OCR Interpretation


The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, October 15, 1915, Image 5

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1915-10-15/ed-1/seq-5/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 5

i
; We've Got It;
; j Everything in the line of Wines, Liquors, Cigars ?
,, j ?
j: JUNEAU LIQUOR CO.,Inc. i
!: "The Family Liquor Store"-Phone 94?Free Delivery !
iniiiiiniuniiinMninininiiiiuiHiiniiiiii'
S THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 11
J OF JDNEAD '
United States Deposits $100,000.00
Capital, Surplus and undivided Profits over 100,000.00
: 1 1 ?
United States Depository
OPEN SATURDAY EVENINGS UNTIL EIGHT O'CLOCK
!!! FIRST TERRITORIAL BAM
Douglas Qp ALASKA 2$ Front 1t Juneau
INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS & 0
ACCOUNTS, AND ON TIME DEPOSITS TT Q
AT AgRA MKAT mMPANY John Reck. Mgr.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturer* of all Kinds of Sausages Oar Hams and Bacbn Are
Home-Smoked
mum
h. r.
GOODM.OI
Prwldnl
iiinm
Alaskan Hotel
HBADQPARTERS for COMMERCIAL MEN ^
11111111
E. B.
BOBBACfl
Muit?r
I 1 1 1 1 1 I I
ItftfttttttttfftfIffifftttfttfy
New Stock Hard Wheat Floor i:
SCANDINAVIAN GROCERY, General Merchandise
Kom 211. Op^?. City Dock Agt*. PmiUii Coocroto Block* J "
Groceries and
Men's Goods
Alaska-Gastinean Mining Go.
THANB, 0000 ALASKA
When ordering BEER
insist on RAINIER PALE |!
? m 111111111 ii 11111111 M i n 111111111111111111 u 11111
;ii 111111111111 i i 11111111; i; 1111 n n 1111 n ii i m n i;;
ili! The grotto
? ?:; c. r. brophy ::
I*!' Distributors of Glass, Doable
Stamp Whiskey, Wines and Cordials
Olympia and Rainier Beer
;; 95 front street telephone no. 210
1:11111 n i m 111 n n m m 111 m j m i.nj i m 1111 in i-::
? 111 m m 111 n: m m m 11 m n i i n 11 ii 111innii m
?
o s o
i| rheidelberg Liquor Co.-. ;j
J | | '? INCORPORATED. ? 1 = I ] |
Largest Stock Best Brands or
< > Imported and Domestic Liquors
< > and Wines for Family Use. < >
< > ? < > j
i; Free Concert Erery BTcniag 7 Till 12
< ? 4)|
< ? Free Delivery. Mali Order* a Specialty. Telephone 666 <!
? ?
f D THE HOUSE OF
Louvre D3X good liquors
The Famous Waterfill and Freazier Whiskies
MOVING PICTURES EVERY EVE 8 TO 12 O'CLOCK
E. S. HOLDEN. MANAGER
IF YOU ARE PARTICULARLY INTERESTED IN THE PRICE AND
QUALITY OF YOUR BUTTER AND EGGS. YOU WILL CALL AT Gl
VANETTI'S. YOU WILL ALSO FIND A SPECIAL PRICE ON DRY
GOODS OF ALL KINDS. A TRIAL WILL CONVINCE YOU.
- PHONE 385 J. M. GIOV ANETTI Prompt Service
fine poultry
Fun line frvsb and cured meats-Government Inspected. Try our WQd Rom Lard
Frye-Bruhn Market
HEIRESS TAKES
THE VEIL AND
BECOMES NUN.
Miss Lucy Drexel Dahlgren, daugh
ter of Mrs. Eric B. Dahlgren and
granddaughter of tho late Joseph
Drexol, multi-millionaire. has taken
her first rows as a postulant in the
Convent of tho Blessod Sacrament at
Cornwells.
A year ago Miss Dahlgren. who was!
videly known socially, caused tho
greatest surprise among her friends
by announcing her intention to quit
the world and enter tho nunnery*
where her cousin, Mother Katheriner
Drexol, is the superior.
Tho ceremony now announced was
tho novice's first serious step toward
tho cloistered life. There were 11 oth
er postulants with Miss Dahlgren.
Mother Inherited a Fortune.
Miss Dahlgren's mother was Lucy
Drexel, who inherited $20,000,000 upon
the death of her father. Miss Droxel
married Eric B. Dahlgren, who was tho
son of Rear Admiral Dahlgren, a civil
war celebrity, who made a fortune
through the invention of the Dahlgren
gun.
