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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, October 01, 1915, Image 1

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five ARE
MURDERED
BY MANIAC
SKAGWAY. Oct 1.?After running
amuck and killing tour men at Ear
Lake early yesterday morning. Alex
ander Gogoff, a Russian section hand,
appeared at the office of the White
Pass railway at Whitehorse with a .10
30 rifle at 1:30 o'clock in the after
noon and confessed. He was arrested
and disarmed, and a party headed by
Dr. Clark started for the scene of the
shooting.
The party found the bodies of Pat
Kinslow. the section foreman. George
Lane. T. Boskovich and an Austrian,
all section men. Henry Cook was
alive when found, but died soon af
ter reaching the hospital in White
lrorse. A. Wilkinson, another section
hand, was found hiding in the woods,
where he had taken tefuge during the
time of the shooting.
Gogoff was discharged from the sec
tion early last spring because he was
thought to be mentally nnsound. He
will be arraigned this afternoon.
Cook was married and has a family
l^Skagway. He is a member of the
EHks* lodge.
THEY PROTEST
ANNEXATION
J. F. McDonald was last night elect
ed chairman of a temporary organiza
tion formed by the people who live
oatstde of the city limits who met in
the native school house for the pur
pose of voting upon the matter of an
nexation to the city of Juneau. The
sentiment of the meeting last night
was against annexation. It Is plan
nod to bold a larger meeting next
4 Monday night at the same place, at
which time several resolutions will
be put to a vote, among them being a
protest to the City Council in regard
to the school tuition.
The following were appointed to a
committee to draw up the protest: A.
B. fallaham. Capt. Peter Madsen.
George Harrington. Charles Spores and
Martin Hoist.
* ?????????? 4p' ? ? ? ? ^
+ >
? ? EAGLE RIVER +
+ GETS SCHOOL +
+ ?+? *
+ It wan decided this after- +
+ noon that in all probability a +
* school will be established for +
+ a short term this year at Eagle ?
+ River. Members of the Eagle +
+? River School Board have been +?
?fr conferring In this city about ?
* the matier during the past few ?
+ days and If the finances can +
+ be arranged schools will be +
+ opened later on in several dls- +
+ tricts whose applications have +
* been In for a long time. +
* *
? ???* ?>?*?????* + * +
COLONEL JACKLING
AND PARTY HERE
TO VISIT MINES
Col. Dnniel C. Jackling. multi-mit
Uonalre mining man of Salt Lake. Au
dolph Spreekles. a wealthy sugar re
finer of California. President Charles
M. MacNeill of the Utah Copper Co.,
Frank G. Janney, manager of mills for
the Jackling interests. Secretary H.
B. Tooker and Secretary John Ridge
way arrived on the private yacht Cy
prus at 12:30 this morning and will
be here until Sunday, inspecting the
Alaska Gastlneau Mining Company, in
which they are heavily Interested.
Mrs. Jackling. Mrs. Spreekles and
Mrs. MacNeill complete tho party.
Captain Lewis is in command of the
Cyprus and Captain Ed Hickman is
pilot
This morning General Manager B.
L. Thane and Chief Engineer Harry
L. Wollenberg. of the Gastlneau Co.,
accompanied the party to Annex
creek, where the power project of the
company will be examined. The Cy
prus made the trip lnt<v Taku Inlet
and the mining men went ashore on
the ship's motorboat.
DELINQUENT TAXES
COMING IN SLOWLY
Since the city taxes became delin
quent there has been paid a total of
$78 plus the penalties in each case.
This leaves something close to $6000
still outstanding. The penalty for de
linquent payment is 103- of the
amount of the assessment, and must
be paid with the amount of the tax.
GILBERT TO MOVE
HIS TINNING SHOP
George K. Gilbert has leased the
Caro building, in Second street, and
will more his tinning and plumbing
plant from the Shattnck building, in
Front street, at an early date.
? *
* WEATHER REPORT ?
4? Maximum?57. *
* MiRimam~25. *
* CLEAR ! : *
+ *?>****** + * + ?**?>?
