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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, August 14, 1915, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. VI, NO. 644. JUNEAU, ALASKA, SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 1915. PRICE TEN CENTS.
BALTIC ENGAGEMENT LOST BY THE GERMAN FLEET
GREAT TEUTON DRIVE IN NORTH IS HALTED
^ : X : : :' i
ORE CARS
DERAILED;
OIOURT
C. C. Nichols, a brakeman on the
Alaska-Juneau ore train, is In St.
Ann's hospital in a very serious con
dition as the result of an accident
which occurred on the train last
night at 9:30. Nichols and Engineer
Louis Erickson were riding on a ten
ton motor truck hauling a train of 15
loaded ore cars from the mine to the
bins at the mill. At the curye just
west of the Mt. Roberts tunnel the
train Jumped the track and bolted
down the mountain side for a distance
of about fifteen feet
Nichols, who was riding on the right
side of the motor tried to save him
self by? jumping down the hillside, but
was caught by the falling machine,
which finally lodged against a large
stump. Erickson jumped on the up
per side of the track and was prac
tically unhurt. The injured man was
Immediately taken down the tram on
a stretcher and put into Dr. Sloane's
car and rushed to the hospital.
Nichols sustained a badly broken
leg. and his skull has been fractured,
and his jaw-bone broken. He was put
on the operating table this morning,
and although he is in a very serious
conditions. Dr. Sloane entertains no
doubt as to his ultimate recovery.
A second examination this atfemoon
proved that Nichol's injuries consist
of a compound fracture of the left
leg and a serious scalp wound with a
possible fracture of the skull. The
jaw bone, which this morning was
thought to be broken, is only severely
bruised. The injured man is suffering
intense pain, and so far it has been
impossible to set the broken bones.
This will probably be done late this
afternoon or early in th emornlng.
Nichols is still conscious, and the
physicians believe this is a good
sign. The young man is well known
here, at one time having pitched for
the Juneau baseball team. He has a
niece living here. Miss Edna Nichols,
employed by the Juneau Telephone
company.
MANUFACTURERS PREPARE
TO PROFIT FROM PLANS
TO PREPARE FOR WAR
WASHINGTON. Aug. 14.?The for
mation of companies for the purpose
of building submarines is one of the
results of the propaganda for prepar
ing the United States for war. A
company with 800,000 shares of capi
tal stock has been organized in New
York. The shares have no par value,
but it is said they will be sold at $10
a share, making the capital $8,000,
000. Other companies are being or
ganized in Boston, Baltimore and in
Philadelphia.
TRADE BALANCE
ECXEEDS ESTIMATE
WASHINGTON. Aug. 14.?The trade
balance in favor of the United States
for the last fiscal year, passing the
estimate of the Department of Com
ment of Commerce, which placed it
at a billion dollars, amounted to ex
actly $1,094,422,792. according to sta
tistics made public by the Department.
The increase in American exports,
which are becoming greater and more
varied each month, extends to a wide
range of commodities, and at the end
of the year was including pramtlcally
every important line except copper,
lumber, agricultural and electrical
machinery. Cotton, iron and steel,
coal and other commodities showed
a decline for the year, but an Increase
for the last part of it
VICTORIA BUSINESS MEN
WANT PROHIBITION
VICTORIA. B. C., Aug. 14.?A depu
tation of 35 business men demanding
prohibition until the end of the war
and referendum afterwards, waited
on the Executive today. The Premier
pointed out the difficulties and prom
ised an explicit answer before the
prohibition convention on August 25.
FOREST FIRE KILLS
MAN AT VANCOUVER
VANCOUVER, B. C.. Aug. 14.?Wal
ter C. Richards, employed by the
Western Canada Power Company, died
of suffocation in a forest fire at Ard
ley. just outside Vancouver. He was
fighting the fire. Serious forest fires
too numerous to count are in progress
throughout the FTaser Valley.
FILES SUIT.
John R. Atkinson has died suit
against A. G. Schonacker. G. A. Schon
acker and Fred Parsons to show an
accounting of an alleged partnership.
