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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, November 02, 1915, Image 1

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VILLA IS I
BIG LOSER
IN ATTACK
DOUGLAS, Arfte., Nov. 2. ? Gen
eral Callee wired the Carranra agen
cy in Washington this afternoon that
he had defeated Villa. Two warnings
were sent Calle* by American officers
today after two American soldiers
here had been wounded by stray bul
lets.
DOUGLAS, Ariz., Nov. 2.?Several
hundred Mexican soldiers lost their
lives today in Agua Prleta, just
across the border, when after four
deeperate attacks. General Pancho
Villa's troops were forced to draw
away from the city, which is being
defended by General Calles, of the
generr.l staff. It was the most Im
portant battle of Northern Mexico In
two years. >
General Calles reported that the
Villa force# were In full retreat, leav
ing large number* of dead and wound
ed behind them. About four hundred '
dead or dying VIHa soldiers strewed 1
the desert around the barbed-wire bar- '
ricades of the Mexican town.
MINES SLAUGHTER VILLI3TAS. '
Early this morning a general at
tack on Agua Prieta was made by the
Vlllistas. Two sharp artillery at- '
tacks preceded it but no serious '
break was made in the defense. Af- ,
ter a calm, following the first cannon ;
attack, a storm of shot and shell sud
denly burst and the outposts of Cal
les* army reported the Villa forces '
advancing. Instantly dozens of 3-ln. '
rifles and quick-firers were pouring'1
their shells at Villa's men and the
explosion of fcur mines outside the
trenches also worked havoc among
the attackers. After an hour's fight- ?
ing It was evident the attack would
fall.
Villa moved 10,000 of his men yes
terday under .the cover of a dense
haze of smoke from a Douglas copper
smelter. At noon he had reached a
point on the" west side of Agua Prl-1'
eta and the demand was made on Cal
les for the surrender of the city by 1
2 p. m. The main body of Villa's ar- 1
my came In contact with- Garranza
sentries early yesterday morning. The 1
outposts opened flro on the Villa ?
troops and then fell back to the '
trenches. 1
Slang Villa's Only English.
Yesterday afternoon Villa him
self. with four of his officers, camo
to the American lines to get his hear
ings as to the location of tho Amer
ican boundary line. "Do you expect
to take Agua Prieta?" a U. S. army
stair officer asked. "Sure Mike," re
plied Villa, grinning broadly. It was
the only English he spoke. In Span
ish Villa inquired whether the Unit- 1
ed States Intended to help General
Calles. In view of the fact that the
American government had recognized 1
Carr&nza and had assisted reinforce-'
ments in reaching Calles. He was as
sured that the American forces in 1
the trenches facing the Mexican hat- '
tlefield would treat both sides alike.
"And there must be no firing across
the line." he was told. Villa said
that he did not Intend firing across
the line and for this reason wanted
to get his bearings on the boundary.:
General Frederick Funston arrived
today, to take command of the Amer
ican forces here.
SEATTLE STUDENTS
SAIL TO "ROOT" IN
CALIFORNIA GAME
SEATTLE, Nov. 2.?Two hundred
students at the University of Wash
ington sailed for San Francisco on
the steamship Congress this morning
to witness the Saturday clash on
Berkeley Field, of the Washington
and California university football
teams.
CAPT. LOUIS LANE
ON WAY TO SEATTLE
?+?
FAIRBANKS. Nov. 2.?Capt. Louis!
L. Lane, who sold his power schoon-:
er. Polar Bear, to V. Stefansson last
fall aud made delivery of the boat
too late to secure transportation to
Nome, arrived from the Arctic yes
terday. and departed this morning for
Seattle. He Is accompanied by H. H.
Burt and J. S. Adair, of San Fran
cisco. who had been with him on the
Polar Bear for 20 months. Capt.
I.ane and associates came diredtly
from Banksland in the Arctic over
land across Alaska.
SELF SLAIN EDITOR
HAD BIG INSURANCE
ST. LOUIS. Nov. 2. ? Edward L|
PreetoriUB. publisher of the St. Louis
Times, who killed himself yesterday
had life insurance politices In force
for $100,000, It was learned today.