NEW RECTOR
EOR TRINITY
CHURCH HERE
The Rev. Guy Christian of Rich
mond, Va.. who for Ave years was the
priest in charge of tho Episcopal
church at Nome, Alaska, arrived in
Juneau today, having been appointed
by the Rev., J. W. Wood of New York,
as rector of Trinity Episcopal church.
Junoau. He succeeds John R. Jones,
layreader. who took the Rev. G. E.
Renlson's place this summer. Rev.
Christian is accompanied by Mrs.
Christian.
For the past year Rev. Christian has
beeu studying at Oxford University,
England. Prior to his trip abroad, he
was at Nome, whore his superior ab!.
Ity and earnestness made a decidedly
favorable impression. He was ex
tremely popular there.
Captain G. H. Whitney met the
Rot. and Mrs. Christian this morning
and 13 assisting them in getting lo
cated. They will occupy tho rectory,
adjoining the church.
Rev. Christian annonnced that ser
vices will bo held Sunday at o'
clock, and as it is the drst Sand ay in
the month Holy Communion will be
observed. Evenlngsong will be at
7:30 p. m- Sunday School teachers
and children will meet at 12:30. The
choir will hold a meeting at the rec
tory tonight at 8 o'clock.
WOODWORTH-HUNT
LAUNCH ARRIVES
IN SPIRIT CITY
SEATTLE, Oct. 1.?Ben Hunt, form
erly star pitcher on tho Vancouver
Northwestern League baseball team,
and "Blllle" Woodworth. an entertain
er of Juneau, Alaska, arrived here
this morning from Prince Rupert, B.
C.. on theid 24-ft. launch, the "Alas-,
kan," after a trip beset with perils.
Woodworth and Hunt will have the
launch repaired, and will then attempt
to reach San Francisco .In the small
craft.
Hunt went to Prince Rupert this
summer to pitch for the Canadians in
a series of games with the Ketchikan
team, i
EMPIRE HELPS TO
REUNITE MISSING .
MAN WITH SISTER
This morning The Empire was lit
erally "tickled to death."
Why 1 Because it helped to locate
a man who for 17 years had been lost
to his sister. Glen C. Bartlett, mana
ger of the Gastinean Hotel, also aided
and abetted The Empire in the case.
A week ago The Empire received
from Sydney, Australia, a communi
cation Inquiring as to the whereabouts
of one Peter Dclaney. The communi
cation was published. Mr. Bartlett
saw it. and wrote to Peter Delaney,
of Ketchikan, sending him the copy of
the paper.
Today Mr. Bartlett received from
Delaney the following:
"I received the Empire you sent
me. Thank you. my dear boy. That
was my sister all right. I had not
known for years where she was. I have
written her a long Tetter. Bless her
big heart, she will be glad to hear
from me and I am going to see her
If she does not come to Alaska. Bo
sure and thank The'Empire for its in
terest in this matter."
STANDARD COMPANY
MAY BUILD TANKS
AT NARROWS TOWNS
The Standard Oil Company has ac
quired sites and will probably orect
oil storage tanks at Petersburg and
Wrangell early next year. General
Manager John D. Helps has returned
from Petersburg, and while he states
that definite plans for the erection of;
the tanks have not been made .the
company expects eventually to' make
the improvements at the Narrows cit
ies when business warrants.
One of the company's engineers
came from San? Francisco to examine
the sites, not long ago.
"DESCRIPTIVE OF JUNEAU."
Under the above heading the Seattle
Post-Intelligencer says of The Em
pire's special Development Number:
"The Alaska bureau of the Se
attle Chamber of Commerce and
the ^Post-Intelligencer have re
ceived copies of the development
number of the Alaska Daily Um
pire, published at Juneau, of
which John W. Troy is editor.
This special number, printed on
book paper, contains forty pages
descriptive of Juneau and condi
tions generally throughout Alas
ka. It contains special articles
by Gov. Strong, B. L. Thane, John
B. Willis. Charles Goldstein, Sen
ator B. F. Millard, and many oth
er prominent Alaskans and is il
lustrated."
ALTAR SOCIETY MEETS.
