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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, August 14, 1915, Image 2

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1915-08-14/ed-1/seq-2/

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Cents
..AT THE PUMP?
i RED CROWN
GASOLINE
OF QUALITY
^ ALASKA SUPPLY COMPANY
SINOLOA BEINGS
2,400 TONS OF
EQUIPMENT
The cargo of the Slnola bound for
Anchorage consists of 2,400 tons of
boilers, knocked-down locomotives,
huge cranes and derricks and other
equipment of a similar character, that
was used in the construction of the
Panama canal. Some of the pieces
weigh more than five tons.
Last spring the canal authorities
assembled on side tracks at Balboa
a great quantity of equipment for ship
ment to Alaska the moment the gov
ernment engineers in the North were
ready to begin the heavy construction
works. That the construction of the
new railroad is about to begin in real
earnest is indicated by the northward
voyage of the SInoloa.
According to reports received from
San Francisco, the Sinaloa is receiv
ing $*.'0 a ton for taking the equipment
cargo to Anchorage, or a total of $48,
000 for the entire cargo. The high
rate is explained by the shortage of
ocean tonnage as a result of the Eu
ropean war.
The Sinoloa will return direct to
Seattle after discharging her cargo
at Anchorage and enter the new Pu
get Sound South American West
Coast service inaugurated by C. Hen
ry Smith last December.
She will be the second vessel to be
placed in the new service. The first
was the Baja California, now en route
to Peru and Chile.
"SPOKANE" SAILS.
The steamship Spokane. Captain
Thomas Johnson, sailed last night for
Sitka, and will steam to Seattle from
that point. Her passengers for Seat
tle included the Misses Ida Parr, Mary
Martin and Mayme Arnold, Fred El
Parsons and W. H. Kivlan.
"Kendrick" commercial sign-writer
and bulletin board advertiser. 7-23-tf
BRITT WINS
CHEST OF SILVER
AT REXALL MEET
William E. Britt, who returned yes
terday from a visit to the San Fran
cisco Exposition and tho convention
of the Rexall druggists at the Golden
Gate City, won a handsome chest of
silver at the Rexall convention. The
prize was one of five similar prizes
awarded for the best talk on the drug
conditions of his State or Territory.
There were representatives at the
Rexalll convention from every Ameri
can State, insular possessions and
from each of the Canadian provinces.
Each state delegation was called up
on to name one of its druggists to
make a ten-minute speech to the con
vention, reviewing the drug trade of
his section. Mr. Britt responded for
Alaska.
"I was never more surprised in my
life when the jury made its award,"
said Mr. Britt "My name was the
second one read off. and 1 was speech
less."
The silverware is high grade, and
is contained in a solid mahogany
chest. It is on exhibition at Mr. Britt's
store.
Best of All Expositions
Mr. Britt. who was a resident of
Chicago at the time of the exposition
there and who was an interested vis
itor at the St. Louis fair, says from
an architectural standpoint and in
other respects, the San Francisco ex
position is superior to either of the
others. He spent eleven days at
San Francisco and most of the time
was spent at the exposition.
"The 'Palace of Arts' and the 'Court
of Abundance,"" said Mr. Britt, "are
the most wonderful places in the
world. Their beauty is entrancing.
I could not refrain from thinking what
a pity they cannot be perpetuated."
Mr. Britt says the nights were dis
agreeably cold while he was at San
Francisco.
UTAH COPPER SHOWS
GREATLY INCREASED PROFITS
BOSTON, Aug. 5.? The report of
the Utah Copper Company for the
second quarter of 1915 shows a net
profit of $4,412,298, compared with $2,
167,415, in the first quarter; surplus
after dividends was $2,787,808, compar
ed with $949,048 in the previous quar
ter. The cost of production was 6.57
cents per pound, a low record. The
earnings were at the rate of $11 per
share per annum.?(Boston News Bu
reau.)
MRS. PRATT BURIED.
Mrs. Pratt. 23-year-old daughter of
Mrs. J. W. Salsbury, who died hero
Thursday morning, was buried in Ev
ergreen cemetery this afternoon. The
funeral was held from the Presbyter
ian church, the Rev. J. B. Stevens offi
ciating.
? ?
New Fall hats, just arrived, and
they're beauties?Goldstein's Empor
ium. 8-14-tf.
Everybody reads Empire "ads."
