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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, September 14, 1915, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
*._. ? ? - ?? :
VOL. VI.. NO. 668. JTTNEAU, ALASKA, TUESDAY, SEPT. 14, 1915 PRICE TEN CENTS.
ROUMANIA AND BULGARIA ARE ON BRINK Of WAR
U. S. NOT
READY TO
ARBITRATE
WASHINGTON. Sept 14. ? The
American government is not yet will
ing to discuss with Germany the ques
tion of arbitration in connection with ?
the sinking of the Arabic. It was
stated today by a high government
official that "the question of arbitra
tion is not an issue."
It was stated authoritatively that
what the American government wants;
first is a disavowal of the attack on
the Arabic. Until that is forthcom
ing. it was stated that the* United
States would refuse to arbitrate any
differences between the United States:
and Germany. It is held by American
diplomats that until Germany directly
and unqualifiedly disavows the Arabic;
attack the United States cannot go
any further in negotiations. This at
tack. it is alleged, came after a direct
promise from Germany that there
would be no more such attacks, there
fore tho negotiations between the
countries must stop until that is of
ficially disavowed and repudiated by
the German government
It is stated by the same authority
that the United States would prob
ably be willing to arbitrate with Ger
many the question of the amount of
damages due the United States, but
that the principle of the freedom of
the seas must be recognized at all
times.
BERNSTORFF CONFIDENT.
WASHINGTON, Sept 14?There is
not the remotest doubt but that Ger
many and the United States will
agree on all matters of negotiation
between them, according to Ambassa
dor Von Bernstorff. He says there is
no difference in principle between the
countries, as both stand unequivocally
for the freedom of the seas. He said
that Germany understands the United
States better now than it did a few
weeks ago.
GERMANY REPUDEATE
HESPERIAN ATTACK
____ i
WASHINGTON. Sept. 14.?In a note j
received from American Ambassador i
James W. Gerard at Berlin at noon
today the German government made 1
a qualified disclaimer of responsibil
ity for the sinking of the Allen liner
Hesperian, bound from Liverpool to
Montreal, on which there were two
Americans.
GERMANS HAVE
SECRET CODE FOR
TRANSMITTING NEWS
NEW* YORK, Sept. 14.?Germans in
New York hare received and are
showing code cable and wireless mes
sages of which the following is an
example:
"Silk red necktie: three hundred
down."
This dispatch was translated as fol
lows:
"Silk" means "Zeppelins"; "red neck- >
tie" means "British flag, as represent
ed by the British capital. London:"
"down" means slain, and "three hun
dred" tells the number of victims. A
translation of the dispatch quoted
means, therefore. "Zeppelins slew 300
in London.
Other dispatches that wonld seem to
have commercial meanings have been
received in great numbers, and it is
the conviction of the secret service of
the government that there has been
arranged a complete working code so
that German spies and sympathisers
in the United States may communi
cate with European confederates with- i
out difficulty.
PANAMA CANAL SHOWS
BIG FIRST YEAR TRAFFIC
~+~
WASHINGTON. Sept. 14.?The first
year of commercial operation of the
Panama canal was completed on Aug
ust 14th.. In that year 1317 vessels i
of 6.494.673 tons passed through the
canal. The tolls earned amounted to
$5,216,149.
NEW COMPETITION FOR
FORD'S AUTOMOBILE
. ???
BOSTON. Sept. 14.?Another sen-|
sation will soon be launched in the
automobile world by the Chevrelet
Company, which, it is understood, will
shortly announce a new five-passenger
car to retail at $490.
This would seem to indicate added
competition for the Ford cars.
BRIDGE COMPANIES ARE
DOING BIG WORK
NEW* YORK. Sept. 14.?Since Aug-4
ust 1st bridge and other fabricating
shops have taken contracts for ap
proximately 150,000 tons of steel
shapes, valued at $9,000,000, for con
struction of commercial buildings,
manufacturing plant extensions, sub
ways and railroad and highway bridg-j
es.
? + + + + + + + + + + + + + *!
+ +
+ WEATHER REPORT +
?> t
+ Maximum?56. +
+ Minimum?40. +
?> Cloudy?Rain?.38 in. +
+ ?
