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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, October 15, 1915, Image 4

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
PUBWafflCT) BY THE EMPIRE PRPTMNQ COMPANY
JOHN W. TROY, Editor and Manager
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Oca yefir. by mall, la advance *10.00
Stz months, by mall. In advance, B.OO
Par Kaaftt delivered LOO
Watered aa second-class matter November 7, 1913,
at the poetofflee at Juneau. Alaska, under the Act of
March 3. 1*7*.
A JUST ONE
There will be general satisfaction among the peo
ple of Qaatineaa channel because of the reinstatement
of Deputy Marshal Frank Bach, of Douglas. Mr. Bach
is a pioneer of Douglas. He has been a faithful worker
for this section of the country, and Is a good cltlson.
The escape of Dupee. which caused Mr. Bach's sus
pension. was something that would be likely to occur
to any officer. It was unfortunate, and nono felt so
badly about it as Mr. Bach. However, it was a matter
that did not Involve Mr. Bach's integrity In any man
ner. nor did it Impeach his capacity as an official.
The Department did simple Justice to a worthy of
ficial when Mr. Bach was reinstated.
SOUTH IN PROSPERITY DEAL
The increase of three cents a pound for cotton docs
not only apply to the 1915 crop but to 4,000,000 bales?
-about 25 per cent?of the 1914 crop that has been held
over and remained unsold at the time of the rise. This
means that the South will realise approximately *750,
000.000 for cotton (and this allows a large sum with
which to pay off the Indebtedness against the holdover
crop) as against something over *500,000.000 last year.
In addition to this substantial improvement, there was
a fifteen per cent decrease in the area planted to cot
ton, which has added to the cerial and vegetable crops.
The increase in the corn and hog production has been
marked. The South is in on the prosperity deal.
PAN-SLAVISM UNDER TEST
Judging by the attitude of Bulgaria, Pan-Slavism Is
undergoing the severest strain to which it has been
subjected since the war began. The passage In Rus
sia's ultimatum to that country accusing It of "prepara
tion for fratricidal aggression against a Slav and allied
nations" bears witness to a wounded Pan-Slavic senti
ment as much as it does to concern for the military
consequences of such a hostile course.
At the outset it was generally assumed that Pan
Slavism would suffice to keep Bulgaria neutral?if not
actually to enlist its support for the Allies. There were
reports during the early stages of the conflict of pro
nounced differences between the Czar Ferdinand and
his ministers as to the attitude the nation should take.
A common race, a common religious community, a com
mon history of hatred for the Turks, and supposedly a
common distrust of the Austro-German policy of pres
sure to the east and southeast?the sentimental argu
ment was complete.
Unfortunately for the Allies, tho ruling powers of
Bulgaria have been cherishing ever since the last Bal
kan war the resentment that comes from thwarted ambi
tions. Coupled with this sentiment Is the desire to re
cover the gains they had within their grasp at the close
of the first Balkan war but which were lost In the sec
ond. And all this has led this Slavic country into the
Teutonic camp.
Pan-Slavism Is no doubt a powerful sentiment, but
it has seemingly not yet acquired great political author
ity. National ambitions and resentments are still the
governing principles when it Is a question of action and
not of dramatic discussion or mere sentiment.
MILITARY INCREASE
There is no doobt bat that the American people
frvor an increase in their army and navy. There is no
doobt bat that we should have an increase in both,
with, perhaps, a considerable increase in the navy. How
ever. there will be little support tor the Rooseveltian
program to provide compulsory military service, nor is
there any chance that the United States will start out
to create "the largest navy in the world"
The United States is not and must not become a
military Nation. Our greatest glory has been achieved
in the ways of peace. The finest thing about the Civil
war was the discharge of the Grand Army immediately
after the war was over.
