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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, September 24, 1915, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. VI., NO. 676. JUNEAU, ALASKA, FRIDAY, SEPT. 24, 1915. PRICE TEN CENTS.
...... i ' . ' i L 1
BULGARIA IS ALL READY AND GREECE RETALIATES
FOUNDRY
TO MOVE
TO THANE
Otto Wicklander. well known foun
dry-man. Is completing the architec
tural plans for a new building for
the Enterprise Foundry, which he and (
Andy Lagergren of Treadwell estab- <
lished in Juneau two years ago. It is ,
announced that the foundry will be' i
moved to a new location "on the Thane
road, where it will be more conven
ient to the Alaska Gastincau Mining ;
Company. The Enterprise Company
has an agreement with the mining
company under which the bulk of the
company's business is secured.
The new foundry will be 60 x 120 ;
feet, and will be on a solid foundation.
It will be equipped with a crane ca
pable of lifting 40 tons, and will be ;
able to handle any work from the in
dustrial plants in Alaska. Heavy ma
chinery is to be installed throughout. ,
Enlargement of the plant was ne-1;
cessary by reason of the increased
volume of work, and as the present j
foundry building in Front street is on ^
piling, a change to a solid foundation .
was necessary. Work on the new i
building will start within a few days.
|,
McADOO HAS PLAN TO
PROTECT U. S. IMPORTS
-y i;
? ,
WASHINGTON. Sept. 24.? Secre- <
tarv McAdoo has obtained an opinion ]
from Attorney General Thomas W. i
Gregory upon the manner of putting
into effect a provision of the tariff <
act of 1894 which directs a relfquida
tion of the customs duties on imports
when the money standard of value
of the country from which the Im
ports are made has fluctuated more ,
than 10 per cent. Such a move, it is ,
pointed out. would protect American (
importers because of the drop in ex- |
change.
The New York importers have pe- .
titioned Secretary .McAdoo to reduce ,
the valuation of certain imports from ,
Italy. Austria and Prance. The basis ;
of the petition is the fact that valua-1'
tlons of articles imported were made
up when the currency of the coun
tries named had a greater value in
the United States than at present.
? i
NEW YORK. Sept. 24.?F. W. Hirst \
editor of the London Economist, has j
cabled to the New York Tribune: (
"Our exchange problem and its diffi
culties are gradually becoming un
derstood here, but none seems to have .
perceived that sales to your side nec- j
essarily diminish your power to lend ,
us money. What you want, of course ,
is consumable commodities. From '
this standpoint gold is better for you .
than bonds, as being more resalable.
and for us gold has the great advant
ate that commodities bought with
gold are bought presumably without {
exchange loss." (
M-COMBS' PLACE
AS COMMITTEEMAN
IS NOW ASSURED
NEW YORK. Sept. 24.?Friends of
Willim F. .McComb8, chairman of
the Democratic National Committee
have declared that Che recent election
of Wm. B. Haldeman to succeed Urey
Woodson as the Kentucky representa
tive. practically assured him control
of the committee.
For some time influences adverse
to Chairman McCombs. including
Secretary McAdoo. hare been trying to
force him out of the National chair- 1
manship.
There is no way to shelve him. if
he insisted upon remaining, but if a
majority of the committee should ask
for his resignation, he probably would
be forced to grant their request. But '
prominent members of the committee '
have been urging him to continue,
and he has gone to great pains to 1
make a careful canvass of the com
mittee.
As a result of this canvass his many
friends say that he has nothing to
fear from those who would like to
bring about his downfall.
? ? ?
GAMBLES FOR LIFE
GENEVA. Sept. 24.?How an Al
pine chasseur gambled for his . life
with a captured German, is told in a
letter to his sister in Geneva. "I
won." he says, "but had not the heart j
to kill my adversary. He spoke
French well, having been at Marseilles
two years, and knew the game of'
'manille' well, but the cards favored
me. My corporel and myself were
sent oat at night to reconnoiter. and
we captured this German sentinel,
quietly smoking, out of reach of his
rifle standing against a tree nearby.
He surrendered, but made sarcastic
remarks in French about the way we
made prisoners, so I challenged him
to stake his life against mine at
cardn. The German is now a satis
fied prisoner in France."
