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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, November 11, 1915, Image 1

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VOL. VII., NO. 925. JUNEAU, ALASKA, THURSDAY, NOV. 11, 1915. PRICE TEN CENTS.
SURVIVORS SAY ANCONA WARNED; CAPTAIN DENIES IT
BOAT FOR
LOCAL RUN
G.T.P. PLAN
(.'apt. C. H. Nicholson of Vancouver,
B. C.. general manager of the Grand
Trunk Pacific Steamship Co., and G.
A. McNicholl of Prince Rupert, an of
ficial in the freight and passenger de
partment of the Grand Trunk rail
road. are visitors In Juneau. They
registered yesterday at the New Cain
Hotel, upon their return from Skag
way. and In the afternoon conferred
with the local G. T. P. agent, H. R.
Shepard. over passenger and freight
conditions here.
"We are doing a little missionary
work, studying conditions generally in
Southeastern Alaska." said Capt. Ni
cholson last night. "While our plans
have not reached maturity, it is not
at all improbable that we shall enter (
the Alaska field. We have had the
matter under advisement for some
time and we now believe that the ,
time has come when we could enter
the trade, and get our share of the
business. ('
"If upon my return to Vancouver, j
the Grand Trunk Pacific should de- ,
cide to start a steamship service to j
Juneau and Skagway. the service
would be Inaugurated on or about ,
the first of January. 1918, and we j
would begin by running a small boat j
with ample passenger and freight fa- t
cilitles to meet the business between (
Alaskan points and Prince Rupert t
for the time being.
"With the opening of the season j
in the spring, we would then put in ;
service, and run under regular sched- ]
ule our two fast boats, the Prince
George and Prince Rupert."
The company expects to reach out (
for a big slice of the Eastern travel ,
from Alaska, and freight shipments (
also will be sought. J. M. Keller has i
been designated temporarily as the (
Skagway agent of the company and ] ?
Mr. Shepard will continue as the Ju- ,
neau representative of the line.
Capt. Nicholson and Mr. McNicholl t
visited the Elks' Club last evening.' j c
EX-MARSHAL i
PERRY DIES ,
INJDUBUQUE
DUBUQUE. Ia? Nov. 11. ? George
G. Perry, at one time United States
marshal at Fairbanks. Alaska, died
here yesterday. He was 68 years of I
age and has been prominent in Iowa 1
politics for many years. Perry leaves <
a fortune estimated to be 850,000. ]
(
The death of George 0. Perry re
moved a man who was welt known i
throughout Alaska when he served as <
head of the policing system of the I
Fairbanks district during the early
days of the camp. It was during <
Perry's administration that Hender- i
son. the notorious "Bluo Parka" ban- i
dlt operated on Pedro Creek, robbing i
miners of their gold dust. Hender
son was caught and after his convlc- i
tion was sentenced to a long term in
McNeil's island penitentiary. I
Perry wac appointed In 1900. by
President William McKlnley. He
served for two terms and was suc
ceeded by Marshal Henry K. Love.
SAILING CRAFT AGAIN <
ENTER EUROPEAN TRADE
NORFOLK. Va.. Nov. 11.?The six- i
masted schooner Edward J. Lawrence i
has been chartered to take 5.000 tons i
of coal from Norfolk to Spain for $52.- i
500, the highest rate ever paid an i
American schooner for coal carrying-.
The s&rcity of tonnage has created
an unprecedented demand for large
schooners.
ENGLAND IS TO QUIT
COINING HALF SOVEREIGNS
LONDON. Nor. 11.?Great Britain
vill discontinue the coinage of their
half-sovereign pieces, owing to the
great wastage on the coin, due to the
large surface exposed in proportion
to its value.
KUSHNICK GUILTY.
After three minutes of delib
eration the jury this afternoon
found George Kushnick guilty
of shooting with intent to kill.
The case of the United States
against George Kuahnlck, charged
with shooting with intent to kill Steve
Stampo'.lo on Pennock island, near
Ketchikan, in September will proba
bly go to the jury late this afternoon.
