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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, September 24, 1915, Image 4

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
PUBLISHED BY THE EMPIRE PRINTING COMPANY
JOHN W. TROY, Editor and Manager
SUBSCRIPTION RATE8:
On? year, by mall. In advance $10.00
Six months, by mall. In advance, 6.00
Per month, delivered 1.00
Entered as second-class matter November 7, 1912,
at the postofflce at Juneau, Alaska, under the Act of
March 3. 1879.
PUNISHMENT, IF GUILTY
A Seattle policeman shot and killed a young man
and now a coroner's jry finds from tho evidence pre
sented to them that the killing was without Justifica
tion. Ordinarily little attention Is pafd to tho findings
of such a jury; it is a relic of an olden day and gener
ally is in disrepute. But regardless of the conclusions
of this jury this shooting should be made the subjoct
matter of a Grand Jury Investigation and this police
man punished if guilty.
It is hoped this matter will not be dropped as Is of
ten done in like cases. Too frequently it Is found that
some officer sworn to preserve the law violates the law
and seeks refuge In tho assertion that the act was com
mitted in the performance of bis duty.
Why Is it that men clothed with a little brief au
thority take It upon themselves to abuse such power
as is vested in them as s.,orn guardians of the peace?
A brutal, law-breaking policeman, or other officer, is
a disgrace to a community, brings tho law into disgrace,
and shames a public so unfortunate as to have him in
their midst. Let us hope that justice will reach the
guilty. If the Seattle policeman is guilty we hope he
will bo severely punished, not only for the wrong done,
but also as a warning to others of his kind.
TYPHOID VACCINATION GAINING FAVOR
An enormous increase In the number of persons
seeking anti-typhoid vaccination is reported by tho U.
S. Public Health Service. Not alone is this increase
manifested among the beneficiaries of that organization
and government employees, but the general public is
also awakening to the value of the inoculation. Re
ports from physicians throughout the country Indicate
that many are receiving the preventative treatment
and laboratory establishments have had a greatly in
creased demand for the vaccine. So great is the call
among employees of the government that it has been
necessary to Issue a second edition of the Secretary of
the Treasury's circular stating the localities where the
treatment may be received. It is estimated that dur
ing 1914 over 100.000 persons throughout the country
were immunized and it is believed that in 1915 the num
ber will exceed 300,000. In four counties of North Caro
lina. where campaigns are now being conducted, it is
estimated that 20.000 people will be immunized.
The public is seldom stow to accept an innovation
of worth. The reduction of the case rate in the army
from 536 per 100.000, before the discovery of anti-ty
phoid vaccine, to 3, since inoculation wa3 made compul
sory, has not passed unnoticed. During four months of
1898 there were over 2,000 cases of typhoid among 10,
000 soldiers encamped in Florida; in 1911, among 20.
000 men similarly encamped, there were but 2 cases. If
such a degree of immunity can be harmlessly conferred
upon a body of men living under adverse conditions and
whose age renders them susceptible, the conclusion is
that protection can just as easily be afforded ordinary'
citizens.
Anti-typhoid vaccination is quite as simple as that
for smallpox and even children do not complain. There
are no local effects other than a slight reddening at
the site of the injection, and sore arms are entirely
lacking. In a small percentage of cases a mild systemic
reaction, accompanied by headache and a slight rise
in temperature, occurs, but if the treatment is given
at night the person's rest is undisturbed and he is en
tirely unaware of these symptoms. In the majority of
instances, however, there is not the slightest inconven
ience. The Immunity probably lasts for several years,
although its duration is less than that of smallpox, which
frequently persists for a lifetime.
It is believed that more widespread recognition of
the .benefits conferred by anti-typhoid Immunization will
have an Immediate effect upon the morbidity and mor
tality rates for the disease. As a result of sanitary
measures alone the death rate from typhoid has been
cut in half during the last fifteen years; what has been
done In fifteen years of sanitation can be accomplished
in as many weeks with inoculation. It is conceivable,
if immunitlzation attains the general recognition that
smallpox prevention has secured, and there is no reason
why such acceptance should not be accorded it, that
typhoid will be a rare disease by 1930. This means that
even many of the older physicians of today will live to
see the time when the infection will no longer be com
mon.
