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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, August 28, 1915, Image 4

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
PUBLISHED BY THE EMPIRE PRINTING COMPANY
JOHN W. TROY. Editor and Manager
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
One year, by mall. In advance 110.00
Six months, by mall, tn advance, 5.00
Per month, delivered 1.00
Entered as second-class matter November 7, 1912,
at the postoffice at Juneau. Alaska, under the Act of
March 3, 1879.
MATTER FOR REJOICING
The attitude of Germany in connection with the
Arabic incident shonld be gratifying to Americans. The
messages that have como to our government from the
German government are such that the chance of war
between the two countries seems more remote now
than it has seemed at any time since the sinking of
the Lusitania. If Germany means anything she means
that she has recognized the righteousness of the posi
tion of President Wilson and that it is her intention
that there shall be no more Americans killed.
Putting it another way, President Wilson has won
a great diplomatic victory in the interest of the free
dom of the seas. His pcrsistance has been rewarded.
So has his patience. His firmness was rewarded with
the granting of his contentions; his patient coolness
with assurance of peace.
The American people have not wanted war with
Germany. They have not wanted contentious wrang
ling. They have had little patience with the mouth
ings of a statesman who has not missed an opportunity
to say that we ought to have been at war long ago.
They have wanted peace. But they have backed tho
President with a whole heart and a unanimity that
stirs patriotic hearts deeply. It is because they have
done that that the President has been able to gain his
points and to gain them without war.
The German correspondence over the Arabic af
fair Is a matter for National rejoicing.
ARE THE FEDERAL RESERVE BANKS USELESS?
The chronic kicker wants to know what use the
Federal Reserve Banks are, in view of the fact that
the National banks of the United States are now car
rying $S00,000.000 of excess reserves and the State
banks and trust companies about $500,000,000 more.
The answer: The Federal Reserve banks are of no
more use just now than the newly canned fruit is to the
housewife in these days of fresh melons, peaches, pears
and applies. The canned fruit is simply dead weight
on the shelves, representing money tied up that prof
its nobody: it will continue so to be until the time of
bleak days and frosty nights, when gardens and or
chards take a long vacation. Then the canned fruit
will be the housewife's chief resource. And so, when
the present wholly unnatural conjunction of a war scare
with a tremendous Inflow of money from food exports
comes to an end, when once more the demands of
American business crowds the available credit resourc
es of the nation, the Federal Reserve Bank will be
worth 10 times what it has cost to carry it through the
present period of congested cash, for the banker will
rest secure on the solid fact that good commercial pa
per, thanks to the Federal Reserve Bank, will be cash
in the day of his need.
MORE SHIPS FOR ALASKA
The Information that the Admiral Line is to add
two new ships to its Alaska fleet and that the Alaska
Steamship Company will add three is Indicative of the
development that those who are managing the affairs
of these two steamship lines foresee. The Alaska
Steamship company already has purchased the City of
Puebla, one of the finest passenger ships on the Pacif
ic coast. It will purchase or build two more ships for
the Northern trade.
When these vessels are added to the Alaska Coast
fleet there will be not less than a score of passenger
ships plying th waters of Southeastern Alaska. It
means, probably, that no section of the world, lying
as far distant from the more settled communities and
depending wholly upon water transportation, will be
better supplied for transportation?if, indeed, as well.
Confidence in continued Alaskan development is
now boundless among those who arc engaged in com
merce and mining and other important phases of ac
tivity.
AN UNPRECEDENTED RECORD
A recent report of the Interstate Commerce Com
mission shows that the railroads of this country car
ried 250,000,000 passengers in the quarter which ended
December 31 last without causing a single death by
collision. It is the first time since these reports began
to be issued nearly 15 years agfo that the railroads
were able to make such a showing. It may have been
luck that brought the railroads through the three
months without a fatal collision, but the railroad men
say it was due to the "Safety First" campaign which
has been carried on by all the railroads. A few more
records like it will put the theory of luck out of con
sideration and prove that the railroads are growing
safer because railroad men have taught themselves
to be careful.
