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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, August 19, 1915, Image 1

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YOL. VI., NO. 647. JUNEAU, ALASKA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 19, 1915. ^ PRICE TEN CENTS.
. ,' | ?? .vt... ? ? ? ,? i ji". t
BRITISH LINER TORPEDOED NEAR LUSITANIA'S GRAVE
? ? >:#-? ??::- ?? >. ,.< a.
? ? r*: : ? S 5 : = : ? ?; -?. .. ..
TEXAS DEATH LIST SHOWS 400 LOST LIVES
AMERICAN GIRL WHO
WAS f. HOLT'S PUPIL
ACCUSSED Of BEING SPY
Arrested at Prince Rupert. B. C.,
and held under surveillance for ten
days as a German 3py Is the experi
ence of Miss Elsie Scheel of New
York, who is a passenger on the
steamship City of Seattle, in Juneau
yesterday.
Miss Scheel reached Prince Rupert
two weeks ago from Vancouver, trav
eling north on a Grand Trunk Pacific
boat. Shortly after her arrival in the
Canadian city she was conscious of
the fact that she was being watched.
"They shadowed me everywhere, and
I couldn't turn a corner without meet
ing someone whom I knew to be a
soldier or civil police, and they stared
me almost out of my shoes." she said
yesterday.
To Church with Bodyguard.
"My trunks were searched, and
they even went so far as to send
three soldiers with 'me to church."
Miss Scheel continued. Finding no
evidence that she was a spy, the au
thorities finally released the young
woman.
The young woman admits that she
is of German parentage, but she says
she was born In America. Her fa
ther is a member of the Bunds So
ciety. a German organization, in New
York, and her mother who is a prac
ticing physician, is prominent in Ger
man club circles. >
* \f {no C?KA<\1 'O of apioo
? ICWrUiUJi IU i'li.io kA,uvvi 0 otvcvu,
the Canadian authorities said they re
ceived advices from New York that J
Miss Scheel was a spy in the employ
of the German government, and she
was constantly under surveillance on
her trip across the continent. The
young woman believes that her ac- ,
qnalntance with Prof. Erich Muenter
prompted the Canadians to be sua- ,
piclous of her. Muenter fled from 1
Harvard several years ago after he had ,
been wanted on a charge of poison
ing his wife. He turned up in New ^
York the other day as Frank Holt, the
man who tried to kill J. P. Margon at
his summer home near Glen Cove,
L. L Holt, or Muenter. later commit
ted suicide in the Mlneola jail. "1
knew Muenter, as Holt, when he was
teaching in Cornell University,"
Miss Scheel said. "But our relation
was only that of pupil and instructor,"
. she said.
Returning to Rupert.
Miss Scheel is going back to Prince
Rupert, without fear of further moles
tation. She is making the trip on the
City of Seattle, to Skagway and Sit
ka. to see the country, she says. She
expects to travel East over the Grand
Trunk- railroad out of the Canadian
city.
It is common knowledge along the
coast that the British government ls[
planning to send a fleet of merchant i
ship out from Prince Rupert, bound
for Vladivostok with munitions of
war, and it is believed that German
spies have been sent to Prince Ru
pert to gain what knowledge they
can of these plans, and to make
Sketches of the naval drydock which
is being built there.
CARRANZA LIKES
U. S. GOVERNMENT
WASHINGTON. Aug. 19.?General'
Venustlano Carranza today sent a for
mal announcement to the State De
partment. expressing his "highest re
spect for President Wilson and the
peopde of the United States."
NOME JUDGE ON WAY
TO VIRGINIA HOME
"The longer I stay in Nome the
better I like it," said Judge John Ran
dolph Tucker, federal Jurist forx the ?
Second Alaska division, this morn
ing. Judge Tucker is on his way to
Seattle, on the steamship Victoria, ac
companied by Mrs. Tucker. They will
go east to Bedford County, Virginia,
their former home, and Mrs. Tucker
expects to spend the next winter
there, for the benefit of her health.