That the married life of Miss Dahl
gren's parents was not happy was re
vealed three years ago when the moth
er seed for divorce and insisted that
the testimony in the trial be given
in open court. An unidentified cores
pondent was named, and the case at
tracted the widest attention because
of the prominence of the persons in
volved.
Special Blessing by Pope.
Miss Dahlgren's mother is a sister
.of Mrs. Harry Lehr. and the family on
all sides, with the exception of Mother
Katherine Drexol, had been active so
cially. although Mrs. Dahlgren devoted
a great part of her time to Catholic
charities.
A feature of tho ceremonies at Corn
wells was the receipt of a special
blessing from the Pope. The an
nouncement of the blessing was con
veyed on parchment in the Pope's own
handwriting, and was in response to a
petition forwarded to Romo a month
ago by Mother Katherine Drexel
Many high dignitaries of the church
attended the ceremonies in the con
vent chapel. Tho sermon was deliver
ed by the Rev. W. P. Stadelman, direc
tor of the Holy Ghost Apostolic col
lege, Cornwells. ? (Spokesman-Re
view.)
ALASKA TRADE
PLEASES SEATTLE
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Alaska Commerce With Seattle
To Alaska.. $1,728,769 $1,481,675 17%
Prom Alaska 3,504.508 1,804,993 94%
Total $5,233,277 $3,286,668 60%
Interest in Territory Increases
Illustrating the Increased interest
in Alaska many articles now appearing
in the newspaper^ and magazines
throughout the country relate to the
northland. The clipping bureau fur
nished the Alaska Bureau for the per
iod of two months has supplied 275
newspaper articles relating to Alaska.
These- articles cover forty different
subjects, those on the value and pro
duction of Alaska leading with a to
tal of forty. Government railroads
was eighth in number of articles. On
the remarkable progress of Juneau
there were only two articles, showing
that the public generally does not yet
appreciate the great development tak
ing place at Juneau and what It will
mean to the mining world. Now that
the interest in Alaska Is aroused to
such a degree, it Is purposed by the
Bureau to further this publicity in
every possible way. Special articles
and means of accomplishing this re
sult are now being formulated.
Committee Is Gratified
The appreciation shown in the work
of the Alaska Bureau is most gratify
ing to the members of the committee.
During the last five months 258 news
paper articles and editorials pertain
ing to the work of the Bureau, an av
erage of 43 a month, have appeared
in newspapers. One hundred and fif
ty of these articles are in papers pub
lished outside of Seattle, an average
of one a day. The executive com
mittee Js now at work on a program to
cover at leasf two years' activities.
The plan is of such a constructive
nature that gratifying results are ex
pected to ensue in aid of Alaskan de
velopment.?(Seattle Chamber of Com
merce Record.)
SIXTY-SIX CHILDREN
IN SEWARD SCHOOLS
Sixty-six children are now attend
ing the local schools but the full num
ber is not yet in attendance. The to
tal number of pupils last year was
fifty-eight. Quite a considerable num
ber of additional children will attend
later on.?(Seward Gateway.
j FOREST NOTES OF INTS^EST
(From the Forest Service, U. S. Dept.
of Agriculture)
PORTLAND. Oct. 7.?The railroads
of this country purchase approximate
ly 135,000,000 cross ties annually. Last
year approximately 43,850,000 of these
ties were treated or creo'soted. This
quantity of treated material would
construct a double track about 8,700
miles in length.
If all of the 7,730,000 Douglas fir
cross ties, treated in 1914. were laid
by one railroad, a double track pas
senger service and a single track
freight line could be run between Se
attle and San Francisco.
It has been determined that in the
Rocky Mountains and Pacific Coast
region ninety per cent, of the dam
age to Douglas fir, commonly known
as gum check of pitch seam, is caused
by the work of the Douglas At pitch
moth.
Last year 3,625,000 linear feet of
poles (telephone and telegraph) aver
aging 30 feet to the pole, were given 1
creosote treatment. Should these
treated poles be placed at 100-foot in
tervals, 1,600 miles of wire could be
stretched.
