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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, July 29, 1915, Image 6

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V ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE ?)
+ Douglas Branch +
? M. A. SNOW, Manager ?n
*****************
WANTED ? Two respectable male
roomers for a front room. Inquire
Mrs. D. Campbell, near Treadwell P.
O. 7-28-tf
DOUGLAS. July 2!' -The advance
sale of tickets f w the Bernhofer-Was
terlaln Concert indicates a good
house tomorrow night at the Lyric
Theatre. Little Miss Wasterlaln and
her mother will leave for the South
very shortly and this will be her last
appearance in the North for the next
few years.
Choir practice will be held at the!
Congregational Church tonight.
Henry Brie is a returning passeng
er on the Spokane. Mr. Brie has beenj
below for the past three weeks pur
chasing stock and fixtures for his:
new drug store on SL Ann Avenue.
The building will be in readiness by
tonight, and it is thought the store
will open by the middle of Septem
ber.
Russell Yorke and wife, who have
spent the past six weeks at Warm
Springs Bay. returned this morning
on the SL Nicholas.
The Douglas clean-up 1-t progress
ing merrily. William Morris was giv
en 60 days in jail for vagrancy yes
terday and sentence was suspended
on his promise to leave town by Sat
urday.
Fire Company No. 3 ("The Scotch
Brigade") was defeated in a baseball
game last night by No. 1 Fire Com
pany. The game was played on the
local grounds and the score was 12
to S. It is probable that a return
game will be played.
EXTRA SPECIAL PROGRAM
THURSDAY AND SATURDAY
DOUGI.AS. July 29.?Tonight and
Saturday night an extra show of 6
reels will be given at the Lyric thea
tre. "Dead Reckoning." the 4th ep
isode of the "Trey o' Hearts" series,
will be shown, and one of the Famous
Players film.* entitled "The Ring and
the man." in 4 parts, and featuring
Bruce McRae. will also be a great at
traction. On Friday night the Bern
hofer-Wasterlain concert will bo on.
The advance sale of seats promises a
crowded house. ***
TREADWELL. July 29. ? Two
games of the tennis were played in
the double tournament yesterday af
ternoon and evening. Montozon and
Sparling, beat Reynolds and Grier
two straight sets, the scores being
6-4 and 6-2. Allen and Higley won
from Chilson and Shotts also in two
sets. Their score was 6-1 and 6-0.
The last game of the first round was
scheduled for 3:30 this, afternoon.
The opposing teams arc Ellis and
Kinzie vs. Midford and Pilgrim.
D. J. Kinzie is in receipt of a card
from Pete Vcricich in Servia stating
that he is starting for the front. Geo.
Eror. who was reported as killed four
months ago. also signed the card.
There were the two first men to leave
Treadwell for the war.
The Spokane is due at Treadwell
tomorrow with 44 tons of freight.
C. G. McKinnon will leave on the
Spokane for the Sitka Springs, where
he will spend a few weeks before go
ing South.
TREADWELL TEAM WINS
FROM ALASKA-JUNEAU
TREADWELL. July 29?The Tread
well Fire Department ball team won
its second game in the Channel Lea
gue and now stands at the top of the
column with 1000 per cent. The score
last night was Treadwell 5. Alaska
Juneau 0. The game was very inter
testing and attracted a large crowd.
GEORGE T. WEBSTER
VISITS CAPITAL CITY
George T. Webster, prominent Se
attle business man. who represents
the Lambert Hoisting Engine Com
pany. designers and makers of steam
and electric and conveying machin
ery, arrived in Juneau today on the
Alameda, and is a guest at the Gas
tineau. He will be here on business
for five days.
Mr. Webster is one of the pillars
of the Arctic Club. Seattle, and has
a wide acquaintance in Alaska.
ANOTHER PAPER FOR SEWARD.
?
Nell Sexton, of Seattle. Is a pas
senger on the Alameda for Seward,
where he will Immediately establish
The Alaska Post, a dally newspaper.
He has a complete plant with him,
inclndtng presses and a linotype ma
chine. and Is accompanied by R. G.
Chambers.
Roy W. Schenck. a Chicago news
paperman. who will be managing edi
tor of The Post, will arrive on a lat
er boat.
POST SURGEON LEAVES FOR
THE SOUTH.
