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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, September 04, 1915, Image 1

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/ THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE"!
VOL. VI., NO. 661. JUNEAU, ALASKA, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1915. PRICE TEN CENTS.
Allies to take the weimsive in west, indicated
?PINK' FISIt
LIKELY TO
COME HIGH
If the scheduled run of "pink" fish
falls to materialize on Puget Sound
?and it Is now twenty clays overdue
?Southeastern Alaska salmon can
ners this year will make fortunes.
Only in this district has the sal
mon industry fared well this season,
according to cannerymen now In the
city. From Y&kutat to Bristol Bay,
whero the industry depends solely on
the "red" fish, the season has been
the poorest In many years, the pack
falling 60 per cent, short of Its aver
age mark. In some points in Bristol
Bay, and at Chlgnlg and Afognak.
the pack Is' said to have been but SO
per cent, of what was canned last
year.
Great **Plnk" Year Here
Pink salmon in unlimited number*
have been the catch in Southeastern
Alaska this summer and it is because
of the great abundance of that varie
ty of salmon that has enabled all
Southeastern Alaska canneries to reg
ister record packs. If the pink run
Is a failure on Puget Sound, and all
signs point that way, Southeastern
Alaska's pack will control the mar
ket?at the expense of the Sound and
Westward canners. RejJbrts from Se
attle are that only <10,000 cases of red
salmon have been packed for the en
tire Puget Sound district, which has
a canning capacity of 5,000.000 cases.
About 1.100,000 cases has been the av
erage pack on Puget Sound.
Pinks May Go Soaring
A prominent cannervman told The
Empire last night that he would not
be surprised to see pink salmon quot
ed in the opening prices at $5.00 a
case. Sixty-five cents a case is the
usual opening price for that species
of salmon, but as the red salmon
pack in Southeastern Alaska this sea
son fell off considerably, the pinks
will be the headliner. it Is believed.
Don. Davis, captain of the Tee Har
bor cannery tender Alexander, who
was in Juneau last night, says that
the Tee Harbor plant has packed 48,
000 cases, and is now winding up its i
affairs for the season. The Alexander i
brought in 2500 salmon to the JuneauI
Cold Storage Company, which were
caught in that company's trap near
Tee Harbor.
CAPTAIN STORRS IS
MADE SUPERINTENDENT
OF "ADMIRAL LINERS"
SEATTLE. Sept. 4. ? The Paclflic
Alaska Navigation Company yester
day created the office of superinten
dent and President H. F. Alexander
announced that Captain A. J. Storrs,
master of the S. S. Admiral Dewey,
had been selected for the position.
Captain James Brennan. commander
of the steamship Admiral Farragut
has succeeded to the command of,the
steamship Admiral Dewey. Captain
Michael J. Jensen, who commanded
the Admiral Watson up until the time
she sank when rammed by the steam
ship Paraiso at her dock here Sunday
morning, has been assigned to com
mand of the steamship Admiral Far
ragut. The latter vessel will sail
tomorrow night on her first Alaska
voyage.
JAY W. BELL AND MISS
OSTROM ENGAGED
The engagement of Miss Lorn Edith
Ostrom. daughter of Mrs. C. A. Gs
trom of Seattle, to Jay William Bell
of Juneau has Just been anounced.
The wedding will take place in Seat
tle sometime next month. The couple
will go to San Diego and San Fran
cisco for a wedding trip, after which
they will return to Juneau.
The bride-elect is a sister of Charles
C. Ostom of Juneau, and lived here
for more than a year prior to July,
when she returned to Seattle with her
mother.
Mr. Bell has made Juneau his home
for the past nine years. He came
here from Fremont, Neb., ahd at the
present time is cleric of the United
States court, a position to which he
was appointed by Judge Robert W.
Jennings, on October 1. 1913.
COAL ON PAVLOF.
Th? Pacific-American Fisheries Com
pany's steamship Pavlof. under chart
er to the Alaska Steamship Company,
reached port early this morning, and
will be here until tomorrow at noon.
She brought 60? tons of freight for
Gastlneau Channel, including 252
tons of coal tor Juneau and 100 tons
of coal for Thane. The Pavlof. which
formerly was the steamer A. G. Lind
say. is under command of CapL W. B.