PIONEERS
ALLOWED
PENSIONS
Prof. C. C. Georgeson was a pas
senger on the Northwestern for Knik
where he will spend several days in
specting the Government Agricultural
Experiment Station. While in Ju
neau Prof. Georgeson passed upon
the applications of several pioneers
for pensions. These applications,
which have been on tile in the Gover
nor's office for several weeks await
ing Prof. Georgeson's arrival. They
wore granted today and the following
pioneers will receive allowances:
William Henry Robinson, age 84,
Valdez, $10: John Kerr, age 74, Nome,
$10; Cap King, age 68, Nome, $8;
Michael Harty, age 66, Pox, $8.
The Board of Trustees of the Al
aska Pioneer's Home is composed of
Gov. J. F. A. Strong, Prof. C. C. Geor
geson and W. P. Mills.
Among other matters which will be
attended to by Professor Georgeson is
the proposition of cross-breeding the
yak with Galloway cattle, which was
recently proposed. Prof. Georgeson
was not in a position to state just
what steps would be taken, if any, in
regard to the experiment, and stated
that no definite plans would be out
lined until after the matter had been
thoroughly Investigated.
MANY PEOPLE BOOK
PASSAGE FOR JUNEAU
SEATTLE, Sept. 14.?The Spokane
will sail from Seattle for Alaska to
night. The following named havo
booked passage.
For Juneau?F. W. Foyzely, Grace
Asterberg, Jack Ashton, Mrs. Albert
Berry. Robert Smith, Mrs. J. C.
Smith.
For Treadwell?Mrs. L. Werneche
and two children.
Coming on Admiral Evans.
Juneau passengers on the Admiral
Evans sailing tomorrow night will in
clude Beatrice Walls. Miss Ellen A.
Anderson, Mrs. H. Walls, Dr. L. B.
Collier, George Studebaker and wife,
Miss Urinia Per in and John Smith
and wife.
CHINESE CAFES
DISCHARGING JAP
COOKS IN CHICAGO
?+?
CHICAGO. Sept. 14.?The wholesale
discharge of Japanese cooks and wait
ers from restaurants operated by Chi
nese which has attracted a great deal
of attention in Chicago for the last
few days was explained today as be
ing part of the effects of a general
boycott proclaimed by Chinese in the
United States against the labor and
products of Japanese in this country.
LANE MAKES NEW
RULES FOR ALASKA
INDIAN OIL LANDS
WASHINGTON. Sept. 14.? Secre
tary of the Interior Franklin K. Lane
announced his decision In the Osage
Indian Oil land case. Beginning on
March 16, next year, Osage tribes-i
men in Oklahoma will get one-sixth
royalty from oil and gas taken from
their land. Lessees of Indian lands
in the future will be restricted to al
lottments of 4800 acres each. The
decision affects millions of dollars
worth of Oklahoma oil lands.
8,000 WORKINGMEN
GET RAISE IN PAY
BOSTON, Sept. 14.? Nearly 8,000
workers In the factory of the Scoville
Manufacturing Company, at Waterbury
Conn., have been given an increase of
wages of 10 per cent, and a half holi
day on Saturdays.
? ? ?
GOLD AND SILVER
COMING FROM MEXICO
NEW YORK, Sept. 14 ? Eighteen
carloads of gold and silver bullion from
Guanajuato. Mexico, have been ship
ped across the border bound for
Perth Amboy, N. Y.
PENNSYLVANIA CHEMICAL PLANT
WORKING ON FULL TIME
PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 14.? For
the first time in years all of the 17
chemical plants of Forest. Warren,
Elk and McKean counties. Pa., are op
erating to their fullest capacity.
KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS
ELECT THEIR OFFICERS
At their regular meeting for the
annual election of officers last night
the Knights of Columbus chose the
following men to 1111 their various
posts: Grand Knight. Frank A. Boyle;
Deputy Grand Knight, P. F. White;
Chancellor. J. R. Atckison; Recorder,
H. F. Turner: Financial Secretary, F.
W. Hebert; Treasurer. George M.
Simpkins.
BRITAIN WILL NOT
TALK FREEDOM OF SEA
LONDON. Sept. 14.? Sir Edward
Gray formally declares that Great
Britain will not discuss the freedom
of the seas while there exists unfree
dom and unsecurity against war and
against German methods of war on
land.