Further, there is no National necessity for a great
military force. The present war in Europe is making
further conflicts among Nations less probable. The cost
of the great war there is yet to be felt. With peace
there will come the payment of interest on the billions
of war indebtedness and the pensions. There will also
come the reconstruction period and its cost. "People
who dance must pay the fiddler." and those who fight
must pay for that. Even disregarding the heartsickness
that it will cause, the price of the war in dollars and
cents will enforce a curtailment of preparation for an
other war.
The President has suggested that there should be
an increase in both army and navy, but he is not in
favor of the plans urged by the leagues that are circu
lating "preparedness" propaganda. However, his plan is
quite radical enough.
President Wilson admits that he will vote (or Wo
man suffrage at the New Jersey election on that sub
ject. Thus is he emphasizing the fact that he was not
attempting to evade an expression on the subject when he
said that he believed woman suffrage to be a State
question and not a National matter. As a citizen of
New Jersey he is in (avor of permitting the women
to vote. As President of the country he favors per
mitting each State to decide questions of suffrage for
itself.
The excellent Alaskan articles that are running
through Leslie's Weekly from the pen of Col. John A.
Sleicher. editor of that publication, under the title. 'The
Truth About Alaska." cannot fall to be of substantial
aid to this Territory. CoL Slelcher's articles are the
result of a trip along the Alaskan coast made by the
author last summer. They show that he made the trip
with his eyes open, and that he caught the main points
involved in Alaskan development.
Those who talk Immediate statehood for Alaska in
lieu of a "full Territorial form of government" are doing
yeoman's work to keep things just as they are. Every
one who is at all familiar with our country's history
ksows that there is no more chance for immediate state
hood tor than there Is hope tor the abdication of
the Czar.
The good performances of those U. S.-built submar
ines now In the British davy suggest that we ought
hnuceforth build all our submarines for a foreign coun
try and then buy them back.
Those who opposo self-government for Alaska should
be frank and say so. They should not advanco the
'Immediate Statehood" subterfuge.
After this war Is over small nations will probably
be a little more careful In picking their kings and kings'
consorts than they have been heretofore.
It la said that Villa cannot write his name. And,
seemingly, he cannot make his mark any more.
THE PRESIDENT A-WOOING GOES
(Seattle Times.)
Mr. Wilson's success in keeping secret from the
prying, curious world his courting of the fair Widow
Gait is directly traceable to the tendency of the Ameri
can people to regard the present chief executive as a
human machine.
Cynical Washington would have derisely laughed
down a rumor that the President was party to a love ro
mance. The American public, steadfast to Its own ap
preciation of this man of many silonces, also would have
absolutely declined to connect his name with the thought
of romance.
Bocanse of this set belief, therefore, the announce
ment of his engagement was a big surprise.
Yet, if there is a man In contemporary political life
who needs the support and comfort of a helpmeet, It is
Mr. Wilson. For month, he has borno a weight of work,
worry and responsibility such as falls to the lot of but few
men.
The bride-to-be Is to be congratulated, not merely
because she will occupy soon the position of First Lady
of the Land, but. more, because sho is to sharo in the
life work and achievements of a strong, silent high
minded American gentleman.
ALASKA AND ITS NEW WAR DOGS
iseaiue limes, .j
Alaska, as reported In The Times, Is constantly let
ing slip Its dogs of war: but they are a different breed
from the kind mentioned by the poet who cried, "Ha
voc," before turning loose his mailed and martlaled can
ines.
The Alaskans are entering the service as transport
animals. They arc displacing the horse to an extent.
They are valuable because of their endurance. They are
adapted to the hardest kind of work in winter, and can
perform prodigies of strength when put to the tost
The purchase of the Allan team of sixteen mala
mutes and 200 other trained dogs, noted in The Times,
may be only a forerunner of a considerable movement
to secure Alaskan dogs for the armies of the Allies. The
arrival of an agent of the French government in Nome
Is opportune, for he has reached there at a time when
there are many splendid dogs for sale.
In the settled centers of Alaska the dog was dis
placed first by the horse and later by the automobile,
with the result that the far-seeing agent of the warring
Europeans has hit upon an opportunity for his purchase.