Kushnick. who is a native, is repre
sented by 0. A. Tucker.
+ + + -f + + ** + + + ? + + o
? ?
v WEATHBR REPORT ?
+ Maximum?39. +
+ Minimum?30. ?
+ Partly cloudy. +
+ Rain?.02 in. ?
????+????????????
12 DAYS PASS
AND CHRISTIE
CASEUNSOLVED
NO CLUES FOUND
Deputy Marshal Manning ar
rived today from Petersburg. "I
found no trace of Krause, al-|
though I got 'confidential' stor
ies, about 150 of them, as to
where he was," he said. "I am
positive, however, that if it was
Krause whom the watchman at
the Taku cannery saw on the
boat identified as having belong
ed to Krause, that he is not trav
eling alone. There was anoth
er man with him on the boat,
the watchman said."
Friends of William Christie persist
In the belief that the missing man Is
at the botom of the channel, as day
after day no clue Is found to the un
ravelling of the mysterious mission
which took him away from Trcadwcll
twelve days ago.
At the same time friends of Edward ;
Krause. whom the marshal's office is
seeking as an accomplice in the at
fair, are firm In their belief that he
had nothing to do with the matter
outside of the possibility of his hav
ing rented his boat to the partlos to
the disappearance, whoever they may
have been.
And yet, the deputies of the mar
shal's office have been working for
learly two weeks In a futile effort to
ocate Krause. Several clues have
>een found as to his whereabouts but
t seems that he has "Just gone" when
;he marshal gets there. Deputy J. L.
Manning Is returning from Peters
burg on the gas boat LUllan while
Deputy Martin Klldahl returned to
Petersburg last night.
Meantime Mrs. Christie, who as
Mrs. Gesekus bocamo a naturalized
:ltlzen of the United States In May
>f this year, remains at her homo or
the Island, convinced that her hus
band has met with foul play. Mrs
Christie Is Inclined to adhero to the,
theory that her husband has beer,
nurdered.
The continued failure to And any
race of Christie calls to mind the ?
llsappearance of Gus Bakke. who
Iropped out of sight a couple of
nonths ago and whom a careful and
thorough search has been unable to
ocate.
CYCLONE DOES
BIG DAMAGE AT
GREAT BEND, KAS.
KANSAS CITY. Nov. 11.?When a
:ornado swept Great Bend. Kansas,
late last night two persons were kill
id. thirtv-six people were Injured and
property valued at J500.000 was ruin
id.
Most of the damage was done in the:
region southwest of Great Bend. Sev
iral hundred sheep were killed, and
form buildings suffered.
In Great Bend the waterworks, the
slectric light plant, the Santa Fe rail
road station, three flour mills and
several grain elevators were destroy
ed.
Communication was interrupted last
sight, but was restored today.
GOLD IMPORTS
REACH TOTAL OF
$335,000,000
NEW YORK. Nov. 11.?Tho total
Gold Imports of the United States for
1915, beginning with the first of the
year and terminating with the last
day of October, ten months in all. has!
reached the enormous total of $335,
[>00,000. It is the greatest record any
country ever made in the same length
of time. S.
GOLD AND RETURING
SECURITIES MAY KEEP
STERLING EXCHANGE UP
BOSTON. Nov. 11.? Francis W.
Hirst, the editor of the London Econ
omist, says In the Boston Advertiser
that the revival of peace rumors Is
to be attributed entirely to the finan
cial and economic conditions and dif
ficulty of the belligerent governments.
The position of the Bank of England
and the treasury Is better now than
It was during the month of May. Ho
says:
"I believe every soldier at the
front costs $1500 a year, although the
average for those stationed In Fland
ers Is considerably less. It Is ex
pected that American exchange will
be firmer for some weeks now, es
pecially If Wan Street's ability to ab
sorb our American securities contin
ues unabated. A good supply of the
gold export is, I hear, assured."