FAIRBANKSANS
ARE HELD EOR
CREEKSLAYING
FAIRBANKS. Aug. 14.?Julius Mil
ler and William O'Connor today were
held to tho federal grand jury, with
out ball, on a charge of murdering
Mrs. W. S. Rowe, of Olncss, nearly
three weeks ago.
The blood-stained garments of the
duo are being held as one of the bits
of evidence against them. Both Miller
and O'Connor deny they committed
tho murder, but neither of them were
able to prove, the story they Jold, that
they wero in Fairbanks on tho night
Mrs. Rowe was killed.
PATRIOTIC DESIGNS
FOR WASHINGTON
FLOWER GARDENS
?4?
WASHINGTON, Aug. 5.? Govern
ment officials are joining the Citi
zens' Committee in endeavoring to
make the G. A. R. Encampment, to be
held here the latter part of Septem
ber, a great success. Along this line
special floral designs are being laid
out on the lawns of the Capitol build
ing, and other government buildings.
These designs include insignia of the
G. A. R.. tho Women's Relief Corps
and allied organizations to be here
during t?e convention.
Under the direction or supenmena
ent of the Capitol building, Elliott E.
Woods, two flower beds have been
laid out on the sloping grounds of the
west front, designed to add to the
attractiveness of the grounds during
the encampment. On the north, or
Senate wing, the Grand Army badge,
seventy-five feet long, and twenty feet
wide, has been the subject of the
gardener's work, while on the south
end, or the House wing, the badge
of the Woman's Relief Corps, of simi
lar dimensions, have been reproduced.
It is estimated that about thirty thou
sand plants were required to make
these designs.
The eagle at the top of the G. A. R.
badge is coleus, of golden color, while
althernanthera, dark red was used in
making the crossed cannon. For the
main part of the design, the National
colors, the alternating red and white
stripes are of Iresene and centeurea,
and the blue field is a mass of agera
tum. The five pointed star pendant,
is outlined with yellow coleus, while
the bronze effect of the metal was
produced by the use of acalpha, a
bronze leaf folige plant. The other
design made have been similarly
treated with various kinds of plants
to bring out the color scheme.
Surrounding the Sherman statue,
utsj south of the Treasury building,
on Pennsylvania Avenue, and accesl
ble to the visitors, four army corps
badges have been reproduced with
the use of various foliage plants. The
designs for these, about twenty feet
: in diameter, were laid out under the
direction of Charles Henlock, super
intendent of gardens. On the north
side of the statue Is the badge of the
Fifteenth Corps, on the west side the
badge of the Fourteenth Corps, the
badge of the Twentieth Corps being on
the south side and the Seventeenth
Corps being represented on the east
side. About seventy-five thousand
plants were used in making these em
blems.
Superintendent George W. Hess, of
the Botanical Gardens, has had over
hauled and equipped with modern ap
paratus the magnificent Barthold
fountain that stands in the center of
the gardens. This fountain was ex
hibited at the Centennial Exposition
of the French government and at the
close of the exposition was presented
to this government and removed to
its present location. The fountain
when completed will be an added at
traction to the gardens. The "fountain
will be illuminated at nlcht.
. t ,
DR. AXED ROASTS
"BILLY" SUNDAY
SAX FRAXCISCO. Aug. 14.?"Billy"
Sunday begins his "campaign for
Christ" here without the assistance
of Rev. Charles F. Aked. of the First
Congregational church, San Francis
co's most famous minister. The lat
ter. who resigned recently from the
clerymen's Committee of One Hun
dred. organized to preach the gospel
to San Francisco's fair visitors when
it was decided that "Billy" Sunday
should be invited to conduct a revival
in a specially erected tabernacle,
said:
"1 must be free to say that there
is no such God as he pretends, no
such Christ, no such Heaven, and no
such hell?and that I cannot compro
mise my posttion as a minister of
Jesus Christ."
JOHNSON IS GROOMED
FOR MOOSE LEADER
WASHINGTON, Aug. 14. ? Gflson
Gardner noted author and correspond
ent, says that it is certain the Pro
gressives will have a candidate for
President in the field in 1916, and that
the likely candidate is Hiram \V. John
son, Governor of California.