Capt. I.ambie. for two years post
surgeon at Fort William H. Seward,
with his wife and children were
southbound passengers on the Hum
boldt this morning. He has been
transferred for duty In the States.
FOR RENT?Unfurnished flat. In
quire Mrs. Forrest, 5th and East Sts.
Phone 52. 7-29-6t
Free, sound-prqof telephone booth
for the use of the public at the Hill i
Drug Co.. Phone 32. 7-23-3t !
FEDERAL PRISONER
IS THOUGHT INSANE
John Reilly, a prisoner In the fed
eral jail, is believed to be Insane.
Jailer "Jack" McDonald says he Is
as wild as a March hare, and Dr. E.
M. Bevls this afternoon mado an ex
amination of the man. and partially
conflrmed what Jailer McDonald said
of Reilly, although a watch will be
kept on him for two or three days,
to determine fully his condition.
Early last week Reilly was held to
answer to the charge of stealing 25
mink skins from !x>ulse Degonjhe of
Douglas and was bound over to the
grand jury. He had already been
bound over once on the charge of sell
ing liquor to Indians and was in the
Federal jail at the time the second
charge was brought against him.
BARRINGTON MAY
LOCATE IN SEWARD
Capt. Sid Barrington for many
years a Yukon navigator, and pres
ent manager of the Side Streams Na
vigation Company of Dawson. Y. T.,
was in Juneau today. He is a pas
senger on the Alameda to Knlk An
chorage, and will look into transpor
tation possibilities in the Cook Inlet
Susitna and Kuskoqulra country, with
the view of establishing a packet ser
vice on those streams.
80ST0NIANS HERE
NEXT MONDAY NIGHT
The Juvenile Bostanlans. fresh
from a successful trip to Fairbanks
and Dawson, will open an engage
ment in the Orpheum Theatre next
Monday night. Manager J. T. Spickett
said today. The bill will be "Gypsy's
Love." The Bostonians are playing
at Skagway tonight.
The Majestic Stock Company plays
"Brown's In Town." at the Orpheum
tonight.
PARTY VISITS MINE.
+
Leaving town this morning at 11:30
in the C. W. Young Co. auto-truck a
party of six went up to Perseverance
mine as Mr. Fisher's guests to go
through the mine and return by way
of Sheep Creek tunnel. The party
Included Mr. and Mrs. Harry Fisher,
Mr. and Mrs. P. V. E. Ivory, and Mr.
and Mrs. J. C. McBrlde. They came
through the tunnel on the 1 o'clock
train and spent the romainder of the
afternoon in the big mills at Thane,
returning on the ferry late in the af
ternoon.
Mr. Ivory and his wife are in Jun
eau on a brief visit. Mr. Ivory is a
well-known illustrator whose work
has appeared in the Saturday Even
ing Post and in Leslie's.
FORMER JUNEAUITE TO
- MAKE CEMENT BRICKS
FOR ANCHORAGE FOLKS
M. W. Deldrick. formerly of Ju
neau. has purchased several lots iri
Anchorage and will operate a plant
for the manufacture of cement bricks
and building blocks for use in build
ing chimneys and houses.
A corporation has been formed, of
which Mr. Dledrick is the manager,
to prosecute the work.
M. W. Dledrick is a former resident
of Juneau.
NOTED ARTIST HERE.
P. V. E. Ivory, a noted illustrator,
who has done considerable work for
the Saturday Evening Post, the Les
lie-Judge publications, and the stories
of Rex Beach, is a guest at the Gas
tlneau hotel, accompanied by Mrs.
Ivory. He is accompanied on his Al
aska trip by Mrs. Ivory. Their home
Is in Wilmington. Del.
Today Mr. Ivory purchased a parka
and muk-luks from the Case curio
store, for use as models.
DENMARK HAS LARGEST
ARMY IN HISTORY NOW
COPENHAGEN, July 29.?The Dan
ish army now consists of 540,000 ful
ly trained men and men in training.
This is the largest army in the his
tory of the nation.
PACIFICISTS ARE JUST
LIKE COPPERHEADS
SAN DIEGO, Cal.. July 29.? For
mer President Theodore Roosevelt
in an address at the Panama exposi
tion yesterday likened the pacificists
to the "copperheads" of Civil War
days. He asserted that he had four
sons who would go to the front for
the United States in case of war in
which this country was a party.
Col. Roosevelt said that he. believed
in enforcing peace in Mexico.