Knight. "Jimmie" Lankin is pu/ser.
Edward E. P. .Morgan, formerly pur
ser of the Jefferson but now general
representative of the Alakka Steam
ship Company, is maktnp an official
trip on the steamer.
The Pavlof goes to Skagway from
here.
? **??** + + * + ? + ** i
+ +
* Maximum?57. +
+ Minimum?35. ?
? Cloudy?Rain?.42 .in. +
* *
if.****************
ORPHANAGE
BURNS; FIVE
GIRLS DIE
SAN FRANCISCO. Sept. 4. ? The
bodies of five children, three of whom
wore burned beyond recognition, wore
recovered early today from the ruins
of St. Francis Girls' Directory, which
was totally destroyed by fire a few
hours earlfecBj^
The bodies of Elisabeth O'Brien. 5
years old, and her sister Katie, 141
years old, were identified. The bodies j
of throe other small girls were found
in one bed.
Fifty-two children and six adults
1 were housed in the Orphanage, which
was a five-story frame building.
Only the heroism of the Sisters in
charge of the institution kept the
! death toll so small. Forty seven
children, several of whom were blind,
and four aged women were roscued
from death by Sister Mary Margaret,
the Mother Superior, Sister Mary Ag
nes, Sister ,M?ry Katherlne and po
licemen.
CREDITORS FILE
SUIT TO RECOVER
ALASKA DEPOSITS
SEATTLE, Sept. 4.?Two suits
were filed today in the King county
superior courts by creditors against I
the defunct Washington-Alaska bank
of Fairbanks. The first was brought;
by Elizabeth Smart, who asks the re
storation of $S56.25 in deposits. The
second was filed by W. A. Sblnkle,
who asks $2804.52 and the appoint
ment cf a receiver for securities held
in this state by the bank and its par
ent company, the Fairbanks Banking
Company.
II
SUFFERED AT
HUSBAND'S HANDS
MRS. MOHR SAYS
PROVIDENCE. R. L. Sept. 4.?Mrs.
Elizabeth Mohr, released yesterday
on bonds of $10,000, and, awaiting the ?
grand jury's investigation of the mur- j
der of her hnsband. Dr. C. Franklin
Mohr, said today that what she had i
suffered at the doctor's hands would .
have caused some women to kill him.
She repeated that the throe no
groes who confessed to the murder,
but said that she had engineered it,
were lying. "They worked for the
doctor, and I have heard them threat
en him If he did not pay them wages
he owed them." she said.
SITKA TRIP OF
STEAMERS ENDED
The excursion trips to Sitka, of (he
Alaska Steamship Company, and the
Pacific Coast Steamship Company, are
over. The steamship Dolphin, which
arrived from Sitka early this morn
ing, on her way South, completed the
trips for the former company, and |
when the steamship City of Seattle
arrives from Sitka tonight it will
mark the last tourist trip of the Pa
cific Coast Steamship Company fleet <
for the season. i
The excursion season began early
in June and has been the best in the
history of Southeastern Alaska, sev
eral thousands of people visiting the
Territory on the steamships. -
The Dolphin got away for the South
at 5 o'clock this morning. Among
the passengers were W. G. Beattie,
Miss Helen Robinson. Mrs. A. E. Ed
monds and M. E. Robinson for Ket
chikan, F. Hilderbrand and L. B. Ad
sit for Petersburg, and A. Carlson,
Mrs. H. H. Townsend, Miss Mae
Schmidt and Miss Orral Storer for
Seattle.
LIGHT KFEPER'S^
WIFE IS DEAD
Funeral services over the remains
of Mrs. Charles Bohm were held from1
the Young Chapel at 4 o'clock this
afternoon. Interment was held in
Evergreen Cemetery. Mrs. Bohm died
Wednesday at her home on Sentinel
Island. 40 miles North of Juneau,
where her husband is employed by
the government as lightkeeper. The;
cause of death wa.- cancer. The body
was brought to Juneau yesterday, ac
companied by Mr. Bohm, Mrs. Flora
L. Peterson, a daughter, and Peter
Elliott and family, of Yankee Cove.
Mrs. bohm was born In Bath.
Maine, on January 19. 1883. The
Bohms have lived in Alaska for a 1
number of years.