Judge Tucker was appointed two
years ago, by President Wilson to
succeed Judge Cornelius D. Murane.
LEAVE ON MARIPOSA.
Passengers leaving on the Mariposa
this morning included Mrs. Milton
Winn, Mrs. L. M. Hambrlght, J. F.
Hurley, Mrs. S. W. Mason. Mrs. Anna
Hartmen. Miss Dorothy Thornton, C.
Stevenson, Mrs. Anna Stevenson and
C. H. Wilbur for Seattle; and E. O.
Richmond for Wrangell.
TEDDY, ALSO.
NEW YORK, Aug. 19.?Col. Roose
velt has become a member of the ad
visory board of the American Defense
Society.
? ? + * + + + + ++ ?> + ?> + ?<.+
* WEATHER TODAY *
* Maximum?68. *
+ Minimum?30. +
* CLEAR!! +
+????????+?+???+4
? +
MISTAKE COSTS
THOUSAND DOLLARS
?1 I :
SEATTLE, Aug. 19. ? Mrs.
Anna H&nke, an aged German ,
woman, became flustered this
morning when she realized that- j
she had mistaken a chance au
tomobile for a "Jitney bus." On
learning her mistake she left the j
| machine, leaving behind her a
canvass bag containing $1,000 in
gold, the savings of a life- {
' time.
Other than the fact that "it
was not a Ford," the woman
was unable to give tho police
any description of the car which | ,
carried away her money. She
I remained today at the police sta- ,
Hon. in the hopes that the driver
of tho car would return the mon- (
ey to the authorities.
I J
4 (.
WOODWORTH BOAT !
BLOWN OUT TO SEAj
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C., Aug. 19.
The 2S-foot launch Alaskan, of Juneau, '
with BUlie Woodworth and Cy Con
fer as passengers, arrived here last '
night, after a thrilling experience. J
The boat was blown out to sea at Dlx- 1
on's Entrance, bad engine trouble, lost
her sail and her dingy, and drifted ]
for three days and three nights in a
storm.
Monday night the Alaskan was pick
ed up by the fishing boat Susie, and (
towed here. Woodworth and Confer ,
will appear in song at a local play- J
house tonight, and they expect to ,
leave before the end of the week.,for J
Seattle.
AMERICAN BANKERS HAVE
NO CASH FOR MEXICO
NEW YORK, Aug. 19. ?New York
bankers said regarding the reported
Intention of the Administration to con
fer with bankers on the subject of
financing a new government in Mex
ico that they would not advance any
money to Mexico unless every cent
was guaranteed by the United States
government.
CANADIAN GOVERNMENT
ORDERS CARS FOR CROPS
-
MONTREAL. Aug. 19.?The Canad
ian government railways have order
ed 1,000 new steel freight cars from
Canadian companies for immediate de
livery, in anticipation of the require
ments for moving the big wheat
crop. It is reported that the railways
are negotiating for large purchases of
second-hand American cars.
CANADIAN PACIFIC IS
TO OWN ALLAN LINE
MONTREAL, Aug. 19.?The Canad
ian Pacific Railway Company will
take over the Allan line on October
first, a new corporation having been
organized in Montreal under the name
of the Canadian Pacific Steamships,
Limited. New company will take ov
er all ocean steamships now operat
ed by the Canadian Pacific railway
line and the Allan Line.
NON-SUIT REQUESTED '
IN SHAW-OURGAN CASE
A motion for non-suit was filed this
afternoon in the case of Shaw vs Dur
ban & Bonnet, in which the plaintiff
asks for a judgment of $90.60. Winn
& Gore represent the defendants.
Owing to the enforced absence of the
plaintiff at the afternoon session of
the case, the matter has been contin
ued until ten o'clock tomorrow morn
ing.
Represented by Attorney O. A.