RUSSIA BUYS TRUCKS
NEW YORK. Nov. 2.?The Inter
national Motor Company of New Jer
sey has Just closed an order for 700
five-ton motor trucks to be construct
ed for Russia.
? *
? WEATHER REPORT +
+ Maximum?<3. 4*
+ Minimum?33. +
+
+ + + + + + ? + t + + +
SEVEN DIED
IN WRECK OE
S. L EON A
VANCOUVER. B. C., Not. 2.?Con
firmation of reports of the death of
seven members of the crew of the
steamship Leona when the vossel
foundered in the Gulf of Georgia yes
terday, reached Vancouver this morn
ing. The dead are as follows:
Captain Cochrane.
Pilot Ludlow.
Engineer W. Anderson.
Fireman H. Cecil.
Joseph Grannell.
Chinese cook.
Chinese mossboy.
The balance of the crew was res
cued.
COURT DEAF TO
APPEAL OF CLUB
RETAILING LIQUOR
SAN FRANCISCO. Ncv. 2.?Card j
?nd social clubs in Alaska must pay
i license to retail liquors the same as
(described for saloons, it was indi
cated today when the United State*
circuit court of appeals denied the
petition for u rehearing ia an actiou ?
which sought relief from that imposi
tion. The case in question originated
it Nome, after a social club had beer,
forbidden to retail liquor without sa
oon license.
The court held that no error had
>een made in the Nome district court
it the original trial of the case. At
that time the case was appealed to
:he circuit court here and the Nome
lecision was affirmed.
MRS. CAMPEN
IS ON STAND
?
The trial of Mrs. Cecilia Cfitnpen.
I'h&rged with attempting to kill her
husband. Walter Campen. began lr.
:he United States district court tills
uornlng at 10:30 o'clock.
jury United St'tes District Attorney
lames A. Smlser said that the gov
?rnment would present evidence to
show that Mrs. Campen was a smart
and designing woman and her hu?
band a man of timid and shrinking
nature. He said that the evidence
would show that Mrs. Campen had
deliberately shot her husband for the
purpose of taking his life.
In the statement for the defense
Z. R. Cheney stated that the defense
would prove that Mrs. Campen had
shot her husband in a justified effort
to protect herself from serious bod
ily Injury with which Campen had
threatened her in a fit of insane jeal
ousy.
Early In the course of the trial
Lester Campen. the 12-year-old son
of Mr. and Mrs. Campen. was exclud
ed from the courtroom on the ground
that he will be called as a witness.
This ruling of the court was shortly
after followed by an order exluding
all witnesses. At noon the court
went into recess until 1:30 this after
noon at which time Mr. Campen was
called to the stand as the first wit
ness for the government.
Mr. Campen had not reached the
narrative of the shooting before time
for press this afternoon.
The following Is the Jury' empanel
ed for the case:
H. T. Tripp, B. R. Lelvers. John
Welch. Charles Haley, J. T. Stephens,
Fred H. Smith, J. H. Gilpatrick. of
the regular panel and A. W. McFad
deu, H. L. Stockman. Frank Murphy.
W. S. Murphy and J. R. Mullins, for
the-special venire.
THIRTEEN ARE
INCINERATED
NEW YORK. Nov. 2.?When a ten
ement in North Sixth street, Brook
lyn. burned yesterday thirteen per
sons are known to have burned to
death. The origin of the Are has
not been discovered.
ANCHORAGE CHURCH
STARTED THIS WEEK
SEWARD, Nov. 2.?Rev. James L.
McBride passed through this city on
Thursday on his way to Anchorage
where he will commence the erection
of the new Presbyterian Church at
thit place. Mrs. McBride expects to
join him within a few weeks.
AGED SISTER OF
GENERAL MILES IS
TOURING THE NATION
SEATTLE, Nov. 2.?Mrs. Anna Ma
ria Miles Sprague, a sister of General
Nelson A. Miles, is in Seattle for a
few days. She Is on a tour of the
United States, during which she ex
ipects to visit friends and relatives ir
every state in the Union. Mrs
Sprague is 79 years old.
