OCR Interpretation


The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, September 30, 1915, Image 1

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1915-09-30/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. VI., NO. 681. JUNEAU, ALASKA, THURSDAY, SEPT. 80, 1915. PRICE TEN CENTS.
TREMENDOUS CASUALTIES IN WEST
EXECUTION
OP I. w. w.
IS STAYED
WASHINGTON. Sept. 30. ? Presi
dent Wilson today wired Gov. William
S. Spry of Utah to delay the execu
Hon. set for tomorrow morning, of Joe
HUlstrom, a member of the Industrial
Workers of the World, who killed J.
W. Morrison and his son Arllng.
The President had declined to act
nntll the Swedish minister to the
United States. W.A. F. Kkengren, per
sonally requested him to obtain a re
prieve.
Hillstrum was to have met his death
at the hands of a State firing squad,
in Salt Lake, having chosen that
method of death in preference to hang
ing.
BOYS IN BLUE
MEET EOR LAST
TIME IN CAPITAL
WASHINGTON. Sept. 30.?The reg
ular session of the 49th encampment
of the Grand Army of the Republic
began this morning and will contin
ue until tomorrow. While three or
four hundred of the veterans are trans
acting the business affairs of the or
ganization. the balance of the Civil
war veterans will be sightseeing.
All that remains of the Union ar
my of 200.000 men. which fifty years
ago passed in review before Presi
dent Andrew Johnson, marched up
Pennsylvania Avenue from the Capi
tol to the White House yesterday and
doffed their hats to President Wilson.
It was a stirring scene and thousands
witnessed the procession.
This event was the chief spectacu
lar feature of what will no doubt be
tbe last reunion of the "Boys in Blue"
in Washington. It rivaled in interest
and display any inauguration cere- ;
mony ever witnessed.
Miles Is in Parade
One of the conspicuous figures in!
the parade yesterday was General
Nelson A. Miles, honorary grand mar
shal of the parade. General Miles;
was the highest officer in the Ameri
can army during the war with Spain
and also is a veteran of the Civil War.
His personal escort consisted of 100
uniformed Spanish War veterans.
One of the interesting features of
the reunion was the official and for-'
mal presentation of greetings from
the younger veterans of the war with
Spain to the grim old fighters of the
Civil war. This presentation of good
wishes and comradeship has been
made in pursuance of a resolution
adopted by a unanimous rising vote
at the recent national encampment of
the United Spanish War Veterans at
Scranton. Pa.
Defense League To Meet
Great preparations are being made
for the Conference on National De
fense. which will be held here Octo
ber 4?7, immediately following the
G. A. R Encampment. The conference
is to be held under the auspices of the
National Defense League, and the Na
vy League. National Rifle Assoeiation.
and affiliated defense organizations;
will narticinate. !t Dromises to be as
large a gathering as the G. A. R. En
campment. Thousands of the Grand
Army veterans will remain in Wash
ington after the encampment to at
tend the Conference on National De
fense.
Representative Jnlins Kahn. of Cal
ifornia. chairman of the National De
fense League has appointed a citi
zens committee of prominent Washing
tonians who will have charge of local
arrangements for the conference. The
press committee includes practically
the whole membership of the Congres
sional Press Gallery and all of the
leading newspapermen of the Na
tional Capital.
NORTHBOUND STEAMERS
BRING MANY TO JUNEAU
SEATTLE. Sept. 30.?At midnight
last night the Humboldt cleared for
the North with the following bookings
for Juneau:
Ralph Chatham. E. F. Balbson. Chas.
Hadd. F. J. Bailey. F. C. Paiff. G.
Gragg. Rev. A. T. Rocati. Roy Smith.
D. McKay. J. Keene, F. M. Hemser
and three steerage.
The Northwestern is scheduled to
leave Saturday night and has ad
vance bookings as follows:
John W. Troy. Mrs. J. Stenhouse.
L. B. Adsit. Miss M. MacLeod, Miss
A. MacLeod, Mrs. Field. H. E. Bro
berg and wife and six children.