According to a recent report of the
Department of Agriculture the cost
of state highways, based on general
conditions, varies in different sec
tions of the country from $1500 to
1*5,000 per mile,
~~ - ' *? 1 '
WARM SPRINGS IS
FINE RE80RT AND
HUNTING IS GOOD
According to William Bcrlbner,
outing at that place, Warm Springs
Bay Is oflo of the fluent springs In the
country, and Is without doubt a ver
itable sportman'a paradise. Wild
gamo are in abandonee on Baranoff
Island, the duck shooting is good, and
not far from the Springs are excellent
Ashing banks.
The springs Is now In chargo of
George Mead, formerly of Juneau. Mr.
Mead la building Ave new cabins on
the beach, and will pipe the springs
water from the hill, to a new plunge
irhlch Is being built nearby. There
are about thirty people at Warm
Springs at the present time. The gas
boat Tlllikum makes trips once a
week from here.
? ? ?
WIN8 BEAUTIFUL
HIGH POWER RIFLE
Ed. Kendall, of the U. S. surveyor
office, Is not only champion dumb-bell
lltfer of Juneau, but has now defeated
Tom Shearer, the export rifle shot
Mr. Kendall and Mr. Shearer were tied
for first place In the contest at Camp
en's shooting gallery, and In the shoot
off Mr. Kendall's score was 29 out of
a possible 30, while Mr. Shearer's
I score was 26.
U. OF W. MAGAZINE
TO HAVE NUMEROUS
ALASKA CORRESPONDENTS
The first issue of a monthly maga
zine to be put out by the faculty of
the department of journalism of the
University of Washington for newspa
per men of the state of Washing
ton will go to press about October 15,
according to Prof. Frank 0. Kane, the
head of the department.
"The publication will be frankly
educational," said Prof. Kano yester
day. "It is to make inspirational the
promoting of good movements in jour
nalism. We will get the editors in
terested through the monthly maga
zine, and will aid them in effecting
an organization which will ?fcork to
ward specific ends. It will be a sort
of monthly newspaper institute."
The newspaper will be edited by
the mombers of the journalism faculty
and published in the University print
ing department, according to the plan !
as outlined by Prof. Kane. Material
will be furnished by newspaper men
throughout the state. Correspond
ents will be appointed in every coun
ty to negotiate with nowspaper men
for securing contributions, and they
will be responsible for the collection
of newB from that district. Every
metropolitan staff will have its repre
sentative. It is also planned to have
several Alaska correspondents, as
that territory is considered to fall
within the Immediate field.?(Seattle
Times.)
MAJOR A. E. RANSOM
GOES TO IDAHO
SEATTLE, Oct. 9.?With the best
year's business, since beginning op
erations, just passed, the Northern
Life Insurance Company, of Seattle,
Is inaugurating a policy of expansion,
in keeping with which Maj. A. E. Ran
som has been promoted to the position
of general agent at Boise, with Juris
diction over the Southern Idaho terri
tory. The Northern Life company
has retained a number of successful
producers and is thus able to place
men in charge of new states that have
been thoroughly grounded In tho com
pany and its policies.
Maj. Ransom has been with the com
pany for eight years -as division su
perintendent, the last four in charge
of Alaska, where ho places a large
volume of business. Few insurance
men in tho Northwest are better
known than Maj. Ransom, who. with
Mrs. Ransom, and their son, Arthur
Emmet, jr., will leave for their new
home today.?(Post Intelligencer.)
GOVERNMENT SEAL
CATCH IS VALUED
AT OVER $400,000 ,
SEATTLE}?The government's catch
of fur seal and fox Bklns on the Prib- a
'.of Islands during tho last year is ]
worth more than $400,000. accoidlng ''
to W. T. Bower, who brought It south. .
Mr. Bower is chief agent of the dlv- "
Ision of Alaska of the Bureau of Fish
eries of the Department of Commerce. 1
He makes his headquarters at Wash- 'l
ington, D. C., and is on his way to .
the capital after a five weeks' trip ''
to the north. He is at the Frye Ho
tel. I
There are now about 400,000 fur (
seals on the islands. Mr. Bower says,
and poaching, for many years the "
cause of much international litigation, ,
is a thing of the past. The 3,000 fur ()
and 400 fox skins brought to San (
Francisco by Mr. Bower will be ship- ?
ped to St. Louis and there sold at .
auction. Mr. Bower went north on '
the U. S. Collier Saturn, which was
loaned to the fisheries bureau for the 0
transportation of supplies. He re- ()
turned to San Francisco on the same n
vessel, and came to Seattle by train. 0
Yesterday he conducted a hearing in c
the local office on the preposition to ^
close to commercial fishermen three v
Alaskan streams, Bond Lake lagoon a
and Quadra and Horta Creeks. Fed- c
oral hatcheries are located on the lat
ter two creeks. .>
Mr. Bower heartily endorsed the n
movement at the University of Wash- t
ingt&i for the establishment of a train e
ing. school for fisheries experts. ?