Tucker. T. P. Shaw, more fa
miliarly known as "Paddy" Snaw, ap
peared before Judge Jennings this
morning to be heard in his suit against
Durgan & Barnett, which was filed
some weeks ago to recover the amount
of $90.60 due for carpenterwork, and
vtbich he had previously protected by
filing a lien on the property in ques
tion. namely a house on the" Seater
tract back of the cemetery.
The defense claimed that the lien
was not .filed within the thirty days
stipulated by law and that the work
had been done under contract, their
claim amounting to a complete denial
of the complaint.
BOAT IS SOLD.
A bill of sale in the custom's office
notes the transfer of the pleasure boat
"Tryve" from Condrad Dahl to S.
L. Hogue, both of Ketchikan. The
selling ''price of the boat, whoso ton
nage is 11 gross, is given as $1800.
NORTHLAND
ENDORSES
1917 PLAN
"It was a clean sweep. Every Al
aska town has now endorsed our plan
of helping Alaska celebrate its fif
tieth birthday, in 1917. I found the
people of the North in. an enthusias
tic frame of mind, after they realized
that we are trying to help then), and
not ourselves. The semi-centennial
Is yours, two years from now, but we
are going to be here 'with bolls'."
So said John L. McPherson this
morning. He was here three hours,
while the steamship Victoria was in
port, and in his pockets he has en
dorsements from the interior and
coast cities, strongly favoring the
plan for the celebration of the semi
centennial, as advanced by the Alas
ka Bureau of the Seattle Chamber of
Commerce, of which he is secretary.
Mr. McPherson same North as the
jpecial messenger of the Seattle or
ganization, to sound out the sentiment
of the people in the North.
In brief, the celebration during the
summer of 191^, will be one continu
ous festival, each town on an estab
lished itinerary celebrating in its
turn. A great throng of people from
the States, who are Interested in Al
aska or want to bo interested, will
come North under the auspices of the
Seattle Chamber of Commerce, and
will assist the cities to successfully
carry out their jubilee. Ketchikan
will be the Nfirst city to celebrate.
Juneau will be the fourth. It will take
the entire summer for every town to
iave its fun and frolic.
MOLTEN LAVA
FROM STROMBOLI
MESSINA, Sicily. Aug. 19. ? The
phiof signal officer on the island of
Stromboli, reported today that the vol
:ano on the Island was in eruption. A
iirge quantity of lava has formed a
lake of fire between the mountain's
craters and the sea and the flow is ac
companied by loud detonations, and
clouds of steam and smoke.
MILL FOREMAN WEDS.
V. C. Clausen, foreman of the Alas
ka-Juneau mill, and Miss Edna Kief
er were married yesterday afternoon
at 5 o'clock, Commlsisoner J. B. Mar
shall officiating. The cercomny took
place at the courthouse in the pres
ence of A. J. Stephens and Charles
B. Phiehcke.
<5he couple will reside here.
HENRY HOEGE DIES.
SEATTLE. Aug. 19.?Henry Hoege,
a resident of Seattle for 30 years, died
here this morning. He was engaged
In the carriage building business.
LAKIHAINEN MARIES.
???
Vlli Lakihainen and Alma Kaperi,
both of Juneau, were married last
night by Commissioner J. B. Marshall
at the court house. The ceremony
was witnessed by Charles Uotila and
Olga Uotila. The couple will reside
in Jnneau.
GRUBSTAKE NO 2
SELLS FOR $800
William Solomon of Seattle has
sold to Thomas Hanbury of Ketchi
kan the Grubstake No. 2 for $S00, ac
cording to a bill of sale filed in the
custom's office. The boat is 38 feet
long and draws 11.6 feet Her ton
nage is 8 net.
HEIDEMAN BUR I END.
Victor Heideman, who died Tues
day morning in St. Ann's hospital,
was burled this afternoon. The fu
neral services were held In the Odd
Fellows' hall, the local lodge of Odd
Fellows having the services in
charge.