IDLE FOR SEVEN YEARS
NOW TO COMMENCE WORK
BOSTON. July 29.?The Chadwick
Lead mills in Salem. Mass.. idie for
more than seven years, will manufac
ture shrapnel for the British govern
ment.
RANSOM GOES OUT.
Major A. E. Ransom, of tho North
ern Life Insurance Company, is a
passenger on the steamship Alameda,
for Anchorage, and will spend sev
eral weeks in Southwestern Alaska
before returninlg to Juneau.
OPEN JEWELRY STORE.
J. H. Plant of Valdez is making ar
rangements to open a Jewelry store
In Juneau.
> ? ? t i i i i i ? ? ?' i i i ?? i i i i i i i i i i i i i ?? i i i i i i !? i i i i i i i i n i i i i ;
"HIRSUTONE"
THE IDEAL HAIR TONIC
WITH A GUARANTEE OF SATISFACTION ? IT WILL REMOVE ??
ii DANDRUFF. NINETY PER CENT OF THE MEN ARE TROU- "
?? BLED WITH THI8 DISEASE. TRY A 50c OR $1.00 BOTTLE AND ??
I! GET RELIEF. SOLD ONLY ~
:: AT SMITH'S DRUG STORE ii
+ Elmer E. Smith, Douglas, Alaska. ?
II I I I 1 1 1 1 ! I I I I I I II I I II 1 I 1 11 I I 1 I I 1 1 I I I I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 | I I I 1 i |
.
CLAXTON
ARRIVES
IN CITY
(Continued from Page 1.)
Chief Lopp, of the Educational Bur
eau, is making hiB first trip to the In
terior and Nome, since 1909. He will
go down river, examining the gov
ernment schools, and Interviewing
tho superintendents and physicians
in the educational service. He will
leave Mr. Beattle at Haines, and will
catch an early boat for Dawson, from
Whltehorse. Y. T.
Supt. \V. G. Beattie has been spend
ing the summer in Eugene, Oregon,
where his family is living at the pres
lent time. "Yes, I am still with tho
educational bureau," he said this
morning. Mr. Lopp said: "Mr. Beat
i tie's services have been very valu
able. and wo couldn't part with him."
School Board Conferred With.
Dr. Claxton, W. T. Lopp. chief of
the Alaska division of tho Bureau of
Education, and W. G. Beattie, super
intendent of government schools In,
Southeastern Alaska, arrived today
from Ketchikan, on tho Alameda.
They have been to Metlakahtla. on
a mission to induce the Rev. Father
William Duncan, aged missionary, to
peaceable relinquish his village to
the government.
News that Dr. Claxton and his par
ty would be in Juneau for two days
this week was received in a letter
from Mr. Beattie to W. W. Casey, a
member of the local school board. In
his letter Mr. -Beattie said: "He is
anxious to meet the school boards
of the various towns. He is a strong
speaker and would be willing to ad
dress a popular meeting along lines
of education. It is his duty as com
missioner of education of the United
States to advise and counsel with the
school authorities of the various
states and cities of the country oh
all matters of this nature. Dr. Clax
ton spoke Sunday night in Ketchi
kan. at Red Men's Hall, at the re
quest of business and professional
men. The mayor presided at the
meeting and the churches gave up
their evening services in order that
their congregations might be present.
CLAXTON SPEAKS
ON "ARMAMENT"
"No one who has read the history
of the past will deny that when an
individual or a nation is ready and
prepared for something, that some
thing will come. To a heightened
state of preparedness may be attri4
buted the present world war."
So says Dr. P. P. Claxton. United
States commissioner of education,
who is in Alaska on official business.
His recent speech in Seattle on the
subject: "Lessons America may
learn from the War in Europe." il
lustrated his views.
"I am not one of these men who
demand peace at any price," said Dr.
Claxton. "But I do believe that with
a system of education we can do
away with war. The nations of Eur
ope^ for instance* since August 1,
have expended eighteen billion dol
lars in this great conflict. Is there
not some manner that they may pay
eighteen billion dollars and prevent
such conflicts?
Valuation of Italy
"The valuation of the little king
dom of Italy?all its lands, its build
ings, its railroads, farms and real es
tate, the wealth of a country which
has grown for 3,000 years, is but twen
ty billions of dollars. If Italy had
sunk completely beneath the sea. the
loss to the world would not have been
much more than one year's warfare.