The editor of the Scientific American says the
Queen Elizabeth of the British navy is the most power
ful man-of-war afloat, and that the Tourvllle of the
French navy Is second. He gives third place to the
California of the American navy and fourth place to
the Fuso of the Japanese navy. These vessels, he says,
and their sister ships constitute a class by themselves
and none of the other navies of the world have a ser
ious contender with them for fighting power. Other
authorities have given the California class first place.
All Alaska newspaper men and many other friends
of Will A. and Harry G. Steel, the well-known Aaslkan
newspapermen, now of Cordova, regret to learn of the
killing of their brother. Stewart Steel, also a newspa
perman. The latter was killed when a passenger train
struck him as it was passing through Sbamokln, Pa.,
August 7. where the dead man was employed on the
Shamokin Dally Herald, of which another brother, J.
Irvin Steel, was editor and proprietor.
There is just one hopeful sign that we may soon
see peace. It is that they are betting three to one In
London that the war outlasts the year. The betting
on the war thus far has gone by contraries.
There is nothing to prevent those people who have
come to the United States only to find that our civili
zation is far inferior to that of Europe from going back.
The New York Son may be right in saying thai
malaria and mosquitoes -are Interchangeable termn
bat. unfortunately, a man who Is trying to sleep cannot
exebango the mosquito ch&ntant for a quiet case of inal
aria.
"Theodore Roosevelt explores Palisades Park In
auto." The Palisades havo been hinted at many time,
but now they're on the map as firmly aa tho River ol
Doubt.
Tho troublo with plans for a Polish kingdom ad
vanced by Germany Austria and Ruaaia is that they
not only have a string but a good stout ropo tied to
them.
The news that Chicago Is about to establish a mu
nicipal "woodyard" will hurt tho city's reputation as
a winter resort in certain well-known quarters.
It seems to be up to Uncle Sam to be tho man who
puts order in border so far as Mexico Is concerned.
How much would it cost to hire Carranza. Villa
and Zapata desert their country?
OUR DEBT TO VIENNA.
(Boston Newts Bureau)
The note to Vienna?which hardly could help be
ing happy in thought and pharslng, in Its conjunction
of authorship and subject?also happily coincides with
a domestic opportunity. It is an answer to Austria;
but also it is an enlightening rebuke to many within
the United States who have become wilfully or inno
cently astray mentally on the matter. And it coin
cides also with the cumulative exposure of tho type
of sedulous German propaganda which has been seek
ing within this country to twist every possible item
of fact or sentiment into vnntago for its cause, with
little respect for anything else.
The case which Vienna blunderingly put into the
hand of Washington could hardly have been stronger;
the line or reasoning was crystal clear in advance. It
needed no such puzzlement and delicacy of thought as
many other problems of war diplomacy have Involved
for us. Instead of inflicting any such burdens upon our
neutrality, it gave scope for a fine exposition of the
nature and practice of that neutrality.
The diplomatic handling of this piece of expound
ing has resulted in "showing up" the Vienna diplomacy
as inept The latter, complaining of imagining "un
neutrality," is convicted of Itself urging thereby a real
unneautrallty. It is convicted of therein advancing
"the novel principle that neutralization is a neutral du
ty,"?the equalization to be exerted only in favor of
the special-pleading complaintant These truths are bul
warked by refutations of the Austrian argument through
use of its own citations of authority; and the case Is
mado complete by the citing or repeated Austro-German
example.
Apart irom tno ciear tact mat an arms enmargo,
as urged by Vienna, would have been equivalent in in
ternational effect to our using some power, if we bad
it, that would hamstring or cheat of victory a German
army on land, there is the domestic side of the ques
tion. Embargo would be unjust to belligerents and to
ali other neutrals as a precedent; but, beyond that, It
might prove fatally dangerous to ourselves. By elud
icating that effectively, the answer to Austria accom
plishes a notable service here at home.
At a time when a specious appeal for embargo is
being advanced in some quarters on grounds of
"morality," the government has demonstrated that it
would be in fact not only illegal, but unwise and im
moral. We might conceivable exercise it as a weapon
of our own, for precaution or reprisal or defence; but
never to "equalise" foreign belligerents.