The deceased was employed as a
cook, at the Perseverance mine. He
was born in Sweden 28 years ago. and
had been in Alaska for several years.
OLD MILEAGE PAID.
W. W. Shorthill, secretary to Gov.
J. F. A. Strong, today paid to J. C.
Kennedy, member of the First Alaska
Legislature (250 for mileage due Mr.
Kennedy from the legislative session
two years ago.
It will be remembered that at the
last session of the legislature request
was made to Washington for the pay
ment of the mileage deficit from 1013.
Mr. Kennedy came the farthest dis
tance, in getting to the legislature,
and his traveling per diem conse
quently was the greatest. .
"'PROSPERITY IS COMING"
"Things are better and improving
?prosperity is coming," said Sewell
L. Avery, president of the United
Statesa Gypsum company, when in
terviewed regarding trade condi
tions.?-(Chicago Herald.)
TEXAS DEATH
tIST NOW 400;
STORMS ABATE
GALVESTON, Aug. 19.?Official es
timates of the damago In Galveston
alone, from floods and stormB, today
was placod at $10,000,000. According
to estimates compilod at New Orleans,
the property loss to the entire south
as the result of tho hurricane this
week is estimated at $62,000,000, two
thirds of which Is damage to buildings j
and one-third damage to cotton and
oil plants.
Naerly lour nunurea persons iobi i
their lives. ReportB sent out from
here yesterday that 500 had died in
Galveston were later found to be un
true. The sea-wall, constructed after'
the disaster of 1900, saved Galveston
from greater loss of property and life,
although several hundred feet of It
were washed away. Food, bedding and
tents have been rushed here from
Fort Sill and Fort Leavenworth, on
orders lBsued by the War Depart
ment.
About Ave hundred homos were de
stroyed here. Today all danger was
over. Tho wind had died down, the
/
flood waters had receded from the
streets, and all flres are under con
trol.
+*+?++*********+*?
* +
+ FRANK'S BODY ARRIVES. +
* ?
+ Now York, Aug. 19. ? The +
?> body of Leo M. Frank, hanged +
+ early Tuesday morning by a *
* masked mob near Marietta, +
* Ga.. reached here- early today. +
* Tho remains were met by *
+ Frank's mother and other rel-. +
+ Uvea. +
* ?
U. S. MARINES
CURB HAYTIENS
WASHINGTON, Aug. 19.?One com
pany of American marines have land
ed at St. Marc. Haytl, and are In con
trol of that town,' it was announced
today. An attempt on tho part of
the rebels to oppose tho landing of
the troops failed.
COLONEL MULHALL
COMES TO SEATTLE
SEATTLE, Aug.. 19. ? Col. Martin
M. Mulhall, known as a former lobby
ist in the employ of the National
Manufacturers Asosclatlon, who be
came involved in considerable trou
ble in Washington, has taken up a
residence In Seattle.
HEAD OF CARDINAL
COLLEGE IS DEAD
ROME. Aug. 19.?Cardinal Serflna
Vennutelli, Dean of the College of
Cardinals, died here today. Cardinal
Vanutelli was .consecrated in 1887
and died at the ago of 80 years.
SWAN CO. MAY BUY
ALASKA STEAMER
SEATTLE, Aug. 19. ? W. F. Swan
and associates are negotiating for a
steamer to place In the Alaska trade.
TWO MOREJBOATS
FOR ALASKA S. S.
SEATTLE, Aug. 19. ? It was an
nounced today by the Alaska Steam
ship Company that between now and
spring the company would build or
buy two steel steamships of 2500- tons
each, for the Alaska service. The
company recently bought the steamer
City of Puebla from the Pacific Coast
Company.
The steadily Increasing tonnage
from Alaska, especially copper ore
shipments, has necessitated the ad
ditions, Vice President Baxter said to
day.