JEWISH NEW YEAR
NEXT THURSDAY
Thursday of next week is the Jew
ish New Year, known as Rosh Hash
anah. which, with Yom Klppur. which
Ooraes ten days later and which is
fhe Day of Atonement, are perhaps
tho two.Jewish festivals most rigidly
observed.* The latter festival is cele
brated by a fast which lasts from sun
down of the day just previous until
sundown of the day itself.
In observation of these festivals all
of the local Jewish business houses
will be closed all day September 9.
Mrs. Marie Rrcnnan, night operator 1
at the Juneau Telephone Exchange,
will leave tonight for a vacation trip >
to Seattle. 1
MEXICANS
SLAIN BY
RANGERS
BROWNSVILLE, Tex.. Sept 4.?
Seven Mexicans were killed In a bat
tle this afternoon between Texas
rangers, on the American side of the
border line, and Mexicans believed to
bo Carr&n^a soldiers, on the Mexican
side of the Rio Grande river near old
Hidalgo, Texas.
At 2 o'clock this afternoon the bat
tle was still being waged. There wore
forty Mexicans in the original attack
ing party. They fired across the river
this morning, at Texas ranchmen,
near where the fight was being fought
this afternoon. No ono on the Ameri
can side bad been killed when the
last report was received here.
Nine more Mexican bandits have
been killed by American posses in
the vicinity of San Benito within the
past twenty-four hours.
ARMY PLANE FIRED ON.
Over a hundred shots were flred
at a United States army aeroplane by
Mexicans, late yesterday afternoon.
The shots were flred from across the
border. The aeroplane was flying
over Brownsville when it was attack
ed. The Mexicans later opened flro
on a squad of soldiers guarding the
electric lighting plant and the Are
was returned. No casualties were re
ported.
MEXICANS GOOD WHEN
WARSHIPS ARE NEAR
WASHINGTON. Sept. 4.?Rear Ad
miral McLean has reported that no
anti-foreign demonstrations have oc
curred in Mexico since the battleships
Louisiana and New Hampshiro ar
rived there.
TWO HUNDRED
DIEJN WRECK
WASHINGTON, Sept. 4.?Two hun
dred persons. Including many women
and children were killed In a train
wrecfc this morning 200 miles East
of Mexico City, American Consul
John R. Silliman reported today In a
dispatch to the state department. No
details were given.
g
GRAND JURY RETURNS
BUT FIVE INDICTMENTS
KETCHIKAN, Sept. 4?The grand
Jury adjourned yesterday, after hav
ing returned five indictments, four
Df which charged the giving or sell
ing of liquor to Indians. A. L. Brown
of Craig was Indicted on two counts,
charged with felonious assault on an
Indian girl at Craig.
Jose Riviera, indicted for selling
liquor to Indians plead guilty and was
lined $20/
Judge Jennings has announced that
he will not announce his decision on
the liquor license question until Mon
day.
SHUfWATER
OFFSUNDAY
Water will be shut off by the Ju
neau Water Company Sunday morn
ing at 7:30 in order that the pipe line
may be repaired. Superintendent
George Ziegler said this afternoon:
"I don't know whether it will be shut
off for three hours or three days. We
will work as rapidly as we can."
Repairs were necessitated by dam
age done by a pole-line crew. It is
said the mains were clogged with
debris.
KILLS HIS NEIGHBOR
AND ENDS OWN LIFE
SEATTLE, Sept 4.?James Crock
er, a subarbanite, wont home in a
drunken condition last night and be
gan to abuse his wife. Mrs. Crocker
called Morris Cole, a neighbor, to her
aid. When Cole approached Crocker
shot and killed him and then turned
the weapon upon himself, with fatal
results.
15-CENT FERRY
RATE IN FORCE
When the ferry "Alma" left at 6
o'clock this morning for Douglas,
Treadwell and Thane, the 15-cent pas
senger rate went into effect. Commu
tation books of tickets, sold at the
rate of two for twenty-five cents, will
bo sold only at the office of tho Ju
neau Ferry & Navigation company.
Manager Margrie announced, and
many of the books have already been
ilsposed of.
The reduction of the passenger rate
on the ferry between Juneau and'all
channel points has been popularly re
ceived and travel on that line is ex
pected to Increase from now on, as
the rate is to be permanent.