GROSS WILL ASS
PUBLIC TO GET
BEHIND FIESTE
W. D. Gross will ask (or the en
dorsement of the city council and the
Juneau Commercial Club for the car
nival which he proposes to Btage at
the Hippodrome next month. Ho will
aak for the endorsement on the ground
that he proposes to make it a quasi
public affair, according to the plans
which ho has worked out
Mr. Gross's plans contemplate giving
the gate receipts of certain nights to
various organizations and charities.
"For instance," said Mr. Gross, "I ln
tond to let the Library Association
have tickets to sell for one night?a
night that will be designated 'Public
Library Night.' The Library would
get all of the gate receipts for that
occaston. Then, there would be a sim
ilar night for the Pioneer's Home, and
one for various lodges that might de
sire to participate in the matter."
It is Mr. Gross' further Idea that If
the City Council and the Juneau Com
mercial club endorso It and the citi
zens generally take to the Idea, that
a public carnival association would
be organized, or some other manner
devised to carry off the carnival as a
wholly public enterprise In the fu
ture.
WOMAN WHO TOOK
LIKE IN LAKE IS
FORMER NOMEITE
Mrs. Ruth S. Scott, a saleslady in
the Frederick & Nelson store. Seattle,
who drowned herself in Lako Wash
ington last Saturday, visited Juneau
last summer, and at one time lived
in Nome. After a visit of two weeks
here In July, last year, Mrs. Scott
made a trip to Sitka Hot Springs,
staying there two weeks. She was
the widow of a Nome minor.
In a statement to the King County
coroner, Clifford Wiley, a Seattle con
tractor, in whose charge the dead wo
man left her affairs, assigned her act
to despondency and not because "her
love for a Seattle physician had not
been returned" as published.
".Mrs. Scott was one of the most
tireless workers for the poor I ever
knew." Wiley told Deputy Coroner
Frank Koepfll. "She also was a stead
fast friend of the children at the Orth
opedic Hospital, the Day Nursery and
in other charitable lnstlutions. and
she never was too busy to do all in
her power to make their lot happier
and easier to bear.
"Christmas was always her big day.
Leaving her own home, she gathered
in donations of fruit and candy and
clothing and took them to the poor."
Mrs. Scott whose maiden name was
Barton, was a native of Taylorsville,
111., and according to Wiley, came
from a distinguished family. Both
her mother and sister died suddenly
within a short time of each other and
It is bolleved this preyed on her mind
bringing about ill health.
Fatal Visit Was Second
The following account was taken
from the Seattle Times of August 8.
"She had lived at the Hotel Otis,
Summit Avcuue and Columbia street,
about three years. Most of that time
she had been employed In the cloak
and suit department of a Second Ave
nue Department store. She went out
to the lake Friday night, evidently
with the intention of commiting sui
cide, but later returned to her hotel.
"She was without money on her
trip back to town, persuading the
conducted of the Madrona Park car,
F. H. Lammers to carry her free of
charge on a promise that she would
pay him later. She returned to the
lake early Saturday morning. As 8he
alighted at the end of the line she
handed Conductor O. H. Hogue a let
ter for Lammers. This latter was
found to contain three two-cent stamps
as payment for her fare Friday night.
Leaves Two Letters.
"Two letters were found In her
room at the hotel, one addressed to
; James H. Kane, an attorney In the
American Bank building, the other to
Wiley, who Is a member of the firm
; of Wiley & Morse, in the Central
Building.
"The letter to Kane thanked him for
the interest he had shown in her af
fairs, that to Wiley asking his to care
for the funeral arrangements and her
property. Wiley says Mrs. Scott own
ed a houseboat on Lake Washington,
and a large farm in North Dakota,
so that her suicide was not prompted
by financial difficulties.
"The body has been taken in charge
by the Bonney-Watson Undertaking
Company and probably will be sent
back to Taylorsville."
F. E. Parsons, of the Schonacker
Brokerage company, left for Seattle
on the Spokane.
A. Shyman returned from Hoonah
on the Al-Ki this morning.
The Misses Ida Par and Mary Mar
tin, who have been the guests of Mrs.
G. T. Jackson of Thane, left for Seat
tle this morning on the Spokane.
J. H. Long took passage on the Al
Ki for Seattle, on his way to Port
land.
Rough Dry?55c per doz.
Flat Work?50c per doz.
THANE STEAM LAUNDRY
Phone 175 7-28-tf
WAR DEVASTATES
BALKAN STATES
SPOKANE,"Aug. 7.?tf'ho Ttev. " li'.