W. E. Hazleton and wife have en
gaged passage on the Dolphin which
is to sail north Sunday night.
CYPRUS IS DUE
Late this afternoon the Yacht Cy
prus is due to arrive from Seattle
bringing a party of the directors of
the Alaska-Gastineau Mining Company,
who will remain in Juneau for two or
three days. The party consists of D.
C. Jackling. Mrs. Jackling. Charles M.
MacXeill Mrs. MacXeill, Mr. and Mrs.
Rudolph Spreckles and secretaries H.
B. Tooker and John Rldgeway,
COULD BURNED^
"ABLER" HAVE
BEEN^ SAVED?
That the burned power schooner P.
J Abler could have been salved had
Captain William Gregory of tho U. S.
lighthouse tender Kukul rammed her
yesterday afternoon when the Kukui
had the burning vessel near the Doug
las Island shore? Is the belief of local
mariners. Captain Gregory had two
reasons for not doing this. One was
because the Kukui was too far In
shore and the second was because the
Kukui is a government boat and had
the attempt failed Captain Gregory's
judgment might not have been up
held at Washington.
The tender Kukui Is built of steel
and her prow is unusually sharp.
\long the waterfront?where the ex
perts are found?men said that the
Kukul could have moved at half-speed
at a few feet distant from the Abler,
and could have torn a hole in her
side which would have sent her the
few feet to the bottom, without dan
ger to the Kukui. It was estimated
that Captain Gregory could have
stopped the tender within a half-length
of the vessel.
onouia nave scuraca snip:
! Others blamed the crew for not
having tried to chop a hole through
the stern of the Abler, at the water
i line, at any time between 1 and 2
o'clock yesterday afternoon. The crew
declare this would have been impossi
ble. owing to the heat, and because
the hull of the Abler is of oak, eight
inches in thickness. The craft was
built of hardwood because of the dan
gers attendant upon cruises in Arctic
ice. For fifteen years she withstood
the dangers of the North, without
serious mishap, although at several
times she was jammed by the ice.
The first explosion of the distillate
on the Abler?of which there was
9,000 gallons?occurred shortly after
2 o'clock p. m. The flames gradually
ate their way forward, and the reports
of exploding oil could be heard from
(Continued on page 6.)
DEATHS AND
DAMAGE DONE
BY HURRICANE
?+?
NEW ORLEANS, Sept. 30.?Sweep
ing over the gulf and across the city
at the rate of 135 miles an hour one
of the worst hurricanes known to this
country killed ten people here Wed
nesday night *.nd left a milllon-dol'ar
trail of wreckage in its wake. The
number of people injured has not yet
been estimated.
The storm demolished a large part
of the famous French Market, one of
the show places of the city which has
been for years one of the most popular
resorts in the country.
According to later reports received
from Mobile, the brunt of the Rtorm
was borne by New Orleans, the wind
having materially lessened as it
moved north and east. The worst
blow occurred this morning, the max
imum up to six o'clock last night hav
ing been only 88 miles, as compared
with a rate of 135 today.
f AIM AM A MATEK1AL.
REACHES SEWARD
SEWARD. Sept. 30.?Carrying 1.
500 tons of railroad equipment con
signed to the Alaska Railway Com
mission for use at this place and at
Anchorage, the steamer Wilmington
has arrived from Panama.
The equipment is from the govern
ment railroad in Panama, and 600
tons will be landed Lere, where the
first 13 miies of the Alaska Northern
roadbed are being rebuilt. The tres
tles all along the line are being re
paired and the trail between the end
of the road and Anchorage is being
put in shape for the winter travel.
LAST BOATS LEAVING
FAIRBANKS FRIDAY
FAIRBANKS. Sept. 30.?The last
boats for Whitehorse will leave Fair
banks tomorrow morning and will
carry a full quota of passengers.
STOP ALL WORK ON
RAILROAD SURVEY
FAIRBANKS, Sept. 30.?All survey
parties which this summer have been
working on the Fairbanks end of the
railroad route, have completed the
season's work and are going to the
coast within a few days.