BABY BOY ARRIVES.
At 2 o'clock last night a son was
born to Mrs. H. M- Lawrence at St
Ann's hospital. Mr. Lawrence Is em
ployed as a millwright with the
+ + + + + + ????* <?* + + ?>?>
+ +
* WEATHER REPORT *
* Maximum?65. +
+ Minimum?33. *
* Rain?.68 Inch. *
???????**?* + ? + + ????
ALASKA-JUNEAU
DEPENDANT TO
DAMAGE SUIT
Asking damages in the amount of
$25,000, suit was filed this moruing in
the district court by Mlnta Mllatovich
as administrator of the estate of- Ris
to Milatovlch. deceased, against the
Alaska Juneau Gold Mining Company.
Grounds for suit as set forth in the
complaint allege that Milatovlch was
employed as a mucker In the Alaska
Juneau mine, and that while working
on the 4000 foot level in the No. 2
stope, he was sent by the stope bos;-,
into Stope No. 1. a place where he
had never been before. Near the en
trance of this stope, the complaint al
leges. there was an empty hole 65
feet, and into this hole Milatovlch
fell while obeying the order. No
warning of tho existence of the hole
was given, according to the plaintiff's
statement, and as the result of his
accident, which occurred May 27th,
he received internal injuries and had
his left leg broken, the complaint
charges. Risto Milatovlch died on Juno
J, 1915.
Mllatovich was 32 years of age. Ho
is survived by a wife and three
minor children, in whose behalf dam
ages arc asked in the amount of $25,
)00.
J. H. Cobb and S. H. Millwee will
represent the plaintiff, Hellenthal &
Hellenthal appearing for the defend
ant. As the accident which the plain
liflf alleges caused Milatovich's death
occurred In May, the workmen's com
pensation act, effective August 1. is
lot applicable.
SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY
WILL GIVE AMERICA
GREAT POTASH SUPPLY
WASHINGTON. Sept. 24.?Dr. Thos.
H. Norton, commercial agent of the
Department of Commerce, announces
the discovery by a government chem
ist of a new and seeming practicable
method for the extraction of potas
lum carbonate from feldspar. Should
this new method prove a success, it
will give to America a practically un
Imited supply of potash.
30HEMIANS WILL MAKE
MUNITIONS, IF COMPENSATED
NEW YORK. Sept. 24.?The Bohem
an National Alliance in America, re
'erring in a letter to the New York
Herald the statement of Dr. Dumba.
the Austrian ambassador, that thou
sands of natives of Austria-Hungary
employed in the big steel Industries,
fire engaged in working against their
awn country, says: "We take the
liberty of saying in the name of all
Slavonic workers in munitions fac
tories that they will gladly work on
ill war supplies contracted for by the
Allies as long as they are reasonably
paid for their labor. Their sublime
imbitlon is to help their brothers on
the other side of the Atlantic to ac
complish the rejuvenation of the
Slavonic race to help free all Europ
ean nations from the militaristic mon
ser."
MESSINA FEELS
QUAKE SHOCK
? ?
ROME. Sept. 24. ? Earthquake
shocks were recorded last night at
Messina and other sections of Italy.
No damage was reported.
"LIMBLESS WONDER" DIES
?+?
NEW YORK. Sept. 24.?Pneumonia
caused the death here of William T.
Goy. aged 55. known in side shows
for years as the legless and armless
wonder.
Goy, who was born limbless, hud in
terested thousands by his skill in
stringing beads with a needle in his
mouth.
GRUVER LEAVES;
DECLINES TO TELL
OF MISSION HERE
?
E. L. Gruver left on the Princess
Sophia for his home in New York this
morning. Enruote he will visit the
exposition at San Francisco for a few
days, thence hurry to his home office
to report on his trip to Dawson, which
he made this summer on behalf of
certain English interests. Mr. Gru
ver spent three days in Juneau inspect
mining properties here and on Doug
las Island and visiting his friend. Al
exander C. Young, who lately became
a resident of this city.
Just before sailing Mr. Gruver said
this visit to Juneau was only a prelim
inary one and that in the course of
a few months he would return for a
longer stay. In his judgment there is
no locality on the American continent
enjoying a greater degree of prosper
ity. or where conditions are more sta
ble. and that development in this dis
trict is only a matter of proper time.