NEW YORK'S INTEREST
ACCOUNT IS 954,000,00(
NEW YORK, Nov. 2.? New Yorl
City will have to pay in 1916 154,342,
188 solely for Interest on Its city debt
an increase oi $3,882,739 over 1916.
ENGLAND
ASKED TO
EXPLAIN
WASHINGTON, Nov. 2.?Secretary
Lansing today cabled instructions to
! Ambassador Page at London, to as
certain from the British government
its ground for the seizure of tho Am
erican steamer Hocking by a British
prizo crew, yesterday.
Tho Hocking was formerly under
German register, but was placed un
der American registry several months
ago. She was towed into Halifax yos
terday, with the steamer Harabora,
also seized.
Terming tho seizure of the vessels
as "high handed and illegal," officials
of the State Department early to
day Indicated that the seizures
would be vigorously protesteo. Tho
officials believe thai tho vessel.-* wore
engaged in the coastwiso trsde and
were in no way aiding Britain's en
emies.
Counsul Young, at Halifax, filed his
report this morning, after which Sec
retary Lansing's cable was sent, to
Ambassador Page.
VITAL ISSUE
BEEORE VOTERS
WASHINGTON, Nov. 2. ? Nine
states, all oast of the Mississippi, arc
today holding elections on questions
varying from women's suffrage and
prohibition to the election of gover
nors and legislators.
In New York, Massachusetts and
Pennsylvania the right of women to
ballot holds the boards.
President Wilson left early today
for Princeton, N. J., to vote at the
state-wide election.
GASTINEAU
- CHANNEL WAY
GET BRIDGE
Contingent upon the co-operation of
business men who are not residents of
Gastlneau channel cities but who are
interested in them in a business way.
upon the approval of the directors of
the local banks .of proposed loans from
the banks and upon approval by the
Secretary of War of plans submitted
to Juneau and Douglas business men
by Col. W. P. Richardson, there will
be a bridge constructed across Gastl
neau channel during the coming sum
mer that will connect Juneau and
Thane with Douglas and Treadwell.
The plan of Colonel Richardson was!
briefly: that the Alaska Board of road,
commissioners will contribute $25,000
or as much more as may bo necessary
toward the erection of the bridge that
will cost $75,000 or more, on condl
1 tlor that the people of Juneau and
I Douglas will advance a loan of $50,-1
100*) at 5 per cent interest; the road I
, commission will, in conjunction with
a committee representing the lenders
; of rhe money, establish a rate of toll,
collect the earae and see that the pro
ceeds are applied to the payment of
; the loan; when the loan shall have
been liquidated the bridge to be free
to the public.
Tills proposition wan ?uuuiuit-u
a meeting of business men that was
held in the B. M. Behrends Bank Sat
urday afternoon. Among those pres
ent were representatives of the Ju
neau and Douglas banks. Mayor John
Reck, President H. J. Fisher, of the
Commercial club. Philip R. Bradley
and others. 4 plan was agreed upon
to secure 'be money for the loan,
with the contingencies stated. Those
present thought there was no question
hut that the money will be provided,
and Col. Richardson expressed the be
I lief that tl?c Secretary of War would
approve the plan.
Lieut. J. C. Hehaffey, member of
the road commission, was present,
and he will remain at Juneau for a
week or more to complete tho survey
of Gastineau channel, prepare tenta
tive plans for the bridge, together with
estimates of the cost.
B. M. Behrends, president of the B.
M. Bcbreiils Bank, and one of the
largest Jureau property owners, said
that th% people of Juneau shtould hear
tily co-operate in the plan, because
in tbe end anything that helps any
part of sastlneau channel will be of
benefit to all. He said that there
seems 10 be a demand for cheaper
homes Vn this section, and anything
that win contribute to increasing the
. area in which to build such will con
1 tribute to the greater good of all con
t cerned.
? The meeting Saturday designated
. B. M. Behrends a committee of one
i to carry on tho negotiations for the
, I furtherance of the piano tjint were ap
proved.