One point must be considered in making such a
prognostication. As Immunity is conferred the neces
sity for immunization becomes less apparent to the
general public, and the method will to a certain extent
be neglected. This is the situation as regards smallpox
in the country today, and for this very reason the dis
ease will persist until universal immunization is prac
ticed. Therefore, even with perfect methods, the en
tire elimination of the disease is not to bo looked for.
THE EASTLAND INDICTMENT
Federal indictments were found a few days ago
against ten men charging them with criminal liability
in connection with the foundering of the Eastland at
Chicago in July. An indictment, of course, is not proof
of guilt; but in truth even in the face of a true bill found
the presumption of innocence prevails in their favor
and will continue with the defendants throughout the
trial and until the verdict of the trial Jury is returned
into Court; this is as it should be; it is the law of the
land: it is the law In every English-speaking jurisdic
tion and comes down to us from the great Common Uw
of England. That presumption must be respected and
these men will be presumed innocent until found guilty
according to law by a Jury of peers, but it is timely to
comment to the extent of saying that It is well some
action has been taken; the story should be told to the
world and the very best way of doing this is in a court
of justice.
This awful catastrophe shocked the wholo world
even at a time when human carnage was rampant on the
battle fields of Europe and human life was at a terrible
discount. Helpless men and women and children were
engulfed within a single moment and without the least
warning. Some one is guilty of a crime; the ends of
Justice demand that the guilty should be punished; up
example should be made.
An arroused community baa canned its representa
tive body to invoko tbo processes of tho law and that
Is as it should be. Public clamor Bhould not sway
Judgment in this caso; nor will tho guilty escape. A
United States Judge will sit and hear the case and a
Jury drawn from the body of tho Foderal district of
Northern Illinois will determine tho guilt or innocence
of the accused; with conditions such as this the public
mind may bo satisfied that complete justice will be
done.
This gives rise to tho glorious realisation that we
live in a country of law and order, of liberty and Jus
tice, where tho most lowly of men may demand bis
right and stand at a bar of justice, if over accused,
knowing that the mantle of the law clothes him with
the same protection as it does the greatest and most
powerful of his fellows.
Th body of Fran Angeltco, tho Florentine painter,
who died in 1455, is believed to have been found at
Florence. Of course there are critics who could rec
ognize the old master at a glance.
The Baltimore Sun tells of a Virginia farmer who
killed himself because breakfast was late. To put it
in another way early rising drove him to suicide.
THE WAR AND RACIAL PROGRESS
(London Morning Post.)
Major Leonard Darwin, In his presidential address
on "Eugenics During and After the War" to the Eugen
ics Education Society at the Grafton Galleries yoster
day, said that our military system seemed to de devised
with the object of insuring that all who were defective
should bo exompt from risks, whilst the strong, cour
ageous, and patriotic should be endangered. Men with
noble qualities were being destroyed, whilst the unfit
remained at home to become fathers of families, and
this must deteriorate the natural qualities of the com
ing generations. The chances of stopping war were
small, and we must consider how to minimize its evils.
If conscription were adopted futuro wars would pro
duce less injury to the race, because the casualty lists
would more nearly represent a chance selection of the
population; though whether a conscript army would
ever fight as well as our men were doing in France
was very doubtful. The injurious effects of the war on
all useful sections of the community Bhould be mitigat
ed. Military training was eugenic if the men were kept
with the colors only for short periods. Officers must,
of course, be engaged for long periods, and amongst
them the birth rate was very low. An Increase of pay
would be beneficial in this respect, but only if given in
the form of an additional allowance for each living
child. In the hope of increasing the birth rate attempts
were likely to be made to exalt the ''unmarried wife,"
a detestible term against which all true wives should
protest. If a change in moral standards was demanded
in the hope that the increase in the habit of forming
irregular unions would result in an increase in the pop
ulation, that plea entirely failed because the desired ef
fect would not thus be produced. A special effort ought
now to be made on eugenic as well as on other grounds
to maintain the high standards of home life which had
ever existed in our race, and which had been in large
measure the basis of our social and racial progress in
the past. If we did not now take some steps to insure
our own racial progress being at least as rapid as that
of our neighbors, and if our nation should in consequence
cease in future to play a great part in the noble and
eternal struggle for human advancement, then the fault
would be ours.