The dog, however, is still of great service In the Isolat
ed parts of the Territory.
There are hundreds of dogs for Bale in certain partB
of Alaska, and the chances are that purchases will be
freely made. These hardy canines will do humble but
none the less worthy and faithful service in the zone of
war. With winter coming on. they will be able to ac
complish results under circumstances In which the equal
ly faithful horse would bo helpless.
PROMISING SITUATION
(Seward Gateway.)
The recent strikes of quartz and the splendid man
ner in which they are developing are most promising
for the district. There Is no reason at all why Moose
Pass should not be the greatest mining sensation in Al
aska. The gold brought in yesterday or the day before
shows that the rock is exceedingly rich. Just imagine
three hundred dollars a ton, and then some people have
claimed that the government railroad will run through
a district whose resources are still doubtful.
ALASKA'S GOOD SOIL
(Seattle Post-Intelligencer)
In disseminating knowledge of Alaska's heretofore
little known agricultural capabilities the bureau of soils
of the United States Department of Agriculture Is ac
complishing a work of great value. Intending settlers
are warned, in a recent report, that there will bo, for a
time, no markets for agricultural products except in the
neighborhood of mining camps and in the country ad
jacent to the railroad, until rail facilities are extended
and the population increases.
The soil experts of the bureau found the best ag
ricultural soil in Alaska in the hills north of the Xanana
river bottoms, in the Fairbanks district. There are half
a million acres of this valuable land, made up of deep;
mellow silt loam, with good drainage and moisture-hold
ing capability. Wheat, oats, rye and barley mature
here, and potatoes have yielded over 200 bushels to the
acre. Field vegetables also yield well. There are also
ono and one-half millions of acres of good land in the
hill country between the Tanana and Yukon rivers. In
cluding also the Yukon bottoms, there are 4,500,000
acres of good agricultural soil In this portion of Alaska.
Farther south, in the Cook Inlet-Susltna and the
Kenal peninsula districts, thero are 1,600,000 acres capa
ble of raising good crops, and the climate and soil are
also suitable for the dairying industry.
The Department suggests that there is room for a
(arming population of approximately 100,000 people in
the known agricultural districts, although this area may
be greatly enlarged upon further exploration. It is stat
ed that butter and cheese are likely to be the firBt pro
ducts of the farm to find a profitable export market. The
extension of home markets and an export outlet for oth
er products will come later with the development of the
mining, centers and railway building.
A third war within three years should reduce the
Balkan -States to a condition of bankruptcy wbore lat
er they can boast of deserving to rank with the first
class powers of Europe in the exhaustion of their re
sources.?(New York World.)
Times change and the point of view with them.
So it is that the suicide of a salesman by jumping from
the Brooklyn Bridge gets a pragraph of space where
once it would have had a column.?(New York World.)
A spook expert reports to the Society for Physical
Research that a mysterious picture of Mark Twain ap
peared upon a print of quite another subject. Mark
always was fond of practical jokes.?(New York World.)
Even at this early stage Jocal candidates are be
traying tho familiar tendency to book their names up with
President Wilson's?which shows they think he is still
a winning card.?(Chicago Herald.)
Operations on tho west front have no doubt given
the Russians a chance to breathe three of four long-de
ferred sighs of relief.?(Chicago Herald.)
"The moonshine's bright in the old Kentucky Home"
is the song of the revenue agents operating in the dry
districts.?(Louisville Courier-Journal.)
Villa has executed one of his followers and four
teen of his staff. Following Villa is by no means a care
free life.?(Detroit Free Press.)
"Turks sink a torpedo boat," Must have tried to
navigate It?(Charleston (W. V?.) Mall.)
THE OLDEST BANK IN ALASKA
ESTABLISHED 1891. INCORPORATED 1914
THE B. M. BEHREBDS BASK
TOTAL. RESOURCES
AUG. 7. 1911 . $469,977.93
AUG. 7, 1912 2 . $638,483.03
AUG. 7. 1913 $891,520.02
AUG. 7,1914 . . . . $940,489.18
AUG. 7, 1915 . $1,126,925.55
INTERE8T PAID ON TIME DEP0SIT8
? ?
