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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, August 24, 1915, Image 1

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VOL. VI., NO. 651. : yPESDAY, AUG. 24,1915. PRICE TEN CENTS.
? ? ? ?.Hi' 1 1 ? ^ 1 ^ ? ?? ? - ?? ? ????? ' ? i ? ?? ? ? ?" ?? ' ?????*?? ?> ? ? ? i ? ? ? ? i ????
LOSS Of AMERICAN LIVES REGRETTED BY BERLIN
GERMAN TRANSPORTS SUNK; FEARFUL LOSS
GERMAN TRANSPORTS
SUNK; THOUSANDS OF
INFANTRYMEN DROWNED
PETROGRAD, Aug. 24. ? Three *
German transport* crowded with
Teutonic Infantrymen, were sunk by
Russian land batteries near Pernau,
at the North end of the Gulf of Riga,
according to a semi-official announce
ment In Novo V re my a today. Several
thousand German soldiers were
drowned.
The Germans attempted to land
troops at Galnash, South of Pernau.
The German ships were allowed to
oome close to land before they were
fired on. Then, the announcement
states, a terrific artillery fire was
opened by the Russians and In a duel 1
between the cruisers convoying the
transports and 'the shore batteries,
all of the transports were sunk. The
fight lasted two hours before the last '
transport disappeared.
REPORTS OF SUNDAY'S
BATTLE MYSTIFYING
LONDON. Aug. 24.?Latest details
concerning the German naval defeat
in the Golf of Riga have failed to
clear up the situation. Petrograd ad
vices make it appear certain that the
Germans met with a severe reverse,
although official reports remain silent
as to the Russian claim that four
cruisers, including the Moltke, and
seven torpedo boats, were destroyed.
The Russians now state that an ad
ditional cruiser must be added to
those already sunk or put out of ac
tion. ?*
GERMANY TO EXPRESS j *1
REGRET TO DENMARK |
LONDON. Aug. 24.?Germany's re
ply to Deumark's protest against the
firing on the British submarine E-13
by a German torpedo boat, while the,
E-*3 lay grounded on the Danish Is- j
land Saltholm. will be an unreserved rc
apology, according to information re
celved from Copenhagen today. fr
Fourteen British sailors were kill- ai
ed in the attack. v
+ + ? h
GERMANY HAS LOST 42 cl
SUBMARINES TO DATE
LONDON. Aug. 24.?While the gov- ^
ernment of Great Britain is not mak
ing public the results of the contest
against German submarines it has
been learned upon good authority that
42 of the submarines have been cap- tl
tured or destroyed since the war be- s,
gan. The search for submarines has j
been redoubled within the last week. sj
and an even greater degree of sue- y
cess is looked for in the future. a
di
GERMANY APOLOGISES FOR 3(
SINKING NORWEGIAN SHIP e,
' ~J*~~ o:
AMSTERDAM. Aug. 24.?Germany iD
informed the government of Norway 0I
that the sinking of the Norwegian
steamer Minerva was due to clrcum- m
stances which led the commander of
the submarine to believe that the ves
sel was British. Germany has ex- p,
pressed her willingness to pay dam- a!
ages. S
S
KITCHENER AGAIN URGES tl
BRITAIN TO CONSCRIPT h
U
LONDON. Aug. 24?Lord Kitchen- tl
er Is said to have made strong rep- n<
resentations to Premier Asqulth In
favor of conscription In order to in- ^
crease the British army. Lord Kitch
ener said that Great Britain must
increase her men under arms to 4,
000,000 if she hopes to win the war ^
against Germany within two years.
It is said that Asquith has agreed
to submit the question to parliament ^
when it convenes September 14.
GENERAL CONDITIONS j *
IN RUSSIA NOT CHANGED
s n
WASHINGTON. Aug. 24. ? Cable- ?
grams from Petrograd say that the ^
conditions in Russia have not been ^
changed by the fall of Warsaw. t]
The Russian government made full
preparations for talcing care of the
civilian population that began fleeing
from the Polish capital weeks ago.