W. D. BOYCE'S "CREED."
Do not keep the alabaster boxes of your love and
tenderness sealed up until your friends are dead. Fill
their lives with sweetness. Speak approving, cheering
words while their ears can hear them, and while their
hearts can be thrilled and made happier by them; the
kind things you mean to say when they are gone, say
before they go. The flowers you mean to send for
their coffins, send to brighten and sweeten their homes
before they leave them.
If my friends have alabaster baxes laid away, full
of fragrant perfumes of sympathy and affection, which
they intend to break over my dead bcdy, I would much
rather that they would bring them out In my weary and
troubled hours, and open them, that I may be refreshed
and cheered by them while I need them. I would rather
have a plain coffin without a flower, a funeral without
an eulogy, than a life without the sweetness of love
and sympathy.
Let us learn to annoint our friends beforehand for
their burial. Post mortem kindness docs not cheer the
troubled spirit. Flowers on the coffin cast no frag
rance backward over life's weary way.?(W. D. Boyce.)
MR. FORD'S WAY.
(St. Louis Republic.)
Henry Ford's latest?his announcement that he will
employ any man who has been discharged from the
Michigan State Penitentiary at Jackson?has in it the
quality which characterizes nearly all the actions of the
famous manufacturer. That quality, we should say, is
slap-dashness, if we may coin the word?and bigness.
Of course there are always two sides to be consid
ered in industrial problems, and always will be, so long
as there doesn't seem to be quite enough work to go
round.
Thus it may be pointed out as a class men who are
discharged from penal institutions aro certainly inferior
to men who do not go to prison. All the theories of
the sociologists and the exceptional cases of the roman
cers cannot alter that fact.
Moreover, It may be cited as a fact that a great ma
jority of men who go to prison plead in extenuation of
the crimes they committed that they could find no hon
est employment and that they were driven to a life
of crime.
inis Doing tne case, it wouiq seem tne Dest econ
omy to find work for the man who never has gone to
prison but who may be a candidate for the life behind
bars if he isn't enabled to earn an honest livelihood.
But there Is another side to the question. The
man who bears no stain on his character is in a much
better position to obtain employment when he goes in
to the market where services are bought and sold than
the man to whom there clings the stains of prison life.
And we need no dreadful pictures drawn by romantic
writers to convince us that occasionally a pretty useful
sort of fellow goes to prison, and that the odds against
him when ho pays his debt to society and goes free
again are unfair and unsurmountable. Surely society
is simply guarding its own best interests?as well as
doing a commendable deed on humanitarian grounds
?when It seeks to locate such a man and give him a
hand.
No doubt Mr. Ford's idea is that too many employ
ers have an unreasonable prejudice against all men who
have once fallen from social grace, and that the public
at large is far too unwilling to forgive and forget when
a fellow has blundered and paid the price and has come
forward to ask for another chance.
There is needed a few special champions?or at
least friends?for the man who bears the stigma of an
inglorious hiatus in his existence; and it is in keeping
with the big, free-handed ways of Henry Ford that he
has put petty caution and social malice behind him
and exclaimed heartily, in effect: "Oh, forget It, and
get down to sawing wood again."
If Carranza really wants, as he says, to be as much
like Thomas Jefferson as possible, why doesn't he shave
off those whiskers??(Boston Globe.)
Missouri has been waging a war on ground hogs.
The weather prophet seldom enjoys any great degree
of popularity.?(Washington Star.)
Barnes says Roosovclt is our Bismarck and Bismarck
Is dead and can't help himself,?(Florida Times-Un
ion.)
Well Advertised
"Mary had a little lamb," began the
poet
"I once knew a woman who own
ed 30,000 head of live stock," Inter
posed tho other fellow. "And yet this
great cattle queen never got half the
advertising that Mary received by tbo
ownership of one lamb."?(Louisville
Courier-Journal.)
The Wise Fool
"Duty always comes before pleas
ure," observod the Sago.