The demostic bearing of the question on our own
military fortunes happens also to fit in appositely with
the near prospect of duties or problems ahead of the
Administration. There is the issue of national prepar
edness, on which Mr. Bryan and some others may make
trouble; and there is the matter df southern vehem
ance as regards cotton. In such situations tho Admin
istration has now been furnished by Austria with a
cognant appeal of national need or patrltism.
Vienna, which in this affair has been the tool of
Berlin?itself precluded from again thus stirring the
caldron?has after all done us a distinct service, with
the backhand effect of quite negativing the probable
hopes of breeding dissension or embarrassment here.
A NEW FOE FOR SEATTLE.
(Seattle Times.)
Fairbanks has raised up a new opponent for thiB
city?ono who Is camped on tho trail of the Puget
Sound metropolis and who intends and confidently ex
pects to "trim" the southern contender.
This foe is the Tanana Valley farmer. Tho agri
cultural community in the vicinity of the northern town
has decided to compete with this city for the trade of
interior Alaska in vegetables of all kinds, particularly
potatoes. In fact, a number of shipments have already
been made to points up and down the Yukon.
Reports indicato that the crops in tho ranana re
gion are shockingly healthy this year. Cereals are ma
turing well and conditions generally are so pleasing
that a real, old-fashioned agricultural fair is to be held
the last week in this month?and it promises to be a
humdinger, b'gosh!
SUCH IS LIFE
(Seward Gateway)
The slowness of the coming of the railroad, the
disappointment, the unexpected delays, all of these
things are seemingly the inevitable obstacles which pre
vent the securing of quick possession of all things that
are worth having. Have you ever expected anything that
you longed for eagerly and have you ever got it with
out some disappointments or delays! Isn't it curious?
There is money coming. The date is fixed for its
arrival. You go to get it, and, alas, you are told there
is a hitch. Wait around the corner for the best girl.
She promised to be there at 8 o'clock sharp. Does she
show up. Nix. You have property sold at a good fi
gure and the time is appointed for the transfer but at
the last moment the other side finds some flaw in the
title. You strike a rich paystreak and next day you
have a lawsuit on your hands. Such is life.
There still is an untried field for enterprise. No
automobile manufacturer makes anything to take the
place of the hug-me-tight buggy of the good old days
of long ago. No steering device succeeds the horse
that was trained to keep to the road with the lines tied
around the whip.?(Louisville Courier-Journal.)
Alaska, which was bought from Russia for $7,200,
000 in 1867, has produced $244,156,000 In gold since
the date of the transfer to the United States.?Mining
and Scientific Press.)
If the Kennecott mines in Alaska operate success
fully throughout the winter, they may furnish the need
ed example to cause others to do the same thing.?(Se
attle Times.)
People are asking: "Is Germany stirring up the
Mexican hive to sting Uncle Sam in the back and to
keep him occupied at home?"?(Cordova Times.)
Colonel Watterson's three-column "peril" is not the
Japanese nor the Germans, but the danged that Ken
tucky may go prohibition.?(Washington Post.)
Juneau is to hold a big carnival next month to
which all of the Alaskan towns will be invited.?(Cor
dova Times.)
If you are known as a "Good Indian," did you get
your reputation down town or at home?? (Dallas
News.)
i ? ?
HIT8 FROM SHARP WIT8
? ^
There are always willing voices to
help you to be discontented.?(Now
York World.)
| Onco In a whllo a man makes money
bocause he doesn't know enough to
see tbo risk that ho Is taking.?(Al
bany Journal.)
About tho time a fellow begins to
think ho tf ii budding genius along
comes the frost?(New York World)
Very often just looking wlso docs
not fool anybody.?(Norfolk Ledgor-'
Dispatch.)
It Is as safe to judgo a man by the
excuse ho makes as by the company
ho keeps.?(Desorot News.)
x"
Sometimes a man without a heart
Is described as a man with a back
bone.?(Noshvlllo Banner.)
Honost, now, did you ever sit down
and calculate your veracity batting
average? Try it sometimes and then
tako a square look at tho percentage
column.? (Memphis Commercial Ap
peal.)
A man Is also known by tho com
pany ho dodges.?(Columbia State.)
+ 2 *
BIT8 OF BYPLAY
(By Luke McLuke.)