TRIED TO END LIFE.
) ?
SEATTLE, Nov. 2.?A. B. Bolt, ol
c Fresno, Calif., shot himself with rui
- cldal intent in the Hotel Fry? at at
. early hour this morning. Ho will re
cover.
RUMAN
ARC DRILLING
MANY RECRUITS
LONDON, Nov. 2. ? News coming
by way of Paris lends support to the
growing impression that Rumania is
preparing to intervene in the war.
By royal decree now classes of Ru
manian recruits are being mobilized,
Jiccording to word from Bucharest.
Vienna reports that a grave situa
atlon may arise between Austria and
Rumania in connection with the pro
-posed use of the lower Danube to
transport Russian troops to Bulgar
ia.
S. S. GEORGIA
BREAKS RUDDER
IN LYNN CANAL
While on her way to Skagway Sun
day tho stcamtihlp Georgia broke her
rudder and Is now lying at anchor In
Bridget's Cove, awaiting the arrival
of the steam tug Alice, which Pres
ident Willis ?. Nowcll, of the Juneau J
S. S. Co., sent to her assistance yes
terday. The Alice, which Is under
the command of Charles Carlson, will j
tow tho Georgia to Juneau.
Owlug to the Georgia's accident,
the power boat St. Nicholas has been
chartered by the Georgia's owners,
for the Sitka trip, and will leave to
night at 12 o'clock, tho hour at which
the Georgia was scheduled to sail.
The St. Nicholas will carry mall,
freight and passengers. Capt. James
Davis will be in command.
LINDEN6ERGER
GOES BANKRUPT
SEATTLE, Nov. 2".?The Lindeberg
er Packing Company, operating sal
tories and salmon mild-curing plants
At Nushagak and Southeastern Alas
ka, today went U&tp the hands of a re
ceiver. In a statement placed on file
in tho United States court, the com
pany Is alleged to owo Router's bank.
London. $400,000. It Is said that oth
er of Llndonbcrger's compnnles are
Involved. *
It is said that bankruptcy proceed
ings will bo instituted.
-
?> +1
4- WEDDING IN DECEMBER +
4 ?+? 4
+ Washington. Nov. 2.?It wac +
?4 formally announced last eve- +
4 ning at the White House that +
?4 the marriage of President Wil- +
+ son and Mrs. Elizabeth Gait +
+ will take place near the close +
?4 of December at Mrs. Gait's *
* home. The wedding will be +
+ private. +
4 ?
???*4*+4***4++44
HERMAN RIDDER DIES
IN NEW YORK CITY
?+?
NEW YORK. Nov. 2? Herman Rid
der. editor and publisher of the New
York Staats Zoltung, president of the
international Typesetting Machine
Co., which makes the Intertype type
casting machine in competition with
the Mergenthaler linotype, died here
yesterday, of disease of the kidneys.
Ridder was born in New York 65
years ago, and early engaged in news
paper work. He was not only editor
and publisher of the New York Staats
Zeitung. the leading German news
paper of the United States, at the
time of his death, but he was a di
rector of the Associated Press. He
took on active interest in civic and
social reform, and was prominent in:
tho Democratic party for many years.
He was a former treasurer of the Na
tional Democratic committee.
TJOL H. E. REVELL CARRIES
ANCHORAGE WINTER MAIL
?' '?
ANCHORAGE, Nov. 2.? Tho first
mail for tho Interior left over the
trail from Seward yesterday, and the
first mail for this city will leave on
November 15th. The mall contract
has Just been awarded to Col. H. E.
Revell and calls for 800 pounds of
mail a week. This contract, together
with the interior mail contract which
Mr. Revell also hold*, will give him
j approximately 1500 pounds of mail a
week out of Seward. Col. Revell ex
pects to employ 50 dogs in the dis
charge of the two contracts.