STOCK QUOTATIONS.
NEW YORK, Sept. 4.?Alaska Gold
closed today at 32 %, Chino at 45,
Ray at 22%, Utah Copper at G6%,
and Butte and Superior at 64%. Cop
per metal is quoted at 18.
U. S.-MADE
SUBS ARE
IN BATTLE
fc NEW YORK. SoR 4.?"Oporatlog
under their own power, and without
rofueling or " rcvictualing, and without
tho slightest mishap," says the New
York Herald today, "ten submarines
designed by American naval archi
tects and built by. American artisans
have within the last low months
crossed the Atlantic and are now do
ing yeoman servlco for the Allied
causo In German and Turkish waters.
While the rest of the world has been
dreaming of the day when trans-At
lantic submarsibles would be an ac
complished fact, the thing has been
dono by American gonius and Ameri
can craftsmanship."
Continuing, The Herald says: "In
four months from the time Charles
M. Schwab signed contracts for sub
marines, with tho British government,
the little vipers' as tho little boats
came to be known, wero turned over
to British crews at the Vicker-Maxlm
yards, Montreal, where they wero
built Jointly by the Bethlehem Steel
Company and the Electric Boat Com
pany, and started for the war zone.
Five of the boats are now operating
noar Heligoland, behind which Island
the main German fleet has been In
hiding since the start of the war. The
other five are with tho Allied fleets
in the Dardanelles.
"From every standpoint tho ach
ievement is a remarkable one and Its
chief value to Americans Is that It
demonstrates what American naval1
constructors can do towards strength
ening tho national defense If called
upon."
RETIRED OFFICER
ASKED AS TO
' WAR FITNESS
WASHINGTON, Sept. 4. ? Secre
tary of the Navy Josephus Daniels
has sent notice to all retired naval
officers asking a report from them on
their fitness for active duty, with a
request that they express their pref
erences for assignments.
A similar request to retired army
officers was sent out a short time
ago by Secretary of War Llndley M.
Garrison.
The Secretary of the Navy 1b hav
ing made also a roster and the pres
ent address of all retired. former en
listed men in the navy and the ma
rine corps.
These activities of the military
arms of the government are of the
utmost significance at this tirao. They
are accepted hero as moves in a gen
eral plan to build up an efficient re
serve for both the anny and the na
vy of trainod men upon which a great
volunteer force may rest for drill, in
struction and discipline.
HEMORRHAGE
WAS CAUSE or
SIMPSON DEATH
Brain hemorrhage caused the death
in Victoria, B. C., of Dr. James Kldd
Simpson, Juneau's much-loved physi
cian, who lived here almost contin
uously for 29 years, up until a year
ago, .when he moved to Victoria.
Milton Winn, to whom news of the
death of Dr. Simpson was cabled yes
terday, today received a telegram an
nouncing the cause of death and the
funeral arrangements. The telegram
said that a blood vessel had burst,
causing instantaneous death. The body
this morning was placed aboard a
Canadian Pacific train at Vancouver,
B. C., and accompanied by the Rev.
Mr. Kldd of Victoria, a cousin of Dr.
Simpson, will be taken to Ashton,
Ontario, for interment.
Dr. Simpson's father and mother
are buried at Ashton. At Almonte,
where Dr. Simpson was born, he has
sisters residing.
?f* ?$?#& ??? ??? A ??,
+ ?
* NO EMPIRE MONDAY. *
?fr ?+? 4?
? Owing to the circumstance +
+ that all of the public offices, in- *
* eluding the United States mill- +
* tary cable office, and most of +
??? the places of business will be +
? closed Monday, Labor Day, +
? and in order to give the em- ?>
+ ployees of Tho Empire an op- ?
? portunity to enjoy the holi- ?>
? day, there will bo no issuo of +
? The Empire Monday. It will *
* appear Tuesday evening, as +
+ usual. +
? o a
ANOTHER BUSINESS
MEN'S TRAINING CAMP
NEW YORK, Sept. 4.?Another mil
itary training camp at Pittsburgh
for business and professional men will
follow upon termination of the pres
ent camp.
MISSOURI JUDGE DIES.
ST. LOUISi Sept. 4.?Judge John
C. Brown, of the Missouri Supreme
Court, died here this afternoon.