And when I say that the war 1ms cost
eighteen billion dollars, I do not
mean the loss of property, the loss of
cities burned, the loss of life which
might produce vast sums, nor the
loss occasioned by having 20,000,000
men under arms and away from pro
ductive work?these are not includ
ed. Eighteen billion dollars is but
the cost of running the war. Statis
ticians and those who know, tell us
that if the war continues another
year the cost will increase from 25
to 50 per cent.
"trior to tne war abroad there I
was less talk among the Europeans
of war than there was in this coun
try, with Its trouble in Mexico. Yet
Germany had between 700.000 and 800
000 men under arms?prepared; and
France had between 600.000 and '700,
000; Italy, the same and England the
largest navy in all the world. The
mental attitude of every country's
leaders was centered on war and its
attending preparation.
Present War Came Rapidly
"The present war came moye rapid
ly than any in the history of the en
tire world. What has happened in
Europe teaches us that it is impossi
ble to prepare for tho invasion of
other countries, without those coun
tries invading. Rome was one of the
first examples of this fact Another
lesson which is taught lies in- the
fact that war is not prevented by
making it either more costly or more
dangerous with the modern machines
of death. England has not yet used
conscription, and yet moro than 4,
000,000 men are enlisted under her
colors, though all of them are not
at the front. Making war costly has
no Influence with even the most pru
dent of business men when their pas- 1
sions are aroused.
"With the money the United States .
spent last year in its preparation for (
war. wonders could have been ac- (
complished. In schooling, we could
have established a great national uni
versity, with an endowment of $10,000
000. Or we could have established a
university in every state of the Un
ion, with an endowment of $1,000,000
five schools in technology, with an
endowment of $100,000; five normal
schools, with an endownment of $100
000 each; thirty county agriculture
schools in every state, with an en
dowment of $15,000 yearly; 100 new
high schools, and could have provid
ed for 3.000,000 children at the kin
dergaten stage.
Could Buy All Text Books.
"Besides these things we could ?
have paid for^all text books used In
the country and still have left $200
000 for the public library fund In ev
ery state. Thus. $250,000,000 would
do more to prevent war by education
than It does by armament.
"Will It not be possible some day
for us to spend this money in the
prevention of war?in the payment of
peace, and still keep those we edu
cate to carry on the cares of the
world out of the range of death?"
VERNE HILE FUNERAL
AT 2 P. M. TOMORROW
The funeral of Verne Hile, Infant
son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hile of
Douglas will be held from the Thom
as Undertaking Parlors in Douglas
tomorrow afternoon at two o'clock.
WOMEN ARE FINED.
Fines of $25 each were imposed by
Police Judge Pettit this afternoon,
against Hazel Brown, Irene Taylor,
Anna Banks and Ethel Wilson, who
yesterday were found guilty of con
cubinage. Sentence against Lou Bell,
who also was found guilty, was sus
pended*
Each of the women paid their lines,
and the balance of their bail money
was given to them. They had deposit
ed $50 each, afteistheir arrest in the
raid on the St. Francis last week.
Judge J. J. Kennedy, of Haines, and
recently appointed postmaster there,
and J. W. Combs, the Hafhcs sawmill
man, are business visitors here to
day.
ENGINE AND RAILS
ARE ABOARD ALAMEDA
With twenty round-trip passengers,
and loaded to her guards with freight
for the Alaska Railway Engineering
Commission, consigned to Anchorage,
the steamship Alameda, of the Alas
ka Steamship Company, arrived from
Seattle at 11:30 this morning, under
command of Captain Fred Warner.
The Alameda has several thousand
feet of lumbor for the railroad com
mission, a locomotive and a large
shipment of steel rails.
Passengers for Juneau Included J.
Fain and wife, M. Anderson, W. A.
Kuboff, H. E. Hanson. T. Bowers and
George T. Webster. J. S. Copley was
a passenger from Ketchikan. Tho
Alameda lias freight for the Alaska
Gastlneau Mining Company, at Thane,
and will not get away for the West
ward before this evening.
BOY TO TESTIFY TO SHOOTING.
Lester Campen, 12 years old, who
was a witness to the quarrel of hiB
parents at Kake last Friday, which
culminated in tho shooting of his
father, Walter Campen, by his moth
er, arrived from Kake yesterday, and
will testify at the hearing of his
mother, which has been continued un
til next week, pending the outcome
of Campcn's wounds.
