
the receipt of the new note.
TEDDY COMPARES
BRYAN TO CALf
SAN DIEGO. Calif.. July 27. ? Col.
Theodore Roosevelt was asked to ad
dress the Ad Club of this city today,
and declined.
"But." said the chairman of the
committee extending the invitation.
"Bryan addressed the club last
week."
"Well, if that's the case, let them
get a two-headed calf this week." was
the Colonel's rejoinder.
ONE KILLED AND FIVE
INJURED AT SEATTLE
?
SEATTLE. July 27?A Great North
ern work train's derrick struck the
Gareld street bridge today, killing E.
Kaliorcs. a Greek laborer, and injur
ed five others.
SEATTLE BOY ACCUSES
HIS 40-YEAR-OLD
WIFE OF SWINDLING
SEATTLE. July 27.?Fred Schneid
er. aged 19 years, began suit today
against his wife, aged 40 years, whom
he charges with decamping with his
$10,000 inheritance.
JEFFERSON BRINGING
MANY PASSENGERS NORTH
SEATTLE. July 27.- The steamer
Jefferson clears from Seattle tonight
with 120 passengers on board, main
ly excursionists. Among those com
ing north are:
For Juneau?Miss Jennie Carritta,
Mrs R Lashua. John R. Scott. Jose
phine Kelly. Mrs. John Kelly. H. H. j
Williams. F. P. Cook. E. Tombs. Mr.
and Mrs. Linke. and two steerage.
For Douglas?Mrs. J. F. Type. E.
Israelson. Abner Nort and wife, and
Morris Nort.
JERSEY STRIKERS
RETURN TO WORK
BAYO.VNE. N". J.. July 27.?Some
tliink more than 1.500 strikers at the
Standard Oil Company's Tidewater
plants returned to work today. ?It is
believed that this signifies that the
strike has been broken.
The fairnes of Sheriff Kinkead and
his appeal to the law abiding of the
strikers is given credit for the re
sumption of operations.
Those strikers who returned to
work said that the rioters among
their number more than anything else
are responsible for the failure of the
strike.
SERBIANS REPULSE
AUSTRIAN ATTACK
X1SH. Serbia. July 27.?The war
office says: "On Sunday at 3 a. m.
the enemy, under cover of violent in
fantry and artillery fire, attempted to
land troops on the island of Mychar
ska Ada. in the Danube, but were
thrown back by the Servians. After
the defeat the Austrians opened a
cannonade that last for a long while,
but had no result."
JOHN HAYS HAMMOND. JR..
BECOMES ANOTHER EDISON
NEW YORK. July 27.?John Hays
Hammond. Jr.. will remove his plant
and laboratory from Gloucester to
Fisher's Island, off Mystic. Conn.,
where he will erect a plant and re
search bureau costing >750.000. and
employ at the start 1000 workmen.
* WEATHER TODAY ?
Maximum?8S. +
+ Minimum?51. *
+ CLEAR ! ! *
+????????++??????
REDFIELD
CONDUCTS
( INQUIRY
+++++*++++*++++*+
+ 4
* DEAD AND MISSING +
+? NUMBER...1,220 +
+ ?+? +
+ Chicago. July 27.?The lat- +
* est reports show that there are +
* 827 dead and 393 missing in *
* the Eastland disaster. * '
+ It is said that probably *
+ more than 2,700 were on the +
vessel. +
+ +
ti, + ++ + + 4, + +4, + + + + +'
CHICAGO. July 27.?Secretary of
I Commerce William S. Redfield has:
arrived here and taken personal
charge of the investigation into the
? Eastland disaster. The Federal au
thorities will make the investigation!
as thorough as possible, and to tlx the!
responsibility for the disaster.
The Federal and State authorities
are working together.
Cannote Compute Eastland Oead.
i CHICAGO. July 27.?It will be Im
possible to compute definitely the
number of lives that were lost on the
Eastland Saturday until the vessel
shall have been raised and her con
tents searched. There were a great
number of children on the vessel who
had no tickets and were not counted.