BANDITS ROB
SEATTLE HOTEL
IN DAYLIGHT
SEATTLE, Sept. 14.?Bandits held
np the Standard hotel at First avenue
and Pine streets this morning and rob
bed the clerk of $70 in cash. The rob
bers camo into tho hotel at a time
when there was no one in the place
except the clerk. They disappeared as
soon as the monoy could be socured,
and the police, which were called with
in a few minutes, havo been unable to
locate the perpetrators of the crime.
LONE BANDIT ROBS
LOGGING CREW
Dispatches rocelved here today tell
the story of a lone bandit who held
up 50 members of a logging crew at
Independence in tho southern part of
Washington state this morning. He
secured $250 In cash from the men, or
an average of $5 from each of the
men.
The bandit oscaped.
INDEPENDENCE BANDIT
WOUNDS OFFICERS
TACOMA, Sept. 14?Marshal Hen
ry Stone, of Sumner, was shot through
the right lung and Deputy Marshal
George Smuch was grazed by a bul
let Bandit Charles Anderson, who
engaged the offlcerr. in a duel, receiv
ed a bullet wound in the heel.
When the officers, who were pur
suing Anderson, demanded that he
stop, tho bandit opened flro on the of
ficers. Tho latter returned tho fire.
Aftor emptying hit: rovolver, Ander
son fled into a blackberry field, whore
he was captured by Deputy Marshal
Smuch.
It is believed that Anderson is the
Independence bandit who held up a
logging crew.
SUFFRAGISTS URGED'
TO ESCHEW PARTIES
*1*?
SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 14.?Urg
ing her hearers to forgo any allegiance
with any existing men's political 1
party, Mrs. Belmont, as general chair
man of the Woman Voters Convention
welcomed the delegates gathered here
today.
The convention If- attended by suf
fragists from all sections of the Unit
ed States.
Speakers predicted that the area
In which American women can vote
will be materially extended by vic
tories In pending elections. Eastern
delegates may be described as hopeful
of results in New York, New Jersey
and Massachusetts, but by no means
[ confident.
FRYE HAS BODYGUARD
ON SEATTLE STREETS
?^?
SEATTLE. Sept. 14.?Charles H.
Frye, a milionaire packer who has
been the victim of recent attempts at
blackmail coupled with threats of
death atthe hands of a man whose
name the authorities refuse to divulge,
has not appeared on the streets for
a month save when accompanied by
a bodyguard in the person of H. C.
Adams, a former city detective here.
Charles H. Frye Is head of the Fryc
Bruhn company, which, in addition
to its packing and wholesale meat 1
business has numerous retail markets 1
throughout Seattle and other Wash- '
ington. Oregon and British Columbia 1
cities and towns, s.nd in practically
every town in Alaska.'
? ? ? i
TANANA MURDERER 1
ASKS FOR PARDON
? ?
An application for pardon has been
made to President Woodrow Wilson
by Arthur E. Bernier who was con
victed of the murder of a Tanana sa
loon keeper in 1909. Bernier was
tried by Judge Lyons in 1910 and sen
tenced to 99 years in Leavenworth
Federal Prison.
Judge Lyons endorses the applica
tion which has just been filed asking
for a pardon. No action has been
taken.
MUNITION MAKERS
STRIKE FOR MORE PAY
LOWELL, Mass., Sept. 14. ? Ar
rangements to extend the strike at
the big plant of the United States
Cartridge Company hene were made
at a meeting of the employees last
night. Four hundred of the workers
struck at midnight to enforce the de
mand for an increase of 15% in their
pay. They also demand Sunday night
off with full pay.
ALASKA SPRUCE GOES
TO PUGET SOUND MILL
*The last consignment of a 15,000
foot shipment of lumber will leave
the Worthen Mill on the Al-Ki for Se
attle and will total 4)00 feet of Alaska
Spruce.
This lumber will be used by Wor
then and Martin in the manufacture
of furniture, showcases, etc. The Al
aska spruce has proven itself to be of
especial va ue in white enamel work
and will bt used in place of the flr
which has been used in the past.
EDI"H "G" ARRIVES.
The launch Edith "G", is in port,
having arrived at Douglas this after
noon from Southwestern Alaska.
