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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, August 05, 1915, Image 1

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VOL. V., NO. 636. JUNEAU, ALASKA, THURSDAY, AUG. 5, 1915. PRICE TEN CENTS.
- ?T T ? - ?
PANAMA
MATERIAL
FORROAD
COMOX. B. C.. Aug. 5.?The steam
ship Sinaloa.'bound for the United (
Statsc railroad project at Anchorage. ,
Alaska, with a capacity cargo of ]
equipment which was used in the con- ,
struclion of the Panama Canal, ar (
rived here yesterday at noon and af- ,
ter coaling, will proceed north.
.The Sinaloa took on her cargo at
Colon. The equipment consists of
steam shovels, rails, cars and other
railroad stoclt. and will be used by
Chairman \V. C. Edes, of the Alaska
engineering commission. In the con
struction of the government railroad
to Fairbanks and the coal fields.
The Sinaloa is a vessel of 4.539
gross tons burden. She is 416 feet
long. She is under charter for the
trip, to the United States government.
TRADE COMMISSION
TO AID 8USINESS
IN UNITED STATES
WASHINGTON*. Auk. 3.?Plans for
constructive service to American
business, as well as machinery for en
forcing the federal trade commission
act and the anti-trust laws, have been
provided in thep Ian or organization
formally accepted by the federal
trade commission. This plan is very
largely a creation of Will H. Parry of
Seattle.
The federal trade commission ' is
composed of Joseph E. Davles. Wis
consin. chairman; Edward N. Hurley.
Illinois, vice chairman; William G.
Harris. Georgia; Will H. Parry. Seat
tle and George Roblee. New Hasp- ]
I shire. The following statement has |
been given out.
The task of organizing the com
mission staff was complicated by the
fact that under the federal trade com
mission act the bureau of corpora
tions. with its staff and functions, was
to be ubsorbed by the commission.
The fact that important economic
and legal investigations were under
way by the bureau of corporations at
the time of its absorption, which will
not be completed for several months,
likewise made more difficult the work
of planning the new organization with
a view to its larger functions.
Finds Trained Staff
On the other hand the commission
found in the staff of the bureau fl
body of trained and efficient men.
who by reason of education and ex
perience. are familiar with many of i
the economic and legal problems that
have been and will be presented to
the commission.
The organization has been divided
into three departments, each with its
chief and each with clearly defined
functions and responsibilities. These
departments are, first, the adminis
trative. of which the secretary of the
commission is the chief: the econo
mic. of which the chief economist is
the head, and the legal, of which the
chief counsel Is in charge.. In addi
tion to these three departments there
are three boards of review, the econ
omic board, the law board, and the
Joint board of review. The first two
boards, obviously, are concerned with
the economic and law departments,
respectively, but the Joint board of
review is a co-ordinating body, com
posed of representatives of the econo
mic and law boards, and has to do
with making matters Involving mixed
questions of law and fact.
ENTERTAINS BOSTONIANS
Mis* Grace E. Webster breakfasted
several of the members of the Juven
ile Bostonians at her home yesterday.
Covers were laid for Doris Canfield.
Mabel Gardner. Dixie White. Ina
Mitchel and the hostess.
AID TO MEET.
The Presbyterian Aid Society will
meet tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'J
clock, at the home of Mrs. J. A. Hel
lenthal. 425 Harris street, it was an
nounced today.
NEW MINING CO. FILES.
Articles of incorporation were filed
this afternoon at the office of tho Sec
retary of Alaska by the Doloml Mining
Company of Arizona. The company is
represented In 'Alaska by Chas. H.
Cosgrove. who has offices in Ketchi
kan The directors of the corpora
tion. which is capitalized at $100,000,
are I.ouis Rarth. J. Clark Sproat. A.
B. Thompson, and M. H. Sorrick.
SAUNTON RELEASED.