The members of the bands and other
musicians had been admitted without
tickets, and the vessel had hired a
special corps of waiters and other as
sistants whose names will be found
only on the records that are on the
vessel.
It is believed, however, that the
| dead will exceed rather than be less
than the last estimate?1,220.
First Funeral For Victims.
CHICAGO. July 27?The first funer
al service for the victims of the East
land disaster took place in this city
yesterday when more than 300 cor
teges passed through the streets.
SIR GEORGE PAISH
SEES BRITISH SUCCESS
IN FINANCIAL SITUATION
LONDON. July 27. - Sir George
I'aish. editor of the London Statist,
says: "The way in which Great Brit
ain took up the loan even ex
ceeded the hopes of the government.
It is all a good sign that the empire
| is united in the sentiment of a con
tinuation of the war and providing the
sinews with which to carry it on.
From Germany's finnncfa! point of
view, as well ay from the standpoint
of humanity, the action of the bank
, ers in waiting upon the Kaiser and
urging the necessity of peace is a
matter for general congratulation."
RUSSIA PLACING
STEEL RAIL ORDERS
IN UNITED STATES
?+?
NEW YORK. July 27.?Of an orig
inal inquiry from Russia for between
350.000 and 400,000 tons of steel rails
from American manufacturers, nearly
half now have been placed, and there
, remain a total of 200.000 tons to
230,000 tons still to be contracted
for.
PHILADELPHIA HAS
200 PLANTS MAKING
WAR MUNITIONS
????
PHILADELPHIA, July .6. ? Over
; 200 Philadelphia concerns are manu
: facturing various products on war or
i dere. It .is claimed that Philadelphia
j ranks second to Pittsburgh as a cen
j ter for the manufacture of war mu
i nition for Europe.
? ? ?
BRITAIN TO LIMIT
COTTON SHIPMENT
TO NEUTRAL COUNTRIES
?+?
LONDON, July 27.?According to
an announcement In Parliament, the
British government hopes soon to llm
j it the exports of cotton to neutral
?countries to their actual needs. Eng
land. however, recognizes that plac
ing cotton on the oontraband list
would disturb the United States and
would not. so far as Germany 1r con
. cerncd, advantage her enemies.
' THAW SAYS HE WILL
SUE FOR DIVORCE
I P1TSBURGH, July 27.? Pitsburgh
? papers announce that Harry K. Thaw
has told friends that he expects to
bring suit soon against Evelyn Nesbit
Thaw for an absolute divorce.
The Empire circulation leads. Try
advertising in iL
MEXICAN
SITUATION
CLEARS UP
WASHINGTON. July 27. ? The
threatening situation on the Mexican
front was relieved today when Gen.
Carranza dictated the evacuation of
Naco by his forces, who abandoned
the place and left its government in
the hands of the civil officers.
The government was also assured^
that there would be no attack on No
gales.
These orders eliminate the danger
of fighting on the border and the dan
ger that always results from that
fighting to Americans north of the
line.
Government To Make Important
Move?v
WASHINGTON. July 27.?That the
United States Is planning a definite
step looking toward the closing up
of the disordered situation in Mexico,
and that it will soon be taken was
aqfthotiattvely announced by the
State Department yesterday. There
was no suggestion made as to the na
ture of the proposed step, and no in
timation as to what it would prob
ably be was permitted to get out.
However, it is stated that the
government has determined that the
people of Mexico are tired of anarchy,
and they are satisfied that the United
States has no designs on the integrity
of the country's sovereignty, and
that they will, generally, welcome n
movement on the part of the United
States that may result in order and
constitutional government there.
VILLA LOSES GENERAL |
AND 8,000 SOLDIERS
GALVESTON, Tex., July 27.?Dih-1
patches received here from Constitu
tionalists headquarters say that Gen.
Obregon's main army, assisted by
other large forces, are advancing
from Monterey and Saltillo. and are
attacking Gen. Villa's stronghold at
the city of Torreon.
The dispatches also state that Gen.