WAR CAUSES MEDICINES
TO ADVANCE RAPIDLY
NEW YORK. Nov. 11.? The New
York World says that the present
shortage of drugs and medical chem
icals as the result of the war Is with
out parallel since that existent in the
South during the Cfvll War. Prices
are skyrocketing and are from 2 to
15 times above the normal. Quinine
is $2.50 an ounce against 14 centB a
few months ago.
INCENDIARIES
DESTROY BIG
WIRE PLANT
TRENTON. N. J.. Nov. 11. ? Two j
wire-rope mills owned by the John A,
Roebllng Sons company and used
slnco the European war broke out for
the manufacture of guns, chains and
barbed wire for the ontente allies,
were destroyed by flre early today.
The loss Is placed at one million dol
lars.
Officials of tbo company, after an
Investigation, this afternoon said that
the flre undoubtedly was of incendiary
origin, and rewards of $10,000 have
been offered for information leading
to the capture and conviction of the
perpetrators of the crime.
TAET WANTS
ELIHU ROOT
CHICAGO, Nov. 11.?In an address
hero last night former President Tart
declared that tbo best system of pre
paredness for war that tho United
States could adopt, in his judgment,
would be a happy medium between
the positions on thin subject of Theo
dore Roosovelt aud Wllilam Jennings
Bryan.
Mr. Taft declared that Ellhu Root ,
to the present requirements of the ,
Presidency.
FEARING RIGGS'
TRANSFER, TANANA
WIRES TO CAPITAL
?*?
FAIRBANKS, Nov. 11: ? Fearing i
that Thomas Rlggs, jr., of the Alaska
railroad engineering commission is ,
about to be transferred, the Commer
cial Club today sent resolutions to
Secretary Lane for his retention
here.
Deal Is Custodian. I
Postmaster Deal has been designate
ed custodian of the bank property re
cently purchased by the government, ]
succeeding Marshal L. T. Envln. It
means that Feedral officials In Fair- i
banks will not move their otneos rnmi
tho present locations.
Postoffice Name Changed. i
Brooks postoffice has been changed I
to Llvengood, by order of the post
office department.
m ? (
AUSTRIA SEEKS ONLY !
TO WEAKEN SERBIA
BOSTON. Nov. 11.?In an Interview ]
with a Boston Globe correspondent at
Budapest, Count Tlsza. minister presi
dent of Hungary, is quoted as saying:
"We never had aggressive designs J
before tho war; we have had nono '
during tho war; wo have nono toda^.
But we must have guarantees ofor i
our future security. Serbia will bo
diminished and weakened. It cannot
be so left as to again become tho fire
brand and constant source of dan
ger to the peace of Austria-Hungary
that It has been In the past."
MICHIGAN COPPER
YIELD TO BREAK RECORD
CALUMET, Mich., Nov. 11. ? The
Keweenaw peninsula will have a rec
ord production this year amounting
to nearly 250,000,000 pounds, with an
average price of at least 16 cents.
The demand for copper Is expected to
hold good for four or five years If
the navy building program is author
ized by Congress.
SPECULATORS HAVE BOUGHT
UP MEXICAN SILVER COIN
SAN ANTONIO, Tex., Nov. 11.?
American speculators In Texas for
the past two or three years have been
hoarding up Mexican silver colli, prin
cipally pesos which were bought as
low as 38 cents on the United States
dollar, or 12 cents below the ordinary
fixed value.: Largo profits are ex
pected when tho Carranza government
Is established. Villa war money Is
now regarded as practically worth
less.
? + *
WESTINGHOUSE COMPANY
PURCHASES FIRST HOME
PITTSBURGH, Pa.. Nov. 11.? The
Westinghouse Electric & Manufac
turing Company has taken back the
control of the building in Pittsburgh
where the firm began its business 30
years ago, and will Install machinery
for the manufacture of shrapnel am
munition.