John Saunton who was taken tc
the Federal jail yesterday on suspicl
on of insanity was released thif
morning and will return to the Hawi
Inlot Cannery where he has beer
employed several years. The caus<
of his apparent "insanity" has beer
djagnosed as a bad case of John Bar
leycorn.
When ho was arrested. Sauntoi
gave his name as "Baritello."
? ??> + + ?+ + + + *+ A + + *4
+ WEATHER TODAY 4
?f Maximum?70. 4
+ Minimum?42 4
+ CLEAR ! ! 4
r
ISLANDER
NOT YET
LOCATED
Dragging for the wreck of the
steamsnlp Islander, off the southerly
point of Douglas Island, has thus far
Failed to reveal the spot where the
ressel lies on the floor of Lynn Ca
nal. according to W. J. Rogers, ex- J
pert diver who has financed Ihe ex-!
pedltion. Mr. Rogers was (n Juneau
today.
Mr. Rogers declares that the drag
was made for a distanc./of 200 yards
In every direction tram the spot
where the Islander *as thought to
have sunk. The spat where the Isl
ander went dowi, after striking an
iceberg on August 15, 1901, is said
to have been imown to Henry Finch,
a veteran diver, who showed Mr. Rog
ers its locattm on the charts. By no
means disheartened, Mr. Rogers an
nounces h* determination to contin
ue the starch for the vessel, having
anticipated when the expedition was
formed, that the location of the
wreck vould be no easy task.
GREAr ACTIVITY IN
VOSGES REGION
?4?
WINNIPEG, Aug. 5.?General Man
thwatre of the war the greatest ac
tivity is now displayed on the Allies'
rijlit wing, especially in the Vosges,
wiere the French are using heavy
f#rcCs against the German positions.
.Vorth of Arras the Germans are ceas
S'orth of Arras the Germans are
:e?solessly bombarding the positions.
they lost to the French, using heavy
shells and aerial torpedoes, says* a
special communique on recent opera-j
tions issued by the war office.
German Claim Denied
Refuting the German claim of the
number of prisoners of the French
forces captured the war office an
nouncd:
"Thi'number of prisoners claimed
by tht Germans upproyimately num
bers oer reserve losses, including kill
ed. woinded and missing."
ROOSEVELT FOR GOV.
JOHNSON FOR 1916
MASOt CITY. Aug. 5.?W. A. Lip
Roosevelt who has returned from
the west announces that Governor
Hiram Josison. of California, is his
candidate tr the Presidency in 1916.
ANOTHER fEDERAL
RAID IS PLANNED
ATLANTIC v'.TY. X. J.. Aug. 5.?
President Gtlmbe, of the Federal,
Baseball League said yesterday that
his circuit was iady to make a new'
"raid" on the AiWican and National
leagues, for play^t.
"We are negotiang with fifteen of
the stars in those Ngues, and I think
they will sign with'3i" said Gllmore.
He declared that ndmoney would be
spared to get the bet men available.
WHIPPLE SAIhj WEST.
KETCHIKAN. Aug. The torpedo
boat destroyer Whlppl\ieft yester
day for Dutch Harbor, ,o j0in the
first division of the PaVic torpedo
boat flotilla, whlc left ft the Far
Westward, from Sitka, lai week.
Lieut. F. D. Pryor Is in pmmand,
with Ensign E. F. Robins* and a
crew of twenty men.
EXHIBIT AWARDS MA!*r.
Awards have, been made ft the
Alaskan exhibit at the Panaris pa.
ciflc Exposition and in a lett4 re
ceived last night\Governor Sttotr is
requested to ndufy the recl|iits.
The granting of iwards is male by
number, and wltli the exception y>f
the Alaska Roam Commission ,0
names appear on tl^ list A mom <\.
tailed report Is exacted in the n?A
future. \
Collaborators in tie preparation of
the exhibit submitted by Governor
J. F. A. Strong who lave been grant
ed silver medals are Col. W. P. Rich
ardson. C. C. Georgea?i. Gates & Mo
rauge, R. V. Sewell. !t- 'iiard M. Ds
j vis. Miss M. E. WaAer, Fairbanks
Chamber of Comn* e. Cordova
I Chamber of CommerA Jessie L.