? BIT8 OF BY PLAY *
? (By Luke McLuke) *
? ?
???+++????+???+?
(Cincinnati Enquirer)
When wo try ourselves the verdict
is always in our favor.
Wo are taught that riches are an
evil. But tho worst thing wo know
about riches is their scarcity.
When you want to register at a
hotel why is it tho clerk always hands
you a pen that somebody used to
open oysters?
Wo like to brag about our great
American sense of humor. But you
can't get a bill collector to believe
that there is any such animal.
Before etectlon the party 1b greatly
interested in the conservation of our
National resources. After election
the party is greatly interested in the
conservation of the plum tree.
? *
? QUAKER QUIP8 *
? ?
44444 + + 4*+ + 4* + + 4?!
(Philadelphia Record.)
The man who wins in a walk may
get a run for his money.
There is plenty of room at the top.
but most of us like crowds.
Even the editor of a comic paper
ought to take things seriously.
Many a man is a chronic liar who
never went fishing in his life.
+ ?
* POINTED PARAGRAPHS +
+ +
+ + + + + + + + + + 4. + + + + + +
(Chicago News.)
Agitation is the antidote for stag
nation.
And many a single man is guilty of
double dealing.
Smiles make a better salve for trou
ble than do frowns.
Frequently a man thinks ho is char
itable because he gives advice so free
ly.
Borrowed umbrellas cast the shad
ow of suspicion.
It's useless to waste hints on nar
row minded people. -
Not Scientific
Scientific partens (on a stroll)?You
see out there in the street, my son, a
simple illustration of a principle in
machanics. The man with that cart
pushes it front of him. Can you guoss
the reason why? Possibly not. I will
ask him. Note his answer, my son.
To the coster?My good man, why
do you push that cart Instead of pull
ing it?
Coster?Cause I ain't a hoss, you
old thick-headed fool.?(Tidbits.)
Another Good One
'? *We, the people of the United
States'?that is the way the Constitu
tions begins. It is a conorous phrase."
"What's the matter with 'I and my
four sons?"?(Louisville Courier-Jour
nal.)
Getting Tiresome.
Toward the end of the ride," she was
reading aloud, "they came to a ford?"
"Oh, skip that!" ho exclamied, im
patiently. "I'm getting tired of those
automobile Jokes."?(Buffalo Courier.)
The Cynic
"'Ten years ago' a Western Mayor
said to an Eastern visitor, joyously,
?'ten years ago,' and ho waved his
hand out over the roofs?'there was
no city here at all.' .
"'Hump, said the visitor. 'Hump,
and what makes you think there's one
here now?'"?(Philadelphia Bulletin.)
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
perforins two functionus. It
furnishes you tho least expen
sive moans of presenting your
wares to the public; and, bo
cause of Its
General Use
by the vast majority of tho peo
ple, it has become the great
American business directory. It
is popular with the prospective
buyer because of Its conven
ience, aud popular with the ad
vertiser because of its inexpen
aivenoBs and good results.
Try It In
THE EMPIRE
Classified Advertisements
DYE1NQ AND CLEANING
YOU HAVE tried the rest, now try
the boat. For French dry cleaning,
steam cleaning, dyeing and pressing.
Capital Dye Works, phone 177. 19-tf
3H0E MAKERS.
CITY DOCK SHOE SHOP?Expert
shoe maker, shoes of all kinds neatly
repaired, only first class material
used; work called for and delivered,
phone 294. 6m.
FASHIONABLE DRESSMAKING
All of the latest and most artistic
designs. Thoroughly experienced and
competent dressmaker. Mrs. M. Has
lam. room 12, Maloney Bldg. Phone,
341. _ 9-10-15.