The Ladies' Altar Society of the
Catholic church met with Mrs. E. Val
entine. 52C East Fifth street, this af
cernoon.
: Ptiget Sound Packing Co., ia register
jed at the Occidental.
MILLIONS
GIVEN TO
WAR LOAN
NEW YORK, Oct 1.?J. P. Morgan
announced today that one man had
subscribed, thirty millions to the Ang
lo-French war loan, but declined to
era composing the Guggenheim fam
ily took a million each. Sevoral
banks took from two to five millions
each, Mr. Morgan also stated.
Other subscriptions to the loan are
now pouring in. Some excitement was
created this morning by publication of
a news dispatch from St. Louis, which
contained a statment signed by Sena
tor Stone, In which Senator Stone de
plored the moral effect of the big loan
on the ground that those subscribing
had "forgotten their neutrality," and
had "become partisans of the bor
rowers."
The ^Vorld says that western bank
ers, particularly from the inland, have
already Intimated to members of the
Anglo-French financial commission
that if the proposed credit chiefly in
volved the payment for war supplies
little assistance could be promised.
The German Influence is declarod to
havo been at work for months and
two movements are now under way
to counteract It. Nearly*every bank
in the middle West has on its board
a German or a German sympathizer,
who wonld discourage any participa
tion in the loan. It is stated that two
New York banking houses Believing
a 1500,000,000. loan was practicable,
canvassed their middle west corres
pondents and one figure was revised
to $25,000,000 and the other to $100,
000,000.
A kite London special says it is
believed that if the Allies are suc
cessful in floating a loan in the United
States, Germany will also seek accom
odation.
BRIDESMAID FOR
WEDDING IS ILL
Miss Flora McRae Duncan, of Palo
Alto, Calif., is 111 at her apartment in
the New Cain. Miss Duncan accom
panied her mother ihd her friend.
Miss Sam Shiels of San Francisco, to
Juneau for the purpose of being
bridesmaid when Miss Shiels becomes
the bride of John H. Stanfield of
Treadwell, tomorrow evening.
The wedding will take place in the
Presbyterian church and a reception
at Treadwell will be given in honor
of tho young people.
BEACH COMBERS GET
> METAL FROM ABLER
Only a charred shell remains of the
power schooner P. J. Abler, which
caught on Are while at anchor here
Wednesday. The Arc lasted almost 24
hours, the last smoke dying out yes
terday at noon. Beach combers have
been busily engaged in recovering
brass find other metal with which the
boat was constructed.
Captain Hoffman is here with sever
al memhers'of the crew, but will re
turn to Seattle on an early boat.
CALIFORNIA HEAT WAS
INTENSE, JUDGE WINN SAYS
"The beat In Southern California
was greater this summer than ever,
and I got a real taste of it during the
few weeks that I was in Los Angeles
and San Diego," said Judge John R.
Winn, today. Judge Winn returned on
the Jefferson.
Judge Winn declares that for sever
al days in Los Angeles and surround
ing country the thermometers showed
110 degrees in the shade.
ASKS $10,COO DAMAGES
FOR LOSS OF SIGHT
Asking for $10,000 damages for per
sonal injuries, suit has been filed
through John Rustgard by Rodevan
Saborich against the Alaska United
Gold Mining Co.. as owner of tho
Ready Bullion Mine at Treadwell. Tho
complaint charges that through the
gross and wanton negllgenco of an
employee, Saborich lost the sight of
his right eye and had the left eye
seriously injured. According to the
complaint, Rodevan, an ore-breaker,
was working a short distance from
another breaker whose name is not
given, and as the result of the care
lessness of this second worker a piece
of rock was sledged off and struck the
plaintiff in the eye. The man's face
is alleged to have been badly cut. and
the sight of one eye entirely destroy
ed. Saborich states that ho was
obliged to spend six months in the
USspital as the result of his accident
and that he was obliged to spend, 1n
addition to other moneys, the sum of
Tho plaintiff Is a married man and
has three minor children. He claims
that his earning capacity has been
Compensation Lav. became effective.