"YeB,"' repliod the Fool, "In tho dic
tionary." ?(Cincinnati Enquirer.)
Local Pride
"Is this a first class postofflcc," in
quired the stranger.
"It's as good as you'll find in these
parts," retorted tho native with Jus
tifiable local pride.?(Buffalo Express
Gosh!
As to what did Delawaro and where
did Maryland when she wore her
New Jersey, and also what did Ten
nessee, wo have quit pondering long
ago. What we want to know Is, In
whose garden did Idaho? With what
kind of a rope did some hunter Color
ado, and whoro has Oregon?
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
PATENT.
8. A. H. A.
Serial No. 01608
Notice in hereby given that C. W.
Fries a citizen of the United States,
over the age of 21 years, whose post
office address Is Juneau, Alaska, be
ing entitled to the benefits of Sec.
2306 of the revised statutes of the
United States, and the amendments
theroto, has applied to make entry of
the lands embraced In United StateB
non-mineral survey No. 1111 situate
on the Northeast shore of Gastlneau
Channel, one and three-quarter miles
southeast of Juneau In the Territory
of Alaska, and more particularly de
crlbed as follows, to-wlt:
Beginning at Cor. No. 1 at mean
high tide of the Northeast shoro
of Gastlneau Channel, cor. not
set, wit. cor. a stone set In
ground marked S. 1111 W.C.I
bears north 26 Iks dlst; U.S.I.M.
No. 1 from true cor. No. 1 this
survey bears S. 65* 54' W. 53.76
chs| dlst; thence North from true
cor. No. 1, 1.13 chs. to cor. No. 2,
a stone set in ground marked S.
1111-C2; thence East 14.03 chs. to
cor. No. 3, an Iron pipe set In
ground marked S. 1111 C-3;
thence South 10.09 chs. to road:
12.67 chs. to cor. No. ,4 cor. not
set, wit. cor. a stone in place
marked S. 1111 W.C-4 bears North
56 Iks. dlst; Cor. No. 1 Avalanche
lode S. 989 boars S. 40* 05' 30" E.
24.03 chs. dlst; thence from true
Cor. No. 4 meandering beach of
Gastlneau Channel at line of mean
high tido (1) N. 39* 34' W. 2.23
chs. (2) N. 57* 19' W. 2.92 chs.
(3) N. 34* 52' W. 2.11 chs. (4) N. 60*
47' V/. 2.74 chs. (5) N. 42* 34' W.
1.97 chs. (6) N. 47? 46' W. 6.55 chs.
(7) West 1.10 chs. to true cor.
No. 1. the place of beginning.
Area 8.98 acres. Variation at all
corners 32* 00' E. Latitude 68* 17'
N. Longitude 134* 22' W.
As additional to original homestead
entries of John R. Copeland and Eliza
Green, widow of James Green, de
ceased, H.E. No. 641 and 739 at Lit
tle Rock, Arkansas and New Orleans,
respectively, and dated March 2, 1867
and May 7, 1869, respectively.
And all persons claiming adversely
any portion of the above described
tract of land are required to file with
tho Register and Receiver of the
United States Land Office at Juneau.
Alaska, their adverse claim thereto,
under oath, during the period of pub
lication or within 30 days thereafter,
or thoy will be barred by the provis
ions of tho statute.
CONRAD W. FRIES.
United States Land Office, Juneau,
Alaska, July 31, 1915.,
IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that the
foregoing Notice be published for the
statutory period In the Alaska Daily
Empire, a newspaper of general cir
culation, printed at Juneau Alaska,
the nearest neswpaper to said above
described claim or survey.
C. B. WALKER,
Register.
First publication, July 31, 1915.
Last publication, September 30.
ISLAND FERRY CO.
Gas Boat "Gent"
I5CENTS
LEAVE JUNEAU FOR DOUGLAS
6:00 a. m. 12:30 p. m.
7:30 a. m. 1:30 p. m.
8:30 a. m. 2:30 p. m.
9:30 a. m. 3:30 p. m.
10:30 a. m. 4:20 p. m.
11:30 a. m. 6:00 p. m.
6:40 p. m.
7:30 p. m.
8:30 p. m.