SHOUP GOES SOUTH.
George J. Shoup, son of former Mar
shal J. M. Shoup, and a brother of
[Representative A. G. Shoup, of Sit
ka. passed through today on the Vic
toria to Seattle, on his way to San
Francisco. He is a mining engineer,
mid has been spondlng several months
in the North. He boarded the Victor
ia at St. Michael.
Mr. Shoup will meet his father
when the Victoria arrives in Ketchi
kan tomorrow. Marshal Shoup is
practicing law In the "First City."
FRANK CARPENTER
IS NOW IN SEWARD
Frank G. Carpenter, noted Washing
ton newspaper correspondent and
author, who had been expected here
on the steamship Victor, Is in Sew
ard, having left the Victoria there,
Monday. |Je expects to spend a few
days at Anchorage, the government
railroad terminal.
GERMANS
BEAT WAY
EASTWARD
BERLIN, Aug. 19. ? A further ad
vance of German troops toward the
fortress of Brsct Litovsk, and the cap
ture of two forts north of Novo Geor
glevsk with 1,000 prisoners and 125
cannon, wore features of today's offi
cial announcement of the war office.
Several of the outer forts of Brest
Litovsk are Bald to have fallen.
In the capture of "tho Russian
stronghold of Kovno, and the advance
along tho railroad connecting the for
tress with Brest Litovsk, by way of
(Vilna, the German army is In a posi
tion to threaten Poland.
Advises from tho Russian capital
say that "stubborn fighting Is In pro
gress south of Kovno and on the Blel
oftok-Brost Litovsk line, with success
ful alternating."
?
BLOODY FIGHTING
IN DARDANELLES
LONDON, Aug. 19.?More British
troops have been landed on Sulva
Bay, in the Dardanelles, it is report
ed. General Inn Hamilton reports se
vore fighting In progress, with heavy
losses to both the Allies and the
Turks.
ITALIANS DENY THE
STORIES OF HEAVY L08SES
ROME, Aug. 19.?The Teuton claim
that tbe Italians had lost 200,000 men
are denounced as a ridiculous canard
by the war ministry. Italian news
papers assert that the false state
ments arc sent out with the hope of
influencing neutral nations from en
tering the war.
U. S. A. WON'T JOIN
OTHER NEUTRAL POWERS
WASHINGTON. Aug. 19?The Unit
ed States will continue to act alone
in representations to Great Britain
regarding neutral trade. Negotiations
begun by tjie Sewdish legation at
Washington to Becure American co-op
eration in the proposed concerted ac
tion of neutrals to protest against
British orders in council havo brought
no results.
AUSTRALIAN CASUALTIES
?+?
SIDNEY, Australia. Aug. 19.? The
Austrian casualties to date total 2783
dead and 11,027 wounded.
WAR MUNITION FACTORIES
ARE TO DOUBLE WAGES
NEW YORK, Aug. 19.?The Now
York American sayA that a wage in
crease of 100 per cent, has been
promised the employees of the Aetna
Chemical and Aetna Explosives com
panies of Gary, Indiana, contingent
upon the continuation of the war un
til next June. An increase of ten
per cent, was announced on August
first
DUTCH BUY BULLETS
FROM THE UNITED STATES
The National Brass & Copper Com
pany. of Hastings-on-the-Hudson Is
said to be working on^rge orders for
bullets, three-Inch shrapnel shells and
brass and copper plate for the Dutch
government
BIG ORE BODY IS
LOCATED IN UTAH
BOSTON, Aug. 19.?The Globe fi
nancial page quotes W. E. L. Willa
way ofHhe Utah Metals Company, as
saying that that company's first ore
body is "acknowledged to be the larg
est ever cut in the Bingham camp.."
ALLIES AGREE ON
COTTON CONTRABAND
WASHINGTON. Aug. 19.?The Al
lied governments have agreed on the
principle that cotton shall bo de
clared contraband of war. The exact
date of the announcement is still un
der consideration, as well as other de
tails connected with the proclama
tions..