.Mindeleff. George W". lenley, L. F.
j Schweckebier and Lots Bates.
J mrs. collins'honored.
Mrs. W. T. Tolch etinained jt -
terday at her home, 1!#ne, in h6r-:
or of Mrs. Frank W jpllins, wfeo
' j leaves Friday for San fancisco, tyr
; future home. Her depfftr.- will be
generally regretted, as &? was t a
: great favorite at Thanil Mr. Col
lins, who was chief diaUman for
the Alaska Gastineau croany, will
1 be with the engineering flrra of
", Gruff. Bradley and LeBargJn
Those present were Mettne* Col
1 j tins. Ward. Tolch. Hurlbd/iSemple.
. i Enoch. Jackson, Pullen a>' I.ong,
j. Tenney. Watts. Dupuy, ilendee,
I.; Frakes. Benson. Stevens, P;wk Holt,
Thorp, and the Misses Gall
braith and Parr.
? j "All the News All the Ti?a
HAYTIEN
REBELS
CHECKED
WASHINGTON, Aug. 5.?The crui
ser Eagle shelled the Haytien rebels
under command of General Bobo.
when they endeavored to enter Cape
Haytien today, Admiral Caperton re
ported in a dispatch to the State De
partment this afternoon. Tho rebels
were driven into the woods outside
the city the dispatch added.
AMERICANS PLANT
GUNS IN STREET
OF HAITIAN CITY
PORT AU PRINCE, Aug. 5?Sooth
ing tho unrest that has prevailed In
this city for a week, American guns
were removed fronq tho ships of the
navy and placed in the streets of tho
city yesterday.
They are proving a factor in re
straining the populace from a renewal
of the outbreak which resulted in the
death of the President, the Governor
of the City, the Chief of Police and
other citizens.
Deadlock Over President.
The Haitian Congress is in a dead
lock over the election of a President.
Several ballots have been taken but
no successor to hte dead magistrate
has been selected.
FLAHERTY AGAIN
HEADS KNIGHTS
SEATTLE, Aug. 5.?James A. Fla
herty of New Haven, Conn., was re
elected Supreme Knight when the
Knights of Columbus adjourned Its
thirty-second session here today.
Supreme Secretary William J. McGin
ley and Supreme Treasurer D. J.
Callahan of Washington, D. C? also
were re-elected.
John Bonzano, personal representa
tive of the Pope, who was delegate to
the session, left for Washington and
New York last night.
The ball given in the Hippodrome
was a big success several thousand
attending.
Pope Blesses Convention.
A telegram was received by the
convention yesterday from His Holi
ness, Pope Benedictus. It confererdj
the apostolic benediction on the
Knights assembled.
BODY OF WOMAN
VICTIM IDENTIFIED
SEATTLE, Aug. 5?The body of
the woman found In Schroitz Park
has been positively identified as that
of Mrs. Chtarini Manzl, aged about
25 years. She was an Italian, and
the belief exists that she was mur
dered. Detectives are working on
the case.
COMMITS SUICIDE.
?+?
SEATTLE, Aug. 5.?Arthur G. Tay
lor committed suicide here last night.
He left a note saying that ill health
had caused him to end his life.
BIG CHINESE-AMERICAN
BANK TO BE BUILT
NEW YORK, Aug. 5.?The Chinese
commercial mission which visited
America has completed arrangements
for the flotation of a China-Ameri
can bank with a capital of $5,000,000
WAR DESTROYS FRUIT
CROPS OF PALESTINE
PHILADELPHIA. Pa.. Aug. 5.?A
letter received here yesterday from
Joffa says the fruitg rowers of Pales
tine have lost $30,000,000 as a result
of the war. Not only have moving
troops destroyed much of the fruit,
but the operations on the Black Sea
of Marmora have destroyed their us
ual markets.