Telford Erickson, missionary of tho
American board to Albania, who was
compelled to leave tho country tem
porarily, has made a journey of inves
tigation from Rome to the threo
coast cities of Albania, Valoua, and
Durazzo and Scutari. Ho has sent to
the secretaries of tho board in Amer
ica an account of the desperate sit
uation in this "stato left without ruler
or protector, distracted with civil
strife, and afterwards invadod by tho
armies of Serbia. Mr. Erickson has
written in tho Spokesman Roviow the
following:
"As I pass up the road to the city
from tho boat landing, I notice on the
right in an olive grove, somo thatched
shelters, about two dozou of thorn.
The land is low and pools of green
scummed water nro all about perhaps
100 people living thero. This 1b half
the original number, the other half
now resting In the Improvised ceme
tery not far away. An Albanian
friend, Islam Bey, Is with mo. Ho too.
has suffered; houses burned, proporty
destroyed, or carried off, animals driv
en away, family scattered, and he
knew how to sympathize.
"wo garnered the uttio company to
gether, three men, the rest women and
children. A few men wero In the
town trying to pick up an odd job
and earn a penny or two; others had
been killed by the Greeks before they
got away and many died by deliberate
starvation. Thero wasn't enough food
to .keep alive and they denied them
selves and gavo tho family what thero
was. This, I ascertained, consisted of
a little handful of corn meal, decayed
and mouldy, mixed with nettle leaves
and stewed in a pot One grandmoth
er has managed, God only knows how,
to get a few pennies to buy wool and
is spinning yarn to make a pair of
socks to sell. Sho may make five
cents on her transaction. She needs
them herself, poor thing, but socks
are a luxury in this community.
Death Wall Everywhere
"I cross from tho lowland up a
hill overlooking the city. It is beau
tiful place, high, healthful and clean
and shaded with olive troes. .Down be
low are seen the clear waters of the
bay, with ships lying quietly at an
chor. Here is a camp of 17 shelters.
Surely it will be a delightful contrast
now to what I have just seen below
in the minsmic lowland, but no soon
er do I come within hearing than my
ears are tortured with the death wail
of another mother. Once heard, it
can never be forgotten! This mother
has just lost her little two-year-old
boy. He couldn't stand the faro of
thistle leaves and decayed corn meal
and no 'manna fel.'
"i pass irom tne ouve grove aown
Into the city. Its narrow, cobbled
rambling streets arc swarming with
men, an army of unemployed, thou
sands of them, with latent strength
enough locked up In their muscles
(given a few good meals) to build up
cities, lay forests, construct railways
and highways, extract from the land
its mineral wealth, prepare fields for
golden harvest They have the will
and heart and mind to do it, and out
beyond the city is a land needing all
of these and ready richly to reward
every effort. There is no strike of
discontented workmen, asking higher
pay and shorter hours. But suffic
ient to put bread, just coarse corn
meal stirred up in water and baked
over the coals, bread an American
dog would turn up his nose at?to
put enough of that into the mouths
of their women and children and
themselves to keep them alive?that
is what they want. Here they are all
moving up and down the streets like
a sluggish tide that has lost its way,
or like a plague stricken army, stolid,
stunned and helpless.
Gray Scraps Like Hungry Dogs
"Groups of them linger by the pub
lic ovens, or the vegetable market in
the hope that some scrap will fall
which they can grab. Others slump
down in some shady place, often in
the cemetery as though hoping death
itself might summon them. There is
always a great crowd before the gov
ernment building where relief is oft
times issued to a few of the most
desperate cases.
FAIRBANKS HAS
THREE TRAGEDIES
IN ONE DAY
FAIRBANKS, Aug. 4.? With two
attempted murders and a suicide, all
within two hours, this city was thrown
into a state of feverish excitement
yesterday, and the limited force of
United States deputy marshals were
kept exceedingly busy.
The first tragedy occurred when
Charles Lindstrom, a Chatanika min
er, In the presence of his partner,
picked up a 30-40 rifle and shot him
self through the head.
While the deputy marshals were
investigating this suicide, a report was
received that two Italians had engag
ed in a fight with knives. They were
separated by officers, but not before
both had been seriously wounded.
Returning to the courthouse, the
deputy marshals found JJm Katkhashi
on the steps of the city jail, slowly
bleeding to death from a pistol bullet
wound which he said he received at
the hands of another Japanese while
the two were engaged in a game of
poker. His alleged assailant has not
yet been arrested.
Mrs. Harry H. Williams expects to
leave soon for Olympia, Wash., to
spend the winter. Harry Williams, Jr.,
will enter school in Olympia this Fall.
Miss Mayme Arnold of Seattle, who
has been the guest of Mrs. Clarence'
Cartwrlght, loft on the Spokane last
night, for her home.