TEN DYE PLANTS
IN OPERATION
NEW YORK, Nov. 2.? There are
now ten new dye plants in this coun
i try making 20,000 aniline and inter
> demiatos. The total output is 20,000
- pounds daily. The tenth plant start
ed yesterday. Another company cap
italized at $15,000,000. has started
plans for extensive works- tn differ
ent parts of tho country.
t England to Have Dyestuff Works
A London special says the British
i Dyes Company's principal works will
- be established at Huddcrfleld. Even
RECALL OF
IMPERIAL
MINISTER?
(By OILSON GARDNER, of the
United Press Association.)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 2.?Will our
government be forced to request the
recall of Count Johann von Bernstorff,
German umbassador to the United
States? Will he follow Dr. Konstan
tin Dumba back to his home country?
Will this bo the result of the Inves
tigation!- now going fcrward by the
United States department of justice,
which may connect the German gov
ernment's secret service with the
bomb plots uncovered in Now York?
In addition to the reports being
made to him by Bruce Beltaska, chief
of the division of Investigation of the
department of Justice, President Wil
son, it is understood, has In hln pos
session some important documents
captured in a manner like the Archi
bald seizure, which throw an import
ant light on the question an to where
the money comes from and who are
the directing heads, or "higher-ups"
In these plots.
BALLAINES WIN
SUIT INVOLVING
SEWARD TOWNSITE
SEWARD. Nov. 2. ? Judge Fred M.
Brown this morning renderod Judg
ment for John E. and Frank L. Bal
laine, defendants In the suit against
them by the Alnska Northern Rail
coal company for the townslte of Se
ward and for an accounting of the
proceeds from the sale of lots that
they made In the past.
The Alaska Northern Railroad con
tended that the Ballalnes had pur
chased the townslte with funds of
tho Alaska Central Ralroad while
they were agents and employees of
tho railroad company, and that the
Alaska Northern had succeeded to
nil of the rights or the Alaska Cen
tral.
The Ballalnes claimed the town
lilte an private property, and the
judgment of the court sustains their
position.
Attorney T. C. West, attorney for
the plaintiff, gave notice of an appeal
to the United States Circuit Court
of Appeals.
WIRELESS TELEPHONE TO
TALK WITH TOKYO
WASHINGTON, Nov. 2.?The wire
less station at Arlington, Va., Is be
ing "tuned up" to talk with Tokyo,
11,000 miles away. It Is the expecta
tion of the experts before long to
girdle the globe with the wireless
telephone.
WHEAT EXPORTS EXCEED
ALL WEEKLY RECORDS
NE YORK, Nov. 2.? The exports
of wheat from the United States and
Canada during the past week amount
ed to 11.113,093 bushels, a high rec
ord. The previous high-water mark
was 10,915,119 In the week of January
7th.
CRACKER FACTORY TO
BE STARTED IN SEWARD
SEWARD. Nov. 2.?? Several local
business men here have announced
their Intention to establish a cracker
and biscuit fatory here in the near
future, and it is expected that the
now company will file Its articles of
Incorporation within the week at tho
office of the Secretary of Alaska in
Juneau.
LONDON NEW8PAPER MAN
FAVORS SMALLER CABINET
Lord Northcllffe, owner of the Lon
don Times, says in the Now York
World that tho present British cabi
net of 22 is unwieldy and the govern
ment should be by a small commit
I tee.
NAVY IS KEY
TO VICTORY
SAYS ASQUITH
LONDON, Nov. 2.?That Oreat Brit
aln's mighty navy still will bo the <le
termlnlnj- factor In tho world war and .
that England has confidence In liiti-;
mate victory was declared by Prem
ier Asqulth In the House of Commons j<
today, where he spoke before galler- <
les packed to suffocation. The pre- 1
mler admitted that the position of the 1
empire was serious, stating that the I
money drain was the heaviest In con- <
turies. He hinted that England soon <
?tay seek another loan In the United '
States. ?
Said tho prime minister: "We are ''
not apprehensive about the Easternj
theatre of the war. We feel sure of
our ability and that of the itusslans to '
roll back the tide of the German in- '
vaslon. As to the Dardanelles, I may I
say that the government assumes full 1
responsibility for that enterprise." 1
Among tho points that Asqulth made J
were these: '
1. British losses in France and ?
Flanders up to the end of October !
wero but 377,000 men. <
2. Since the beginning of the war
the admiralty had transported 2.600.