DEPOT BANDIT CAUGHT
\PAR1S. Aug. 5. ? In teh Western
paid, alias Cochran, has been cap
tun>d at Grand Rapids. Mich. He Is
waited on a charge of robbing tho
Chicigo and Northwestern depot and
Amettcan Express Company of Grid
ley of $2,000.
NORTHWESTERN ARRIVES.
The steamship Northwestern, of the
Alaska Steamship Co., arrived In
port at 4:45 this morning, on her way
to Anchorage. She had a heavy car
go of freight for Juneau and Thane,
and was in the harbor until this af
ternoon.
Passengers for Juneau Included F.
F. Criteson, J. F. Meeker. C. F. Ku
bin and V. J. Kubln of Trcadwell, A.
G. Johnson, Edwin F. Davey, Miss
Fannie Walte. Sophie Nlkula and A.
Hempel.
When the Northwestern sailed
^West she took the following passen
gers from Juneau: E. Z. Bowen and
Mrs. M. Helrich for Seward:
Frank Tascher. Oak Olson. H. L.
Faulkner, Hilda Overland, J. M. Hart,
Dr. L. S. Keller, S.JH. Mill wee. L. T.
Merry and Mrs. H. D. Kinase for
Skagway and John S. Copley for
Knik.
GERMANY
WILL PAY
EORFRYE
WASHINGTON. Aug. 5- Germany's
reply to the American note asking in
demnification (or the Binklng of tho
American merchantman William P.
FTye by the converted cruiser Prinz
Eltcl Fredericlf was published in the
morning papers today.
The note refused to conceded that
tho sinking of the Fryo was in viola
tion of American rights, which this
country had Insisted upon. Germany
reiterated her Justification for tho
act, but promised to pay for the ves
sel, providing tho price be fixed by
experts from this country and Ger
many.
ARBITRATION IN
BRITISH CASE
WASHINGTON, Aug. 5.?There Is
some evidence of a trend toward the
ultimate submission of the commer
cial differences between the United
States and Great Britain to a board
of international arbitration.
President Wilson's reply to the lat
est note of the English government,
which refused to concede that Eng
land's Interference with American
shipping was not justifiable, is prac
tically ready to bo dispatched to
Ambassador Walter H. Page.
LATIN STATES
TO JOIN U. S.
IN MEXICO
WASHINGTON. Aug. 5.?Secreta
ry of State Robert Lansing and six
Latin-American diplomats went into
conference today with the end in viow
of restoring peace in Mexico.
WASHlNGT^fc. Aug. 6.? Latin
American countries will join the Unit
ed States in the movement to restore
order in Mexico. This was the an
nouncement that was made here yes
terday evening, and one that is wel
comed by the State Department.
With the United States accepting
the assistance of tho South American
States, there will be none in Mexico
to question the good faith of the
American declaration that this coun
try does not seek toadd to her Terri
torial area through Mexican interven
tion of any kind or to secure any
special privileges, according to those
here who are familiar with the situa
tion.
For this reason and others it is be
lieved that the number of people in
Mexico who will welcome increased
activity on the part of the United
States in tho effort to put down the
various revolutionary movements and
to restore order will be greatly in
creased by the action of the other
Western Hemisphere nations.
ANGELES WOULD
DEPOSE MAYTORENA
WOUGLAS, Ariz., Aug. 6.?Gener
al Felipe Angeles left last night for
Nogales to depose General Jose May
torena, a Villa supporter, as governor
of Sonora. and expects to become gov
ernor of that State, himself.
EMPEROR REFUSES
TO ACCEPT OKUMA'S
RESIGNATION
TOKYO. Aug. 5.?The Emperor has
refused to accept the resignation of
Count Okuma, the premier who rec
ently tendered his resignation with
that of the other Cabinet members.
Yesterday he personally requested
Count Okuma to remain at the head
of the government.