While at many places the sudden de
mands for aid caused temporary short
ages in foodstuffs, general conditions R
remain unusually good. The govern- "
ment extended aid to refugees in trav- ''
eling to interior points. Railway tick
ets were furnished them, and in many ?
cases their food was supplied with
out cost by the military authorities.
PANAMA MARU FLOATED.
SEATTLE, Aug. 24.?The steamship a
Panama Maru, which ran aground in c
Paget Sound early yesterday, was a
floated last night, and proceeded to
Tacoma. undamaged. G
?. a
<>t + + +4++ + ti> + C> + + + + o
? WEATHER TODAY +o
* Maximum?74. * * si
+ Minimum?32. * n
+ CLEAR! * o
??*???*++**??????n
?
U. S. WANTS TO
MANAGE HAYTIEN
INTERNAL AFFAIRS
PORT AU PRINCE. Aug. 24.
24.?A plan to end the period
of revolution In Hayti has been
sent to the Haytlen govern
ment by the United States. An
answer to the communication
not later than Wednesday noon,
Is requested.
In Its address, the American
government expresses Its de
sire that there be accepted
without delay a draft of a con
vention suggested to be held
every ten years, under which
there shall be established an ef
fective control of Haytlen cus
toms. as well as tho administra
tion of the finances of the
country under a receiver-gen
eral and American employees.
Under the terms of the con
vention both municipal and
rural politics are to be govern
ed by natives of Hayti, under
command, however, of Ameri
can officers. The plan Includes
provision for payment of Hay
tlen debts to foreigners and an
engagement to cede no Hay
tlen territory to any foreign
power except the United States.
?
FRY TO MAKE
EQUAL RATES
SEATTLE, Ayg. 24.?An effort t o
?ach a basis for equalizing the
trough water and rail rates to and
om Alaska by way of Seattle, so
j to meet the lower through rates
ia Prince Rupert, B. C., will be made
ere tomorrow, when the North Pa
iflc Passenger association meets.
'ROHIBITION WAVE
DUE TO AMERICAN
SCHOOL EDUCATION
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 24.? That
le prohibition wave that has been
weeping over the United States is
ue to the educational work in oppo
lion to alcohol in the American pub
c schools that began about 30 years
go was a statement made in an ad
ress to the National Education As
xlation yesterday by A. E. Winship,
litor of the Journal of Education,
f Boston. The statement was made
t the course of a speech delivered
a the efficiency of American school
joks, which the speaker said are
asterpieces.
Motion Pictures Endorsed
The use of motion pictures in the
ubllc schools was urged yesterday
fternoon in an address by Grace C.
trachan. District Superintendent of
chools In New York City. She said
lat in those of the 30 schools under
er direction in which they have been
>und particularly valuable, and that
relr use will be extended during the
ext year.
IERMAN RIDOER SUES
HEARST PUBLICATION
NEW YORK. Aug. 24.?Herman Rid
er, publisher of the Staats-Zeltung,
led a suit against the New York
.merican for $250,000 damages for 11
el based on a story in the American
>f May 30. la$t, which said that
hile Mr. Ridder has been opposing
le shipment from this country of mu
itions of war for the Allies the plant
f the International Typesetting Co.,
?hich Mr. Ridder controlled when it
-ent into the hands of a receiver last
lecember. was carrying out a con
ract for aero parts for the British
overnment.
BIG REPORT RELEASED.
CHICAGO. Aug. 24.?The Industrial
elations commission has made pub
c a 200.000-word report of conditions
i the United States.