He is one of the recognized author
ities in the mining world, abroad and
at home, and has acted for others or
hia own firm in.several large deals.
He declined, however, saying the time
was not opportune, to state the par
ticular purpose of his stop-off here.
NORTHWESTERN BOOKINGS.
Advance bookings haev been made
for the Northwestern which leaves
for Seattle late this afternoon as fol
lows: Miss Grace May, Alfred Shy
man. Tom Clement, A. H. Bradford,
J. E. Harton, F. H. Tascher, AJ Clark,
and C. McKlmmins.
BALKAN STATES BECOME INVOLTED
IN WORLD STRUGGLE; AMBITION
FOR MACEDONIA ATTRACTS BULGAR
LONDON, Sept. 24.?Mobilization of the Gre
cian army was ordered today and with Bulgar
ia's border bristling with cannon and her troops
ready for battle against Serbia, it is believed
in London that every Balkan State will be
drawn into the European conflict within a week.
Greece's mobilization is due to her guarantee to
assist Serbia in case the latter country is at
tacked by Bulgaria.
According to an official dispatch from Sofia,
the official journal of the Bulgarian government
today published a decree said to have been dic
tated by Czar Ferdinand, ordering the mobiliza
tion of all classes of troops from 1890 to 1912.
Greeks Are Mobilizing.
An early dispatch said that Premier Venize
los of Greece would ask King Constantine to
sign a general mobilization order at 4 o'clock
today and later an official dispatch from Athens
said the King already had promulgated a de
cree of mobilization for 20 divisions of the Hel
lenic army.
From Rome came news that Greek reservists
in Italy were today recalled to the colors, and
thousands of these soldiers thronged to the sea
ports in Southeastern Italy, to sail for home.
The Athens correspondent of the Paris Matin
telegraphed his paper today that Bulgaria, hav
ing taken certain war steps, had forced Greece to
decide her course without delay, and that the
Greece government's answer to Bulgaria's
movements was mobilization.
Colossal German Drive, Plan.
One million and five hundred thousand men
are to participate in Kaiser Wilhelm's great drive
on Serbia. Advices which reached here today
from various authoritative sources say that 800,
000 Germans already are stationed along the
border between Serbia and Austria Hungary,
or are on their way there.
That Austria-Hungary is massing 800,000
men for use against Serbia, and that Bulgaria,
unless the allies by an eleventh-hour diplomatic
stroke succeeded in holding off, wlil augment this force
with 250,000 men, were reports In which the strongest
credence was placed.
The Cause of the Trouble.
nulgaria's entrance to the war on the side of the Teu
tonic allies will be due to her unfulfilled demand for all
of Macedonia, which the Balkan States captured in the
war with Turkey. Serbia has steadfastly refused to
grant this concession although several days ago the
Serbian minister at Soda told the Bulgarian govern
ment that Serbia wns ready to cede territory as far as
the Vardar River in Macedonia, and that Serbia was
anxious to maintain a common border with Greece.
It is assumed here that the attitude of Greece was sim
ilar to this.
Before the Bulgarian mobilization started yesterday,
tho Bulgarian premier, Vaseil Radoslavoff, in an inter
view said: "We do not desire war unless we can not
prevent it, but wo mudt preserve our territorial rights."
Tho premier intimated that his government was at that
time negotiating with the central powers, with tho aim of
"obtaining the best results for tho national cause."
THE WAR STRENGTH ]
OF THE BALKANS
LONDON, Sept. 24.?With the Bal
kan States certain to be drawn Into
the war, with tho possible exception (
of Rumania, the war strength of Bui- ,
garia, Greece and Serbia is shown to i
be as follows: I
-BULGARIA (certain to be an ally
of tho central powers)?Total war (
strength 450,000. Of these about 400,- (
000 aro reserves, and there are about; i
100,000 men unorganized, bpt availa
ble for duty. <
GREECE (ally of entente powers)?| (
Total war strength 120,000, in addition ]
to about 150,000 men unorganized, but ]
available for military duty. ]
RUMANIA?Total war strength of |
nearly 600,000 men. What Rumania's ]
course will be has not yet been do- \
termined. 1
(
BALKAN SITUATION <
DIVERTS ATTENTION
FROM OTHER FIELDS -
| i
LONDON. Sept. 24. ? There is a -
temporary lull In the lighting in the <
eastern front, whore the Russians are ?
reported to be holding their own .
against the Austro-German troops. ?