LIMA CONCERN GETS
MILLION DOLLAR WAR ORDER
IJM, O., Aug. 5.?A million dollar
order for heavy motor trucks to be
used in Europe, has been received
by the Gramm-Bernstein Motor Com
pany here. It is understood that tho
trucks are to be shipped to the Rus
sian government.
? ? ? ?
?> ?
+ FIRES COST $700. . +
? ??? +
+ One hundred acres of timber ?
* is on fire south of Fort Sc- +
+ ward, according to a cable re- +
+ celved from Myron Hlbbard ?:<
?F by the land office this mornlg.
? "We have two parties working *
-> there now and another should +
+ be sent out at once." says the +
4- message, "and unless we can
* keep the flres in control they +
+ will spread rapidly." *
? Over $300 has already been ?
* spent on these fltes and a fur'- 4
+ ther appropriation of $400 will *
? be made today. *
4* ?
4. A 4. 4. .J. 4. 4. <i> 4. 4. 4.
ALLIES j
GAIN AT
GALLIPOLI
LONDON, Aug. 5.?The crest of the
ridge of Gallipoli Peninsula was gain
od by the British troops yesterday.
Their positions in the Dartanielles
contest have been greatly improved
within the last few days.
The land forces have been aided in
their advance by the fleets of Great
Britain and France.
90,000 TURKS ARE WOUNDED
CONSTANTINOPLE, Aug. 5.?A
total of 90,000 wounded soldiers have
been brought from Gallipoli to Con
stantinople. The mosques of the city
have been converted into hospitals
and all of the available public build
ings are filled with wounded. The
constant stream of dead and wounded
that are brought into the city has
caused a feeling of great depression
here.
BRITISH SUBMARINES ACTIVE
British submarine In the Sea of
Marmora yesterday sunk two steam
ships, a gunboat and a lighter that
were lying alongside of the arsenals
of Constantinople.
GERMANY TRIES TO
COERCE ROUMANIA
BUCHAREST, Aug. 5.?Germany Is
endeavoring to coerce Roumania nnd
force the passage of munitions of war
through that country Into Turkey. A
notice making the demand that the
privilege be granted Germany is ex
pected to come at any time.
SINKING OF GERMAN
TRANSPORT CONFIRMED
London, Aug. 5. ? An official dis
patch from Berlin today confirms the
announcement made In Petrograd
yesterday that a large German trans
port was torpedoed and sunk by a
Russian torpedo boat, in the Baltic
Sea.
No Events in West.
PARIS. Aug. C. ? There Is no
change In the situation in the West
ern theatre of war, the war report to
day announced.
AUSTRIANS
ABANDON ?
OFFENSIVE
ROME, Aug. 5.?The Austrian of
fensive on the Kalian frontier are
subsiding. The Italian gains, notwith
standing the offensive tactics of the
enemy, in the Carso plateau region
have forced tho Teutons to resume
the defensive. The failure of the
Austrlans to make gains have contri
buted to a cessation of their attacks.
CANADIANS CELEBRATE
ANNIVERSARY OF WAR
VERNON, B. C.. Aug. 5.?The an
niversary of the declaration of war
was celebrated here yesterday. More
than 4,000 soldiers participated in the
celebration.
YANKEE LABOR
BEING SOUGHT
BY ENGLAND
CHICAGO. Aug. 5?American work
man are being offered $30 a week, for
a period not less than a year and
transportation both ways, to go to
England and work in the munition
shops and yards.
Agents of the British government
have opened several employment
agencies.
INSURRECTION
IN PORTUGAL
LISBON, Aug. 5.?Three separate
revolutions are in progress in the
Portuguese array and rioting contin
ues. The army is said by govern
ment officials to be completely disor
ganized.
Dissatisfaction over Portugal's
failure to send troops to aid the Al
lies, is said to be the cause of the in
surrections.
AMERICAN EXPORTS
BREAKING RECORDS
WASHINGTON, Aug. 5. ? During
the one year of war the exports of
the United States have exceeded
! those of the previous year by $650,
000,000. It is estimated that the in
crease for the year 1915-16 will ex-;
eeed those of 1914-15 or be even great
er figures. Vrey few of the large war j
| orders that have been received have;
I been filled yet, and the big shipments
! will begin the latter part of the pres
i ont month if the ships can be secured
j to carry the tonnage.