* : ?
(Cincinnati Enquirer.)
Never believe the "Yes" of the man
who can't say "no."
Every man knows that If other men
were only half as decent as he Is this
would bo a fine world.
It Is a good thing that our prayers
aro not always answered. If they
wore mighty fow of uso would try to
hustle for what we noed.
The upkeep of a motor car keeps
many a man down.
The only popular bluffer Is the bluf- j
fer who Is always telling how pros
perous ho is and how well everything
Is going with him.
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
PATENT. I
8. A. H. A.
Serial No. 01608
1
Notice Is hereby given that C. W.
I Fries a citizen of the United States,
iover the age of 21 years, whoso post
office address Is Juneau, Alaska, be
: Ing entitled to the bone&ts of Sec. .
2306 of the revised statutes of the
United States, and the amendments '
thoreto, has applied to mako entry of '
tho lands embraced In United States
I non-mlneral survey No. 1111 situate
oq the Northeast shore of Gastlneau
Channel, one and three-quarter miles
southeast of Juneau In the Territory
of Alaska, and more particularly de
crlbed as follows, to-wlt:
Beginning at Cor. No. 1 at mean
high tide of the Northeast shore
of Oastlncau Channel, cor. not
boL wit cor. a stone set In
ground marked S. 1111 W.C.1
bears north 26 Iks dlst: U.S.I.M.
No. 1 from true cor. No. 1 this
survey bears S. 65* 64' W. 53.76
chs| dlst; thence North from true
cor. No. 1, 1.13 chs. to cor. No. 2,
a stone set In ground marked S.
1111-C2; thence East 14.03 chs. to
cor. No. 3. an iron pipe set In
ground marked S. 1111 C-3;
thence South 10.09 chs. to road;
12.67 chs. to cor. No. ,4 cor. not
set, wit. cor. a stone In place
wurneu o. xi 11 vv.v>-* Dears norm
66 Iks. dist; Cor. No. 1 Avalanche
lode S. 989 bears S. 40? 05' 30" E. '
24.03 chs. (list; thence from true j
Cor. No. 4 meandering beach of ,
Gastineau Channel at lino of mean
high tide (1) N. 39? 34' W. 2.23 j
chs. (2) N. 57? 19' W. 2.92 chs. 1
(3) N. 34? 52' W. 2.11 chs. (4) N. 60?
I 47' W. 2.74 chs. (5) N. 42* 34' W.
1.97 chs. (6) N. 47? 46' W. 5.55 chs.
(7) West 1.10 chs. to true cor.
No. 1. the place of beginning.
Area 8.98 acres. Variation at all
corners 32? 00' E. Latitude 58? 17'
N. Longitude 134? 22' W.
As additional to original homestead I
entries of John R. Copeland and Eliza
Green, widow of James Oreon, de
ceased, H.B. No. 541 and 739 at Lit
tle Rock, Arkansas and Now Orleans.
respectively, and dated March 2, 1867
and May 7, 1869, respectively.
And all persons claiming adversely
any portion of the above described
tract of land are required to file with
the Roglster and Recolver of the
United States Land Office at Juneau.
Alaska, their adverse claim thereto,
under oath, during the period of pub
lication or within 30 days thereafter, 1
or they will be barred by the provis
ions of the statute.
CONRAD W. FRIES. 1
United States Land Office, Juneau,
Alaska, July 31, 1915.,
IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that the
foregoing Notice be publlshod for the
statutory period In the Alaska Dally
Empire, a newspaper of general cir
culation, printed at Juneau Alaska,
the nearest neswpaper to said above
described claim or survoy.
C. B. WALKER,
Register.
First publication, July 31, 1916.
Last publication, September 30.
It r
NAMES 18 NAMES
Miss Ima Ford lives at Ashland,
Ky.
Buzohard and Mixer run a drug
store at Muskcgum, Mich.
A. Butcher runs a butcher Bhop in
Milwaukee.
Ike Hackle raises chickens at Mid
dletown, O.?(Cincinnati Enquiror.)
Taking Chances.
"I think our Congressman is tak
ing long chances."
"How so?"