8ECOND HAND 0Q0D8
SECOND HAND AND NEW ranges
heating stoves, bought, sold and ex
changed. Linings, tops for any stove
In town 114 Front St. Tel. 273.
ME88ENQER 8ERVICE
RELIABLE MESSENGER SERVICE.
Phone 371. "Wo never Sleep." 386
Front 8L
AUTO REPAIRS.
U-AUTO REPAIR and vulcanize
at the Juneau Garage. We do night
and day work. Wllloughby Avenue,
phone 262, G. E. Collins Propr. 6m
PUBLIC STENOGRAPHERS
The best work can bo obtained by
calling the "REMINGTON" public
stenographer. All work given caroful
attention. 10,7.6m
TYPEWRITERS AND REPAIRS
Wo always advance but never re
treat Machines Bold on easy terms to
suit customer. REMINGTON TYPE
WRITER CO. 10.7.7.6
TYPEWRITER SUPPLIES
Wo make our own typewriter sup
plies. Therefore they arc the best
that money can buy. REMINGTON
TYPEWRITER CO. 19,7,6m.
TURKISH BATHS
CITY BATHS. Steam, shower, tub
and Turkish baths. Emma E. Burke,
proprietress, 329 Front Street, phone
316. 10 15 lm
PLUMBING and REPAIRS
SANITARY PLUMBING, heating
and sheet metal work. Br In if your
plans and I will furnish estimate free.
Carl Drlica. 114 Front St Phono 273.
"EMPIRE" DEVELOPMENT
NUMBER
A few copies of the Development
Number of the Alaska Daily Empiro
remain unsold. The number containls
40 pages descriptive of Juneau and
other parts of Alaska. The articles
are by experts, and arc profusely Il
lustrated. The best thing on this sec
tion of the country over published.
Price 25 cents. (10 12 tf
X
?
Aluminum Ware
S-A-L-E
Vin-Low Genuine Fine Spun
Aluminum at a Big Reduction in
Prices. This is- the Opportunity
to Supply your needs
See Our Windows
C. W. IOONG COMPANY
Classified Advertisements
MONEY LOANED
MONEY LOANED
on personal property, diamonds, Jew
elry, notes and bands. All business
strictly confidential. J. Plant, broker
and Jeweler, 64 Front flt, O-S-tf)
MINES AND MINING. '
Frank A. Brown, agont for Alaska
Golf Bolt mining stock, has only a few
shares remaining of an allotment of
stock. Carrying one whole shore bon
uses. A11 other Htock carries a bonus
of % share. Office Pioneer Baths, 87
Front St., Juneau, Alaska. 23-lm
LOST and FOUND
FOUND ? A trolling Bkiff. Owner
may have same by calling on J. A.
Poole, Eagle Creek Point, identifying
property and paying for this adv.?
(1013 tf)
WANTED?Miscellaneous
Christina's home made mince meat
fult cake and plum pudding; phone
402. 9-17-1m.
WANTED?To rent five or six-room
house, furnished or unfurnished, south
exposure and good elevation. Add
"W," care Empire. 1014 2t
WANTED?Residence lot, for cash,
stato size, price and location. "G,
Empire." 1013 tf
HELP WANTED?MALE
WANTED?Boy to care for office,
answer phone and act as messenger;
call "office" care Empire. 10,4,tf
SITUATION WANTED?Male
WANTED? Work at odd JobB by .
day or hour by Porto Rican man. Tele
phone 82:!. 9-28-tf.
SITUATION WANTED?Female
WOMAN WANTS work by the hour
or chamber work. Phone 138. 9129-lm
EXPERIENCED lady, neat and in- <
dustrious, wants work by the day or i
hour. Cooking and sewing preferred. 4
Miss Schmidt, %rMs. Biggs' Rmg. Hs. 4
.(10 15 6m) 4
ROOMS FOR RENT jj
CENTRAL ROOMING HOUSE ? <
Largo front rooms, large windows, 4
plenty of light, neat, clean beds, 81.50 4
per week and up. Mrs. T. Anderson,
Front St 6m.