Panfillo Natera with 8.000 men, oper
ating about Zacatecas has abandoned
Gen. Villa and declared his allegi
ance to the Carranzistas.
The acquisition of Natera is regard
ed as one of the greatest gains Gen.
Carranza has made in some time.
LANE MAY TRY
NORTHWEST
PASSAGE
SEATTLE. July 21.?Should the Ice
conditions be favorable, an attempt
will be made by the Polar Bear,
which left Seattle March 25 for north
ern waters, to pass through the
Northwest Passage and on down to
Boston, according to a letter received
from Lome Knight, one of the mem
bers of the crew, by his father, J.
I. Knight, of Seattle.
The Polar Bear left Seattle on a
whaling and walrus expedition, under
the command of Capt. L. Lane. He
is regarded locally as an able seamnn
and a competent man. Should he be
successful in making the passage, he
will be the first to pass through from
the west. Amundsen made the trip
through from the east in 1908.
At Nome three of the crew of 12
that left Seattle deserted and have
not returned, according to young
Knight. Tbis leaves the Polar Bear
short-handed, but not sufficiently crip
pled to prevent the trip if ice condi
tions are favorable.?(Seattle Times.)
PITTSBURGH COAL MINES
SELL FOR $1,500,000
PITSBURGH, July 27.?The Pitts
burgh-Buffalo Co. coal properties
were sold at auction for $1,500,000 to
the Union Trust Co. of Pittsburgh,
; representing the Frick-Mellon inter
! cats.
;NEW YORK FIRE
LOSSES GETTING LESS
?A?
NEW YORK. July 27.?The loss by
fire in New York City so far this
year is $1,133,112 less than for the
corresponding period of 1914, accord
ing to the report of tho fire fighting
commission's report to Mayor John
Purroy Mitchel.
GERMAN TRADE IS
PRACTICALLY NOTHING
WASHINGTON, July 27.?The Unit
ed States exports to Germany in
June wore only $400, against $14.
000,000 in June, 1914.
REBELION
| WINS OUT
IN HAYTI
PORT AU PRINCE, July 27. ? In
surrectionists arc In control of the
situation at this place today, after a
bloody battle that started in the
streets of this city at day-break and
continued until 10:30 o'clock. Presi
dent Guillaume is at the French lega
tion where he is under the protection
t>f the colors of that country. Dr.
Rosalvo Bobo and the revolutionary
soldiers arc In full command of
tho city in all of Its departments.
The Palace was burning when Pres
ident Guillaume fled from It for tho
French legation. The attack on the
Palace started as soon as it was
light this morning, and continued for
six hours. President Guillaume and
his defenders continued to combat
the assailants until the Palaco was
ablaze and untenable.
The casualties are believed to be
heavy. Among the dead is the chief
of-police. while the prisoners in the
hands of the revolutionists include
the Governor of Port Au Prince, Gen.
Oscar.
The revolution was started by a
regiment of soldiers which resented
the action of President Guillaume In
disbanding them. Other troops join
!cd the disgruntled forces.
GERMANS DROP 15
BOMBS ON DUNKIRK
DUNKIRK. Prance, July 27? Ger
man aeroplanes dropped 15 bombs on
Dunkirk early this morning. The
damage was not great, apd there
were none killed.
GERMANY CALLS OUT
MIDDLE AGED MEN
LONDON. July 27?Zurich. Switz
erland. dispatch says all Germans 45
years old residing in Switzerland
have been called to the colors.
U. S. TO HAVE
A 2500-TON
SUBMARINE
WASHINGTON. July 27. ? Plans
have been submitted to the naval de
partment for a submarine freight
ship of 2500 tons capacity, the aim
of which is to provide for shipments
of contraband of war with the least
possible danger of capture or destruc
tion: the largest submarines now on
the naval list are 600 tons and 180
feet long: a chief naval constructor
is understood to favor a boat with
a displacement of 2500 tons, surface
of not less than 20 knots and sub
merged speed of 15 to 18 knots.