LIABILITY
FOR RAID
DISOWNED
WASHINGTON, Aug. 14.?In com
munications just made public here,
General Carranza has disowned re
sponsibilities for tho trouble on the
Mexican border, ana at Brownsville,
Texas. The communication asserted
his soldiers took no part in tho upris
ing.
The American and Pan-American
conferees' appeal to the Mexican lead
ers for peace was forwarded to Gen
eral Carranza, at Vera Cruz, this af
ternoon. and will be given the widest
publicity in that country.
Orders were telegraphed today to
General Hugh L. Scott to remain at
the border, until certain that the up
rising among the Mexicans in Texas
had fully quieted. -
Dispatches to the States Depart
ment from Vera Cruz today state that
at General Carranza's command the
mayor of Vera Cruz has been removed
for permitting demonstrations against
foreigners.
ANOTHER BAND
CROSSES BORDER
LAREDO. Texas. Aug. 14.?It is re
ported that a band of eighty Mexi
cans. under the leadership of General
Oabreora, have crossed over to tho
American side of the border, in the
vicinity of Rio Grande pity.
I ' * ' *
SHIP PURCHASE
BILL MAY PASS
WASHINGTON, Aug. 14.?Much in
terest is taken here in the announce
ment of Senator John Sharp Williams
of Mississippi that the flight for the
ship purchase gill will be renewed
as soon as Congress meets in Decem
ber. Senator Williams is in favor of
the bill, and that he will do all he
can to cause its enactment into law;
indeed, he thinks the measure "more
necessary now than when introduced"
in the last Congress.
The two Senators from Mississippi
divided on the question last year, and
if Senator John K. Vardaman has un
dergone a change of heart he has not
taken the country into his confidence.
Seven Democratic Senators opposed
the ship purchase bill last winter, and
were responsible for its defeat. Six
of the seven will sit in the next Con
gress. Senator Camden, of Kentucky
has retired and former Gov.) J. C. W.
Beckman will succeed him. Three
other Democrats will replace Repub
licans who opposed the President's
measure. They are, Senator J. D: Phe
lan, of California; Senator Ed. S. John
son. of South Dakota and Paul 0. Hust
ings of Wisconsin.
This means that the administra
tion has bained four and the opposi
tion uost four Senators, and should
give the administration a majority of
a dozen in the present Senate for the
shipping bill.
MINING MEN ARRIVE.
With eighty excursionists, and her
usual large list of passengers for Ju
neau, the steamship Jefferson reached
port from Seattle late yesterday af
ternoon. Among the passengers for
Juneau were H. R. Plate, Robert
Young, R. J. King and T. B. Bur
bridge, a group of mining men, C. S.
Haun, William Haun, Mrs. Haun, Ben
Marrow, Miss Mann, B. J. Keller, Miss
S. Geigcr Miss E. Gelger, Miss E. O'
Keefe, R. G. Fryer, J. E. Moulton, H.
A. Lawrence, A. Meek and George
runs.
MINING MEN ARE HERE;
TO EXAMINE DISTRICT
v H. R. Plate, well known mining en
gineer. who represents the Thompson
Towle interests in the West, is a guest
at the Gastineau Hotel. Today he
and T. B. Burbridge, a mining man of
Denver, who accompanied him to Ju
neau, made a trip to the Persever
ance mine and Thane mill. They will
spend several days here and Mr. Plate
expects to examine a number of pros
pects.
Sanford Makeover, leading spirit in
the backing of the Alaska Gold Belt
property, visited the property today,
in company with A. B. Dodd, general
manager.
R. J. King, a mining engineer from
Tonopah, Nevada, and Robert V.
Young, a consulting engineer from
Tacoma who also arrived here yester
day expects to spend some time in
the district. Young was with the old
Perseverance company before it was
bought by Hayden & Stone.
?*?
SENATOR GAUSTAD
IS NOW AN EDITOR
FAIRBANKS. Aug. 14.?Sonator O.