It is believed her? that tho Ger- ?
mans will entrench and fortify the <
positions they have captured in Rus- ?i
8ia. while her veteran troops are sent <
to the Southern front, to light their ?
way through Serbia if possible.
No news was today reeclved from ?
Dvinsk. where the Germans are bom- ?
barding the stronghold. <
In the western front artillery duels ,
featured the day's lighting.
? *
THREE BILLIONS?WAR.
AMSTERDAM. Sept. 24.?Ac- ]
j cording to official reports re- ]
J ceived today from Berlin, sub- i
1 scrlptions to the new German i
war loan have already exceeded
j three billion dollars. i
i
4 * |
? ? ? ? ? ,
FRENCH RAILROAD IS
BIG LOSER BY THE WAR
? ?
PARIS, Sept. 24.?The receipts of 1
the Eastern Railroad of France, part |
of which Is now In the hands of the
Germans, in the first six months of :
war decreased 25 per cent, of $15,000,
000, counting the $6,500,000 paid as
transfer charges for the War Depart
ment. Operating expenses decreased
but $1,000,000. Despite the difficulties
the railroad has voted $5,000,000 to aid
employees now at the front.
?
ALASKA FUND TOTALS
$18,865.88 SO FAR ,
?+?
Receipts for the Alaska Fund for
the last quarter total $18,865.88, ac
cording to figures compiled by Clerk
Jay Bell of the District Court today.
Twenty-flve per cent of this amount
will be used in the maintenance of
schools, 10% goes Into a fund for the
relief of indigents in Alaska, and the
remaining 65% goes to the road com
! mission.
CARTWRIGHT TO OPEN
STATIONERY STORE
? ?
Clarence Cartwright, who for the
past two years has been connected
with the men's furnishing depart
ment at B. M. Behrends dry goods
store, has resigned his position with
that firm and will leave soon for the
south where he will purchase a full
line of books and stationery with
which he intends to stock a store on
Third street adjoining the Post Office.
RUSSIA IS NOT
SEEKING LOAN;
HITCH CONTINUES
NE WYORK, Sept. 24.?From all in
licatlons, Russia has advised the An
glo-French borrowing commission that
t will not be a party to the loan ne
gotiations, as a participant.
The commission is still unable to
lgree on terms, and it 1b believed in
tome quarters that the mission will
tot be successful.
The British representatives of the
:ommi8sion are Baron Reading. Lord
2hief Justice; Sir Edward Hopkinson
rlolden, managing director of the
London City and Midland Bank; Sir
Henry Babblngton Smith, former
iresident of the Bank of Turkey, and
Sasll B. Blackett, of the British Trcas
lry. The French representatives are
Vf. Octave Homberg, of the Foreign
>nice, and M. Ernest Mallet, regent
if the Bank of France.
:-4?4,4,4,4,4,4>4?4,4'4,4,4,4,4'
:? ?>
S- ROUMANIA WAITING? +
8- ??? <?
I? ZURICH. Sept. 24.?The Ga- *
:? zette do Voss publishes a dis- *
b patch from Bucharest, saying ?
I- that President Therekldes, of ?>
!? the Roumanian chamber of dep- 4
!? uties, said to an employee of 4
f an Austrian company: "I am 4
b pursuaded that the Dardan* ?
^ elles will fall in two or three *
fr weeks. Then we shall inter- +
b veno. I advise you to leave the 4
4* country." +
b 4*
!? 4* 4? <b 4- 4> 4- 4? 4* 4? 4> 4* 4* 4* 4' 4*
ENGLAND PAYS HIGH
TO PREVENT INVASION
NEW YORK, Sept. 24.?J. Herbert
Duckworth writes the Sun that Eng
land's "ring of steel" to prevent in
vasion costs $10,000,000 a day to main
tain. He asserts that England has
7,000 aircraft, and that he has watch
ed the airmen at war games, practic
ing attacking zeppelins and prepar
ing for the promised grand aerial raid
on Krupps' and other vital snots in
tho enemy's territory. At the pres
ent time England has 16,000 men en
gaged in turning out aeroplanes. Up
to June 30, the United States had
shipped 250 areoplanes, valued at $2,
000,000, to England. There are now
standing orders for 60 machines a
week until the end of tho war.