STOCK QUOTATIONS.
NEW YORK. Aug. 19.?Alaska Gold
closed at 33, Chino at 45%, Ray 22%,
Utah Copper, 66%, Butte and Super
ior 62%. Copper metal is quoted at
16%, with the market unsteady.
SHIP HUNTER'S BODY
TO SAN GRANCISCO
?4?
Word has been received from rela
tives of J. W. Hunter who died at St.
Ann's hospital yesterday of neumon
ia, and the remains will bo shipped
to San Francisco on the next boat.
Mr. Hunter's brother, Harvey S. Hun-,
ter, and his sister. Miss Kioanor Hun
tor, reside in San Francisco.
+ *
FIRE OF 8HELL8 TIME8
BUSINESS AT DUNKIRK
DUNKIRK, Franco, July 28.?
The bombardment of Dunkirk by
the giant German gun operating
from Flanders permits the carry
ing on of the business of the city
only four and a half minutes out
of every five.
There Is only one gun being
used In this bombardment, and
the shells come regularly every
five minutes. The people of the
town take advantage of the In
terval between an explosion and
the coming of another shell'*to
transact business, allowing them
selves about half a minute to
make for their cellars. -
In the General Post Office, for
instance, four and a half minutes
after the explosion of one shell Is
heard the clerks and customers
disappear together for thexbase
ment. After the expected shell
explodes, they come upstairs
again and business goes on as
usual until it is time to run
again to safety.?(Mall Corres
pondence In New York World.)
* +
NEW CABINET
FOR GRECIAN
GOVERNMENT
ATHENS, Aug. 19?The resignation
ot Premier Gounarls is hourly expect
ed, since King Constantino has " re
quested that a new Cabinet be form
ed by former Premier Venizelos.
The former prime minister today
notified the King of his rediness to
form a new Cabinet.
Since the declaration by Premier
Counaris that "Greece will not code
one inch of territory to Bulgaria,"
there has been great speculation as
to what course the Hellenic govern
ment will pursue.
In the negotiations conducted with
Bulgaria by the Allies of the quadru
ple entente in an effort to Induce her
to enter the war on their side she
has insistently demanded that she be
ceded that part of Macedonia which
was awarded to Serbia after the close
of the Balkan wars. She also has
sought a portion of the Macedonian
territory which came under the Greek
flag. Macedonia was formerly a pro
vince of Turkey.
BULGARIA READY FOR WAR
IF SHE CAN GET
WHAT SHE WANTS,
???
LONDON, Aug. 19.?A news agency
tary circles it is said the Turco-Bul
garia will join the Allies if Serbia
will cede to her part of Macedonia now
held by the Serbians.
Balcans Bargaining
ATHENS, Aug. 19.?In Greek mili
tary circles It lh said the Turco-Bul
garlan accord not only Includes a
cessation of the railway but also rec
tification of the European boundary
to follow a line from the Mazura riv
er to the sea. It Is also reported that
Bulgaria is attempting to establish
a secret comenant with this country
and Roumanla to Insure more friend
ly neutrality toward Turkey.
Italy's Alms.
PARIS, Aug. 19.?Rome correspon
dent of the Petit Journal quotes a
member of the Italian government as
Baying: "As soon as tlye attitude of
the Balkan States, now neutral, is
definitely determined, we shall take
radical ..measure against Turkey.
Italy is resolved to wipe out German
militarism and. then ^o bring the rul
ers of Germany and Turkey to their
knees."
Italy and Turkey Are Near a Break?
ATHENS, Aug. 19.?All Italian con
suls are prepared to depart, accord
ing to reliable advices from Constan
tinople. They liavo turned over the
official duties In regards to their coun
tries to neutral officers, mostly to
American consuls.
Immediately following their depart
ure It is expected that war between
Italy and Turkey will be declared.