P. Gaustad on Monday assumed the
editorship of the Fairbanks News-Min
er, the owner, W. F. Thompson, hav
ing sold an interest to him. Thomp
son left for Cordova on the Sheldon
auto Thursday, and is gofng to the
States, to remain until February.
"BIG FIVE" OF
PACIFIC MAIL
ARE PURCHASED
SAN FRANCISCO. Auk. 14.?It was
announced last night that the Pacific
Mail Steamship company had sold Its
five largest vessels to tho Atlantic
Transport company of New York.
Tho vessels are the China, Korea,
Mongolia, Manchuria and Siberia, and
will bo taken through the canal at an
early date.
Action of the interstate commerce
commission in compelling the South
ern Pacific railroad company to with
draw its vessels from contract with
the Pacific Mail Company, a subsidiary
concern, and dissatisfaction of the
company with tho LaFollette seamen's
law, were said to bo responsible for
sale of tho fleet.
BRYAN HOLDS
KEY TO PLANS
FOR "PREPAREDNESS"
CHICAGO. Aug. 14.?"The attitude,
of William J. Bryan toward the pro
gram for bettor preparedness for war
will bo an Important factor in deter
mining whether thoro shall be an ex
tra session of Congress to consider
the country's defenses according to
Democratic politicians hero," says a
special Washington dispatch to the
Herald. The dispatch continues:
"If Mr. Bryan decided to rally his
peace following for an open and ag
gressive fight against a considerable
increase of the army and navy Presi
dent Wilson will not call an extra
session of Congress. But if Mr. Bry
an decided to content himself with
voicing his disapproval of the admin
istration program ^as to preparations
for war and to make no furtbor action
tho President may call an extra ses
sion. There is no intention anywhere
It is admitted, to wholly disregard the
wishes of Mr. Bryan."
No Special Section Nccecsary.
PORTLAND. Aug. 5.?'That he would
favor making the Puget Sound Navy
Yard .it Bremerton equal in import
ance and capacity to that of Brooklyn,
N. Y., was the announcement made
yesterday by Senator Ben R. Tillman,
chairman of the committee on naval
affairs, who is spending a few days
here before returning to tho East.
Senator Tillman and Senator George
E. Chamberlain, chairman of the com
mittee on military affairs, each voiced
the opinion that an extra session of
Congress to provide for the national
defense was unnecessary and inad
visable at this time.
The question arose when Senator
Chamberlain called upon Senator Till
man, who has just returned from a
trip to Alaska. They agreed that steps
to strengthen immeasurably the army
and navy should be taken at the reg
ular session, but thought need for ac
tion prior to that time does not exist
"As chairman of the naval affairs
committee," said Senator Tillman, "I
shall support *a program for making
our navy as good as the best. I did
not favor more battleships at the last
session because recent developments
seem to indicate that battleships are
liable to become obsolete. I favor
plenty of submarines and fast cruisers
and whatever else we need to put our
havy on the most efficient footing."
HARRY ANDERSON
LOSES LEFT ARM
Harry Y. Anderson, of the Alaska
Juncau company, sustained an exceed
ingly painful injury last night through
which ho was obliged to have the left
forearm amputated. Anderson was
working in the Alaska Juneau mill
and at about midnight caught is arm
in one of the heavy conveyor belts.
The forearm was completely torn off.
Anderson walked to tho bunkhouse
at the base of the hill below the mill
and reported the accident himself.
Dr. P. J. Mahone was called and tho
man was taken to St. Ann's hospital.
It was necessary to amputate tho
injured arm at the elbow. Anderson
is reporteaas resting as easily at can
be expocted under the circumstances.
RADIO STATION IS
READY FOR BU8INESS
"Jack" Irwin, superintendent or the
Alaska stations of the Marconi Wire
less Telegraph company, will visit Ju
neau soon, to inspect tho local plant.
He will be accompanied by A. H. Gim
nan, manager of tho Pacific Coast di
vision.- ?