"Dr. H. M. Smith, United States ,,
commissioner of fisheries, is very
much interested in tho courses which
Prof. Trevor Kinkaid is now offering" q
Mr. Bower said, "and would probably y
favor a more comprehensive course c
here. It will probably need some fed- g
oral support to get the thing running a
properly.?(Seattle Pest-Intelligencer) -j
"93"HairTonic ]
steps tifB teir from falling out
Wm. Britt, Juneau.
Elmer E. Smith, Douglas,
Is ? ?
Clothes With a Punch
in Every Suit?
/
I That's what the "Live Ones" are demanding, styles that "get over" on sight and with
such an authoritative air the veriest tyro indress recognies them as the authentic mod
els straight from the fountain-head of style. You recognize BENJAMIN coreect
clothes from the description don't you? Andthe descriptions fits B E N J A M IN clothes,
perfectly asBENJAMIN clothes fit you. And we have long since proven that there
is more real style, more real quality and more real value in Benjamin garments than
in any other ready for service clothes in town. What more need we say?
$25.00 to $40.00
or the Woman with
Tender Feet=
Here is a shoe that will make walking a pleasure instead of
a burden. In its sole is a cushion of live wool-felt, which con
forms to your foot, permits free blood circulation and
soothes your burning, aching feet. The Dr. Edison Cushion
Shoe is made by Utz & Dunn Co., of Rochester, N. Y., who
have solved the problems of combining comfort with style
It is a shoe you will be prcud to wear; that will give you
unlimited service; a shoe that is a delight to the woman
who is obliged to stand or walk a great deal. It costs
nothing to look.
| B. M. BEHRENDS CO., Inc. |
I Ladies'Skirt
SPECIALS
? JuhI received a full line of la
l dies' skirts, In the latest and
? best fabrics and effects.
' A full llnio of beautiful novelty
? skirts. In all tho now plaid ef
| fects, elegantly tailored, button
? trimmed?
; $7.00 to $10.00
I Black C'harmeuse, corduroy and
? serges In colors, button trimmed,
I fancy pockets, well tailored?
$6 00 to $10.00
?
? The values In these skirts are
? extraordinary for the prices at
? which we aro offering them.
; MRS. GAGE
COR. 2D AND MAIN,
t PHONE 379
?
h++*++**++*+*++**
? 4
f WAR SIDELIQHT8 4
? 4
Bridgeport. Conn., has war orders
mounting to $175,000,000, most of
rhich are being filled In Its cartridge
nd rifle factories; added to thiB ac
ual ordnance business is more than
100,000,000 In orders "for other pro
ucts, many of which are for war ac
essorlcs. Nearly 40,000 operatives
re employed in the Bridgeport fac
orles, of whom 25,000 are engaged
a making instruments of war. Before
he first of January, when new fac
orles now In the course of construe
ion will be completed, 20,000 addl
lonal operatives will have employ
lent If they can be found. Accord
ag to the last United States census,
ho population of Bridgeport was 102,
00; today It is 140,000. The Reming
on Arms Company alone Is spending
10,000,000 In extensions and nearly
30,000,000 for new equipment. This
ompany has contracts for more than
,000,000 rifles at $31 each, or $93,
00,000, and for more than $50,000,
00 in ammunition. On January 1st,
ext, the plant will have a capacity
f 12.000 rifles a day and of 10,000,000
artridgeB a day at $37 a thousand,
"he payroll of the city of Bridgeport
rar plants Is not far from $1,000,000
week and Is constantly growing,
iver 3,000 Germans are employed in
he "plants of this city; in some de
artments the Germans even out
umbering the workmen of other na
lonalities. Notwithstanding every
ffort to induce them to desist in their
rork, the German employees are glv
lg the most satisfactory service.