EXPORTS MARK NEW
EPOCH IN TRADE
NEW YORK. Nov. 11.?New York
the last week in October established
a world's record in export trade. When
the custom house closed for the week,
an approximate total of $80,000,000 of
cargoes for foreign countries had
been cleared from that port
8TOCK QUOTATIONS.
NEW YORK, Nov. 11.?Alaska Gold
closed today at 29, Chlno at 54%. Ray
at 26%, Utah Copper at 74%, Butte
and Superior at 68%.
Copepr metals remains at 18%.
INV RS
QUIT RIGA
BOG LANDS
BERLIN, Nov. 11.?German troops
have ovacuatcd the forest district to
tho west and southwest of Shlock, and
west of Riga Because that roglon has
been transformed into a vast swamp
by heavy rains, rays the official an
nouncement issued by the Gorman
war office today.
Tho array of Prince Leopold of Ba
varia reported no change on its
front in Rusia today but tho army of
General von Linslngen reported:
"Wo are progressing northeast of
Komorov."
Tho Russians are roportod to bo
massing near Mitau, in the Riga dis
trict, but owing to the condition of
the country tho war oillce believes no
concertod attack will be made in that
region, by the Slav forces, tho 'an
nouncement concluded.
GALLIENI PUTTING
WAR INDUSTRIES
ON SOUND FOOTING
PARIS, Nov. 11. ? Despite tho fact
that Geenral Galilenl, the "dofendor
of Paris," has been in the war office!
but a short time, many changes in the j
administration are noticeable In a
marked "tuning up' 'of the war ma
chinery, says Le Matin today.
Tho now French cabinet, Just or
ganized under tho leadership of M. I
Aristido Briand as premier, is repre
sentative of all the political parties
In the republic. With Minister of
War Galilenl are Alexandre Ribot,;
minister of finance, Reno Vivian!, for
mer premier, minister of justice and
M. Combc3, a formerly premier and
Jules Cambon, tho veteran diplomat.
"BIG 5" WAR COMMITTEE.
LONDON. Nov. 11.?Great Britain's
aew cabinet war committee during
tho absence of Lord Kitchener, it was
inounccd today, will consist of Prime
Minister Asquith, Arthur' Balfour,
David Lloyd-George, Andrew Bonar
Law and Reginald McKcnna.
3ERMAN STEAMSHIP LINE
TO Enter PACIFIC TRADE
NEW YORK. Nov. 11.?The first
?ct of the Hamburg-Amerlcnn lino at
the conclusion of war will be the op
ening of a line of largo steamers
from Hamburg direct to San Francls
:o via the Panama Canal. This offic
ial statement Is made by Dr. Otto
Ecker. managing director of the line,
who has arrived from Germany to
look after some of the affairs of that
company In America.
He thinks the end of the war Is in
sight. "Should another winter cam
paign bo required, however." ho said,
"Germany Is prepared for It The on
ly possibility Is that of a complete
German victory."
BELLIGERENTS BUY
500,000 HORSES AND
MULES IN AMERICA
NEW YORK. Nov. 11.?Alfred B.
Mackay, chairman of the executive
commltteo of the National Horse Show
Association says:
"The European war has taken some
thing like 500,000 horses and mules
out of this country during the past
year, and it Is predicted that double
that number will follow if hostilities
continue for two more seasons."
LAURIER MAY RETIRE
FROM PUBLIC LIFE
MONTREAL, Nov. 11.?The Canad
ian press predicts the early retire
ment from the leadership of tho Li
beral party and from public life of Sir
Wilfrid Laurler.
CANADA GETS WAR
ORDERS FQR $500,000,000
NEW YORK, Nov. 11.?D. A. Thom
as, Lloyd George's representative In
America, declares that orders already
placed and large orders now being al
lotted in Canada for war supplies and
munitions would amount In tho aggre
gate to $500,000,000.
- " * ? A A A Jk t A A A X A JL
+ "T ? T -r T T T T T Tl.