MINNESOTA WATCHED
BY SECRET SERVICE
AGENTS AT SEATTLE
SEATTLE, July 27?The Minnesota
is taking on a full cargo of war muni
tions for Russia which will be de
livered at Vladivostock, and secret
service agents are constantly on
I guard to prevent the vessel from
! being dynamited by sympathizers
i with Germany in the war in Europe.
| It is reported that an attempt will be
1 made to blow the vessel up.
The cargo consists of all manner of
! material that is used in warfare, and
j general supplies.
STOCK QUOTATIONS.
NEW YORK. July 27.?Alaska Gold
closed yesterday at 32%; Chino,
44%; Ray, 22%; Utah Copper, 62%;
Butte and Superior, 70%.
Copper was quoted at 19 cents.
* *
* BRITISH LOSE 331,00 MEN. *
??? <?
* London, July 27.?A state- +
ment of the casualties of the *
?> British army and navy Issued +
+ today shows that the total Brit- +
ish losses In killed, wounded ?
* and missing since the begin- +
* ning of the war in the army +
l+ and navy number 331,000. <?
* *
4- *!? *;? -}? + ?!? ?;* 4- -t
+ t t ?
* +
? PROHIBITION LAW +
* UPHELD BY COURT *
-J- ?4*?
+ Olympio, Wash., July 27. ? +
+ Superior Court Judge D. F. +
+ Wright today held the Wash- *
+ ington prohibition law to be +
+ valid. +
4? <4?
ITALIANS
LOSE A
GENERAL
4444444444444444
4 4
* TERRIBLE FIGHTING 4
4 ON ITALY'S FRONT 4
t ?+? +
4 London, July 27.?Dispatch- +
4 es from the Isonzo Italian front 4
4 declare the fighting in pro- 4
4 there to be the "mightiest and 4
4 most frightful in the history 4
4 of Southern Europe." The +
?F fighting has progressed for sev- 4
4 cral days without definite re- 4
4 suits. 4
4 Mowing Austrian# Down. 4
4 Austrlans are fighting with 4
4 the utmost contempt of 4 j
4 death, and are being mowed 4;
4 in masses with Italian artll- 41
' 4 lorj'. 4 .
4 4
44444444+44444444
UDINE, July 27.?General Antone !
Cantorc. one of the highest ranking
officers of the Italian army, was
killeu last night in a battle on the
Isonzo front. He is the first general
officers of the Italian army to be kill
ed iu the war.
it is reported here than Ger.. fan
tore was killed by artillery flro.
Italy's Plane Working Out.
ROME, July 27.?It Is stated by the
war office that Italy's plan of cam
paign against Austria Is gradually be
ing worked out successfully as origin
ally contemplated. Successes con
tinue both on the Isonzo front and in
in the Alpine region.
TURKS PLANNING
| " TOR LAST STAND
ATHENS, July 27. ? The Turkish i
troops are preparing for a last des
perate stand at Gallipoli. They are
throwing every available man on the
narrow part of the peninsula near the
Sea of Marmora, and erecting strong
fortifications in which are being
mounted heavy siege guns.
The Allies have landed many rein
' forcements to the troops that have
been operating on the peninsula dur
ing the last two weeks, and their ar
tillery is being equipped for siege
purposes. It Is believed here that
eventualities of the greatest import
ance may be looked for on the pen
insula within the near future. That
a tremendous effort will be made to
capture or reduco the last Turkish
fortification by the Allies, and thus'
open the Dardanelles for the passage
of the British and French fleets.
May Have Wide Effect.
ROME. July 27.?The early fall of
the Gallipoll defenses and the open
ing of the Dardanelles it is believed
here will have a tremendous effect
on the Balkan situation. The feel
ing prevails at all of the Southeast
ern European capitals that with the
fall of the Dardanelles the doom ofj
Constantinople would bo scaled. It |
would subject the Turkish capital to
bombardment by the fleets, and it is
almost certain that the demand on;
the part of the people of Constan
tinople that the place bo surrendered '
rather than to permit its destruction j
would he insistent. A threatened |
bombardment of the city with the
power to make the threat good could '
hardly fail to produce revolt in the j
city. It is known tlyit Bulgaria and !