C. E. Bence has become manager of
the local station, and has announced
that a continuous service will soon bo
inaugurated here. N. J. Monohan, of
Spokane, has arrived hero to be night
operator.
+ t + + + + +
* *
+ CABLE STILL "DOWN." +
4 ?>
4> The American cable is still *
* interrupted between Seattle +
4? and Sitka. The Canadian land *
* wire is ' working, although *
* messages are coming through *
* on that circuit subject to con- *
4> siderable delay. ?
* *
+ * ? + + **** * + * ? * *
RUSSIANS
AT BAY IN
RIGAZONC
WASHINGTON, Aug. 14. ? The
American ambassador at Petrograd
has cabled that the American consul
has taken over British interests at Ri
ga. No explanation was given.
LONDON. Aug. 14. ? Prince Leo
pold's Bavarian army Is reported to bo
marching due east from Warsaw
without resistance, accordThg to a late
dispatch from Petrograd. The objec
tive 1b believed to be Brest Lltovsk,
where the Russians have thrown up
several miles of earthworks.
It was announced today by tho Pe
trograd war office that 'several Ger
man army groups had fallen into the
hands of the Ruslsans, tho latter hav
ing cut their way through the German
forces operating around Suwalki.
It is reported that Field Marshal
von Vindenburg, tho Nemesis of tho
Russians, Is now in command of the
forces attacking Kovno, the key to the
Petrograd - Riga railroad. It is be
lieved in London that the Germans ex
pect to mass their attack at this
point, with the Russian capital as
their objective.
uatc last nignt auvices wore re
ceived that the Russians are stub
bornly resisting the German drive In
the north. Reinforcements have
reached the Grand Duke's forces and
the Baltic flank movement of the Au
stro-German armies has been sum
marily checked. ^
BRITISH GOVERNMENT
PAYS FOR AMERICAN CREDIT
LONDON, Aug . 14.? The London
Times says the purchase of American
bonds In England before the August
bnnk holiday advanced the prices to
IcvoIb several points above the Ameri
can market. If this represented the
purchases of bonds by the British gov
ernment to bo used as security for
temporary loans in America, the
Times says, il is a clumsy method and
exceedingly expensive. The govern
men should negotiate with the insur
ance companies, trust companies and
other holders for large blocks of the
bonds.
EXPORTATION OF BRITISH
COAL CEASES AUG. 30TH
LONDON. Aug. 14.?After August
30 British coal cannot be shipped any
where except to the British possess
ions and protectorates. Export here
tofore has been restricted to the Brit
ish possession and to countries which
are allies of Great Britain.
JAMES HOGAN
ASKS DIVORCE
Divorce proceedings have been bo
gun by James Hogan against his wife,
Bertha Hogan, on the grounds of
cruolty and desertion. Mr. and Mrs.
Hogan were married in Juneau in
November, 1913, and are the joint own
ers of several pieces of property in
this city, among their holdings being
the Totem Building on Ferry Way,
lots on Calhoun avenue, as well as
marble works in this city. The local
marble works is a branch of a larger
establishment in Marshfleld, Oregon,
of which Mr. Hogan is tho owner.
rile complain), mattes tau t equeau;
that tho plaintiff be recognized as a:
half ownor in all of these properties.
Mrs. Hogan has stated that she is
the sole owner of the Juneau property
and the contest over this question will
probably from a part of the proceed
ings.
Only a short time ago Mr. Hogan
returned from Marshfleld where ho
had been on a busines trip. Mrs. Ho
gan, who had recently returned here,
has gone back to Montana, where she
formerly lived.
The plaintiff will be represented by
J. G. Held and V. A. Paine.
Kearn* Asks Separation.
J. W. Keams of Douglas has begun
dlvorco proceedings against Esther
Kcarns. who became his wife on April
15, 1906, in Arkansas. Tho decree Is
requested on the ground of desertion,
Koarns alleging that his wife has re
fused to live with him since the first
month after their marriage. It is be
lieved that Mrs. Koarns is at present
In Minneapolis, although she has not
boon definitely located. O. A. Tucker
will represent the plaintiff.