WEDDING EPIDEMIC
FAIRBANKS. Sept. 20.? Weddings
are epidemic here at the present
time. Four brides arrived from the
States Tuesday and according to re
ports more of the fair sex are on
their way hcce to gladden the heart
and home of some sourdough.
STOCK QUOTATIONS.
NEW YORK. Sept. 30.?Alaska Gold
closed today at 32%, Chine at 47%.
Ray at 25. Utah Copper at 70.
Copper went up to 13 %, and re
mained there.
HISTORIC
WILL NOW
RETURNED
RICHMOND. Va., Sept 30.?Martha
Washington's will, which was looted
from Fairfax Courthouse by a North
ern soldier during the civil war, to
day was returned to State authorities
here by J. P. Morgan.
The State of Virginia has been
pressing a suit In the first supreme
court, but the proceedings will be
dropped. Morgan's father the late J.
P. Morgan, purchased the procious
instrument from the soldier who had
purloined it, and the souvenir hung
in a frame in the Morgan home In New
York.
PHILLIES WIN
CHAMPIONSHIP
BOSTON, Sept. 30.?By defeating
the Boston Braves yesterday, the
Philadelphia Nationals won the
championship in the parent leaguo.
Orover Alexander let the Braves off
with one hit while the Phils got ten
hits off Dick Rudolph. The scores
was 5 to 0.
+ ******* ********
* ?
+ SETTLE IT? *
* *
+ WASHINGTON, Sept. 30.? +
+ Tho United States State De- +
+ partment officials have been *
+ advised unofficially that the *
+ German foreign office is about +
* to make a statement which *
* will settle indefinitely all pond- *
* Ing controversies between Ger- +
* many and the United States *
* growing out of the submarine +
* policy. *
* +
+*++++***+++++++
WIRELESS TELEPHONE
PERFECTED; VOICE
TRAVERSES NATION
WASHINGTON, Sept. 30.? The
statement was made by officials
of the telephone company at New
Haven today that at midnight
messages by wireless telephone
were sent from the wireless tele
graph station at Arlington, Va.,
to Honolulu, a distance of 4,600
mile s.
WASHINGTON. Sept. 30.?For the
first time In history the sound of a
human voice was transmitted across
the continent without the aid of wires,
yesterday. Naval officials at Arling
ton, Va., conversed with-the command
ant of the Mare Island Navy yard at
Vallejo, Calif.
WIRELESS LOCATES
BULLET IN BRAIN
OMAHA. Neb., Sept. 30? Dr. T. H.
Millener last night located a bullet
in the brain of a wounded man by the
use of wireless electric waves.
DUMBA'S SUCCESSOR.
?*?
BUDAPEST. Hungary, Sept. 30.?
A Vienna dispatch Is published here
today saying it has again been learn
ed in diplomatic circles at the Aus
trian capital that the government will
not await the arrival of Dr. Constantin
Dumba from the United States be
fore appointing his successor.
The new ambassador, it is stat
ed, will be named at once.
The dispatch says that Kajetan von
Kapos-Mere, former Austro-Hungar
ian ambassador at Rome, has been
tentatively selected for this place.
DUMBA'S PASSPORTS
DELIVERED TODAY
?+?
WASHINGTON. Sept. 30. ? Sir Ce
cil-Spring Rice, tbe British ambassa
dor, today delivered safe-conduct pa
pcrs for Dr. Dumba's trip through Eng
land. to the State Department
CADDIES ON STRIKE.
SEATTLE, Sept. 30.?Caddies em
ployed on the municipal golf links to
day went on strike for twenty cents
an hour. They have been getting fif
teen cents.
SUBMARINE STRATEGY?
NEW YORK. Sept. 30.?That Ger
many secretly established a submar
ine base on Guernsey Island, in the
English channel, and that 30 suppos
ed fishermen captured there proved
to be enlisted men in the German na
vy was the inforpatlon brought here
by Frank S. Perr, of Ithaca, N. Y.,
who arrived on the Minnehaha.