10:00 p. m.
Saturday Night Only 11:30 p. m.
LEAVE DOUGLAS FOR JUNEAU
7:00 a. m. 1:00 p. m.
8:00 a. m. 2:00 p. m.
9:00 a. m. 3:00 p. m.
10:00 a. m. 4:00 p. m.
11:00 a. m. 5:25 p. m.
12:00 noon 6:20 p. m.
7:00 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
9:00 p. m.
10:30 p. m.
Saturday Night Only 12:00 Midnight
LEAVE DOUGLAS FOR THANE
6:15 a. m. 4:35 p. m.
LEAVE JUNEAU FOR THANE
?(Via Douglas)?
6:00 a. m. 4:20 p. m.
* LEAVE THANE FOR JUNEAU
?(Via Douglas)?
6:35 a. m. 5:05 p. m.
Commutation Tickets at Rate of 25c
the Round Trip
Express and Freight Carried
Phone Juneau 194 for Special TrlpB
Cole's Dock, Juneau
City Dock, Douglas
The
StNichoIas
Leaves Young's Float for Doug
las, Funter, Gypsum and Ten
akee, Tuesday's at 8 a. m.
For Charter when not on sched
ule.
Hunting Parties our specialty.
Telephone 006 or 56.
SAFETY FIRST
THE ALMA
RUNS ON THE FOLLOWING SCHE
DULE TO DOUGLAS, TREADWELL
AND THANE
FARE 15 CTK
Juneau Ferry 8 Navigation Company
Leaves Juneau for Douglas, Treadwell
and Thane
6:00 a. m. 1:00 p. m. 7:00 p. m.
7:15 a. m. 3:15 p. m. 8:00 p. m.
9:00 a. m. 4:45 p. m. 9:30 p. m.
11:00 a. m. 5:45 p. m. 11:15 p. m.
Saturday Night Only 12:30 a. m.
Leave Douglas for Treadwell & Thane
6:10 a. m. 1:10 p. m. 7:10 p. m.
7:25 a. m. 3:25 p. m. 8:10 p. m.
9:10 a. m. 4:65 p. m. 9:40 p. m.
11:10 a.m. 5:55 p. m, 11:25 p.m.
Saturday Night Only 12:40 a. m.
Leaves Treadwell for Thane
6:15 a. m. 1:15 p. m. 7:15 p. m.
7:30 a. m. 3:30 p. m. 8:15 p. m.
9:15 a. m. 5:00 p. m. 9:45 p. m.
11:15 a.m. 6:00 p.m. 11:30 p.m.
Saturday Night Only 12:45 a. m.
Leave Thane for Treadwell, Douglas
and Juneau
6:25 a. m. 1:25 p. m. 7:25 p. m.
8:10 a. m. 4:10 p. m. 8:25 p. m.
9:25 a. m. 5:10 p. m. 9:55 p. m.
11:25 a. m. 6:10 p. m. 12:10 a. m.
Saturday Night Only 12:55 a. m.
Leave Treadwell for Douglas & Juneau
6:35 a. m. 1:35 p. m. 7:35 p. m.
8:20 a. m. 4:20 p. m. 8:35 p. m.
9:35 a. m. 5:20 p. m. 10:05 p. m.
11:35 a. m. 6:20 p. ra. 12:20 a. m.
Saturday Night Only 1:05 a. m.
Leave Douglas for Juneau
6:40 a. m. 1:40 p. m. 7:40 p. m.
8:25 a.m. 4:25 p.m. 8:40 p.m.
9:40 a. m. 5:25 p. m. 10:10 p. m.
11:40 a. m. 6:25 p. m. 12:25 a. ra.
Saturday Night Only 1:10 a. m.
SCHEDULE SUBJECT TO CHANGE
WITHOUT NOTICE
Twenty-Ride Commutation Tickets
For $2.50
mmammmmmmmmmmmame
TOATWr AUTO-STAGE
lHALlEl SCHEDULE
Leave Juneau Leave Thane
9:00 a. m. 9:20 a. m.
10:30 a. m. 10:50 a. m.
1:00 p. m. 1:20 p. m.