FOR RENT?Nicely furnished front
room, Mrs. R. Leake, 114 Main St.
?9,30,tf 4
FOR RENT ? Newly furnished
housekeeping rooms $8.00 aDd 310.00
per month. Seavlew apartments.
FOR RENT? Desirable furnished
front room and bath. $2.50 a week.
Close in. 433 Seward St. 'Phone 273.
?(10-ll-6t)
HOTEL NORTHERN, 120 Front St, ;
caters to pormancnt roomers, tourist
theatrical and local transients. Under
new management. Housekeeping
suites and rooms.
HOUSES AND FLATS FOR RENT
FOR RENT, 2 and 3 room furnlshef
housekeeping Bultes; reasonable, "Thf
cozy corner of Juneau." Cliff Apart
nieuts, near court house. 2-1-lm
FOft RENT?Five-room house, with
bath, $20 month. Add. N. R.. Empire.
?(1015 tf)
Sleeping rooms, 50c, one or two men
?also housekeeping rooms, reasona
ble, 335 Franklin St lO.l.tf
HOUSE for rent, Mrs. M. J. Davis tf
FOR SALE?Miscellaneous
SAFE?Fire and burglar proof Bafe
for sale cheap. In fine condition;
good as new; on terms if yon wish.
Call and see same at Mendham &
Ostrom. 90 Front Street. 9-17-tf.
Hard Dak Folding Bed, spring, mas
sive design, French plate mirror,
$17.50, large mission style fumed oak
rocking chair, $8.00. Phone 379. ?
(10151m.)
I
LADIES?One hundred packages of ?
six delightful toilet preparations, con- I
sisting of the following: Princess To
klo Wrinkle Treatment, Liquid Skin
Beautifier, Ideal Hair Tonic, Ideal
Rouge, Ideal Antiseptic Tablets?
Three Dollars and Fifty Cents worth
for ONE DOLLAR?P. O. Box 634.
(9-20-lm.)
FOR SALE!?Good paying rooming
house, 28 rooms, all full, doing first
class business; best of reasons for
selling. Address "S. L? Empire"?
9-23-tf.
SAFE?Firo proof safe for sale
cheap. In first class condition. Terms
if you wish. Can be seen and all in
formation at W. H. Case Curio Store,
Juneau, Alaska. 9-lC-tf.
RE8TAURANTS AND CAFES
OWL CAFE open day and night.
Bost meals in town. Chop Suey and 1
Noodles, Chinese style. 187 Front St. '
CITY RESTAURANT, Chop Suey
arid Chinese Noodles, sent anywhere
In the city on special order. Board
with room $1.00 per day. Phone 337. ]
9-9-6 m. >
i
SEATTLE RESTAURANT ? Chop |
Suey and Chinese Noodles sent out ?
on special orders. Prompt, quick ser
vice. Box seats for ladles. 68 Front |
St. Phone 3-4-3.
TABLE BOARD
FIRST CLASS table board. Always
the freshest and best of everything
the market affords. Down town. Mrs.
Lahikaincn, 314 First SL 9-14-16
_ BAKERIES
EUREKA BAKERY?You can obtain
the Pennant bread, the Roman
meal bread, the whole wheat bread
and the Gluten bread, by telephoning
234. lm.
PEERLESS BAKERY ? Our motto:
"Quality First." Insist on Poerloss
Bread. It is worth the monoy ? 126
Front St., phone 222. 10-l-6m
?
PROFESSIONAL.
;? ... " ?
Dr. Melville G. Evans
Room* 431-133
Goldstein Bldg.
Office P^nc 150 Ret. Phone 1402
______________
William Pallister, M. D.,
Specialist In the treatment of disease*
and deformlttoe of the eye and ear.
noao and throat
Officer. Foarth Floor, Goldstein Building
0(11 co Phone ISO. Claaiea Fitted.
a :
MR8. A. D. GROVE
Red Cross Graduate Nurse
Surgical Medical Obstertlcal
Cases cared for at yonr home.