Jay W. Bell, clerk of the U. S.
district court, left today for Seattle.
He will be married next week to Miss
Lora Ostrom, formerly of Juneau. The
couple will return here after a honey
moon trip to California.
Assistant Engineer John Zug of the
Alaska road commission left for Pet
ersburg this morning on the City of
Seattle, on official business.
SOLDIERS
OUTRAGED
ON BORDER
* ?
* CARRANZA WARNED . *
<!> ?<?? ?>
* Brownsville, Tex., Sept 30. +
* ?The United States military ?
-> officers today notlQod the Car- ?
?f ranza commanders that if they +
4> continue to fall In tho disperse- +
+ ment of Mexican rebels con- *
* contratlng at Progresso, that it *
* will be rogarded as an un- +
friendly act. and that stops will ??
+ be taken to protect the lives +
?b and property of Americans. *
+ *
WASHINGTON, Sept. 30.?General
Funston reported today that in a light
Friday. Mexicans took PrlyajLq^fiyosa. .
TT ST"A. and cut off us ears, then
turning him loose.
A dispatch from San Antonio says
that a Mexican claiming to have been
ono of tho bandits who killed Private
Richard Johnson, made an affidavit to
Captain McCoy that after Johnson was
killed tho body was mutilated, the
head being severed and the ears bolng
cut off.
Carranzlstas are said to have been
responsible for both outrages.
CARRANZA IS
PLANNING BIG
LOAN, REPORT
WASHINGTON, Sept 30.?How to
raise the vast sums that will be re
quired to refinance Mexico and to
pay damage claims is under consid
eration by Carranza's representatives.
It is reported that Louis Cabera, Car
ranza's minister of finance, has been
in New York making preliminary ar
rangements for a loan, and has been
assued that if recognition is given by
the government and an embargo is
placed against Carranza's enemies,
all the money needed will be forth
coming.
Local officials in touch with the
resources of Mexico say that the float
ing of a big loan would bo easy. If
Carranza can sbow that ho has the
power to collect taxes and develop
the national resources and industries
of his country, he can get all the
money he wants, as there are many
millions of idle cash waiting invest
' racnt.
Conditions Improving
Improvement in conditions in Mex
ico City was indicated in dispatches
i dated September 24, which reached the
State Department today. The report
was summarized by the Department
as follows :
Advices, dated September 24, from
Mexico City, state that the general or
der there is good, but that there is
fighting between the factional forces
in the vicinity of the city. It is
stated that there appears to be a good {
disposition on the part of the authori
t les to afford ample guarantees to ;
I foreigners, and that, in general, Mexi- \
rans are the only ones that have rec- ,
ently suffered from depredations. It
is reported that more than 30,000 j
quarts of soup are being distributed ,
by the American Red Cross Society,
dally. September 3 about 100 mer
chants were placed under arrest for ,
failure to comply with the provisions
of tho official price lists.
It is estimated that 150 Americans
have left Mexico City since the ar
rival of Gen. Gonzales, of whom about
one half wore given financial assist- ,
ance by the American representative. ]
It is estimated that there are not more (
than 1.000 Americans in Mexicn Cltr.
!
MARINE SERGEANT |
KILLED IN HAYTI i
?*? i
WASHINGTON. Sept. 30. ? Ser
geant Edward C. Thompson, of the
sixth company of United States mar
ines on patrol duty in Hayti, has been
killed by Haytien outlaws, Rear Ad
miral Caperton cabled the State De
partment this morning.
Thompson met his death while re
turning to camp at the head of a par
ty which had just recovered the body
of Private Matthew I. Littak, who had
been drowned near Port au Prince
while in swimming.
CHIEF MURPHY HONORED.
SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 30.? Fire
Chief Thomas Murphy, of the San
Francisco department, was elected
president and Harry Bringhurst of
Seattle was named secretary, by the
Pacific Coast Fire Chiefs' Association
trutflv
TO AUCTION "EASTLAND"
CHICAGO, Sept. 30.?The steamer
Eastland, which overturned In the Chi
cago river July 24, will be resold at
auction December 20, by order of
Federal Judgo Landts, on the petition
of White & Garry, of Cleveland, for
payment of $34,000 for raising the
AMERICAN SHIP
HITS RUSS MINE;
THREE INJURED
WASHINGTON, Sept. 30.?The Am
crlcon sailing ship Vincent was
blown up by a mine in the Whlto Sea,
Northern Russia, yesterday, accord
ing to advices received by the State
Department today. The crew was
saved, although Captain Amberman
and three men were injured.
An apology to the United States gov
ernment will bo made by Russia, Am
bassador George Bakhmetieff infor-j
mally intimated.
MASSACRE OF
ARMENIANS HAS
AROUSED WILSON |
WASHINGTON, Sept. 30.? Presi
dent Woodrow Wilson is considering
requesting Germany, on humane
grounds, to halt the Armenian massa
cres of hor ally, Turkey.
This was learned yesterday from a
source close to administration offic-1
ials. Thousands of letters have ar
rived in Washingtln this week, asking
that the United States take action
at once to put a stop to the butchery
of Armenian Christians by Turks and
Kurds.
It is declared that over 500,000 Ar
menians have been put to d oath,
some of them tortured and others
drowned, since the war began.
???*??? + ? + ? + ? + + ? + ??
t 4
4 STEAMERS HASTEN 4
4 WITH MUNITIONS 4
4 ??? +
4 NEW YORK, Sept. 30.? 4
4 Twelve steamships arc being 4
4 hastily loaded with munitions 4
4 of war for Russia, in order to +
4 reach Archangel before the 4
4 close of navigation. 4
4 4
44444444444444444
HOLLAND PROTESTS AT
ZEPPELINS SAILING
ACROSS THE COUNTRY
THE HAGUE, Sept. 30.? Serious
protest to Germany concerning the
passage of German aeroplanes and
Zeppelins over Dutch territory has
been made at Berlin by the Dutch
government, it was learned today.
The Holland government declares
It expects Germany " to take ade
luate measures to avoid violation of
Dutch neutrality In the future."
? * *
GERMAN AGENCY
CLAIMS CEYLON
IS IN REVOLT
BERLIN, Sept. 30. ?"Private re
ports from the British Island of Cel
lon", says the Overseas News Agen
cy, "are to the effect that the entire
Island has been in a state of rebellion
since June and that all tea plantations
on the island have been destroyed and
that more than two thousand persons
liave been shot during riots that at in
tervals have broken out."
The Nows Agency further says: "So
perfect has been the work of the
British censor, thaf. the news has
hitherto been unpublishod."
BRITISH THY IU
GET SHRAPNEL
IN NORTHWEST
SEATTLE, Sept. 30.? Agents rep
resenting the British government ar
rived here yesterday. They are seek
ing to place a portion of a $5,000,000 j
shrapnel contract in Northwost cit
ies.
BIG SUBMARINE
CONTRACT MAY GO
TO CALIFORNIA FIRM
WASHINGTON, Sept. 30. ? The;
Unon Works may be given the con
tract for the construction of sixteen
new submarines for the United States,
its bid having been the lowest.
TELLER IS ARRESTED;
IS SHORT OVER $20,000
WALLA WALLA, Wash., Sept. 30.?
Elmer Holman, teller of the Farmers
& Traders Savings Bank was arrest
ed today, and Jailed on a charge of
having embezzled $20,000 of the bank's;
funds, I
WESTERN BATTLEFIELDS DRENCHED
WITH BLOOD AS GREATEST BATTLE
OF WAR RAGES; ALLIES ADVANCING
LONDON, Sept. 30.?Blood is flowing like water in the West. Emperor William is per
sonally leading the German troops, Genenil von Hindenburg, the Nemesis of the Russians, is
coming to assume command of the Teutonic armies, and further gains have been made by the
English and French. This is the summary today of what will probably be the most sanguin
ary struggle in the history of the world. Bdck and forth over the fields of dead and dying sol
diers, nearly four million soldiers are fighting, as a result of the Allied offensive drive, which
began six days ago.