"He is actually making a tour of
the district to inquire how tho freo
seeds ho distributed turned out." ?
(Louisville Courier-Journal.)
npil A \[U AUTO-STAGE
InAnJu SCHEDULE
Leave Juneau
9:00 a. m.
10:30 a. in.
1:00 p. m.
2:30 p. in.
4:00 p. m.
5:00 p. m.
6:00 p. ru.
9:00 p. m.
11:00 p. m. '
Leave Thane
9:20 a. m.
10:50 a. m.
1:20 p. in.
2:50 p. m.
4:20 p. m.
5:20 p. m.
6:20 p. m.
0:20 p. m.
11:20 p. m.
car stars t-rom Goldstein's uurtord's
and Alaskan Hotel
Prlvato Car for Hire Any Hour at
Alaskan Hotel.
Day Phone Slnglc-O. Night Phone 105
SCHEDULE
Juneau Ferry & Navigation Company
Leaves Juneau for Douglas, Tread well
and Thane
6:00 a. ra. 1:00 p. m. 7:0ffp. m.
7:00a.m. 3:00 p.m. 8:00p.m.
8:100a.m. 4:00 p.m. 9:30p.m.
*9:00a.m. 6:00 p.m. 11:16p.m.
11:00 a. m.
. Saturday Night Only?12:00 P. M
?9:00 A. M. Trip Does not go to Thane
Leave Douglas for Treadwell & Thane
6:10 a.m. 1:10 p. m. 7:10 p.m.
7:10a.m. 3:10 p.m. 8:10p.m.
8:10a.m. 4:10 p^m. 9:40p.m.
11:10 a.m. 6:10 p. m. 11:26 p.m.
Leave Treadwell for Thane
6:16 a.m. 1:16 p. m. 7:16 p.m.
7:16 a.m. 3:16 p. m. 8:16 p.m.
8:16 a.m. 4:16 p. m. 9:46 p.m.
11:16a.m. 6:16 p. m. 11:30p.m.
Leave Thane for Treadwell, Douglas,
and Juneau '
6:25a.m. 1:25 p. m. 7:26p.m .j
7:25a.m. 3:25 p. m. 8:25p m. -
8:25a.m. 4:25 p.m. 9:55p.m *
11:25a.m. 6:26 p. m. 12:16a.m. .
Leave Treadwell for Douglas & Juneau *
6:35 a.m. 1:35 p. m. 7:35 p.m. I
7:35 a.m. 3:35 p.m. 8:36 p.m. -
8:36a.m. 4:35 p. m. 10:05 p.m. '
9:20 a.m. 6:35 p. m. 12:25 a.m. I
11:35 a.m.
Leaves Douglas for Juneau j
6:40 a.m. 1:40 p.m. 7:40 p.m. ?
7:40a.m 2'40 p. m. 8:40p.m. ;
8:40 a.m. 4:40 p. m. 10:10 p. m
9:25a.m. 6:40 p. m. 12:30a.m. ?
11:40 a.m. \
_ ?
JUNEAU 8TEAM8HIP CO.
United 8tatee Mall
STEAMER GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route
Leavon Junoau tor Douglas, Fun
ter, Hoonah, Gypsum, Ten&kee,
Kllllsnoo, Chatham and Sitka every
Wednesday at 12:01 a. m.
Juneau-Skagway Route
I.eaves Juneau for Douglas, Eagle
River, Sentinel Light Station, El*
drld Rock Light Station, Comet,
Haines, Skagway every Sunday at
12:01 a. m. Returning, leaves
Skagway the following day at 12:02
&. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
ISLAND FERRY CO.
? 15 CTS.??
Succeeding " REX "
LEAVES JUNEAU FOR THANE
VIA DOUGLAS
5:00 A. M. 7:15 A. M. 4:20 P. M.
LEAVES JUNEAU FOR DOUGLAS
6:00 A. M. 12:30 P. M.
7:15 A. M. 1:30 P. M.
8:30 A. M. 2:30 P. M.
9:30 A. M. 3:30 P. M.
10:30 A. M. 4:20 P. M.
11:30 A. M. 5:45 P. M.
6:30 P. M.
7:30 P. M.
8:30 P. M.