Fred J. Vandewall, deputy customs
collector at Skagwoy, is a visitor In
the city.
GERMANY
TO ATTACK
IN WEST
PARIS. Sept 14.?The war depart
ment announced today that it has in
formation that the Germans are trans
porting groat numbers of troops,
many hoavy howitzers and great stores
of ammunition toward France from
Poland.
Great importance is attached to the
movement here. It is believed that
it means that Germany and Austria
are preparing to cease further invas
ion of Russia for the present season,
and to begin an appressivo offensive
movement in the west against the
Allies,
Reports coming from Petrograd
and elsewhere are that the Teutons
are encountering great difficulties in
their advance Into Russia, and that
there are Indications that they will
fortify the positions thoy havo al
ready captured, and wait for another
spring before again pressing tho in
vasion of that country.
On tho other hand, climatic condi
tions will permit of active campaign
ing in tho West until December, and
it is believed that Germany's purpose
Is to utilize tho time in attacking the
Allies along the French frontier.
AVIATORS ATTACK GERMAN8.
PARIS, Sept 14. ? Tho bombard
ment of a railway station at Berns
dortf, 28 miles southeast of Metz, by
French aviators was reported today
in tho official communique from the
French war office.
Saarbruecken and Cantonments at
Chatel in the Argonne forests were
also bombarded.
GERMANY TO SEND
TROOPS TO ALSACE
AMSTERDAM, Sept. 14.?Germany
Is making preparations to send ad
ditional troops and supplies to Al
Bnco. Having recently completed a
second railway line between Strass
burg and Duddler.helm, the Germans
have begun the construction of a dou
ble-track road from Duddleheim to
Molsheim.
+ *
! SANTA ANE CAPTAIN
BLAMES DYNAMITERS !
NEW YORK. Sept. 14.?Wire- !
j less dispatches received here 1
I from the Santa Ana state that '
j Capt. Pavey, master of th eves- |
I sel. believes that she was set on
j fire by a bomb placed on the ves- 1
j sel before she sailed by sym- !
j pathisers with Austria in the j
| war in Europe.
I | I
"SWIETWATER BILL"
IN TOILS OF LAW
?+?
SEATTLE, Sept. 14.?William C.
Gates, known throughoutAlaska andj
the West as "Swift Water Bill," was '?
arrested in Spokane today on a war
rant issued in Seattle, sworn to by
Mrs. Iola Beebe, his former mother
in-law, charging Gates with failure to
Bupport Fred Gates, his 14-year-old
boh, who has been in the care of Mrs.
Beebe.
Gates claims that he gave Mrs.
Beebe,. the boy's grandmother, $10,
000 in payment for her care of his
child.
Mrs. Beebe's daughter, the former
wife of "Swift Water Bill," died sev
eral years ago.
"Swift Water Bill" Gates was one
of the famous characters of the Daw
Bon country in the early days. He
has made several moderate sized for
tunes, but is now said to be in hard
Btralts again.
? ? ?
'l? + 4? + ,fr + + 4,4, + 4, + + + 4,+
4* +
+ PAN-AMERICAN *
* CONFERENCE AT *
* NEW YORK SATURDAY +
t ??? 4
+ Washington, Sept. 14.?Secre- *
* tary of State Robert Lansing *
* announced today that the Pan- *
* American conference on the 4*
* Mexican situation which was to *
+ have convened here tomorrow ?
* will meet at New York Saturday. *
4> ?:*
GRANT JOHNSON SETS
BILLIARD RECORD
-
Yesterday afternoon, in the pres
ence of a number of billiard enthus
iasts, W. Grant Johnson set a record
for Alaska for the 14.2 inch balk line
game by making a run of 104. The
century mark is very seldom reached
in the amatpur ranks and the ama
teur record for the world is 202. m.ade
by Calvin Demarest in Chicago in
1908. ?
PRINCESS ALICE ARRIVES EARLY
SLxteen passengers arrived on the
Princess Alice this afternoon at four
o'clock among whom were John L.
Carlson, Mrs. Odin Hewitt, Mrs. J. J.
Cbnnoye and two children, Mrs. At
kins, R. Crult and Bert Sperry.
*?