GROOM IS 79; BRIDE IS 73
SEATTLE, Aug. 5.?James M. Kel
ton, 79 years old, and Helen L. Hys
ome, 73, secured a license here today
and were married.
****+******+****
* +
? WARSAW +
+ ???? *
4* Warsaw Is first mentioned +
+ In 1224 and after about three +
+ centuries of successful exist- 4?
+ once as a manufacturing and *
4- commercial center, It became +
4- the residence of the Dukes of +
4* Mazovia in 1526. In 1550 the 4?
4- city waB made the Royal rest- +
?I- dence and was formally dcslg- 4*
4- natcd the capital of Poland in ?
+ 1609. +
4? Just a few years after this *
4? honor was conferred upon the - +
? Vistula city. It was captured +
4- by the Swedes in the course 4?
+ of the Northern war and Its +
4- long history of trouble had +
4- begun. In 1764 the city was +
4> occupied by the Russians who *
+ successfully withstood a Prus- 4*
+ slnn siege In 1794 only to turn +
4> and surrender to Suvaroff. 4
4- The next year Warsaw was 4?
4? ceded to Prussia and became a 4
4? popular bone of contention in 4?
4? long oppressed Poland. In 4
? 1806 the French after captur- 4*
4? Ing the city, made it the capi- 4
4* tal fo their Grand Duchy of 4*
4- Warsaw only to lose it again 4*
+ to the Russians in 1813. *
4? 1813. Since the last Russian 4>
4? occupation the city has been 4*
4- the scene of continuous in- 4?
4? surrectiong, and perhaps more 4
4- than any other city in Europe 4
4? has been a hotbed of wrangles 4
4* and minor revolutions. 4
4? Germany's newest prize is 4
4- situated on the left bank of 4
4* the Vistula river and Is con- 4
4- nected with its suburb, I'm- 4
4* ga, by three bridges. Man- 4
4* ufacturing has been the chief 4
4* Industry of the city and this 4>
4- interest, together with a well 4
-J- established commerce, have 4
4- won- for the?census -takers a 4
4- population of 506,643 persons. 4*
4? 4-1
<|i' 4? 4?4?4?4?4?4?4>?f>|
SANGUINARY FIGHTING
CONTINUES AT WARSAW
LONDON, Aug. 5.?Telegrams from
Petrograd say that sanguinary fighting
is proceeding both northeast and
southeast of Warsaw. The Russian
forces tliat remain at tho PoliBh cap
ital continue to hold the Germans in
check at that place, though the Ger
mans are pouring a fire from more
than 200 siege buns into the Russian
defences.
It is believed here that the German
entrance into the city cannot be de
layed much longer. The Russian
evacuation is in full swing, and it 1b
stated that if the Germans can be
kept at bay for another day, the Rus
sian loss when the city falls will be
insignificant when the magnitude of
the operations are taken into account.
No Mercy For Those Responsible For
Lack of Ammunition
Petrograd dispatches say that War
saw will fall not because the Russian
army was dlefeated but because of
the failure of the ammunition supply
along the line that has battled so
vnliantly during the last two weeks
between the Baltic provinces and Ga
llcia. The feeling at the Russian cap
ital is bitter against the officials who
are responsible for the failure, and
the government has promised that no
mercy tfill be shown them when the
responsibility shall liavo been placed.
Evacuation of Officials Soon
The Russian officials at Warsuw
are preparing for an early evacuation.
Arrangements have already been com
pleted whereby United States Consul
Hernando De Soto will care for tho
Russian interests there afetr the ev
acuation. Some of the Russian of
ficial establishments havo already
been abandoned.
GOVERNMENT WILL
PROVIDE MERCHANT
MARINE FOR U. S.