000 troops with losses of life of less a
than one-tenth of one per cent, and 1
in addition to this the navy has safe- 1
guarded the transportation of 330,000 <
sick and wounded men, 3,500,000 tons
of stores and munitions and of 800,-11
000 horses. c
The German fleet, the premier said, <
was "locked up in the Baltic and did <
not dare to show its face." Continu- j
ing, the premier said that after flf
teen months of war the entire mili
tary and naval resources of Germany
"had been reduced to sporadic ef
forts by a few submarines."
In the western thcotrc Mr. Asqulth;
declared the Germans had not gained i t
one foot of ground since last April.11
Tho premier predicted an important t
victory in tho roglon of the Persian
Gulf, where the British are engaged ?
with the Turks. He said the British l<
under General Nixon were now only a | c
short distance from Bagdad. {?
FRENCH DIVER ?
IS DESTROYED
BERLIN", Nov. 2.?The French sub- |
marine Turquoise has been sunk by
Turkish artillery tire according1 to an
official statement Issued today by the
Turkish war office.
British Boat Sunk.
LONDON. Nov. 2.?A British tor
podo boat collided with another ship t
at Gibraltar today and the former was t
sunk. It was announced this eve- j
ninff. t
ANTI-ALIEN LAW IS !
"UNCONSTITUTIONAL"
WASHINGTON. Nov. 2?The Unit
ed States Supreme Court late yes
terday handed down a decision which ]
declares that the Arizona anti-alien j
labor law Is unconstitutional. The ]
law was passed by the Arizona leg- |
islature.
NEW YORK GETS
NEARLY $35,000,000
IN ONE WEEK
NEW YORK. Nov. 2.?In addition
to the $1,010,000 gold for Wells. Far
go & Co.. the Baltic brought in ap- ? I
proximately $2,600,,000 consigned to , J
tin New York banks, all in British , fl
sovereigns. ' ; j I
These consignments bring the to- i |
tal gold importers fob last week up to ,
approximately $34,760,000, the largest ]
week's total on record.
NEW BATTLESHIPS TO
BE STRONGLY PROTECTED
WASHINGTON. Nov. 2.?The speci
fications of the two new battleships,
bids for which will be opened on.
Nov. 19, will call for the equipment
of the greatest defense against tor
pedo attacks yet Introduced into any
American battleship; several new
Ideas will be appended in the con- j
structlon of hulls to enable ships to j.
better withstand subtaarlne torpedo
blows. I
LATE NEWS BULLETINS j
MUST IMPORT COAL.
ROME?Coal at >30 a ton must bo
imported from Japan, owing to a ser
ious shortage of that fuel.
SACRED HOLIDAY OBSERVED.
PARIS?All Saints and All Souls
Day wan observed here and through
out France today and yesterday, by
pilgrimages of wreath-bearing throngs
of mourners to the cemeteries, in
most of which are buried soldiers
who havo fallen on the flold of bat
VALDEZ MAN GOT AID.
WASHINGTON ?'Tho government
Is publishing the names of tboso ac
cepting its financial aid, in potting
out of tho European wur zone, <vhc
[ have since failed to return the cash
advanced. Tho list includes Mirt
Grader, of Caldez, Alaska.
KING OUT OF DANGER.
LONDON ? Ging George returned f
yesterday from the front. He is in
no danger from the effects of injur-,
lee sustained when his mount fell
while he was roviewing his troops.
W. J. McCAFFERTY DIE8.
SEATTLE?W. J. McCarterty, a
well known lawyer, died this morn
HUERTA IS ILL.
EL PASO?Vlctoriano Huerta. ox
dictator of Mexico, is reported to bo
erlousL 111 In his prison at Fort
I Bliss.
SONS GET DAMAGES.
SEATTLE?The heirs of Mrs. Lil
lian B. Whittlesey, who was killed in
r auto accident in 1913, today were
i awarded damage* in the sum of
i 160. The money is payable to Ce
: dric, Walter and Roynor Whittlesey,
E sons of the dead woman.