E. E. BURBACH TO
MANAGE "ALASKAN"
Mark P. Goodman has announced
the appointment of E. E. Burbach,
formerly of the Plankington Hotel,
Chicago .as manager of the Alaskan j
Hotel, which Mr. Goodman yesterday j
leased. Mr- Burbacli has been key
clerk at the Alaskan under its former j
manger, P. L. Gemmett, for several I
months.
H. G. Holt will bo night clerk. No
changes havo been made in the Bar.
\
AERIAL RAID
KILLS SIX AND
DESTROYS HOMES
LONDON Aug. 14. ? Six persons
were killed, 23 wounded and a num
ber of homos were dameged by another
aerial raid on the Blrtlsh coast last
night, by German Zeppelins.
As a result of th raid the Admiralty
has Issued bulletins advertising citi
zens to seek the protection of cellars
when hostile aircraft aro sighted.
SAYS GERMANY WAS
BEHIND HUERTA ACTIVITY
PROVIDENCE, R. I., Aug. 14.?The
Providence Journal says the arrest of
General Huorta at Eel Paso foiled a
plot instigated by Germany to embroil
this country in a war with Mexico,
and to stop the exportation of muni
tions of war to the Allies. It is said
large sums of money have been paid
to Hucrta directly through the Ger
man channels and was used to pur
chase rifles which were subsequently
sent by water from New York to Yu
catan.
WILSON SAID TO
HAVE PICKED RULER
FOR MEXICAN PEOPLE
WASHINGTON, Aug. 14.?It Is said
here tfiat President Woodrow Wilson
has chosen Vasqucz Taqlo, Minister
of Finance, who did not resign bis po
sition on tho assumption of power by
Huerta, as ruler of Mexico.
WANTS TO STOP
BUYING AMERICAN CARS
LONDON, Aug. 14.?Arthur Fell,
M. P., suggested the prohibition of im
portation of American automobiles,
which are now flooding the British
market.
DACIA SEIZURE LEGAL
?
PARIS, Aug. 14.?The French prize
court has handed down a decision
upholding the seizure of the American
ship Dacla to be legal.
1,000,000 MEN WORK
ON BRITISH NAVY
?+?
LONDON, Aug. 14.?The labor of 1,
000,000 men will be required to insure
the predominance of the British fleet
at sea, according to the Chancellor of
the Exchequer, Reginald McKcnna.
The British government, he says, is
spending upon the navy nearly half a
million pounds ((2,500,000) daily in ex
cess of what was spent in times of
peace.
AMERICAN CARGOES
DETAINED BY SWEDEN
COPENHAGEN, Aug. 14.-^Scveral
ships laden with wheat from America
have been detained at Malmoa, Swed
en, owing to the discovery that whoat
which was consigned to a Malmoa mer
chant, was destined to German. Three
large steamers, to which it was in
tended to transfer the wheat, are al
so held.
American Ship Is Prie
LONDON, Aug. 14.?The American
ship Pass of Balmaha, is a German
submarine prize at Cuxhavon. *
BELGIUM IS PAYING
INTEREST ON BONDS
A
LONDON, Aug. 14.? Tho August
coupon of the Belgian 1014 loan Is be
ing paid In London through Baring.
Bros.
BELATED RETURNS CONFIRM
BIG LIBERAL VICTORY
WINNIPEG, Manitoba. Aug. 14.?
Belated returns make somo changes,
but confirm the completeness of tho
Liberal victory in the Provincial elec
tion. The new Parliament will con
tain 49 Liberals, 8 Conservatives and
2 Independents.
TWELVE MORE SHIPS
MAY BECOME AMERICAN
WASHINGTON, Aug. 14.?The De
partment of commerce announced it
had not yet received full proof that
the American Transatlantic Steam
ship Company is able to meet the re
quirements for American registry for
12 foreign ships it proposed to pur
chase. TJie Department is ready to
grant registry when the proof is sub
mitted that the company la. organlz
ing*subdiaries and has the money to
buy ships. - . .