Hllaire Belloc calculates that when
ermany and Austria started the war
hey were so well prepared that their
omparison with Russia, Prance and
irltain was as eight to five In men,
nd about two to one in munitions,
hey were able to put 12,000,000 men
lto the war in the first year. But
, they nro believed to have lost more
' than half that number. Adding the
. Turkish army, which has suffered con
; slderably since It cntored the. war, 1,
> 100,000 strong, the Triple Alliance i
| does not muster more than 7,000,000 I
> fighting men. On the other side the <
armies In the field are estimated as
follows: Russin, 4,000,000; France,
3,500,000; Italy, 1,500,000; Great Brl- ,
tain, 1,150,000; Serbia and Montenegro ,
350,000, making a total of 10,600,000.
Thus It appears that their present;
lighting strength to thnt of their three |
adversaries is as three to two.
Mr. Bark. Aussian Minister of Fi
nance, who is visiting in London, will,
it is believed, as the result of his in
v( ^ligations, recommend strongly, on
! his return to Petrograd, immediate
1 granting of liberal reforms which will
practically do away with the present
JewiRh restrictions in Russia and al
low the foreign Jews to live in and
visit any part of the Russinn empire.
It is stated that reforms will be made
within the ensuing month.
Two hundred travelling toxicologic
cal laboratories have been formed by
the French nrmy authorities and will
shortly leave for the front. Chemists
will analyze water the soldiers drink
and the foodstuffs brought to them,
so as to insure their purity. They
will also control the disinfection of
the front line of trenches, whenever "
that is possible.
Prize money for officers and men of
the British navy which has accumulat
ed during the war is said to be $20,
000,000. None of this has been dis
tributed and the complaint is made
that the purchases by the government
of confiscated cargoes will deprive the
navy of considerable prize money.
The Gorman press Is protesting the
use of "war bread," asserting it is
so adulterated that it Injures health
and calls on the government either to
end the "abomination" or else "confess
that its'storles of vast stores of wheat
are childish inventions."
4* ??
The British Minister of Munitions,
Lloyd-George, declares that 264 addi
tional establishments have been plac
ed under government control for the
manufacture of war munitions. This
makes 979 establishments now under -
government control. -
? i
ON THE LIPS OF JUNEAU LADIES
?both our Benzo Witch Hazel Cream
and word of praise about it. Nothing
better for chapped lips. Get it at
Brltt's. 10 11 tf
Rough Dry?55c per doz.
Flat Work?50c per doz.
THANE STEAM LAUNDRY
Phone 175 7-28-tf ,
X4
Miss Ruth F. Anderson and Miss
Dorothy Morrison left today for San
Francisco. Miss Morrison will go to
Honolulu for tho winter, and Miss An
derson expects to accompany her, af
ter a visit with a sister in San Fran
:isco.
John P. Benson is making arrange
ncnts to leave about November 1 for
Florida.
Get it at Britt's. 10.5.tf.
What Yon Eat
and the manner In which It Is
prepared^should be your first
consideration.
Sanitation
and the purest and freshest of
all food products, characterize
THE WHITE
LONCH
122 FRONT STREET
Red Front' Shoe Shop
EXPERT SHOE REPAIRER
Work Done While Yos Wait. Only the
very be?t leather tued. PHONE 138.
FRONT STREET. OPP. FERRY WAY
C. Petlevlch J. R. McNeil
Old Kentucky Bar
Hotel In Connection
Steam Heated
Family Orders Delivered Free
P. O, Box 577, Phone 91
Front St. Juneau, Alaska
Opera cS?.r x
SECOND AND SEWARD
??i i i rrriTi i i i t i > w
THE KINYON'S
Confections, Lunches, Peanuts ??
and crisp, buttered pop-corn and T
Hot Drinks
121 SEWARD ST. ?
Next Dream Theatre
m 111 n 11 n m i i i h-m-h-h
Fate* I?ci.: nable Third and Harris Street. Joneo
TheBERGMANN1
Newly built and newly furnished, modern In all respects, steam
heated, electric lighted, hot an d cold water In every room; 'bath on
every floor, Including a shower bath. Sanitary conditions perfect.
Dining room In connection.
j Summer Days Are Over |
AND THE LONG WINTER NIGHTS ARE APPROACHING and you <>
will need some evening's entertainment for yourself and family. I
will place in your home an Edison Diamond Point, Victrola or Columbia <>
i Phonograph on very liberal terms; you pay so much down and the
balance on monthly payments. <,
We also sell pianos on terms?cheaper than renting?you save <?
money by our arrangements. Just the same as if you put your money |[
in the bank. <>
ELMER E. SMITH, The Front St. Druggist, Douglas < ?
JUNEAU MUSIC HOUSE, Juneau ;

xml | txt