2:30 p. m. 2:60 p. m
4:00 p. m. 4:20 p. m
5:00 p. m. 6:20 p. m.
6:00 p. m. 6:20 p. m.
9:00 p. m. 9:20 p. m.
11:00 p. m. 11:20 p. m.
Car Stars From Goldstein's Burford's
and Alaskan Hotel
Private Car for Hire Any Hour at
Alaskan Hotel.
Day Phone Slngle-O. Night Phone 105
JUNEAU 8TEAMSHIP CO.
United States Mall
STEAMER GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route
Leaves Juneau lor Douglas, Pun
ter, Hoonah, Gypsum, Tenakee,
Kllllsnoo, Chatham and Sitka every
fnts-ay at 12:01 a. m.
Juneau-Skagway Route
Leaves Juneau for Douglas, Eagle
River, Sentinel Light Station, EI
drld Rock Light Station, Comet,
Haines, Skagway overy Sunday at
12:01 a. m. Returning, leaves
Skagway the following day at 12:02
: a. m.
WILLIS E. NO WELL, MANAGER
?? I ?p-i iii?lfflW??WE?
THE OLDEST BANK IN ALASKA
ESTABLISHED 1891. INCORPORATED 1914
THE B. M. BEHRENDS BANK
TOTAL RESOURCES
AUG. 7. 1911 S469.977.95
AUG. 7. 1912 . $638,483.03
AUG. 7, 1913 $891,520.02 r!
AUG. 7, 1914 .... $940,489.18 \
AUG. 7, 1915 . $1,126,925.55 J
INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS
THE ADMIRAL LINE [ aylgation Co |
Pa set Sou ml-California Route, Seattle
to 8iin Franclaco, connecting with SS. /
Yaki ami SS. Harvard for Southern/:
California Dortc. I|
ADMIRAL BVAN8
SOUTH 8EPT 30th
I'usct Hound-Alaska Route, from Ta
eonia and Seattle for Ketchikan, Pet
ersburg, Juneau, Yakulat, KataUa.
, Cordova. Valdei. Ellamar, Port Wells,
I LoTouchc. Seward. Cook Inlet. Kodiak.
AD. FARRAGUT
WEST SEPT 29th
Our meals, and the attention or our employees to Hugh P. Gallagher, Agt.
your wants have pleasod others. Thoyought to ploase you. Phone "Ad. Line"
< > For Seattle, Prince Rupert
;; Ketdiikan, Wrangell and j
" Petersburg.
] ? City of Seattle Sept. 2 11
Spokane 8ept 5, 16 and 27
For Skagway and Haines j;
City of 8eattle Sept. 10 21 !
| Spokane 8ept. 4,15 and 25 <
connects at Skarwar for < i
Dawson and ait Yukon !!
River points. 3!
> CONN*CTO AT SCATfLQ FOR J |
SAN FRANCISCO, LOS ANGELES, SAN DIEGO and all California Points JI
Through tickets sold everywhere in United States and Canada 4 >
> LOW RATES 1 .orgeat and ttnest passenger stentners on P. C. -UNEXCELLED SERVICE < >
For full particulars apply < 1
11 IL BRANDT. G. A. p. D.. Skattlk. Wash. d. H. EWING, Agent, Juhkau. Alaska '1
J! RIGHTS RESERVED TO CHANGE SCHEDULES
Canadian Pacific Railway Ccirpany
j B. C. COAST SERVICE
Sailing from Juneau for Seattle, Vancouver, Victoria, etc., via Prince
Rupert, B. C.
PRINCESS ALICE 8EPT 3 and 17
PRINCE88 SOPHIA SEPT. 10 and 24
C. P. R. Ticket offices?Orpheum Bldg. and 8plckett'a Poatofflce Store.
JOHN T. BPICKETT, Agent
~? 1 ??<
V]C . ,THE WHITE PASS
cZfm'l jLV'IKON ROUTE *??
Through tickets to and from Dawson, Fairbanks, and all Inter
ior Alaska and Yukon Rlvor points.
During season of navigation, our fleet of modern up-to-date steam
ers will operate regularly the entire length of tho Yukon River and
tributaries, giving a service never before equalled.