Greece are much Interested in the!
fate of Constantinople.
ITALIANS CAPTURE GORIZIA.
LONDON. July 27. ? Information i
through Geneva says the Italians
have captured Gorlzia.
BRITISH SINK TWO
TURKISH GUNBOATS
AND A TRANSPORT
ATHENS, July 27?Yesterday's dis
patches state that two Turkish gun
boats and a transport ammunition
steamer were sunk by a British sub
marine which had penetrated the Dar
danelles and entered the Sea of Mar
mora.
CONGRESSMAN PREDICTS
WAR FOR UNITED STATES
KANSAS CITY. Mo.. July 27.-r-Con
gressman Frank Buchanan, Democrat
of Chicago, predicted that the United
States would bo drawn into the war.
He predicted that this government
would take steps that would involve
no other principle than that to serve
SUBMARINE
PURSUES
| BIG1INER
LONDON, July 27.?A German sub
marine attacked the White Star pas
senger liner Baltic, bound from New
York to Liverpool, which arrived at
Liverpool this afternoon. It was only
by travelling In an Irregular zig-zag
course at full steam that the Baltic
escaped. A submarine pursued her
from off Fastnet almost to Liver-!
pool.
A British patrol boat sighted a Ger
man submarine early Friday and im
mediately gave chase. It was sub
merged and lost to sight. At dusk,
the same day, the submarine re-ap
peared less than a mile away from
the Baltic, and attempted to launch a
torpedo. The Baltic, aware of the
presence of submarines, was already
under full steam, and she started her
zig-zag maneuvering which has saved
so many vessels and proceeded at
full speed for Liverpool. The sub
marine, or another, was seen again
Saturday and Sunday.
SUBMARINES
BURNING SHIPS
IN NORTH SEA
AMSTERDAM. July 27?The Nor
wegian bark Harboe was set on fire
yesterday by a German submarine.
The crew of the vessel was given
Ave minutes in which to tnke to the
boats.
Tho captain and crew of the Har
boe were picked up and brought to
this place. The captnln said that ho
saw three other vessels aflre in the
North sea, and was fearful that he
would be attached, as they were all
In the vicinity of his vessel.
SUBMARINE ACTIVITY
FOLLOWS QUIET WEEK
?+?
LONDON, July 27.?The activity of
the German submarines which sunk
four steamship Sunday and yester
day?two British, one French and
one American?followed a week of ab
solute quiet. Last week was a blank,
as not a single vessel was struck by
the Germans as far as known.
GERMANY PLANS TO
SINK EVERYTHING
SEATTLE. July 27.?Private infor
mation received in Seattle yesterday
says information through reliuble
channels of trade Indicate that Ger
many will shortly proclaim all Brit
ish merchantmen to be pirates, and
German naval men will be instructed
to treat them as such to be sunk on
sight regardless of their mission and
with or without -warning regardless
of the fate of their passengers or
crew. .
LITTLE MEN GIVEN
CHANCE TO FIGHT
MONTREAL, July 27.?The Cana
dian government has reduced the
minimum helghth required of men of
fering to enlist to live feet two inches.
GERMANS LOSE 35 SUBMAR
INES IN BRITISH WATERS
LONDON, July 27.?Figures given
out by the war ofllce place the loss
of German submarines in British wa
ters since last February at 35, and
possibly 39.
SUBMARINE DID NOT
USE U. S. SHIP AS SHIELD
LIVERPOOL, July 27.?The captain
of the American ship Normandy has
denied to the American consul at
Liverpool that German submarine
used his ship as a shield before at
tacking the Russian Bhip Loo.