<? *
4 REACHING WOMEN *
4 *
4 If you want to tell your story 4
* to women consider these facts 4
4 about The Dally Empire. 4
4 The Dally Empire 19 an ove- 4
4 nlng newspaper, and Is brought 4
4 home to tho wife at night when 4
4 she has the time and Incllna- 4
* tlon to read. 4
4 The Dally Empire has a larg- 4
* er circulation, and a larger homo 4
4 delivered circulation than any 4
* other newspaper In Alaska 4
4 The Dally Empire offers you an 4
4 opportunity to tell more Gastl- 4
4 neau Channel women about your 4
4 goods than any other newspa- 4
! 4 per.* 4
4 This territory Is pre-eminent- 4
4 ly an evening newspaper Held. 4
4 THE DAILY EMPIRE 4
4 "All the News All the Time." 4
4 (*Dont forget that The Dally 4
4 Empire Is also the leading mar- 4
4 ket place for meiw) 4
44444444444 ">44444
BRITISH SUB
PUTS GERMAN
CRUISER DOWN
COPENHAGEN, Nov. 11.?The Ger
man cruiser Franolod was torpcdood
and sunk by a British submarine, off
the southern coast 0/ Sweden today.
Nows was received here by wireless
telegraph. The Franelod was a slstor
ship of the cruiser Undine, which was
torpedoed and sunk by a British sub
marine last Monday morning.
DANISH SHIPS
HEAR THUNDER
OF BIG GUNS
COPENHAGEN, Nov. 11.?A can
nonade of terrific intensity was heard
by Danish boats today In tho neighbor
Ben. and it Is believed that it fore
shadows definite nows that British
submarines have made an attack on
a German squadron.
Rumors that the Germnn squadron
was to leave Hcgoland this week,
to attempt to convoy German mer
chant ships across tho Baltic Sea
from Swedish ports, have been per
sistently circulated and many of
them found their way Into the pub
lic press.
MRS. GERARD IS
DECORATED BY
KAISER WILHELM
BERLIN, Nov. 11.?Mrs. James W.
Gerard, wife of the American ambas
sador was decorated by Emperor Wil
liam, with the Red Cross gold medals
of the first nnd second class. It was
the first time that a German first
class medal has ever been given to a J
woman not of royal blood.
The honor paid Mrs. Gerard is In
recognition of her untiring work In
behalf of wounded soldiers and her
efforts to relieve citizens of various;
countries stranded In Germany.
AUSTRIA LOSES MORE
THAN 100,000 MEN
IN ITALIAN OFFENSIVE
PARIS, Nov. 11.?Dlspatchos from
Rome say that the Austrian losses In
the Italian offensive movement along
U.o wholo Cruut from tUa -Adriatic. t<V
the Swiss border have been in excess
of 100,000 men in killed, wounded
captured. The percentage of killed J
hns been large.
Italy proposes to continue the offen
sive movement Indefinitely. It is
said that sho has had nmplo ammuni
tion to continue the bombardment of
the Austraian lines for many weeks.
JOFFRE WORKS FOR
CO-ORDINATION OF ARMIES
??
LONDON. Nov. 11.?It is believed
that Gen. Joffre's recent visit to Lon
don and his confereucc with Kitch
ener concerned a more closely co-or
dinated military policy among the A)
VON TIRPITZ IS IN
BAD WITH KAISER
LONDON, Nov. 11.?A central news
dispatch from Amsterdam says the
Kaiser has disgraced Admiral von Tlr
pitz. To him was due the naval pol
icy of "nipping off" tho British fleet
by submarine attacks and the at
tempted destruction of England's
merchant marine. Both campaigns
have failed according to British claims
and the German government has
guardedly admitted in a measuro tho
failure of tho operations. Von Tlr
pitz's reputation suffered, but it was
because of the torpedoing of the Lusi
tania and the Arabic that the "fash
ion .of the king's countenance was
'
that time on von Tirpltz has been
lomoted in imperial esteem, but this
is tho first Intimation of his "offic
ial" disgrace.