9:15 P. M.
LEAVES DOUGLAS FOR THANE
5:15 A. M. 7:30 A. M. 4:35 P. M.
LEAVES THANE FOR JUNEAU
AND DOUGLAS
5:40 A. M. 7:50 A. M. 5:10 P. M.
LEAVES DOUGLAS FOR JUNEAU
7:00 A. M. 1:00 P. M.
8:10 A. M. 2:00 P. M.
9:00 A. M. 3:00 P. M.
10:00 A. M. 4:00 P. M. '
11:00 A. M. 5:30 P. M.
12:00 M. 6:00 P. M. |
7:00 P. M.
8:00 P. M.
9:00 P. M.
9:45 P. M. |
I I
OLDEST BANK IN ALASKA
THE B. M. BEHRENDS BANK
Condensed statement of conditions at close of business Aug.
7, 1915, (as reported to Territorial Banking Board.)
RESOURCES
Loans and Discounts $ 602,553.88
Overdrafts v None
Bank Building, Furniture and Fixtures 45,691.18
United States and Other Bonds 62,550.00
Cash and Due from Banks 416,130.49
$1,126,925.55 1
LIABILITIES
Capital $ 50,000.00 \
Surplus and Undivided Profits 40,620.87
\ Deposits 1,036,304.68
\ $1,126,925.55
THE ADMIRAL LINE [ avigation Go j
???i??. ?
Pueot Sound-California Route, Seattle 5
to San Franclaco, connecting with SS. /L
Yale and SS. Harvard for 8outhem Jx.
California porta. Bp
ADMIRAL EVAN8
SOUTH SEPT 6
Pueet Sound-Alanka Route, from Ta
coma and Brattlo for Ketehilran. Frt
V friiburst. Junoavi. Yulutat. Ratalla.
1 Cord OVA. Valdcz. Ellamar, l'ort WdU,
J LaToucbc. Soward. Cook Inlet. Kodlak.
ADMIRAL WAT80N
WE8T SEPT. 2
Our moals, and the attention of our employees to Hugh P. Gallagher, Agt.
your wants have pleased others. Theyought to please you. Phone "Ad. Lino"
<| For Seattle, Prince Rupert
|| Ketdiikan, Wrangell and j
;; Petersburg.
? ? City of Seattle, Aug. 8, 20
][ Spokane, Aug. 2, 14, 27
1 >
Tor Skagway and Haines ;;
V City of 8cattle, Aug. 5, 17 <!
8pokane, August 11, 23 <[
I connect* at Skatrwajr for < ,
/ Dawson and all Yukon
River points. < >
connects at matt lb tor < ,
:: SAN FRANCISCO, LOS ANGELES, SAN DlIGO and all California Poinls ;;
Through tlckeis sold everywhere In United StAtea and Canada < >
< > LOW RATES? Largest and finest passenger steamer* on P. C. ?UNEXCELLED SERVICE < >
< > for loll particulars apply 4 >
'' H. BRANDT. C. A. P. D.. Seattle. Wash. S. II. EWING, Agent. Juweao, Alaska 4 >
\{ RIGHTS RESERVED TO CHANGE SCHEDULES "
Canadian Pacific Railway Company
B. C. COAST SERVICE
Sailing from Juneau for Seattle, Vancouver, Victoria, etc., via Prince
Rupert, B. C.
PRINCE8S ALICE JULY 23, AUG. 6, 20
PRINCE8S SOPHIA JULY 16, 30, AUG. 13, 27
C. P. R. Ticket offices?Orpheum Bldg. and 8ptckett's Postoffice Store.
JOHN T. 8PICKETT, Agent
The
Route of
Comfort
THE WHITE PASS
& YUKON ROUTE
Speed
Service
Safety
Through tickets to and from Dawson, Fairbanks, and all Inter
lor Alaska and Yukon River points.
During season of navigation, our fleet of modern up-to-dato steam
ers will operate regularly the entire length of the Yukon River and
tributaries, giving a service never before equalled.
Daily train service will t>e maintained between Skaguay and
White Horse, and our fully equipped Parlor Observation Cars afford
travellers every comfort and convenience.