IOCIALIST SAYS
GERMANS LONG
FOR PEACE
RERUN. Aug. 24.?In the course of
debate in the Relschtag Saturday
it. Eduard David., Socialist leader,
aid:
"There lives in the "hearts of the
erman people today as In those of
II other peoples a longing for the day
f the restoration of peace. The Eur
pean peoples are bleeding from thou
ands of wounds. Every day of war
leans further frightful destrudtion
f values. The lust for conquest must
ot prolong this war unnecessarily."
GRIZZLY
ATTACKS
MINERS
SKAGWAY, Aug. 24.?Bert Brunei
and Tom Webb, prospectors, are In a
hospital at Atlin, B. C., suffering from
severe wounds received when they
were attacked by a huge grizzly boar
Saturday.
Webb and Bruner were working a
claim about five miles from their
camp at the North end of Atlin
Lake. As they started back to their
tent a female bear and her two cubs
blocked their path. The bear made
a lunge at thorn and a fight ensued.
Neither of the men were armed. Fin
ally th bar disappeared Into the
woods, ioaving Bruner and Webb ly
ing on the ground. John Bowdcn, an
other miner, traveled 45 miles over a
bad trail and reached Atlin after a
16-hour trip. A Canadian government
launch went after the two injured
men and took both to Atlin, where
they were placed in a hospital. Webb
was badly bitten in the chest, stom
ach and hip, but was able to walk.
; Bruner is severely injured. Ho has
deep cuts in his head and body, and
I his legs were badly lacerated. Nelth
jer of the men could tell how they
managed to keep from being smother
: i d in the animal's embrace.
MISSOURI TOWN
FLOODED; TWELVE
PERSONS DROWNED
LITTLE ROCK. Ark., Aug. 24.?
When the White river overflowed Its
banks last night five thousand pooplo
of Newport were driven from their
homes, twelve are known to be dead
and a score of persons were reported
missing.
Early reports Bald that ten feet
of water had raced through the streets
i of Newport and the river was still
; rising.
The section affected is known as
Valley Park. About two thousand
people suffered owing to the lack of
drinking water.
TIDELANDS CASE
\ STILL HANGS FIRE
?+?
After another day's argument of
the tidelands case the matter is still
not concluded. The only witnesses
today were William Layton, who was
on the stand until 3:13 this afternoon,
and F. J. Wettrlck, who was called
Immediately after that to testify as
to the validity of plats of the prop
erties which hod been introduced by
the defense. Throughout the day the
entire session has been given over to
a minutely detailed direct and cross
examination as to the length of Lay
ton's tenure of the property, his title
to it, and the uses_Jo which it has
been put since it came into his pos
session. ??
When the government rested its
case in the Tidelands controversy at
ten minutes to four yesterday a mo
tion for nonsuit was immediately
made by J. H. Cobb for the defense
who charged that the District At
torney had no authority to bring the
suit.
District Attorney smiser naa intro
' duced a letter which was cited as tho
i authority to bring the suit and upon
an inspection of this document after
Mr. Cobb's motion was put Judge
Jennings stated "I have no hesitancy
at all in saying that this letter does
not show authority for bringing this
suit, but whether or not authority has
got to be shown is a different matter.
The letter shows no authority at all
because tide lands and public lands
are two different things and if that
is all there is to the letter it does
net show anything. But whether or
not you have to show anything is a
question in my mind."
Mr. Smiser then moved that the
matter be postponed until the Court
had an opportunity to verify the gov
ernment's allegation that authority
has been given and the Court an
nounced a recess until 7:30 last ev
ening.
After a full discussion of the mat
ter at the night session Mr. Cobb's
motion for non-suit was denied and
the defense opened its case. At 11
o'clock the matter was continued un
til ten o'clock this morning.
No decision has as yet been render
ed by the Court in regard to the ques
tion of necessity for tho government's
showing authority to bring the suit.
COLONEL PERKINS
IS BACK IN ARMY
???
WASHINGTON, Aug. 24.?Colonel
P. M. Perkins today was ordered to
take command of the marine barracks
at the Puget Sound Navy'Yard, Brem
erton, Wash.