Mrs. J. L. Gage, of the Gage Shop,
expects to leave shortly for a stock
buying trip to the Outside.
C. S. Lindsay left for Portland, and
will spend the winter in that city.
Fred Hillard of Ketchikan is regis
tered at the Circle City Hotel.
YOU HAVE tried the rost. now try
the best. For French dry cleaning,
steam cleaning, dyeing and pressing.
Capital Dye Works, phono 177. 19-tf
WELL KNOWN WRITER
ABOARD NORTHWESTERN
Ruth Kedzle Wood, a well known
author of touriBts books, in a passen
ger on the steamship Northwestern,
tomorrow, bound for Seattle. Mrs.
Wood has been in Alaska for several
weeks on a pleasure trip and will
write up her journey for the New
York Herald. In recognition of her
contributions to the literature of trav
el, Mrs. Wood has recently been made
a Fellow of tho Royal Geographical
Society of Great Britain, an honor
very rarely bestowed upon women.
In May of this year she was elect
ed a Fellow in the American Geo
graphical Society. Ruth Kedzle Wood
has for several years beon a regular
contributor to the "Bookman" and
articles from her pen aro frequently
seen In tho Sunday magazlno sec
tions of the New York Herald, the
New York Times, and the New York
Tribune.
MATERIAL TO REBUILD
CANNERY IS TAKEN
?+?
Tho barge Bonanza, In tow of the
big tug Richard Holyoke, Is on its way
to Koggiung with matorlal to rebuild
the burned Libby, McNeil & Llbby
cannery at that point. The cargo on
the barge is identical to that which
the steamship Bertha had In her holds,
when she was burned to the waters
edge on Kodlak Island three weeks
ago.
The Richard Holyoke called In at
Douglas yesterday, to take on water,
leaving tho barge at anchor In Young's
Hay, Admiralty Isalnd.
Call In and look at the awetlest line
of HATS ever shown In Juneau?
Goldstein's Emporium. 8-14-tf
Empire want ads. work all the time.
$<$ THE *'
MECCA
Duality and
Service Our
tt Motto ft
JUNEAU DEPOT FORJ
MECCA FIZZ
?! FIRST TERRITORIAL BANK
Douglas OF ALASKA 29 Front It. Juneau
INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS a Q
ACCOUNTS, AND ON TIME DEPOSITS 4* 0
ALASKA MEAT COMPANY John Reck. Mgr.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Our Hams and Bacon Are
Home-Smoked
I?" 'S1 SPECIALS ?
egetable LjI. v^IljlILI J ?
WATCH THIS STORE-We carry the largest line i
of FRL ITS and VEGETABLES in the city.
H. J. Raymond Go. * Phone 28
GENUINE -
KENTUCKY
MOONSHINE
is on the road
for
1111 THE NEWHl
TRIANGLE BAR
MORRISON'S PLACE
Douglas FistiS fee Co,
ORDERS TAKEN 8 DELIVERED
City Wharf Phone 411
MiMHtinnm . 111111*9*
:: The Alaska Grill !?
!I Full Orchestra Music during !I
Dinner Hour ;;
? The Bed Appointed
Place in Town ? ;
; Best of Everything Served ;
it Moderate Prices
iHininnMtnitim>itii
? *
AMONG THE THEATRES. +
"Your Girl and Mine"
In 7 Acts.
Booked for Monday and Tuesday.
One of the world's famous film cor
poratlon feature produced, will bo
shown at the Lyrla theatre:, The
management is going to considerable
expense to make the Lyric a feature
house, so "get wise," as the Lyric
will give you tho goods, no matter
what day you come.
The equipment at the Lyric Is Just
as good as any other house to fea
ture big Alms.
This seven act production?"Your
Girl and Mine," was produced under
tho auspices of tho National American
Woman's Suffrage Association, and is
presented by tho World Film Corpor
ation.
Not only as an argument for suff
rage but as a play with a story, a
"punch" and a mission.
"Your Girl and Mine" is a big play
with a big mission, built on a big
scale. It is a whole evening's enter
tainment and a very interesting eve
ning at that.
Remember, Sunday, Monday and
Tuesday. ???
GRAND THEATRE.
A complete change of pictures to
night, as follows:
"For the Family Honors," two-reel
Rex drama, with Bob Leonard In the
lead. .
"Ranch Man's Double,' 'a Frontier
drama, a sure good ono.
Animated Weekly?all latest events
from all the world.
"Too Much Married," Powers com
edyy. ???