FRENCH TO TAKE
AMERICAN AUTOMOBILES
NEW YORK. Aug. 14.?A Paris dis
patch says that the French govern
ment has concluded a contract
through J. P. Morgan & Co., to take
tho entire motor truck output of the
Packard, White and ? Plorcc-Arrow
companies of the United States for an
indefinite period. In addition it was
announced that France is seeking to
purchase through the same source, 1,
000 3M- ton trucks from other firms.
GERMAN
CRUISER
ISSUNK
LONDON, Aug. 14?A Petrograd dis
patch to the Times today says that
ono German cruiser was Bunk and
several others were damaged in an
engagement yesterday between the
German vessels and the Russian Bal
tic fleet off the Island of Ossel, near
tho entrance to the Calf of Riga.
The German fleet retired after tho
engagement, the dispatch addod,
steaming south to their base.
THE TURKS FACE
SHELL FAMINE
ATHENS, Aug. 14.?Private reports
from Constantinople are that Turkey's
supply of ammunition is distressingly
low at tho present time and with
tralnloads of wounded arriving almost
dally in tho Ottoman capital, the situ
ation is growing acute.
DENIED RUSSIA
OFFERED PEACE
LONDON, Aug. 14.?Tho Hamburg
Wachrichten characterizes the report
that tho Kaiser offered separate peace
to Russia, guaranteeing the latter free
use of the Dardanelles to be without
foundation. The paper observes that
"Germany does not own the Dardan
elles."
PARIS, Aug. 14.?A French cruiser
has been sunk in the Dardanelles, by
a German submarine.
GERMANS PLAN TO
ATTACK SUEZ CANAL
PARIS, Aug. 14.?It is reported that
German shipbuilding plants are mak
ing arms'and constructing boats with
which to launch an attack on the Suez
Canal.
ROUMANIA AGAIN
CONSIDERS WAR
PARIS, Aug . 14.? Roumania has
called all men to the colors. The Rou
manian minister in Paris has been
recalled for consultation. The Cabi
net has approved a credit of $20,000,
000 for military purposes.
Roumania Ready
PITTSBURGH, Pa.. Aug. 14.? E.
Boscea, Roumania's agent tor tho pur
chase of war munitions in the United'
States, said:
"Roumania is ready to go to war
at a moment's notice. We have 850,
000 men ready to throw into the field"
GERMANS RELEASE
AMERICAN SHIP
WASHINGTON, Aug. 14.?Tho Am
erican registered steamship Wico,
seized by a German cruiser and taken
to Swinemunde as a prize, is under
going repairs at that port, it was learn
ed today, when news was received
from Berlin that the crew and cargo
had been released.
WAR MUNITION MAKERS
MAY GO ON STRIKE
NEW YORK, Aug. 14.? A country
wide strike of all union machinists In
plants manufacturing munitions of
war is imminent, according to the of
ficers of the International Associa
tion of Machinists.
ITALIANS CREDIT IS
TO BE ESTABLISHED
NEW YORK, Aug. A?It is rumor
ed In banking circles that arrange
ments are being made for the estab
lishment of an Italian crelit with New
York bankers. It is not known wheth
er the credit will be established in
New York or London.
ALLIES PREPARED FOR
AN INDEFINITE WAR
?+?
NEW YORK, Aug. 14.?The Allies
are preparing to continue the war for
at least threo years more, if necessa
ry, according to William Ellis Cory,
former president of the United States
Steel corporation, who arrived on the
French liner Espangne from Bordeaux.
Mr. Cory said it was problematical as
to whether the allies would like to see
the United States enter the war, but
he thought they would rather have the
financial than the military aid of this
country.
+ ' +
+ MONEY FOR ALLIES, +
4- ?4? 4
? New York, Aug. 14.?Interna- ??
4- tlonal bankers are arranging *
4- for a half billion credit for the 4
-!? Allies. ?
4? +
? 4 + 4444't,44'>4*4<'4
? + ??? + + + + ? + + ?> + + + +
+ WEATHER TODAY +
+ Maximum?60. 4>
* Minimum?39. +
? Rain?1.20 in. +
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