The accident occurred in November,
Mary E. MacKubblna of Philadel
phia. Prank Parriah or Seattle and
George P. Relly of Seattle are late ar
rivals at the New Cain
DE
FOl 0 BE
tt
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C., Oct. l.~
Tho steamer Delhi lias been floated.
When the water was pumped out and
the hulk exposed to view, there was
sreat disappointment for those con
cerned in her. Her engines uro
gone, and tho hull is in such condi
tion that repaint are practically out
of tho question. The Delhi has been
purchased by Captain Baldngton for
$2,000.
BOMB SET OFF;
WENATCHEE MAN
HAS CLOSE CALL
WENATCHEE, Wash., Oct. 1.? A
bomb believed to have been set off by
an enemy slightly wounded President
P. S. Leonard of tho Wenatcbee Prod
uce Company this morning when Its
oxplosion wrecked a local garage.
Leonard had a close call. Many neigh
boring windows wore shatterod by the
explosion.
+ t ?
ARRESTS FOLLOW
RIOTS; SEVERAL
ARE INJURED
CHICAGO, OcL 1. ? Two hundred
striking garment workers engaged in
street rioting horo today. Several
men and women and one policeman
were injured. Nine men nnd two wo
men wore arrested.
The rioting was precipitated by
picketing.
SIX MIDDIES ARE
DISMISSED; OTHERS
DEMOTED ? HAZING
WASHINGTON. Oct. 1.? The dis
missal of sis midshipmen and the sus
pension of four others for one year
without pay and demotion to the next
lowest claBS of fifteen others was an
nounced by Secretary Daniels today as
a result of the recent lialzng investi
gation at the United States naval
academy at Annapolis.
MURDERER IS
REPRIEVED UNTIL
OCTOBER SIXTEENTH
8ALT L, MCE CITY, Oct.Acting
under instructions from President Wil
son, Gov. William S. Spry lato last
night reprieved Joe Uillstrora, mom
been shot by a firing squad at the
State penitentiary this morning for
having committed a double murder.
The reprieve will bo in effect until
October 16th. The request on the
President was made by the Swedish
ambassador to Washington.
ELIAS MONTFORT
HEADS THE G. A. R.
WASHINGTON, Oct. 1?Ellas Mont
fort of Cincinnati today was elected
commander-in-chief of the Grand
Army of the Republic. Kansas City
has been chosen as the place of the
1916 encampment.
E. C. MACDONALD DIES.
SEATTLE, Oct. 1.?E. C. MacDon
ald, well-known politician and form
er assistant attorney general, died
here today. MacDonald at one "time
was private secretary to Governor
BANKERS INDICTED.
WASHINGTON, Oct. 1.?Throo of
ficers of the Riggs National bank were
MRS. GEO. DEWEY HONORED
WASHINGTON. Oct. 1.?Mrs. Goo.
Dewey, wife of Admiral Dewey, has
orary member of the Ways and Means
Navy League. Mrs. Dewey has shown
a deep Interest In the. Woman's Sec
interest is shared by navy women in
general. Ari&y women also have
shown a desire to co-operate in this
work of arousing American women
to the cause of national defense, and
many of them have Joined the ranks
of the Women's section.
EXCLUSIVE CLOAK AND
SUIT SHOP TO OPEN
A. Grconbuum arrived this morning
with a large stock of ladies suits an<i
cloaks, anil will, within a week or ten
days, open "The Parfsienne," In the
Held building formerly occupied by
The Fashion. Mrs. M. Greonbaum will
have the active management of the
new store.
"J am going to remodel the building
morning. "We will put in a largo
front, for display purposes, as we ex
pect to permanently make our borne In
Juneau. I have brought to Alaska on
ladies' wear to be found anywhere."
Cordova Times: Miss Ada White.;
Wee. wa" a passenger on the North
western for Anchorage, where she will j
accept a similar position with the Al
E
CHES
ARE GOAL
LONDON. Oct. l.?In tho West to
ot the fighting. They are hammering
away at tho second - German line in
the Campagno, In tho direction ot the
Grand pre railway and at the same time
are dropping bombs on the line and
stations to prevent the Germans from
bringing up reinforcements.