ENGLISH BEEF COST
WILL BE LESSENED
LONDON, Sept. 24.?Livo cattle for
slaughter at a port of landing will be
admitted to England thus abrogating
a prohibitory order issued more- than
fivo years ago. A reduction in the
cost of beef, estimated in some quar
ters at 25 por cent., is expected.
UPRISINGS CLAIMED
BERLIN, Sept. 24.? The Overseas
News Agency says: "Private reports
have been received that Indian mu
tineers have destroyed the British
railroad line in Travanoors (a native
state of Madras, in the extreme south
ern part of the Indian peninsula), and
that in Belucbiatan boundry regions,
Afghans have destroyed the military
barracks in the city of Lorers and
are now marching on Quetta."
MORE BIRTHS THAN DEATHS
LONDON, Sept. 24.?According to
available figures the excess of births
over deaths in England and Wales
for the June quarter was 74,515, com
pared with 101,933 for the same quar
ter of 1914; 105,727 for 1913 and 192,
293 for 1912.
AUSTRIAN PRINCE
DIES IN BATTLE
VIENNA, Sept. 24.?Prince Freder
ick of Thurn and Tax was killed yes
terday in battle on the Gallcian front,
it was officially announced. Ho fell
while leading a chargo of Austrian
landwehr against the Russians. His
troops suffered severe losses.
? *
* FEARFUL SLAUGHTER. +
4? ?+? 4
4- New York, Sept 24.?Dr. M. 4
* Symbad Gabriel, president of +
+ the Armemian General Pro- 4>
+ grossive Association In the +
+ Unltod States said today that 4
4- ho had received information in 4
4* letters on which ho estimated 4?
4- that 450,000 Armenian Chris- 4
4? tlans have been put to death 4
4? by Turks and that over 600,- 4?
4? 000 had been rendered home- 4
4? less. 4*
+ 4
4 + + + *4+4'*4-44 + + 4 +
ELLIOTT AND BRIDE
TO ARRIVE TOMORROW
Albert Elliott is returning on the
Dolphin from Seattle, accompanied by
bis bride, who formerly was Miss
Helen Gilmore of Missouri. They
will arrive here tomorrow.
The wedding ceremony took place
August 29 at Sunnyside, Wash., at
the home of a relative of the bride.
The bridegroom is a foreman's help
er, who is employed in the Enterprise
Foundry.
715 BRITISH PLANTS
MAKING MUNITIONS
LONDON, Sept. 24.? David Lloyd
George, minister of munuitions, has
announced that 180 more factories,
transformed into munitions plants,
have taken over by the munitions de
partment. making a total of 715.
DELIVERED UNFIT SHOES
TO MILITARY; 15 YEARS
PARIS, Sept. 24.? It' is reported
from Budapest that an Austrian mili
tary court has sentenced to 15 years'
hard labor a shoe dealer who deliv
' ercd to one regiment shoes, which
1 had already been rejected elsewhere
I as unfit for military requirements.
? ? ?
TO HONOR WEDDIGEN
BERLIN, Sept. 24.?The next popu
lar hero In Germany to be honored
by the erection of a wooden statute
which will be converted into metal
by gold, silver and iron nails contri
buted by admirers, will bo Capt. Ot
to Weddigen. who commanded the
submarine U-9 when she sank three
British cruisers in the North Sea last
September.
DEPOSITS DECREASE.
NEW YORK. Sept. 24.?The Canad
ian Bank loans in New York decreas
ed about $7,000,000 during July, while
the balances carried with the New
York correspondents decreased $3,
000,000 in the same time.
STOCK QUOTATIONS.
NEW YORK, Sept. 24?Alahka Gold
closed today at 33, Chlno at 44%,
Ray at 22%, Utah Copper at 67%,
Butte and Superior at 58%. Copper is
''rm at 18.
FIGHT IS DRAW.