BLOODIEST
BATTLE ON
SERB SOIL
LONDON, Nov. 2.?Serbian resist
ince In the Northern part of that
:ountry has been crushed and the
'all of Nlsh, the provisional capital,
s hourly expected. A dispatch from
Jofla says the forts defending Nlsh
vers under bombardment by the
2ermans and Bulgarians this morn
ng. The news came as an official
itatement from the Bulgarian war of
Ice.
SLAUGHTER IS TERRIFIC.
In Southern Serbia the Allies are
?eported to be throwing the Biigar
ans back by fierce attacks.. A dls*
>?tch from Athens says: "The
rrsnch and Bulgarlano nre engaged
n a terrific battle between Strumnlt*
:a and Krovlak and farther south the
British and Bulgarians are fighting
imld the worst slaughter of the 8cr
)!an campaign. There are now seven
llstinct war zones In Serbia."
Qreat Arsenal Taken.
The Serbian town of Kraguyevatz.
it which is located the great Serb
traenal has been taken by tho Ger
nans. according to word received to
lay from Berlin.
Another dispatch from the Sorb
ront says that an attempt of tho Bul
pirlans, with tlje aid of artillery, to H ,
llslodgo French troops from their
lorthornmost position In Serbia, met
wltli failure.
GERMANS ATTEMPT TO
CAPTURE RIGA HAS
BEEN GIVEN 8ETBACK
LONDON, Nov 2.?The Times says
oday that Russian troops have been
anded at Varna, an important Bulga
?Ian port, on tho Black Sea.
The Post's Fotrograd correspond
int says that British submarines op
iratlng In the Baltic Sea and the
:omnlete closing of the Gulf of Riga
>v Russian mine* have thwarted all
jorman plans for the taking of Rl
m. Courland.
'? ? '? >
GERMANY WILL
BLOCK GRECIAN
COAST WITH SUBS
BERLIN. Nov. 2. ? Submarine
>lockade of the Grecian coast wna or
iered yesterday, and will bo effective
Immediately, It war. announced by
;he war office today. The same tac
:lcs that havo prevailed around Eng
and will be used.
BERLIN DENIES RUMOR
CROWN PRINCE'S DEATH
BERLIN, Nov. 2.?It was denied
lero today that the German Crown
Prince had died near Verdun, In a field
loslptal. The report reached Turin
'rom a Rome newspaper.
TURKEY CLAIMS
THAT ALLIES ARE
NOW WEAKENING
CONSTANTINOPLE, Nov. 2.? The
war office says the Allied command
ers on Galllpoll peninsula have noti
fied their respective governments that ?
unless they receive reinforcements
Immediately they will be compelled to
abandon Important positions which
have been held at a heavy cost.
The War Office also claims to have
Intercepted several wireless messages
from French and British Headquart
ers on Gulllpoll Peninsula In which
warning was given that the Allied boI
diers needed food and ammunition
supplies, lack of which would com
pel retreat to the coast In the near
future.
Rocent attacks by the Ottoman for
ces have shown that the Erltlsh and
French troops are carefully husband
ing their ammunition. Instead of
meeting these 'assaults with a heavy
fire, tho defending forces are coming
to rely more and more on the bayon
et.
The War Office says further that
Turkish batteries Friday silenced the
guns of enemy warships and land ar
tillery.
BRITISH GOVERNMENT TO
PROTEST AGAINST ABUSE
OF AMERICAN PASSPORTS
LONDON, Nov. 2.?The British gov
ernment le preparing n protest against
the abuse of American passports by
persons to whom they are Issued. An
official statement will soon be Issued.
& |
ITALY H0LD8 COTTON
INTENDED FOR GERMANS
WASHINGTON. Nov. 2.?American
cotton valued at approximately $50,
000,000 shipped from the United States
and consigned to Germany is In pos
session of the Italian government,
according to Captain J. W. Batchelor,
of the Iiverpool Salvage Associa
!t,on
C. W. Beider has returned from I
Mendenhall, where he had a contract
on the Mendenhall bridge.

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