Absence of news from the British
front apparently Indicates that these
their position in the atrip of territory
so recently won.
In the great battle in the Artois
district tho* French have mado fur
ther progress by means of attacks
with hand grenades on the German
trenches. Announcement to this ef
fect was mado late today by the
French war office. In the Champagne
a German counter attack near Mais
ons do Champagne was checked.
The Germans violently bombarded
the French trenches near Souplr,
norm or tne a nine, our mnae no in- 1
fnntry attack.
The latest communication from
Paris today said: "French forces
have made furthey progress In their
battle for the possession of Vimya
Heights."
BERLIN CLAIMS 8UCCESS.
BERLIN, Oct. 1.?German counter
attacks on tho northern end of the
Anglo-French battlefront In the West
continue to press the English back,
the war office statement today an
nounced.
44444 4* + -> + 44 + 44,J,+
* ' 4
* WARNING TO AUSTRIANS. 4
4 ??? 4
4 PITTSBURGH, Oct. 1. ? 4
4 Despite Vienna denials, offlc- 4
4 ial warnings to Austro-Hungar- 4
4 Ian subjects that death may be 4
4 the penalty for atding In mak- 4
4 Ing munitions for the Allies, 4
4 were printed today in Aus- 4
* trian papers in Pennsylvania. 4
. +
4 4 4t 4 4 4"4 4 4 4 4 4 4 ? 4
, .
ITALIANS LOSE 1000
IN FRUITLESS ATTACK
VIENNA. Oct. 1. ? "An attack
against the Flltach region, which has
cost the Italians In the valley alone
1,000 men. failed entirely," says an
official statement regarding the Ital
ian front. "Early this morning the <
advanced trenches were abandoned
by the enemy."
Tim report also says that the Ital
ian artillery has shown renewed ac
tivity on the' Tyrol front, and an
nounces that after the repulse of a
surprise Italian attack in the Ursic
region an Italian advanced position
was blown up with the troops holding
it, while Italian dugouts on the Do
berto Plateau also were blown up.
TWO GERMAN SPIES
SENTENCED IN LONDON
LONDON. Oct. 1. ? Two spies, a
man and a woman, received sentence
yesterday. The man was sentenced
to death, while the woman of Ger
years* penal servitude, subject to ap- "
peal.
CHINA IS NOT READY
FOR STANDARD OIL
PEKIN, Oct 1.?Because of the dif
ficulty In determining: at the present
time what provinces are the best
suited for marketing and operating
purposes, the negotiations between
the government of China and the
Standard Oil Company have been tem
porarily suspended. They will be re
sumed just as soon as prospecting
now under way has ascertained the
available area In the Sbensl province. I
The Chinese authorities are hopcftil
for success.
RUSSIANS RELEASE
AMERICAN SUSPECT
WASHINGTON, Oct. 1.?The State
Department advices from Moscow, Rus
sla Tuesday told of the release of
John Simon, traveling representative
of the Rice & Hutchins Shoe Com
pnny, of Boston, who had been detain
ed there on suspicion of being a spy.
A man named Keen, whoso initials the
State Department were unable to
tative for the Rice A Hutchiiis Corn
authorities.
MUNITIONS FOR $60,000,000
MINNEAPOLIS. Oct. 1?It is roport
. pectlon just concluded, Apportion- 1
xnent was the subject of a conference !
;ii! Ottawa by niemberfs of the Camd- I
: dla.ii Bankers' Association, Canadian
uartment. The distributing economy
EYE WITNESS
TELLS ABOUT
f RENCH COUP
PARIS, Oct-1.?A French eye-wit
ness to the terrific battle of Wednes
day and Thursday, In which the Fronch
took the first line of trenches in the
Champagne, says:
"Our men loapea our of their
trenches and made for the German
trenches beforts the forest The Ger
mans bolted through the woods, pur
sued by our first 'ware.' Sections of
the second 'wave* explored the ruined
German trenches and underground
shelters, which often were twenty
feet deep. An thoy had no desire to
go down Into these holes, from whence
It seemed unlikely tHey would come '
out alive, our men dropped bombz and '
Drod shotguns through tho openings, 1
which effectually prevented the oc- 1
cupants from coming out and attack- :
Ing us from the rear.