NEW TYPE
OE DIVER
SfGHTED
BERLIN, Sept. 4.?A dispatch from
Cbristi&nla today says that a Gorman
submarine of a now type, and far larg
er than any previous vessel of thin
character had been observed off the
Southwestern coast of Norway by the
officers and crew of a fishing smack.
This is regarded in Berlin as con
firmation of the reports that tho gov
ernment is about to place in commis
sion a type of submersible which will
bo known as super-submarines, far
excellent in speed and armament the
best of the German submarines of the
U-type, used so effectively during the
war.
SUBMARINE DAMAGES ,
STEAMER W. T. LEWIS
LONDON, Sept 4.?Lloyd's receiv
ed word today that the British steam
er William T. Lewis had been tor
pedoed by a Gorman submarine, but
that she was still afloat and was on
her way to port In a leaking con
dition.
LABOR LEADERS
SAY GERMANS
FOMENT STRIKES
PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 4. ? Stor
ies of how Philadelphia labor leaders
had been approached by men who may
have been American agents for the
German government with the view to
foment strikes In local plants engag
ed to the manuacturo of ammunition
for the Allies was unfolded today
by members of some of the strongest
labor organizations in the city.
In this connection it was also al
leged that the efforts of certain so
called "peace" associations to per
suade Philadelphia organizations to
send delegates to their conventions
were probably tho work of German
agents.
One prominent labor man, closely
identitfied with several of the strong
est labor organizations in Philadel
phia, said that three weeks ago Pres
ident Edward' Keenan of tho Central
Labor Union had gone on record in of
ficial meeting as having been offered
money by "a detective connected with
a local bureau" to furnish certain in
formation.
Tho detective, it was said, had of
fered to pay for each name supplied
to him by Mr. Kccnan of tho work
men at the Baldwin Locomotive works
who applied for- admittance into the
ranks of organized labor. At the
time the statement was made by Mr.
Keenan many laboring men inferred
that this detective was working for
the German agents in America.
Mr. Keenan's special representa
tive, Arthur Wilson, said for Mr. Kee
nan that such incidents had happen
Cd' ______
BRITISH COLUMBIA MAY
HAVE ELECTION NEXT MONTH
VANCOUVER, B. C.. Sept. 4.?That
Premier Sir Richard McBride has de
termined to call the provincial elect
ion for October 6, is claimed to- be u
positive fact. Tho Morning Sun say.sj
ho will make the proposed prohibition
plebiscite the issue of the campaign.
The prohibitionists are not satis
fled with the proposed plebiscite, and i
demand a referendum on an act sim-.
ilar to that recently voted for in Al- j
berta when that province went dry.'
They want the prohibition law to be
come effective July 1, 1916.
LOCK UP CASHIER
AND SECURE $1300 j
nuiu n l AMniA, opiii, ??.?Danaiui (
held up tho Selaah State Bank late
yesterday afernoon, took $1300 from;
the vaults, locked Elmer Dahlin, the
cashier, in the vault, and made thoir
escape.
ONE CANDIDATE WHO
THOUGHT HE HAD QUIT
BOSTON, Sept. 4.?Former Lieuten
ant-Governor Barry failed to with
draw as a candidate for second place
on the democratic ticket, and his
name will therefore be on the ballot.
Barry, had announced his withdrawal.
GRAIN RUSH EXPECTED.
CHICAGO. Sept. 4. ? The North
Western has notified its agents to in-'
duce coal shippers to stock up quick
ly and get the tracks clear for the im
pending grain rush.
SOUTH AMfeRICAN
WOOL CLIP SHORT
BOSTON. Sept. 4.?South American
wool clip for tho coming season will
bo about 30,000,000 pounds smaller
than for last year, according to. cable
advices. Argentine and Uruguay will
each be about 15,000 bales short.
MASSACHUSETTS CORPORATIONS
MU?T PAY OR QUIT
BOSTON, SepL 4.?Fifty-one cor
porations were enjoined Friday for do
ing business in Massachusetts until
they have made a tax return to copi
missloner of corporations.
GERMANS
TAKE MORE
PRISONERS
BERLIN, Sopt, 4.?The army head
quarters staff announced today the
capture of Brldghead, on the DvSna
River at Fricdricbstadt, 40 miles be
low Riga, with 37 Russian officers and !