Daily train service will t>e maintained between Sknguay and
White Horse, and our fully equipped Parlor Observation Cars afford
travellers every comfort and convenience.
Full information cheerfully given upon applying to A. P. 21PF,
Traffic Manager, 8kaguay, Alaska, and 612 8econd Avenue, 8eattle,
*? i. i
t1 l"I 1111 1 I 1 I I I I M'
ALASKA
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
.. afety. Service, Speed Tickets to Seattle. Tuconn. Victoria and Vancouver. Through ? ?
tickets toSan Francisco
NORTH SOUTH
I! JEFFERSON Sept. 19, Oct 1 8ept 20, Oct. 2
- DOLPHIN Sept. 25, Oct 7 Sept. 26, Oct. 8
I! MARIPOSA Sept. 17, Oct. 3 8epL 27, Oct. 13 II
?? ALAMEDA Sept. 21, Oct 9 8ept. 17, Oct. 1 19 ;;
" NORTHWESTERN Sept. 28, Oct 16. .8epL 21, Oct. 6 24 -
WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt, Elmer E. 8mlth Douglas Agt. ||
-f-H-H-l-K-H-i ? II 1M1 I I I I 1 1 1 I 111 111 1 111 11 H 1 111 1 HI 111 11 1
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CC. I
| The Alnika Flyer j ^ HUMBOLDT The Alaska Flyer | I I
Leave Seattle, Sept. 29. Arrive Juneau, Oct 3
Sails South, Oct 4
Juneau Office Valentino Dldg., Phone 79. Pettlt A Harvey, Agta.
Douglas Office M. J. O'Connor Store Seattle Office 712 2nd Ave.
DOCKS JUNEAU CITY WHARF
STEAMSHIP "DESPATCH"
SOUTHBOUND
Wednesday, Sept 22nd.
JOSN HENSON, C. W. YOUNG C., Agta
Agt. Douglas Juneau?Phone 217
(rffffEI Save Time j Money
P Use the New Short Route to and from
lUXsUSEASTERN CANADA, EASTERN AND
SOUTHERN UNITED STATES points via
PRINCE RUPERT
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway and Stesrc:hips
Lowest Fares. Unexcelled Dining and Sleeping Car Ser
vice. For full particulars apply to
H. R. SHEPARD & SON, Ticket Agts. Phono 217, Juneau Alaska.
? ?H II I I I I I I I I | | | || | | | || |
:thr [)ns'd'rpassed equipment j
i1 Itf $? l6 real Northern i [
lUiBsjR AIL WAY i;
Affordr. the Maximum of Comfort from the Pacific Coast . ,
?' To St. Paul, Chicago and the East?THE ORIENTAL LIMITED
! I To St. Paul and the East?THE GLACIER PARK LIMITED | |
To Kansas City and the South?THE SOUTHEAST EXPRESS
" To San Francisco and the Expositions, via Portland and Aastorla and J J
the newest, safest and fastest steamships?"Great Northern" and ! !
?? "Northern Pacific." ? ?
LOW HOUND TRIP RATES INCOMPARABLE DINING SERIVCE | |
Rates nml Complete Information from Any Local Steamship Agent or . ,
A. S. DAUTRICK, Traveling Freight and Passenger Agent \ |
Room 18, Valentine Bldg., Juneau ? >
[; T. J. MOORE. City Passenger Agt., Second and Columbia, Seattle. |
If. DICKSON, City Passenger Agt.. 348 Washington St., Portland. < ?
?H I I I 1 HH-H i 1 I M I I I H I I H I I I I I 0 I II I I I I II I I | 11 || 11? I
1 Gas Boat Tillicum 1}
WILL LEAVE FOR
WARM SPRINGS BAY
? -?1 .
KAKE MAIL ROUTE
Schedule in Effect April 1 to Nov. 30.1916
rhe E. A. HEGG noils every Monday at 8 o'Clock
?. m. from Young'rf Float, stoppidg atDoutrias,
Tuku Harbor, Eimcstoue, S nettle bom, Surodutn,
Windham Bay, Five-Finircr Light, I'anshmw and
Kako. CAPT. P. MADSEN.
.its

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