"A majority of our men followed the
Germans, who were running like
bares through the woods. They soon
captured the second line of trenches
in the middle of the forest and went
on, some even crossing the Souchez
brook or coming up the sunken road
[eaamg to Angrot, dui tuo uermans ?
brought up reserves and tried to sur
round us. This maneuver was foiled
however, by our officers, who drew*
bur men back to the first lino cap
tured. During the night the QermanB
fortified themselves in the woods, but
it daybreak our artillery stopped their
work by a furious bombardment. The
Bvening before the forest had pre
sented its usual aspect, but in a few
minutes all waB changed. One after
mother the trees wore mowed' down by
ihells. The Gorman artillery was not
Idle either, but sent at us a steady
stream of shells, which plowed up the
earth all around. Our men bore tho
scathing fire philosophically for since
:hoy have reecivcd their new ateel
helmets they did not fear wounds in
the head. In the afternoon the guns
leased' firing and we were ordered
to attack again. Machine guns which
tho Germans had placed on their
[tanks wore soon put out of action.
It was difficult going, in the woods.
Men stumbled over branches but on
the other hand the holes torn In the
ground by shells gave shelter against
machine gun lire. These were cun
ningly concealed in pita covered with
.feel plates. Barrels protruding
through narrow slits were Invisible
from a distance and tbby sent at us
t withering fire. From behind trees,
dumps and from the pits our men
kept hurling a constant stream of
bombs and soon drove the Germans
3ut of the woods, which remained in
mr ha,. Js."
3ERMAN VIEWS OF
ALLIES' LOAN PROPOSAL
BERLIS, Oct. 1. ? Negotiations
Py the Allies for a great loan In the J
United Stater, is being closely watcb
?d by Germany. The press displays 1
prominently all available Information c
ind comments at length on the var
oub developments.
Tho Frankfurter Zeitung expresses
he belief that Kuhn, Loeb & Co. will
lot participate in the loan: "The sen
or partner, Jacob H. Schlff as well
is other partners," It says, "has been
iwaro that Russia is in the center
if reaction in the world and that Rus
dt. who oppresses the Jepvs In most
larbarous way.*, will ben fit by the
rURKS REINFORCED
ALONG GALLIPOLI
ATHENS, Oct. 1. ? Heavy Turk
sh reinforcements are being rushed
o the Dardanelles in response to ur
gent pleas from German commanders
in Gallipoli Peninsula. French war
diipa arc continuing the bombard
ment of the Turkish batteries on the
Asiatic coast. ?
A German aeroplane which descend
id while flying over Bulgarian terri
:ory was confiscated and the observ
er and pilot Interned.
HESPERIAN TORPEDOED . '
GREAT BRITAIN INSISTG 1
LONDON. Oct. 1.?The British of- 1
ricial press bureau says regarding the 1
Gorman claim that the Hesperian was
not sunk by a submarine: "UndoUbt
>dly proof exists that a German sab- 1
marine was actually In the locality 1
whore tho Hesperian was attacked, '
in (I ships were sunk both to the '
north and south of this spot on Sept [
and 5. The explosion was of the ?
typo caused by a torpedo. This is
(inclusively proved by a fair-sized 1
fragment of a torpedo now in the pos- ?'
session of the admiralty, which was 1
nicked up on board the vessel before '
- ?> 1
AUSTRIA LODGES 1
ANOTHER PROTE8T
WITH AMERICA
WASHINGTON'. Oct. 1. ? Ambas
sador Penfield, at Vienna, reported
to the State Department yesterday
[hat t)c had received a second repre
sentation from the Austro-Hung&rlan
government, protesting the manufac
ture of ammunition and other muni
tions of war for the Allies, In the
United' St Ales.
J. H. Irving, of the Irving Tailoring <
ned ill!:; morning from a I
BULGARIA
TO TIGHT
OR DISARM
LONDON, Oct. 1v?Austro-Ger
man army officer* have arrived In
Bulgaria to participate In direct
ing the mobilization of the Bulgar
ian army, it w^b officially announc
ed today in the presa bureau.