RUSSIANS NOW
Of PER EFFECTIVE
RESISTANCI
BERLIN, Sept. 14.?Loonhard Adell
war correspondent of tho Tageblat
with, tho Austrian headquarter^ li
Poland, reports that tho Russian rc
slstence on the Sereth river has at
sumed tho most serious aspcctB. Th
proportions of tho resisting forces in
dlcate that the new Russian com
mander has been ordered to hold Ah
remaining positions in Russia's pot
session In Gallcia.
The force of the Russian counte
attacks in various parts of the Urn
In Gallcia scorns to corroborate thl
conclusion.
The Tageblatt, speaking on th
strength of the report of its corret
pondent, says people may again lool
for serious eventualities from tin
cast rn front.
TEUTONS LOSE HEAVILY.
PETROGRAD, Sept. 14.?The Gei
man and Austrian forces Invadini
Russia lost 465,000 men in two monthi
according to official statements madi
here today. It is announced by tin
Russian government that the Gcrmai
prisoners who have fallen into thi
hands of the Russians admit tha
while German regimenLs were annl
hllated In the storming attacks 01
Russian positions.
German prisoners conflrm the re
ports of the Russian air corps tha
the difficulties under which the Tcu
tons aro advancing are without par
allcl military history.
The Pussian official statement con
eludes with tho declaration that with
in the last threo weeks more thai
70,000 German prisoners have fallei
into the hands of the Russians.
LENOX, Mass., Sept. 14.?Austrlai
Ambassador Dumbn announced torta;
that he had requested tho foreign of
flee of his government to recall hln
on leave of absence in order that h<
might explain through a personal re
port on the situation in the Unitec
States which resulted in the request
by the United States government foi
his recall. He said that he expcctec
to receive his orders to report t<
Vienna at any moment. He will thci
ask for his passports from the Secrc
tary of State.
SHIPMENTS TO DENMARK
WILL NOT FAIl
?*?
COPENHAGEN, Sept. 14.?The Dan
ish importers have completed ar
agreement with Great Britain by whicl
goods shipped to Denmark, consignee
to tho Merchant Guild at Copenhagen
will not be stopped by the British au
thoritles. The arrangement is the
same as that with the Netherlandi
Overseas Trust, except that the ship
mcnts must be made to individua
members of the guild, but the organ
ization guarantees such consignment!
will not reach the central powers.
CONDITION OF ANARCHY
IN PERSIA.
LONDON, Sept. 14.?Reuter dis
patches from Teheran say that a con
dition of anarchy prevails in Persia
It Is stated that the government mill
tary forces have been defeated in r
series of engagements with tribesmen
and a number of Swiss officers witt
tho government forces wore rcportec
killed.
The outbreak among seperatt
tribesmen covers a wide area.
GERMAN AGE LIMIT
HAS BEEN RAISEC
COPENHAGEN, Sopt. 14.?The Fo
kcblad, of Holding, a frontier Journa
with excellent sources of information
In Germany, states that there was re
cently an alteration in the Retchstaj
concerning a national service lav
which the German papers arc forbid
den to discuss.
"The law will Increase the age lim
It to 54," the newspaper says. "1
authorizes the calling out of all mci
who hitherto have been rejected o:
account of their physical condition
including even those who previous!]
have not been considered fit for tlx
untrained landstrum."
.VANCOUVER MAN
SHOOTS AFFINIT>
VANCOUVER. B. C., Sept. 14.?H
M. Cottinghain, owner of the Hote
Regent, shot and perhaps fatall;
wounded Mrs. Cora Abie, his afllnity
when he found another man in he
apartments.
DORA BRINGG POWDER
As part of the consignment of th<
steamer Dora, which Is due to arrlvi
this week will be a powder shipmen
of 100 tons for the Dupont Powde
Company.
DREDGF. OUTFIT ON WAY
TO THE RUBY DISTRIC
A dredge outfit was among th
freight on the Northwestern yestoi
day bound for the Ruby district fo
the Alaska Gold Mining Company,
company organized by John Holmgrer
cf Fairbanks, and associates.
STOCK QUOTATIONS.
NEW YORK, Sept. 14.?Chino clos
cd today at 44%; Alaska Gold, 30%
Ray, 22%; Utah, 66%; Butte Supei
lor, 66%. Copper is quoted at 17%.