GERMAN COMMUNICATION CUT.
The French have cut the railroad running through Sora
mc-Pye, one of the main lines of the German communication, ac
cording to various official announcements today. The railroad
was severed at Sainte Marie. The French, after four attempts,
broke through the outer German line, a Berlin statement said,
whereupon the German reserves delivered a counter attack, cap
turing 800 prisoners and annihilating the rest of the attacking
force.
The Paris war office, in chronicling the advance in Cham
pagne announces that a footing in the second German line of
defense was captured and at several points important support
ing works to the south of Ripont, in the Ste- Marie section, al
so were taken. Paris also asserts the Allies have completed the
conquest of the first German defense lines.
The flower of the British army today is battering the Ger
man line in a mighty effort to capture Lens?the key to the
Teutonic main-line of communications. Orders to inaugurate this
smash against the Germans came direct from Xord Kitchener and
he inistructed the British commanders to exhaust every human
endeavor in their efforts to pierce the German wall.
CARNAGE IS INDESCRIBABLE.
Today's engagement on the Western front marks the sixth
day of continuous fighting. Much desperate fighting is in pro
gress around Arras and La Bassee and in the Argonne and
Champagne districts. Whenever there is a lull in the infantry
fighting, heavy artillery is being brought into play and the car
nage is characterized as "so frightful as to be almost unbeliev
able."
Streams of wounded are pouring into surrounding towns for
medical aid. Advices from the headquarters of Generals JofTre
and French as well as thse from Berlin admit the losses on each
side have been staggering.
In a desperate effort to stem the tide of the Allies' advance
the Germans are hurling every available man against the French
and British. Kaiser Wilhelm in person is reported to be direct
ing the German efforts. He is also said to have dismissed several
of his generals for allowing their lines to be pressed back al
most to the breaking point. Following a conference with the
Crown Prince a new German commander to take charge of the
forces in the West was expected momentarily today and it was
said that General von Hindenburg would be put in charge.
Germans Admit Losses.
"The loss of another position in France, to the Allies, as a
result of the great battle now in progress is anv>ounced in the
earliest official statement issued today by the war office. The
Germans lost Hill 191." This was the wording of an official dis
patch from Berlin this morning.
"Last night, in a battle between Loos and Ypres, the Ger
mans defeated both wings of the British army," a later official
German communication stated.
An early dispatch from Paris said: "The French have pen
etrated the Germans' second line of defense in the Champagne.
The carnage on both sides is terrible."
Paris claims a notable advance and Berlin concedes that the
French have gained ground.
SITUATION SERIOUSLY TAKEN
IN THE GERMAN CAPITAL TODAY
BERLIN, Sept. 30.?News of the offensive of the Allies on
the Western front is taken very seriously in the German capital.
Thousands of people fill the streets, watching the bulletin boards.
The Berliner Tageblatt remarked editorially to day that
"nothing would be more foolish than to overlook the terrible ser
iousness of the recent battles in the West," and that "it would
be equally wrong for the Germans not to have the fullest con
fidence in their troops and leaders."
IMPERIAL PALACE TO GIVES ITS
METALS TO MUNITIONS FACTORIES
GENEVA, Sept. 30.?The Emperor's palace in Berlin today
was visited by a commission having in charge the seizure of
metals for government use. The court chamberlain made out a
list of the metals used in the palace and members of the royal
family made out individual lists. By orders of the Emperor
all metals not actually necessary, will be seized.
ZEPPELINS HEADED FOR ENGLAND.
LONDON, Sept. 30.:?Six Zeppelins were sighted today over
A< -schot, 23 miles northeast of Brussels. They were bound in
a westerly direction, probably toward Dover and the English
channel. This information was contained in a dispatch from Am
sterdam.
GRECIAN LOAN OF $30,000,000 VOTED.
ATHENS, Sept. 30.?Without debate, the Chamber of De
puties today passed a bill declaring Macedonia in a state of
siege and authorizing $30,0000,000 for the mobilization of the
Greek army,

xml | txt