NEW YORK, f.ept. 24?Johnny Dun
dee and Joe Mandot fought a ten
round draw here last night and Joe
Azevedo outpointed Frankie1, Calla
han in another 10-round mill,
U. S. SOLDIER
IS VICTIM Of
MEXICAN RAID
BROWNSVILLE, Tox., Sept. 24. ?
Mounted Mexican bandits today at
tacked a detachment of the 12th U.
S. Cavalry at Progresso, forty miles
west of here early today, and killed
Private Stubblefleld, of Troop B. The
bandits numbered over a hundred.
They made their escape, after llring
a volley at the United States cavalry
men, whom they hod surprised.
MANY PEOPLE BOUND
FOR ALASKA PORTS
SEATTLE, Sept. 24.?At 9 o'clock
last night the City of Seattle loft for
Alaska with tho following bookings
for Juneau:
Mrs. E. H. Biggs, William Biggs,
Mrs. N. C. Miller, Mrs. B. H. Jones, and
one steerage
For Douglas?Miss C. Gllmore, Mrs.
T. Rouce, B. E. James, and Mrs. B.
Slade.
For Treadwell?Mary Dcpue, Day
ton Depue and two children.
On the Al-Kl.
Tho Al-Kl left this morning for Ju
neau and is bringing tho following
passengers:
G. J. Johnson. E. R. Keith and wife,
Mrs. Agnes King, George J. McClellan,
E. W. Knapp, Miss E. Johnston, R.
Olson, F. Chrlstenscn, D. W. Thomp
son and wife and three steerage.
Alameda Tonight.
Passengers who will leave on tho
Alameda for the north tonight include
In addition to lists previously an
nounced: E. M. Huff and wife, Rich
ard McCormlck, R. C. Falrley and
wife, John Barrett and wife. Dr. M.
G. Evans, Miss J. Clark, Mrs. E. A.
Clark, E H. Pierce and several steer
age.
HOUSE HAS TROUBLE
GETTING PAST WHITE
HOUSE POLICEMAN
-4?
WASHINGTON, Sept. 24.?Col. E.
M. House, personal friend of Presl
detn Wilson, today was refused ad
mittance to the White House, by the
policeman on guard, who did not
know him. After a police sergeant had
Identified the Colonel he was allowed
to enter. Col. House smiled and gave
the policeman a cigar. The policeman
profusely apologized when he learned
his mistake.
SHIPPENS IS LOSER;
WIFE NO. 1 GETS
FOURTEEN THOUSAND
SEATTLE, Sept. 24.? Judge Tall
man today granted the petition of
Mrs. Elizabeth J. W. Shippens of Chi
cago for an order compelling Joseph
Shippens to pay back alimony. The
sum the court ruled was due Mrs.
Shippens Is $14,000, and represents
alimony accumulation of thirty-two
years. Mrs. Shippcn was the first of
Shlppen's three wives.
Judge Tallmans' decision takes
Shlppen's annuity of $400 from his
present wife, and gives It to the com
plainant.
? ? ?
BODY OF WOMAN
WHO DIED IN THE
ARABIC RECOVERED
QUEENSTOWN, Sept. 24.?A body
washed ashore last night near Clon
akllty island today was positively
identified as that of Mrs. Josephine
Brugulere of New York, who lost her
life when the White Star liner Arabic
was torpedoed and sunk by a German
submarine, operating off Fastnet
Rock.
ACCUSED GERMAN
ATTACHE WATCHED
IN SAN FRANCISCO
| SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 24.?Cap
;?alni Franz von Papen, military at
j i ache at Washington to Count von
Uernstorff, the German ambassador,
who recently became implicated In
(lie troubles of Dr. Dumba, the Aus
trian ambassador, and whose with
drawal by Germany the United States
government is expected to ask, is in
San Francisco. He is being closely
| shadowed by operatives of the United
j States secret service.
REJECTED RECRUITS
MAY JOIN THE GERMANS
NEW YORK, Sept. 24.? A Reuter
dispatch from Berlin says it is offic
ially announced that persons pre
viously exempt from military service
on account of physical unfitness will
bo re-examined with a view to their
possible fitness for duty at the pres
ent time.