3325 Infantrymen, including Cos
sack cavalry. The point had been
considered one of the strongest, in
the Russian line.
Petrograd admits the retirement of
tho Russian armies to tho North bank
of the Dvina in Sector, where a des
perate struggle is being waged to pro
tect Riga and the road to Petrograd.
North of Vilna the Russians claim to
have continued offensive operations,
and to have gained some ground. The
Russians have received heavy rein
forcements, among the fresh troops
being the soldiers under General
Ruszky. who-stopped the first German
drive at Warsaw.
Tho situation in Galicia remains
unchanged.
The German-Emporor, with General
von Falkhaycn, chlof of staff of the
German army, and Field Marshal von
HIndorburg are camped forty miles
north of Nowogeorgiewsk, captured
August 20 after an 8-day siege.
BERNSTORFF TRIED TO
PREVENT ENTENTE'S FORMING
?
LONDON, Sept. 4. ? Letters pub
lished in London Daily Chronicle
show that in 1904 when Count von
Bernstorff was stationed in London
and there were rumors of a coming
entente between France and England
he tried to got Lucien Wolf, political
writer for the Chronlcb, to print an
attack on proposed alliance. Copy
was sent by Von Bernstorff to be writ
ten ostensibly by Wolf from British
point of view.
FRENCH NOTES AT
PREMIUM IN BELGIUM
% A
LONDON, Sept. 4. ? French bank
notes are selling in Belgium at a 25%
premium and Belgium bonds issued
before the war at 99%, payable- in
1917, are selling at 98; according to a
Paris despatch.
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD
TO AID FRENCH CREDIT
NEW YORK, Sept. |.?The Penn
sylvania Railroad will Issue dollar
bonds for $27,000,000 and offor them
on the American market. The pro
ceeds will bo used to pay off that
amount of franc bonds, and the money
will bo. placed to'the credit of tho
French banks which will take up the
French owned bonds. That will al
low a French credit of $27,000,000.
It Is said that other American rail
roads will issue bonds and sell them
in this country for tho purpose of
retiring British and French owned
bonds. This is expected to aid the
exchange situation.
VON JAGOW REFUSES TO
PROMISE NO CONQUEST
AMSTERDAM. Sept 4. ? Gottlieb
von Jagow, German foreign minister,
declined to reply in Reichstag to ques
tions of Dr. Karl Llcbknecht, one of
tho socialist leaders, whether the
German government is disposed to
abandon its idea of annexation of any
conquered territory and enter into
immediate peaccpour parleys if other
belligerent are powers similarly in
clined. Dr. Liebknech attempted to
speak but was prevented from doing
so by continued loud applause, shouts
of "Stop!" and laughter.
AMERICAN TANNERY MACHINERY
FOR SOUTH AMERICA.
BOSTON, Sept. 4.?There was ship
ped from Lynn on Friday seven tons
of leather-making machinery for
Buenos Aires and Montevideo. Hem
ingway Machine Co. was the producer
and shipment was the second within
a fortnight. Previous to the war
leather-making machines were manu
factured in Germany.
SEATTLE TO GET AFTER
SHORT LINE PROMOTERS
SEATTLE, Sept. 4.?Failure of the
promoters to complete the Seattle Ta
coma Short Line for which a fran
chise was granted to Merle J. Wight
man and C. E. Hucklef of Tacoma, in
1907, may result in the city attempt
ing to claim as forfeited three de- ?
posits made by the promoters aggre
gating $13(500.
MANITOBA GOVERNMENT
ACCUSED OF CORRUPTION
WINNIPEG, Man., Sept. 4.?Charg
es that enormous over-payments were
made to the contractors who. erected
the new parliament buildings of the
province of Manitoba, that these ov
er payments In part at least were de
signed to provide , a campaign fund
for the recant. Itobiin government,
and thnt some members of that gov
ernment 'were cognizant of what was
going on, were reported today In the
report of the royal commission that
inquired Into the charges.
Thomas Kelly & Sons are the con
tractors m.mod In the report as hav
ing received the enormouB over-pay
ments.