138 E. 6th St., Phone 1405
?
| Dr.' E.' H. Raser :
"DENTIST ??
/ 1 and 3 Goldatein Building ' |
6 Phone GC. < ,
S Hour*, 9 a. m. to 9 p. m. < ,
??????????????#???????????
MISS ALBRECHT
OSTEOPATH
Swedish Massage. Medical Gymnastics. Ex
port treatment siren In all caaca requiring
massage, diet and mechanical therapeutics.
Room* 419-421 Goldatein Bnllding. Phone 282
Hoars 1 to S p. m. and by appointment
DE. H. VANCE
OSTEOPATH
5 and 6 Malony Bldg., phone 295
Hours 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
h f
I Anv Broken 8Dectacle Lenso !
duplicated and fitted for $1.60,
made by best lonso makers, no
matter what you paid for your
glasses originally.
L J. SHARICK
Jeweler and Optician
!+????? + <?? + ?+?? + +
? OR. LEONARD P. DAWE8 *
:* Surgeon and Physician *
5. Office First Nat. Bk. Bldg. ?
?? Hours 10 to 12 m; 1 to 4 *
:? and 7 to 9 p. m. +
t- Phone 2602; Res. 2603 ?
!?
D R. G. C. MAULE
Dentist
Third St, Douglas, Alaska
Tel. 16, Hours 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
:? ?
: White & Jenne f
DENTISTS T
? Rooms 8,9,10, Valentine Bldg. A
! PHONE 176 A
. Thoa. H. White, Ter. Board. License No. 9 A
. Choa. P. Jenne. Ter. Board. License No. 8 A
-i i ii 11 in 111 in 111 li 11 ill
r
G. K. GILBERT
PLUMBING and
SHEET METAL WORKS
121 Front SL Phono SSI
? ? ??????
Bergmannpinesgroom
New Mssstfemcnt-- Better Than Brer
BREAKFAST 6i00 a. ?. to 11.00 a. >.
LUNCH - - 12:00 a. a. to 1:30 p. m.
DINNER - - 5:10 p. at. to .7:00 p. ?.
RATES S1.00 A DAY
Bergmann Hotel Dining Room
FRANK GEBRING, M.a.fler
Nu Bone Corset
? Miss and Mrs S. Zenger ?
JUNEAU CORSETIERES
Kitting In your own home. A perfect fit
U guaranteed. For appointmenU Phone
136. Address 288 Main Street. ?>
MADE IN JUNEAU
Concrete Dry end Watertight Floors and Cel
lar*. Concrete plain and ornamental Walls
and Fences. Concrete ribbed or travel finish
ed Sidewalks and Steps. All work guaranteed.
ESTIMATES AND PLANS FREE.
> H. D. BOURCY,
? Box344 Contractor
JAjMcKannaTransfer
FREIGHT?COAL?BAGGAGE
SADDLE HORSES FOR RRNT
Light end Hesty Hauling of all Kinds
Office 127-129 Front St, phone 65
CHIMNEYS
Double-Lock- Fire-Proof- Clinker- Concrete
Chimney. (NOT CINDER OR COKE.)
12x13 In. Flue 6x6 In.
Sizes 12x14 in. " 6x8 in.
14x14 In. 8x8 In.
Concrete Products Mfg. Co.
Nenr Electric l.jglit Plant
Piano Tuner
GEORGE ANDERSON. Expert. Twenty
roar* experience. Factory representative for
Sigh Grade Pianos and Player Piano*. Address'
Sox 991. Phone 143.
QLYMPIA OYSTERS >
ON THE SHELL
Tenakee Grabs
Don't forget to try our Oyster Cock
tails. See ua for orders for private
parties or banquets. Leave orders
wltn your Grocer or Butcher.
WE MAKE THESE COCKTAIL8
HERE IN JUNEAU
Phone 206 Front A Franklin Sts.

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