Italian troops will then join the Al
llch at the Dardanelles.
DR. DERNBURG IN ITALY
LONDON, Aug. 19.?A News Agen
cy dispatch from Turin, announces
that the arrival in Italy of Dr. Dera
burg to open propaganda work has
been noted.
The Empire has most readers
BIG WHITE STAR LINER
ARABIC TORPEDO? AND
SUNK BY GERMAN "SUB"
LONDON, Ang. 19. ? The
White Star liner Arabic, one of
the largest English merchant
men, was torpedoed and sunk to
day by a German submarine, off
Fastnet, and 48 passengers and
her entire crew were drowned.
Early reports said the survivors
numbered 375. A dispatch from
Liverpool says., the British
steamer Dunsley was torpedoed
by the submarine while picking
up survivors of the Arabic, but
did not sink.
The attack on the Arabic oc
curred not far from where the
Lusitania was sunk last May, af
ter she had been submarined by
a German boat.
Cruiser and Liner Sunk.
This morning the Admiralty
posted a bulletin saying the Wil
son liner Grondo also had been
sunk by a German submarine,
but no lives were lost.
From Berlin came a dispatch
saying that a British cruiser
was sunk this morning in an en
gagement off the West Coast of
Jutland, and later the Admiralty
confirmed the loss of the cruis
er, but did not name her. The
vessel went down after a fight
with a German torpedo boat, and
her entire crew is said to have
perished.
Late today It was said that the to
tal number of boats sunk this weok by 1
German submarines who thirty-six,
with three neutral ships.
Wilson's Mesasge Published.
London afternoon papers today re
printed President Wilson's warning
to the German government, issued at
Washington on July 21. The accounts
laid special emphasis on the final par
agraph of the President's document,
which strongly warned Germany
from sinking passenger vessels with
out warning. .1
It is charged that tbo submarine
failed to warn the Arabic, but sped
the torpedo on Its errand of death a
moment after passengers on the boat
had sighted Its periscope rising above
the water.
The Arabic was on her way to Liv
erpool, from New York. As a precau
tion against the shrapnel Are of sub
marines, recently put into effect on
the White Star line, the Arabic had
a great number of sand bags piled
high around the promenade deck as a
protection to steering gear.
NORWEGIANS PROTEST.
CHRISWANIA, Aug. 19.?The halt
ing of the Norwegian mall steamer
Haakon VII and the seizure of the
mails aboard her, by a German sub
marine has been followed by the fil
ing of a protest at Berlin, and a de
mand for a return of the malls.
The Haakon VII was on her way to
England, from Bergen.
NASHVILLE GETS BIG
ORDER FROM ITALIANS
NASHVILLE, Tcnn., Aug. 19.?Over
$2,000,000 worth of tobacco purchas
ed by the Italian government is stor
ed in a Nashville storehouse await
ing Bhipment to Italy.
FILM COMPANY GET
BIG ANNUAL CONTRACT
NEW YORK. Aug. 19.?The Mutual/
Film Company of New York has clos
ed contracts for the distribution of
$8,000,000 in motion picture films this
year.
ST. LOUIS COMPELLED
TO REFUSE WAR ORDERS
ST. LOUIS, Aug. 19.?All efforts of
the Allies to place a $29,000,000 or
der here for picric acid have failed
on account of a scarcity of the raw
material.
GERMANY'8 LOSSES
ARE OVER 2,200,000
COPEANHAOEN, Aug. 19. ? The
latest German casualty lists give the
total Prussian losses at 1,641,000 and
those for Bavaria, Saxony and Wur
ttemberg 637,114. This does not in
clude the naval losses nor prisoners
of war in Germany's lost colonies.
CRISI8 NEAR IN ROUMANIA?
ZURICH, Aug. 19.? A Bucharest
special reports that a -ministerial cris
is is said to be Immlent in Roumanla.

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