H. Robert Plato or New York, Mr.
and Mrs. T. B. Burbrldge of Denver,
Robert Young of Tacoma and R. J.
King of Tonopah, Nevada, form a
group of mining men which reached
Juneau yesterday. They are staying
at the Qastineau Hotel.
NOTICE TO CREDITOR8.
Having been appointed administra
tor of the estate of Glacomo Brondlnl,
deceased, by tho Commissioner for
the Territory of Alaska, sitting in
Probate in Juneau Precinct, by order
issued July 27, 1915, all persons hav
ing claims against said estate are
required to presont them, verified as
by law prescribed, within six months
from the date of this notice, to H.
B. LeFevre, the attorney for the un
dersigned administrator, at room
number 210 in the Seward Build
ing, Juneau, Alaska.
CONSTANT PELLEGRINI,
Administrator.
H. B. LE FEVRE,
Attorney for the Ad
ministrator, Juneau, Alaska.
First publication July 31, 1915.
Final publication August 21, 1915.
?*??????????????
* ?
? COURT NOTE?. ?
? ?
******** +* * * * * * *
John C. Boylo, :X Woodshopper
Creek, has been granted a notary's
commission by Governor Strong.
Articles of incorporation have been
filed by the Pacific Mild-Cure Com
pany, a $10,000 corporation whose Al
askan headquarters are at Ketchikan.
John Meyer of Seattle is president of
the company, and Prank Ersklne of
the same plsco its secretary.
HT R. SHEPARD 18
ALA8KAN AGENT
H. K. Shepard has been appointed
Alaskan agent for the Norwich Fire
Insurance Co., of Norwich, England.
This company filed with their power
of attorney, the annual proof of incor
poration required under the law re
cently passed. Although a great
many of these proofs have reached the
office of the Secretary of Alaska for
filing the papers of tho Norwich Co.
are the first to reach tho office in the
proper form.
New Fall hats, just arrived, and
they're beauties?Goldstein's Empor
ium. 8-14-tf.
FREE SHOW TICKET8.
Thano laundry will give a ticket
to tho Grand theatre with each bundle
of laundry brought to our office in
Arctic Barber Shop, phone 176. 31-tf
<? ______?? <?
o o
i; Dream Theatre ;;
< > < ?
\ I TONIGHT AND SUNDAY NIGHT J \
< > "Famous Players" Present ??
o "THE SCALES OF JUSTICE" o v
< | 5 Reels J ?
< > Featuring Laul McAllister and <>
Jane Fearnley
< > This picture comes heralded < ?
J J to us as one of the liest ever < J
< ? produced by tho Famous Play- < >
JI ers, and around tho magic J J
< > words of Love, Duty and Law, < ?
\ I is wvoen a tragic story of a dls- < \
< > trict attorney who throws hon- < >
! \ or, position and duty in the ^.
'? scales against a woman's love. ? >
o Two Show*?7:30 and 9 ,,
10c AND 25c
Nu Bone Corset
? Miss and Mrs S. Zenger ?
JONEAO CORSETIERES
Fitting In your own home. A perfect fit
In guaranteed. For appointment* Phone
136. Addreaa 2S8 Main Street. ->
C. Petlevlch J. R. McNeil
Old Kentucky Bar
Hotel In Connection
8team Heated
Family Orders Delivered Free
P. O. Box 577, Phone 91
Front St Juneau, Alaska
MADE IN JUNEAU
Concrete Dry and Watertight Floors and Cel
lars. Concrete plain and ornamental Walla
and Fences. Concrete ribbed or travel finish
ed Sidewalks and Steps. All work guaranteed.
ESTIMATES AND PLANS FREE.
H. D. BOURCY,
Pox M4 Contractor
P'McKannaTransfer
j FREIGHT?COAL?BAGGAGE
SADDLE HORSES FOR RENT
; Light and Heavy Hauling of all Kind a
Office 127-129 Front St, phone 55
[ TREADWELL FOUNDRY |
Our plant is VERY COMPLETE in
its equipment, and with melts every
few days, is able to turn out custom
work promptly. & p p ::
| Hardware, Iron and Steel |
Our stock of necessity is very com
plete, ranging from heavy mining
and Milling supplies to Shelf Hard
ware in our General Store, including ::
large Supply |Tools for machine shop,
carpenter, electrical and mining work. :
Electrical Supplies
Same applies to our Electrical Sup.
ply Department. fi fit i:
IQ \ I |7 C Will be made from any of the above < I
departments through store. # ?
Alaska Treadweli Gold Mining Co. jj
= MERCANTILE DEPARTMENT |

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