1 -
: PARLIAMENT FINDS
;; GRAVE SITUATION
t LONDON, Sept. 14.?While a tone
of confidence marked the opening of
r Parliament today there was no at
0 tempt on the part of the government
B to minimize the gravity of the situa
tion. It waR admitted by the govcrn
c ment that the Cabinet has been ser*
iously debating the subject of con
it scrlption for the purpose of increas
ing the army to the number that it is
believed that the situation demands.
BOND PROCEEDS
TO BE SPENT
j IN AMERICA
I NEW YORK, Sept. 14.?Represen
j tatlvcs of Great Britain and Franco
, who came here for tho purpose of
( floating a loan aro asking that the
United States take $1,000,000,000 in
. stead of $500,000,000 as was at first
proposed. They pledge that if Amer
. leans take a loan of $1,000,000,000 that
t every cent of It will be spent In tho
United States for cotton, meat, wheat
and other war munitions.
It is also stated that if tho United
States docs not take a loan it will
naturally be necessary for Great Brit
, aln to purchase all the cotton, moat
1 and other supplies possible In other
markets where the British and French
exchange arc higher.
> LOAN LIKELY TO BE PLACED
That tho loan will be placed In New
York Is not questioned by bankers
' here. In fact, It Is the solution of the
situation that New York bankers have
! been begging and praying for for the
last Ave weeks. Large papers, Includ
ing the World. Tlmos and Herald and
J practically all of tho llnanclal publi
cations are urging that the loan be for
} $2,000,000,000, because they claim that
1 it will requite that amount to main
tain normal British values for Brit
ish exchange for a year.
Conferences have been held today
between American bankers and the
foreign representatives. No annouce
mens have been made as to the pro
i posed loan, but it is accepted here as J
a fact that it will be on a Ave per
! cent basis with freedom from any in
come or other tax charge.
ITALY ORDERS 50,000
AMERICAN OVERCOATS
1 NEW YORK, Sept. 14.?The Italian
government has ordered 50,000 over
} coats for Italian army from Staw
Brothers, Newark, N. J., The coats
must be ready in three months. About
1000 a day will liavo to be made. This
firm, in March, made 50,000 khaki
Jackets for the British army. 1
? ? * ,
. RUSH ORDERS OF j
IRON FOR ITALY i
[ PITTSBURGH, Sept. 14.? Unusual
urgency of Italy's need for pig Iron
, was Illustrated In Pittsburgh this week
I when a special train of 34 freight cars
was made up and sent over the Penn
5 sylvanla railroad to the seaboard with
nothing but besscmer pig iron aboard |
The iron was ordered at special cost
to be shipped in time to reach the ;
> sailing of an Italian steamship today. '
I
. AMERICAN AND RUSSIAN
1 TRADE TO BE IMPROVED
?4? J
1 NEW YORK. Sept. 14?The Rus
- slan-American Chamber of Commerce
r In Moscow is trying to improve con
. ditlons governing trade with this coun
try so that relations may be resumed i
. on a scale approaching normal.
, DURATION OF WAR
, DEPENDS UPON GERMAN
DEMANDS ON ENGLAND
BERNE, Swlterland, Sept. 14?Count
Karl Strugh, Austrian rremier, says
the duration of war depends on how
much Germany will demand from
f England.
. CANADA MUST MAKE
1 LARGER SHELLS HEREAFTER
[ MONTREAL, Sept. 14.?Dr. A. Thorn
r as says that undoubtedly a number
of larger Canadian plants have ma
chinery heavy enough to manufacture
bigger shells. The result of the man
ufacture of munitions to date In Can
e ada is that shrapnel is being accu
q mutated faster thnn it can be shipped
t ?this forming the bulk of Canada's
r present production. Attention must
be turned to heavier shells, and while
Mr. Thomas says the Dominion would
naturally obtain the preference and
r get hor full of orders of this nature,
p the majority of orders must go to
.. the United States, since that country
r is much better equipped.
|l FRANCE TO MAKE
20,000 SHELLS DAILY
PARIS, Sept. 14.?The Paris Matin
j. says that within a few weeks fac
; tories of France will be able to pro
duce 200,000 shells a day, in addition
to those imported.