JAPANESE SCRIBES
TO STUDY UNITED STATES
TOKIO, Sept. 24.?Ten representa
tive Japanese journalists will sail to
morrow for San Francisco, for the
purpose of studying conditions In the
United States.
j GATES GIVES BOND
TO SUPPORT SON
SEATTLE, Sept. 24.? "Swiftwater
Bill" Gates has settled his difficulties
here in connection with the filing of
charges against him of failure to pro
vide for the support of his 16-year-old
son. Gates promised to pay $20 a
month toward the boy's support,
CAPTAINS
GOTON.Y.
fORBOATS
SEATTLE, Sopt. 24.?Captain Fred
Warner, master of the steamship Al
ameda, and Captain Melville Nichols,
pilot on the steamship Jefferson, and
other officers and engineers of tho
Alaska Steamship Company's fleet,
left yesterday evening for New York,
to bring to Seattle, via the Panama
canal, two 4,000-ton steamships which
the company lias just purchased for
tho Alaska servlco.
R. W, Baxter, vice-president of tho
Alaska Steamship and Copper River
railroad companies, today announced
that he had placed order in Seattle
and Schenectady, N. Y? for freight
cars, locomotives and other equip
ment, worth $100,000. Part of this
material from the East will be brought
here on the company's latest additions
to its (loot.
Mr. Baxter has Just returned from
tho East,
GOVERNORS URGE
STATE CONTROL
OF WATER POWER
PORTLAND, Sept. 24.?A few mo
ments before it adjourned at seven
o'clock last evening the Wostern
Governors' Conference passed a reso
lution protesting against federal con
trol of water power, and asking that
Congress refuse to pass the Ferris
bill, which would vest control of all
water rights in various States with
the national government.
BATTLE-CRY OF
MOOSE: TARIFF
AND MILITARISM
NEW YORK. Sept. 24.?Following a
conference with party leaders today,
Chairman Victor Murdock of the Pro
gressive National Committee announc
ed that the Bull Moose would place a
national ticket in the field next year,
with a platform demanding war pre
paration in the United States and re
vision of the tariff.
ROCKEFELLER
DANCES WITH
MINERS' WIVES
?+?
WAHLENBURG, Col., Sept. 24. ?
John D. Rockefeller, jr., last night
turned a miners' entertainment at the
Cameron schoolhouso Into a dance.
To the strains of Tippftrary the mul
timillionaire glided through the intri
cacies of the tango with Mrs. Charles
Kaiser, the wife of the mine superin
tendent. The entertainment was giv
en in Mr. Rockefeller's honor. The
son of the oil king danced every
dance, his partners being the wives
and daughters of his minors.
BERNHARDI'S AMERICAN
TOUR NOT CANCELLED
NEW YORK, Sept. 24.? A United
Press dispatch from Paris reads as
follows:
Madame Sarah Bernhardt has post
poned for two months her forthcom
ing tour to the United States. Asked
regarding a report that she had can
celed her American engagement, she
telegraphed the Associated Press from
her residence at Andernos as fol
lows:
"I am not abandoning my tour in
America. 1 have asked for two months
time in order to form a new com
pany, and all the actors who were
with me on my previous tour are
' serving in the army, four having been
killed. Viva La France."
WIRELESS STARTS
AUTOMOBILE ENGINE
INDIANAPOLIS, Sept. 24.?What Is
said to be the first successful use of
the wireless to start an engine of an
automobile was accomplished at the
Indian State Fair. Gov. Ralston by
pressing a button sent a wireless con
tact which started the engine located
five miles away.
RAILROAD LABORERS
RETURN TO ITALY
NEW YORK. Sept. 24.? The World
declares the exodus of Italians from
this country to go to war and the
highest rates being paid at ammuni
tion factories arc taking thousands of
Italian laborers from the railroads.
MORE WAR ORDERS
PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 24.? The
Italian government is said to have
ordered 500,000 yards of green-gray
woolen cloth from the American Wool
en Company. Switzerland has alBo
purchased 100,000 yards or army
cloth.
THE INTERIOR BOATS
SKAGWAY, Sept. 24.?It was an
nounced today at the White Pass &
Yukon railroad offices that the last
river boat will leave Dawson on Sep
tember 26 for Fairbanks and inter
mediate points. Tho last river boat
for Dawson carrying passengers, mall
and express will Whltehorse op
October 8,

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