* * * .j. * * * + * * * * * + * + ?
? +
? PERSONAL MENTION *
+ *
****************
John S. Copley, former Nome may-;
or, now the Alaska agent for an East
ern distillery, arrived here today on
the Alameda. He stopped over in
j Ketchikan froml the stoamer Mari
1 posa Tuesday. He Is at the Gastin
1 eau.
Mr. and Mrs. S. P. Raymond, Mr.
and Mrs. S. H. Graves, Miss Bunnio
Graves and Lang Cobb returned this
morning from a ten-day outing to
Freshwater Bay.
E. J. Margrle, of the Juneau Ferry i
& Navigation Company and the Al-'
aska Electric Light & Power Com !
pany, left this morning for Seattle.
He will meet J. P. Corbus, treasurer
! of the Ferry' Company, at Seattle.
Mrs. George Max Esterly, wife of a
prominent Nizina mining man, is a
passenger on the Alameda to Cor
dova.
S. L. Burton and family expect to
leave for California soon after the
first of the month. They will locate
In the East.
Mrs. Clarence J. Gerald, wife of a
Seattle cafe man, is a round-trip pas
senger on the steamship Alameda.
Miss Maude Vaughn passed through
on the Alameda to Seward.
Walter Campen, who was shot by
his wife in a family row at Kake last
week is steadily improving. The bul
lets were removed Monday.
Mrs. C. Dahl, who was operated up
on two weeks ago by Dr. DeVlgne left
for her homo at Thane this afternoon.
BIG COPPER SMELTER
IS TO BE REOPENED
SEATTLE. July 29.? A Redding
California dispatch says that the First
National Copper Company will re
sume operations at its smelter after
$300,000 has been spent for a device
for the prevention of fumes.
NOTICE.
Notice 1b hereby given tha? the
town council has flxod the rato of tax
levy for the year 1915, designating
twenty mills on each dollar of assess
ed property; that the taxes aro now
due, and will * become delinquent on
the last Friday in September next
hereafter, at the hour of six o'clock
p. m., and unless paid prior thereto
ten-per cent will bo added to the
amount thereof, together with inter
est thereon at the rate of eight per
cent per annum from date of delin
quency until paid, that the taxes are
payable to the City Clerk at his of
fice in the City Hall between the
hours of 10 a. m. and 12 m and 2 p.
m. to 5 p. m. o'clock each day except
holidays.
Dated at Junoau, Alaska, this 24th
day of July, 1915.
(SEAL; E. W. PETTIT,
7-29?1 wk. Municipal Clerk.
*
MARY BERNHOFER
? AND ?
LITTLE VIOLA WASTERLAIN
in COSTUME CONCERT at the '
LYRIC THEATRE, DOUGLAS, JULY 30TH, 1915
Carolyn Bernhofar, Accompanist
Dance will follow the concert. Music under the direction of Prof.
Wasterlain. Concert will start at 8:30 p. m., sharp. Reserved seats
$1.00, admission 75c. Tickets now on sale at the Palace of Sweets.
AVOIAN GETS JUDGMENT.
Judgment for the plaintiff, in the
sum of $162.72 was rendered in the
Commissioner's court yesterday, in
the suit entitled John Avoian vs. Mike
Oskanoff. H. B. LeFevre appeared
for the plaintiff.
BUILD NEW HOME.
The handsome new home which B.
L. Thane has had built on Eighth
Avenue, across from Mr. Thane's
home, will soon lie ready for occu
pancy. The house is one of the most
attractive in the city.
MRS. L. DEGROFF
SELLS "RED WING"
??
The gas screw "Red Wing" has
been sold for $1000 by Mrs. Lena De
Groff to the Alaska Experiment Sta
tion, of the U. S. Department of Agri
culture at Sitka. Although the bill
of sale was filed just yesterday at the
Customs house here it is dated March
27th.
WANTED?Maid for general house
work. Call In morning at 406 6th
street. 7-29-3t
Dough Dry?55c per doz.
Flat Work?50c per doz.
THANE STEAM LAUNDRY
Phone 175 7-28-tf
"Kendrick" commercial sign-writer
and bulletin board advertiser. 7-23-tf
Meet mo at the Hill Drug Co. 7-28-3
| SCIENTIFIC
LENSES
It Is now known that many
eye troubles are caused by
certain irritating rays in electric
light
These are ultra-violet rays and
the infra-reds.