ALLIES TO
START BIG
OFFjNSIVE
LONDON, Sept. 4.?That the Fran
co-English allies are ooon to com
mence a gigantic offensive movement
all along the Western front was the
semi-official statement Issued in Lon
don this afternoon.
Those who are in touch with the
military heads intimate that orders
liavo been delivered for a concerted
attack on (he German positions very
soon. Intense activity with artillery
continues to mark the lighting of the
Allies in the,West and Paris alludes
to the violent bombardment of the
German trenches as proof positive
that the cannoning is to be followed
by infantry attackB at all points, but
particularly in Northern France,
where the center of the line rests.
"END OF WAR ONLY
WHEN ALLIES WIN."
MONTREAL, Sept. 4. ? Robert L.
Borden, prime minister of Canada
returned today from London. He
said: "The war will never terminate
until the entente Allies win a com
plete victory over the Germans."
ENGLAND'S WAR EXPENSE
TO EXCEED GERMANY'S
AMSTERDAM, Sept. 4.? Dr. Karl
Helfferich, secretary of the German
Imperial treasury, speaking In the
Reichstag on the second reading of
the 52,500,000,000 war loan said: "Un
til now 55.000,000,000 hrave been vot
ed and our estimates of war needs
still are exceeded by real war expen
ditures. The expenditure in one
month is higher by one-third than
the total expendtlure for the war of
1870, but every German knows that
the sacrifices will not bo in vain. Up
to the present the German total ex
penditures have been the highest, but
they are now being exceeded by
Geat Brritaln. The coalition of our
enemies now is bearing almost two
thirds of the total cost of the war."
AMERICANS TO M'AKE
CHEMICALS FOR ALLIES
?4*?
BOSTON, Sept 4. ? The plant of
the New England Manufacturing Co.
in North Woburn that is to manu
facture chemicals for the Allies, will
be fully under way within a few .
weeks and will then be able to manu
facture 140,000 pounds a day.
BRITAIN GETS MONOPOLY
OF U. S. COPPER AND RUBBER
?+?
BOSTON, Sept. 4.?German Coun
cillor Hclnrich F. Albert In the Globe
declares that the British government
from the beginning of the war has
concluded contracts in this country
whereby every American manufactur
er of rubber goods and of woolen
goods lias been compelled, as a con
dition of securing crude rubber or
raw wool to sell his entire product
through a British agency and has
been prevented from supplying any
part of it to Germany or Austria-Hun
gary or from dealing with any neu- f
tral nation except through the Brit
ish agency." He says the copper pro
ducers have been required to deal
with their output of copper in a like
manner; the packing industries have
likewise been compelled to withhold
their products from neutral countries
as jvell as from enemies of Great
Britain, except to the extent to which
Great Britain may permit such sales,
and efforts in the same direction are
now being made to tie up the entire
cotton crop.
BOSTON H EHALU TO
BE SOLD SEPT. 14TH
BOSTON, Sept. 4.?The Boston Her
ald, will he sold at public austlon on
Sept. 14 at 10 a. m. for failure to
meet the payment of the semi-annual
interest ?due on bonds secured by a
mortgage In 1912, according to an an
nouncement made by tho Common
wealth Trust Company., trustee of the
mortgage. All property, equipment,
good will, copyright, goes with the
sale. The Associated Press franchis
es and the right to the name of both
the Herald and the Traveler will go
to the highest bidder. No bid will
be considered which Is not accom
panied by a deposit of $30,000, to be
forfeited if the bidder'falls to make ?
good his tender.
YOUTHFUL HUSBAND
ACCUSED OF THEFT
TACOMA, Sept. 4.?Only 17 years
old and a groom for a year, Leo Rose
a mill hand, living In the East End,
has been arrested on a charge of
chicken stealing. John Sortis, who re
sides near Rose, swore to a complaint
and Rose was arrested by Constable
Martin. The youth denies his guilt.
His wife Is staying with friends.
' Four Want Pensions.
Applications for Pioneer's pensions
have been filed at the office of tho
Governor by the following men:
?William Henry Robinson, 84 of Val
dez; John Kerr, 74, of Nome, Mancl
Batard, 83, ,of Nome; and Cap King,
68, of Nome.
These applications will not be pass
ed upon until Professor C. C. George
son returns from Southeastern Alas
ka. '

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