GERMANS DYNAMITE
AN AMERICAN
DALLAS, Tex., July 27.?The home
of J. D. Padgitt, a manufacturer of
: saddles and harness who had a con
tract to make cavalry saddles for
the British and French governments,
was dynamited last night, after thnt
\ of W. T. Moore, foreman in his plant
had been blown up. Moore was fa
tally wounded and other of his house
| hold were injured. The dynamite
i failed to wreck the home of Padgitt,
as the bomb did not work as its mak
: ers Intended that it should.
J. H. Padgitt stated this morning
that he had cancelled his orders from
the Allies In the European war. ,
The circumstance that Padgitt had
been warned to cease manufacturing
supplies for the Allies on penalty of
great harm is accepted as proof that
German sympathizers are responsible
fo his act.
IGERMANY
PLANS BIG
MOVEMENT
<, + + + + + ,!,<,+ t + + + + t +
* *
4- GERMANS BEING 4
4- DRIVEN BACK ?
4- ?+
4- Ixmdon, July 27.?Dlcpatch- 4
4* es thia evening say that the 4*
+ Germans arc retreating south 4
4? and east of Pultusk. 4?
4- German attacks against Iv- 4*
4* angarod have been defeated. 4*
4* The Germans have battered 4
4* down some of the advanced 4?
4? defenses of Novo Georgievsk. 4?
* +
LONDON, July 27.?Unable to re
duce the immediate defense* of War
saw, the Germans have abandoned the
attempt to capture city of Riga and
Gen. Von Buelow's cavalry have been
turned southward and are now within
80 miles of the railroad line that con
nects Petrograd with Warsaw. In
this way the northern German line is
closing in on the main railway artery
to the Russian capital.
Similarly a southern army, far to
the south of the line of attack on the
Lublin-Chelm railroad which has fail
ed, is similarly approaching the
main southern artery of the Russian
railroad system operating between
Warsaw, and through that place ta
Petrograd, from Odessa.
The Times, describing this move
ment declares that human history can
show no parallel to the tremendous
extent of the enveloping movement
that is being prosecuted against War
saw. The distance between the op
erations on the north and those on
the south exceeds 700 miles. The
Times says the movement involves
results to Russia and her western al
lies comparable with a Russian re
sistance of a general Mongolian inva
sion.
I ne purpose 01 me movement is to
shut off the supplies and reinforce
ments that Russia is crowding Into
Warsaw from three directions?from
Petrograd, Odessa and Moscow.
These have been potent In preventing
the earlier fall of Warsaw.
Confirming this interpretation of
Germany's plan of campaign comes
the Information from Berlin that the
German war office has intimated to
the press and people that the fall of
Warsaw need not be expected for two
or three weeks at least.
RUSSIA MAY BURN
CITY OF WARSAW
LONDON, July 27. ? It Is again
stated in news dispatches from Petro
grad that Russia will order the burn
ing of Warsaw if It should be found
necessary to abandon the city. It Is
said that the government will not per
mit the city to become valuable to
.the Germans In their operations
against Russia.
GERMAN AVIATORS
TOOK VISTULA
BRIDGE AT WARSAW
LONDON, July 27.?German avia
tors yesterday hurled bombs on the
bridge crossing the Vistula bridge at
Warsaw.
Several civilians were killed, but
the damage to the brldgo was not
great. The aviators beat a hasty re
treat wnen It became apparent that
gunners were about to get their
range.
RUSSIANS LOSE 1,500,000
PRISONERS TO TEUTONS
BERLIN, July 27.?The total num
ber of Russian prisoners that have
been captured by Germany and Aus
tria since the beginning of the war
Is placed at 1,500;000 men.
RUSSIA PURCHASING
WINTER WAR SUPPLIES
BOSTON. July 26. ? The Boston
Globe says that a Russian commis
sion now in Boston is placing heavy
orders for supplies for next winter.
GERMANY MAY NOT
SHIP ACROSS ROUMANIA
???
LONDON, July 27.?A dispatch
from Bucharest says Germany has
formally requested Roumania to al
low the transportation of munitions
through that country and that Rou
mania Is opposed to such a conces
sion. Germany desires to ship war
supplies to Turkey.
The Empire circulation leads. Try
advertising In it.

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