And only recently has a lense
been perfected that satisfactorily
filters them from the eye.
It can be worn constantly as
the tint Is invisible except with
close scrutiny.
If your glasses are not com
fortable?talk to us about this
lense. It is really a preventa
tive of cataract
Robert Simpson
OPTOMETRI8T A OPTICIAN
A. P. Ex.
Opera fe?,
SECOND AND SEWARD
NEW NAME FIRM.
"Alaska Lighterage & Commercial
Company" is the now name of the
John J. Sesnon Company, of San
Francisco, according to a decree of
the California Superior Court which
wa? Issued yesterday. Notice of the
change of name has Just been receiv
ed at the local Customs Office. The
company operates at Nome.
THOUSAND PAID IN.
About a thousand dollars in city
real and personal taxes has been paid
into Treasurer E. W. Pettlt's office.
The total assessment Is >65,000. Tax
es will become delinquent on Sep
1 tembcr 24.
XXXXXX + XXXXXXXXXX
1 ? ? TTTTTTTTTTTTTT
?J* +
+ CLASSIFIED ADV. +
* +
LOST?Electric auto headlight be
tween Standard Oil Dock and Alas
kan Hotel. Finder take to Burford's
and receive reward. 7-?8-3t.
WANTED ? Couple without chil
dren desire small furnished house by
Aug. 1st. Must be close In and rent
reasonable. Add. P. O. Box 615. ?
(7-27-tf.) ?
WANTED?Man as partner In es
tablished business, small amount of
capital required. Good money maker.
Apply by letter "R., Empire." 7-28-3t
WANTED?Rosldence lot. Stato
size, location, and lowest cash price.
XYZ, Empire offlco. 2-23-6t.
GIRL wants work by day or hour.
Phono 22. 7-23-6t.
WOMAN wants hour work, phono
138. 7-19-tf.
FOR SALE?Rooming house; best
location in town, clearing $175 a mo.
Inquire Empire offlco. 7-28-lm.
HOUSE FOR RENT?F. J. Wettrlck
FOR RENT?Front room, furnish
ed, use of bath and phone. Mrs. R.
Leak. 114 Main st. 7-26-tf.
FOR RENT ? Two or three room
apartmonts with bath; furnished or
unfurnished, phono 33 or 167. 7-24-tf
FOR RENT?Five rooms and bath,
concrete houBO, phone 369. 2-16-tf.
FOR RENT, 2 and 3 room furnished
housekeeping suites; reasonable, "The
cosy corner of Juneau." Cliff Apart
ments, near court house. 2-1-lm.
HOUSE for rent Mrs. M. Davis.?
Nicely furnished rooms; hot and
cold water in each room, with or
without board. Mrs. Shannon, 235
Gold St. 7-13-lm.
St Nicholas leaves for Tonakee and
way ports. Tuesdays at 8. a. m. 12-28'-tf
FOR SALE?M. D. Berry's entire
transfer out fit at bargain. 3-16-tf.
COME to the 0almlst. I toll you
about work, business, marriage and
the future. Get your fortune told.
306 Front St. 7-7-lm.
Independent Electric Co., wiring and
repairing promptly done. Phone 34. ?
Forrest bldg., E. Carlson, Prop.
?(7-10-lm.)
? f
V, L. G Thomas Merl P. Thomas * ?
? Alaska Furniture 8 Undertaking !?
Co., Inc. 11
v Funeral Directors & Fmbatmers '!
From Head to Foot we Clothe the Man
iHhhH-HHHiiMHiinnni nuiiiiit in jinniiniimiiiinHMHiiimniiiiinnm
Don't Pay Excess
mm a-H-H-w mimi H#ii iiniiiniiiimmiiii
You stout men usually feel that you have to
pay extra money for a fit in clothes. You
don't have to?
1 Hart, Schaffner S Marx
mi
Make clothes that will fit you, and we've got them here. Don't he
skeptical about it; come and see. For 525 we'll fit you in a suit
your tailor can't duplicate under 540?and we'll prove it.
I GOLDSTEIN'S EMPORIUM I
THE HOME OF HART. SCHAFFNER & MARX CLOTHES AND THE EMERY SHIRT

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