Col. Perkins on July 16 was rein
stated in the navy, by a special act
of congress. He had been out of ac
tive service for ten years, owing, his
friends claimed, to the efforts of a
clique to oust him.
LYNCHING i
VIRTUALLY
CONDONED
MARIETTA, Ga., Aug. 24.?"Loo
M. Frank came to his death by bang- ?
ing at the bands of parties unknown t(
to this Jury."
This was the verdict reported to- u
day by the coroner's Jury which was e
empaneled to inquire into the lynch- g
ing of Georgia's famous prisoner, p
near Marietta a week ago, after
Frank had been taken from the State
Penitentiary at Milledgeville, by a n
mob of twenty masked men.
The coroner's Jury retired to con
sider Its verdict without having heard f]
any testimony concerning the iden- f(
tity of any person connected with tho
affair. Within three minutes after "
the jurors retired, the verdict was ?
handed in.
Frank was buried last Friday In H
Brooklyn, N. Y? where his parents re- ?
side. J
TEST ASKED OF I:
LAW FORBIDDING t
INDIANDRINKING\
Matt Carlson was this morning lc
bound over by D. S. Commissioner
J. B. Marshall to answer to the grand
jury on the charge of selling liquor K
to a native. Several days ago Carl- Cl
son was taken into custody by Chief K
of Police E. J. Sllter, who had seen
him give liquor to a native named C
Jake "Williams, he alleged. At the
time of the arrest there was some
doubt as to whether or not Carlson
could be held on the charge becauso
Williams claimed tq have "departed
from the-customs-hod habits of his 0
native tribe .and -to have adopted the ''
white man's mode of living." The evi- 8
dence on this point was not sufficient, fc
and Carlson was caused to appear be- ''
fore the commissioner.
At the preliminary trial Carlson nl
was represented by John G. Held, fil
who has requested that Jake Williams cl
be held to answer and has filed a c
complaint against him under the re- n
cehtly passed Territorial law which
holds the native punishable for wrong- T
fully soliciting intoxicating bever
ages. Whether or not a warrant will
be issued for the arrest of the native
is a question still unsettled, since the 'c
only point on which the native party 0
to such a transaction can be held to b
answer hinges upon whether or not
ho actually solicited the liquor. While
Williams Is thought to have accepted E
the liquor, not sufficient proof has so
far been brought before the Commis
sioner to establish the fact that he
solicited it. The matter will probably
be decided tomorrow.
This case will be watched with con- d
sidcrable interest as it is one of the ei
first to come up under the new reg- y
ulation, which has changed the crime ai
from a felony to a misdemeanor and o:
which, under certain circumstances,
holds the Indian also answerable. E
KRUPPS EMPLOY WOMEN
GENEVA, Aug. 24.?To aid in man- 13
ufacturing munitions of war the t:
Krupps aro now employing five thou- s'
sand women at Essen. The gigantic k
plant is running full blast and every o:
hour of the twenty-four is being util
ized. s s
DEBS TO ESTABLISH
A LABOR COLLEGE
NEW YORK. Aug. 24.?Eugone V. a
Debs, late Socialist Presidential can- 0
dldate, announces that he is about to
start a national labor college at Fort 11
Scott. f
t t ir
CABINET MEMBERS
TALK RUSSIAN AID
PLAN WITH MIKADO d
TOKIO, Aug. 24.?Premidr Okuma A
and the Minister of War today paid
the Emperor a visit at Nikko, to re
port their plans for increasing the
supply of war munitions in Japan. t)
The newspapers today published g(
news that Japan expects to send sev
eral ships to Vladivostok, laden with
war material which will bo used by a
the Russian armies in the field.