Full information cheerfully given upon applying to A. P. ZIPF,
Traffic Manager, Skaguay, Alaska, and 612 Second Avenue, 8eattle,
:?? j
t-j-M-M-M-M-i I 1 1 I ! I III 111 III III III 1 11 1 1 1 111 1 11 ill I ili II
ALASKA |
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
. afety. Service. Speed Tickets to Seattle. Taccma. Victoria and Vancouver. Through A
tickets to San Franciaco ..
NORTH SOUTH ;;
I Jefferson Aug. 13, 25 Sept 7 August 15, 27, 8ept 8
Dolphin Aug. 7, 19, 31 August 9, 21, 8ejt 2 ?*
Mariposa Aug. 9 and 27 August 19 and 8ept 6
Alameda Aug. 15 and Sept 2 August 25 and Sept 12 [ j
Northwestern Aug, 22 8ept 10 August 11, 30, Sept 18
WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau AgL Elmer E. 8mlth Douglas Agt [ [
H-H-H-H-H I I II 1 III I I I i I I M I Ml I 1 II III I 111 I I II I I I 1 I I I
' "l
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO. I
| The Alaska Flyer | ^ S. HUMBOLDT | The Alaska Flycr| I I
ARRIVE SUNDAY AUGUST 29
SAIL SOUTH MONDAY, AUG. 30
Juneau Office Valentine Bldg., Phono 79. Pettlt & Harvey, Agts.
Douglas Office M.J.O'Connor Store Seattle Office 712 2nd Ave.
DOCKS JUNEAU CITY WHARF
Border Line Transportation Co.
S. S. ALLI due from south August 27
Sitka Excursion, round trip, $12.50
South Bound August 30
C. W. YOUNG CO. JOHN HENSON
Agents Juneau, Phone 169 Agent Douglas
taig5l Save Time j Money
F*c$yTTT?Use the New Short Route to and from
1 'J ASTERN CANADA, EASTERN AND
SOUTHERN UNITED STATES points via
PRINCE RUPERT
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway and Steam:hips
Lowest Fares. Unexcelled Dining and Sleeping Car Ser
vice. For full particulars apply to
H. R. SHEPARD & SON, Ticket Agts. Phono 217, Juneau Alaska.
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H-WW i { I H
;|jgSjj|
THE UNSURPASSED EQUIPMBNT |1
OF THE < ;
Greet Northern
RAILWAY p
Affords the Maximum ot bvfflfff ..v.,. r..e.
" To St. Paul, Chicago and the East?THE ORIENTAL LIMITED "
, To St. Paul and the East?THE GLACIER PARK LIMITED ; J
- To Kansas City and the South?THE SOUTHEAST EXPRESS
To San Francisco and the Expositions, via Portland and Aastoria and '
the newest, safest and fastest steamships?"Great Northern" and ! !
"Northern Pacific." ? >
I LQW ROUND TRIP RATES INCOMPARABLE DINING SERIVCE ; |
. Rates and Complete Information from Any Local Steamship Agent or ! !
A. S. DAUTRICK, Traveling Freight and Passenger Agent J J
Room lit, Valentine Bldg., Juneau !
T. J. MOORE, City Pass?nger Agt., Second and Columbia, Seattle. !
? H. DICKSON, City Passenger Agt., 348 Washington SL, Portland. < ?
I I 1 I I I I I 11 11 I I I 11 I 111 I 11111 111 PI 11 1111 11111111 1111 ||n I
Gas Boat Tillicuml
WILL LEAVE FOR I
WARM SPRINGS BAY
Evory Tuanday Morninc at 6 O'clock from H
the City Dock in Juneau and 6:30 from I
DouxlaaCity Dock. Pa*#cnicer? * Freight I
PHONE DOUGLAS 3-5 ?
KAKE MAIL ROUTE
Schedule In Effect April 1 to Not. SO, 1915
Tho E. A. HECG sails evory Monday at 8 o'Clock
n. m. from Young's Float, stoppldg at Douglas.
Taku Harbor, I.imrr.touc. Sncttisham, Sumdum.
Windham Bay. Fivo-Flngcr Light, Kanahaw and
Kakc. CAPT. P. MADSEN.

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