The communication added:?
"This Is regarded with the utmost
gravity in London."
LONDON, Oct 1. ? Bulgaria must
ilsarm or go to war. No middle
course Is left her, with the entente
powers exerting strong pressure to
force demobilization and the Teutonic
tllles equally strong in their pressure
toward war.
BBjj Overtures Are Made.
Bucharest dispatches today report
lermany and Austria as having offer
ed Bulgaria the whole of Macedonia
md Serbia and an Adriatic port in
Albania as a reward for her active
participation in the war on the side
pf the central powers. An immediate
leclslon is demanded, however. Ger
nany having already dispatched a
<emi-ultlmatum to Sofla, according to
Rome reports.
An official dispatch from Rome early
today says that Serbia has offered to
3reece the districts of Gnlevgelell and'
Do Iran, rich agricultural regions, In
Macedonia, In exchange for Greece's
participation in an expedition against
Bulgaria.
Hostilities Reported.
A late dispatch from Turin reads as
Follows: "Thero already have been
several clashes between Serbians and
Bulgarians along the frontier, accord
ng to reports received here. A Bui
jarlan patrol at Trltchoukc Is reported
o have attacked Serbian sentinels,
vho retreated. The Bulgarians
crossed Into Serbian territory, whero
hey remained several hours. Bul
garian troops are said to be digging
benches all along the frontier and
protecting them with barbed-wire en
tanglements."
+ ? + 4>
b ?
fr CHOLERA IN GALTCIA. 4>
:? *? "? ""r *
? Amsterdam, Oct. 1?Cholera <*
V Is raging In Gallcia, The Tel- +
V egraaf says, and according to *
:? the home office, three hundred +
V cases are reported. +
:? 4.
KUROPATKIN WILL
BE IN COMMAND
OF GRENADE CORPS
LONDON, Oct 1.?General Alexel
turopatkin, a commander during the
tuaso-Japnnese war, has been ap
jointed chief of a Russian grenadier
:orps.
rURKS LOSE 5,000 IN
DEFENDING A HILL
LONDON, Oct. 1. ? A description
>f the fighting in the Anzac region
>n the Galllpoll Peninsula during the
ast week in August and the result
ichieved during this period are given
jy the Dardanelles correspondent of
leuter's Telegram Company.
The capture of Hill No. 60 was im
>ortnnt, says the correspondent, as it
s the last crest of the last ridge sep
iratlng the Anzac zone from the plains
o the north, and thus constitutes a
joint of union between the British
orces and the line across Suvia plain,
jesldcs giving access to a ravine lead*
ng to high ground beyond it.
The Turks, ho says, clung to the hill
with the utmost determination and
when they were thrown out of their
reaches would fight their way back
igain, accepting terrible losses un
flinchingly to regain the lost ground,
with the result that when the last
trenches were finally captured they
ivere filled with the Turkish dead.
It took-three days to oust the Turks
ind the ground around, he says, is
still thickly strewed with their bod
ies and those of British soldiers who
fell in the assaults.
Turkish Loss, 5,000.
It Is computed, declares the cor
respondent, that the Turks* lost 5,000
men before they surrendered the po
sition. The Indian brigade and the
"onnaught Rangers took part in the
righting with the Australians* and New
Zealanders.
The correspondent expresses the op
inion that the Turks will not again
ittuck the Anzac positions after the
terrible losses they sustained in pre
vious attacks. They did succeed, J>ow
sver.'in Sweeping two British batter
ies off a ridge that previously had
ieen won by the New Zealanders. but
when they got across the crest into
the ravine below they came under the
fire of British machine guns.
'They came down in thousands,"
aid a staff officer of the New Zeal
rad Brigade: "they went back in
hundreds," the correspondent's story
continues, Machine gunners, he sayn.
3laim that 5,000 were killed.
STOCK QUOTATIONS ?
NEW YORK, Oct. 1.?Alaska Gold
closed today at 33, Chino 47%. Ray
25%. Utah Copper 6$. Butte and Su
perior C0%. Copper ip at 13%.

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