N
SKAGWAY ENDORSES
THE JUNEAU CARNIVAL
The Juneau Mid-Summer Carnival, t|
being promoted in this city by W. D. c
Gross, was endorsed by thq Skagway
Commercial Club Saturday night, ac- o
cording to the Skagway Alaskan, ?
which says: e
"At the request of C. L. Brown,
of Juneau, the club Instructed the sec
retary to send a letter to the man
agement expressing good will and a
desire to see the Carnival and Mid- <
summer fair that is now being ar- 4
ranged for in the capital city, made a
a great success."
GERMANY
ASKS COOL
JUDGMENT
NEW YORK, Aug. 24.?Count Von
ternstorlT, the German ambassador,
slcgraphed the State Department to
ay requesting that no action be tak
n by the American government, re
ardlng the sinking of the Arabic,
ending receipt of the ofllcial report
rom Berlin.
The text of Von Bernstorff's com
lunlcatlon, was as follows:
"The German ambassador 'has re
elvcd tho following instructions
rom Berlin: 'So far no ofllcial in
)rmatlon is available, concerning the
Inking of the Arabic. Tho German
ovcrnment trusts that the American
ovcrnment will not take a definite
tand at hearing only tho reports of
ne side, which, in the opinion of the
mperlal governmontf cannot cor
aspond with the facts, but hopes that
le chance will be given to Germany
> be hoard equally. Although the
nperial government does not doubt
le good faith of tho witnesses whose
tatemcnts are reported by newspa
ers In Europe, it should be borne in
ilnd that these statements are natur
lly made under excitement which
sually produces false impressions.
' Americans should actually have
>st their lives this would be natural
r contrary to our Intentions. The
erman government would deeply re
ret this, and begs to tender its sin
Brest sympathies to the American
overnment."
I
JOLLIER SATURN
TO SAIL NORTH
WITH PROVISIONS
SEATTLE, Aug. 24.?With a cargo
t winter groceries and supplies, for
ncle Sam's IslandB in the Aleutian
roup, the collier Saturn will sail
>r Unalaska and the Priblloff Islands
>nlght or tomorrow.
The cargo consists of footatuffs,
fieep, chickens, pigs and goats, and
DO tons of coal. The cargo will be
Istributed by the Bureau of Fish
ries. "Captain I. B. Smith is in com
tand of the Saturn.
RAWLER TORPEDOED;
THREE ARE DROWNED
?
LONDON, Aug. 24.?The Hull traw
sr "Commander Boyle" was torped
ed and sunk today in the North sea
y a German submarine. Threo of
le crew were drowned.
DISON PREDICTS
SEVEN YEARS OF
STEADY PROSPERITY
WEST ORANGE, N. J.. Aug. 24.-^
Leaving out the question of war In
UBtries. I am satisfied that the Unlt
i States has embarked on a seven
car cruise of prosperity," said Thorn
s A. Edison, the inventor, to a group
f newspapermen here today.
NGINEER TO BUILD
COAL TERMINALS SAILS
SEATTLE. Aug. 24. ? George W.
rown, an expert on coal transpor
itlon, will sail tonight on the steam
hip Mariposa for Anchorage, Alas
a, to superintend the construction
I the government's coal terminals.
parkman praises
lake washington
canal undertaking
SEATTLE, Aug. 24.?Speaking at
banquet given last night in honor
f the visiting members of the Rivers
and Harbors committee, Congress
tan Stephen M. SparkmoJi of Florida,
halrman, referred to the Lake Wash
lgton Canal project as "the greatest
ork outside of the Panama Canak"
nd declared that when completed it
ould "put the port of Seattle in a
lass all by itself."
nother street car
in seattle held up
?
"SEATTLE, Aug. 24.?A spectacled
andlt held up a Queen Anne Hill
treet car at 11 o'clock last night. He
ot about $12.00 frcm the passengers,
nd made his escape in a waiting
utomobile.
iew york exports
show vast jump
NEW YORK. Aug. 24.?Exports of
ie port of New York for the week
nding August 14 exceeded those of
He same week a year ago by $21,000,
00, a statement issued by Colloctor
?udley Field Malone yesterday show
stock quotations.