ARMIES OF ROUMANIA
AND BULGARIA CLASH
AND BLOOD IS SHED
ATHENS, Sept. 14. ?Actual fight
Ing begun this morning between Bul
garians and Roumanians on the bord
er between the two countries, accord
ing to dispatches received here to
day, when the patrols of the two na
tions clashed.
Ten men were killed and a score
were wounded in the fighting accord
ing to the dispatches.
Dispatches received here through
Roumanian sources say that the Bul
garians were the aggressors in the
fighting.
The news of the clash has caused
the wildest excitement here. It Is
believed that it presages a general
renewal of Balkan hostilities.
ROUMANIA MOBILIZES
TROOPS.
ATHEN8, Sept 14.?Roumanla has
begun at least a partial mobilization
of her army. Several regiments of
cavalry have already been sent to the
Austrian boundary in the northwest
to face an unexpected concentration
of Austrian troops on the border
there. There Is also a more or less
general movement of troops toward
the Bulgarian border.
BULGARIA'S CZAR IN FIELD.
LONDON, Sept. 14.?Czar Ferdin
and, of Bulgaria, has taken the field
at the head of his torops for "annual
maneuvers," according to dispatches
today from Bucharest.
The belief prevails, however, In
many quarters that he is preparing to
lead an attack with his army against
Roumanla.
LOOKS LIKE ANOTHER
BALKAN WAR IS ON
LONDON, Sept. 14.?The clash at
arms between troops of Roumanla and
Bulgaria today and the concentration
of Austrian troops along the Rouman
ian border has perplexed the military
experts here. The government has
declined to give expression to any
opinion regarding the situation, but
other experts have not been so un
communicative. Many of them be
lieve that it presages a war. between
Bulgaria and Roumanla with the pos
sible invasion of Roumanla by Aus
trians. That would have, the effect
of making Roumanla an ally of the
entente powers and Bulgaria an ally
of the Teutonic Empires.
It Is thought that If Roumanla and
Bulgaria go to war that Greece will
join Roumanla for the purpose of fur
ther curtailing the limits of Bulgaria
in the south.
GERMANY ORDERS
ROUMANIANS OUT
OF THE COUNTRY
GENEVA. Sep* 14.?The Geneva
Tribune says that thousands of Rou
manian workmen In all parts of Ger
many have been given notice to leave
the country, and are returning to Rou
mania. The Roumanian banks at To
mesvar and other cities In Austria
have been closed.
BALKANS MAY FORM
NEW LEAGUE AND PUT
1,000,000 MEN IN FIELD
LONDON, Sept. 14.?A Rome dis
patch says the Balkan League Is to
be reconstructed with a provision for
putting a combined army of 1,000,000
men in the field.
AUSTRIA PREPARES
FOR WINTER WARFARE
BERNE, Sept. 14.?A Budepest spec
ial says that Austria is preparing for
a winter campaign. The Russian win
ter will begin In six weeks.
RUSSIAN WHEAT TO
CARGO MINNESOTA
?*?
SEATTLE, Sept. 14.?It was an
nounced here today that the steam
ship Minnesota, which It was recently
reported would sail for London soon,
is returning to Vladivostok where she
will be sold and will take on a cargo
of wheat under charter to Balfour
Guthrie ACompany. The Minnesota
has a tonnage of 20,718 gross and
13,323 net, she is 623 feet long with
a breadth of 73.5. Built In New Lon
don, Conn., in 1904, she was brought
to the Pacific coast for the Oriental
trade and was tho largest as well as
the fastest of tho trans-Pacific liners
sailing from Seattle for Japan.
MANY HORSES READY
TO GO TO THE WAR
PHILADELPHIA. Sept. 14.? More
than 41,000 horses purchased by the
French government are being exam
ined In Philadelphia by French army
officers. The range of prices Is from
$150 to $200. The entire contract will
Involve more than $7,000,000.
BRITISH SHIPPING SHOWS
ONLY SLIGHT DECREASE
LONDON, Sept. 14.?For the year
ended Aug. 31, shipping in and out of
London aggregated 26,842,000 tons, as
against 30,816,000 tons for the 1914
year, a decrease of J2.8 per cent.

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