CORNISH, N. H., Aug. 5.? Secre
tary of the Treasury William Q. Mc
Adoo, before leaving here yesterday
with Mrs. McAdoo for their summor
home at Northaven, Maine, said that
the administration will push meas
ures to provide the United States with
au adequate merchant marine. "The
Democratic party." he said, "is pledg
ed the proposition to give the country
a merchant marine that will meet its
needs, and what the fulfillment of the
pledge is receiving earnest consider
ation." He predicted that there would
be action on the subject by the next
Congress.
SWEDEN BUYS 100,000
TONS OF AMERICAN COAL
?-t*?
PITSBURGH, Pa? Aug. 5.?Swed
ish State Railways have purchased
100,000 tons of West Virginia coal.
Including the purchases In February,
the amount of American coal recent
ly sold to the Swedish State Rail
ways is 120,000 tons.
BAVARIANS PENETRATE
DEFENSES OP POLISH
CITY DURING NIGHT
I ?*?
BERLIN, Aug. 5. ? Warsaw,
capital of Russian-Poland, fell
into the hands of the Germans
this morning.
Tenacious resistance was
made by the Russian troops as
Prince Leopold's Bavarian
troops, followed by strong de
tachments of Austrians and
Saxons, hacked their way
through both the outer and in
ner ring of forts during the
night. Covered by an artillery
fire that was concentrated at
four ^joints on the gates of the
city, the Teutonic allies crowned
their triumph by entering the
city at 8 o'clock this morning.
As the conquerors entered the
Polish capital the Russian garri
son retired over the three bridg
es spanning the Vistula river,
to the Eastern suburb of Paga,
after offering brief resistance.
From Praga the Russians are
retreating along the railway,
leading to Novo-Mnish and over
the plain of the Northern rail
way, keeping touch with its
right wing, which rests on the
Novo Georgiesk line.
Entrance to the city was
made over the Kolish Radom
road. The last line of defenses
was charged by the Bavarians
at 6 o'clock this morning and
the Russians left hundreds of
their dead, in their wake.
RUSSIAN ARMY
IS IN DANGER
LONDON, Aug. 5.?The fall
of Warsaw was confirmed in re
ports which reached London
from the four points of the com
pass today.
The evacuation of the Rus
sian city had been considered so
certain in London that today
the vast turning movement of
the German troops north of
Warsaw excited the concern of
the entente of allies.
London military critics fear
that the evacuation of Warsaw
by the Russians was too late to
save the armies of the Grand
Duke Nicholas from grave dis
aster, which would be inevitable
if Field Marshal von Hinden
burg should get astride of the
Warsaw-Petrograd railway.
In the north the Russians are
defending the line along the Ek
au river, east of Mitau, which
was captured by the Germans
Monday.
Strong German forces are on
the march forty miles south of
Riga.
GERMANS ARE
SHY ON COTTON
ROTTERDAM, Aug. 5.^- Germans
have begun to use flax as a substi
tute for cotton in Bomc of their mu
nitions factories.
All of the stocks of cotton, includ
ing underclothing, shirts and other
wearing apparel, have been inventor
ied, and the merchants, manufactur
ers, Jobbers, and others who hold
them have been notified not to sell
them, but to hold them 'subject to
the order of the military authorities.
"SACRIFICED TO POLITICS"
IS ON BECKER'S CASKET
4
NEW YORK, Aug. 5. ? With the
first casket plate removed, the re
mains of Former Police Lieut. Chas.
Becker were buried in Woodlawn
Cemetery Monday. The funeral was
held in St. Nicholas church. On one
of the floral pieces was the lettering:
| "Sacrificed to Politics."
The plate objected to had read:
"Murdered by Governor Whitman."
CANADA'S WHEAT CROP
BREAKS ALL RECORDS
WINNIPEG. Aug. 3.?General Man
ager MacLeod, of the Canadian Nor
thern says: "The wheat crop is un
paralleled in Candndian history. I
predict 250,000,000. bushels for west
ern Canada."

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