NEW YORK, Au?. 24. ? Alaska
lold closed today at 32%, Chino at
5, Ray at 22. Utah" Copper at 65%
ad Butte and Superior at 62%. Cop
ier metal is quoted at 16%.
4
BERLIN'S COMMENT.
BERLIN. Aug. 24. ? Other
than the news dispatches re
ceived from London for two
days after the liner Arabic was
torpedoed and sunk, no addi
tional details of tho Incident
have been published here.
Today the newspapers pub
lished what purports to be a
brief dispatch to tho London
Telegraph, quoting Joseph P.
Tumulty, President Wilson's
secretary, as saying: "Tho
Americans are unitedly with
tho President, and will, If nec
essary, offer thoir lives to main
tain the inalienable rights of
Americans on land and sea.
Commenting on this statement,
tho Kreuz Zeltung says: "Thoso
Inalienable rights, as is well
known, consist of using British a
passenger steamships."
Several newspapers hero pub
lished the Arabic's manifest on |
the trip from New York toLon- *
don. One paper said that tho
Arabic, "which was painted
like a battleship, had twelve '
American guardian angels on
board."
1
4 V \
VILLA FACES ;
REAL CRISIS!
BL PASO. Aug. 24.?General Villa's
government is facing n crisis accord- j
ing to late arrivals from Mexico. It (
is said that Villa's supporters are t
leaving him. f
VILLA TO FIGHT t
GENERAL OBREGON ,
EL PASO, Aug. 24.?General Pan
clio Villa is reported to be mobilizing
his forces at Torreon, preparatory to
launching a guerellla canrpaign of
warfare against General Obregon in T
the belief that General Obregon's for- 1
ces are superior'in organization and c
equipment.
# t ^ L
CHINA TO BUILD
SUBMARINES FOR NAVY c
?+?
WASHINGTON, Aug. 24.?$t is said c
that China Is to build a submarine
navy. Eighteen Chinese naval offi- 1
cers are now at New London, Conn.,
where they will remain ten monJis
in the shipbuilding establishments
studying submarine boat construction.
t t t a
RUSSIA HAS LARGEST 1
HOARD OF GOLD J
BOSTON, Aug. 24.?A Globe Pet- G
rograd dispatch says that the largest ^
hoard of gold in the world is that
which is held in the vaults of the
Russian state bank, amounting now
to about $850,000,000. Yet a visitor ?
may travel from one end Qf the Rus
sian empire to the other and not see
enough gold coin to buy a pair of
shoes. Paper currency is used univer
sally.
CANADIAN COMPANY MAY
GET RUSSIAN CONTRACT 8
NEW YORK, Aug. 24. ? President 8
Curry, of the Canadian Car & Foun- 1
dry company is negotiating with the 1
Russian government for a new war
order in addition to the $83,000,000
contract received early this year. The '
new order may rjin as high of $100,
000,000.
GREECE BUYS WHEAT 1
CHICAGO, Aug. 24. ? The Greek 1
government has ordered 30,000 tons s
of American wheat.
ALASKA'S GOLD AND 1
SILVER INCREASES ?
WASHINGTON. Aug. 24.?The di
rector of the mint issued a statement
today showing that the 1914 product
ion of gold and silver in Alaska was
greater than the previous years by
$1,400,000.
, , t v
CHINESE TO STUDY [
U. S. SHIPBUILDING ?
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 24.?Chin- a
ese Vice Admiral Wei Han, accompan- a
ied by fifteen Chinese naval cadets, c
has arrived in this country in what
is the first move to build up a modern 1
navy for the youngest republic. When
they hav^ finished a tour of the coun
try's principal naval stations and ship
building yardB, the admiral will place I
the fifteen cadets into ship construe- 1
tlon schools In this country. :
AMERICAN HONOR WILL
BE UPHELD IN ARABIC
CASE; FACTS AWAITED
-f
WASHINGTON, Aug. 24.?If -It la
possible to avoid a diplomatic break
vith Germany without sacrificing
American dignity, the administration
las its plan of action agreed upon.
It undoubtedly is true that Prosl*
lent Woodrow Wilson has decided
lpon the course he will pursue If he
8 convinced that Germany meant to
>e "deliberately unfriendly" in tor
icdoing the White Star liner Arabic,
vith Americans aboard.
According to the United Press As
locintion, the administration stated
in excellent authority as the attitude
if Ihe administration today regarding
ho destruction of the Arabic.
The Associated Press in early re
>orts today declared the United
States was "still without detailed in
ormation on which to shape its
:ourse In the Arabic incident."
Secretary Joseph P. Tumulty after
? conference with the President last
light, issued a statement as follows:
'As soon as all the facts regarding
he sinking of tho Arabic are ascer
alncd, our course of action will be
letermlned." No official word from
Jcrmany on the Arabic case had been
cceivcd at tho Stato Department at
1 o'clock this morning.
The loss of American lives on the
Irablc was the editorial subject yes
erday and today, of nearly all tho
Eastern newspapers, and there was
:onsiderabIe speculation as to what
itand the President will make if he
earns from Germany that no wani
ng was given the Arabic.
ENGLISHMEN ASKED TO
GIVE UP THEIR GOLD
LONDON. Aug. 24.?The British of
'icial press bureau publishes a re
lucst to the public on behalf of the
rcasury to payy in ail the available
;old to the banks and to make cash
lisbursments as far as possible in '
>ank notes.
HANY WORKMEN OUT OF
WORK IN AUSTRIA
BOSTON. Aug. 24.?A Boston Globe
Henna correspondent says that the
irar, while decreasing the number of
uen unemployed, has greatly increas
id tho number of women seeking em
ilayment. In normal times tho num
ler of unemployed males has been
rom two to four percent, higher than
iut-of-work females. Now there is
rom 12 to 14 per cent more women
iut of work than men.
TALY'S KING HONORED
BY FRENCH INSTITUTE
?*?
PARIS, Aug. 24. ? King Victor
Emanual of Italy has been elected
i foreign member of the Academy of
nscrlptlons and Belles Letters, one
if the sections of the Institute of
France. The king is an authority on
aedals and coins . His Majesty's
iook on the subject was awarded the
Icademy prize in 1914.
The French Institute now has two
toads of States, the King of Italy
,nd the President of France, and one
ormer head of a state, Theodoro
loosevelt, among its members.
ENGLISH OFFICIALS ASKED
TO PAY PAPER MONEY
NEW YORK, Aug. 24. ? A London
pcclai says that in view of tho im
wrtance of strengthening the gold re
erves the treasury has instructed the
>ostofflce and all public departments
naklng cash payments to use notes
nstcad of gold whenever possible.
AMERICAN TO REPRESENT
RUSSIAN INTERESTS
NEW YORK. Aug. 24.?Dr. P. H.
Dudley, the metallurgist for the Now
fork Central Railroad, will serve the
lusslan government by Inspecting
teel rail and other steel products
hipped from tho United States to
hat country. It is understood here
hat American steel will be used in
epalring defective rails and equip
aent.
ENGLAND HAS RIGHT
TO CENSORIZE THE MAIL
WASHINGTON. Aug. 24.?It is said
hat the State Department officials
drtually have decided that they are
?oworless-to obtain relief from the
:ensor8hip to which American mail
md cable messaging passing through
he belligerent countries of Europe
ire subjected. Investigation has con
duced tho Department that no treaties
:an bo invoked in protest.
.AY KEEL OF NEW
"CALIFORNIA" SEPT. 10
?4-?
-NEW YORK, Aug. 24.?Tho keel of
he new battleship California will be
aid September 10, it was announced
yesterday.

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