SINKING OF
ANCONA ROUSES
ENGLISH IRE
LONDON, Nov. 1|. ? London's
morning papers commented at great
length on the sinking of the Italian
American liner Ancona, of which
they learned from America.
The Times said today: "This lat
est Incident In the maritime warfare
of Teuton model ought to serve as a
salutary comment on Gormany's exul
tant congratulations to the United
States over its last note to England.
Which do they (the United States)
prefer, tho British or German stand
ard of maritime warfare and maritime
right? The contract is complete."
Tho Daily News said: "Germany,
or Austria, if the guilt should be
proved against all probability to be
Austria's, can be left to renew ne
gotiations with Secretary Lansing.
Tho still unsottled Lusltania controver
sy has today assumed fresh actuality
and the principle at stake is entirely
unaffected by the question whether
or not tho Ancona carried American
passengers."
Other London papers Intimate that
the United States, should it And that
the Ancona was not warned, should
sever diplomatic relations with Ger
many.
SARCASM AIMED
AT BRITISH AND
UNITED STATES
BERLIN, Nov. 11.?German news
paperes have commented with gener
al Rnti8factlon on Secretary Lansing's
last note to Great Britain demanding
the right of neutral commerce to have
freedom of the ocas. Two or three of
the papers, however, speak satirically
of the note.
The. LoKal Anziegor regards the j
note as "worthy of a place besides
those of Germany as regards tho
gravity of tho language used," but
doubt3 "whether corresponding deeds
will follow."
The Boursen Zeltung says: "Tho
note Is not the first of its kind that
has been sent to Great Britain, but
I we have not heard London paying any
attention whatever to the wishes and
demands put forth in the others, and
since Washington plainly believes it
must have special consideration for
its British cousins, especially since
these aro Ruch good cousns, the pres
ent note will be laid on the shelf with
the others, without, having achieved
anything but thqt the American gov
ernment has saved,Juj face';'
GERMANY PLANNING
MANY MORE ZEPPELINS
LONDON, Nov. 11.?A neutral trav
eler from Germany says that tho ac
tivity at various zeppelin centers is
now greater than at any previous per
iod of the war. The new airships are
belnfc built with great speed for work
over England, and for scouting work.
ENGLAND WILL NOT
RESORT TO CON8CRIPTION
LONDON, Nov. 11.? Conscription
has been definitely disposed of. It
is estimated that Lord Derby's plan
of raising volunteers will secure 1,
750,000 men, which will fully satisfy
the requirements of the war office
and conscription will not be neces
sary.
1
LATE NEWS BULLETINS
WILSON TO MEET OPPOSITION.
WASHINGTON ? Republicans In
Congress will be consulted by tho
t President on the administration for
national dofcnse before tho opening of
the coming session. It was learned to
day.
MIKADO FELICITATED.
j KIOTA, Japan?Emperor Yoshlhlto
was receiving felicitations today from
all over the world, on tho occasion of
his accession to the throne. The
congratulatory message from Presi
dent Wilson was among the first re
: eeived.
CUBA RECOGNIZES CARRANZA.
HAVANA ? Cuba today formally
recognized General Venustiano Car
ranza as head of the de facto govern
ment in Mexicc.
McADOO SON-IN-LAW DIES.
WASHINGTON ? Charles Taber
Martin; of Los Angeles, son-in-law ol
? Secretary McAdo of the Treasury de
partment, died of pneumonia at the
secretary's home today.
RUSSIAN DEBT COLOSSAL.
PETROGPAD ? It was announced
1 today that the national debt by Jan
> uary will have reached eight and one
? half billions.
DOG IS JAILED.
SEATTLE?Judge Kenneth Mackin
toBh of the King County superior court
today sentenced "Flirt," an English
bull terrier, to three days in jail to
determine whether the animal is vi
clous or lovable. The owner of the
dog was sued on a charge that he
possessed a dog who was vicious.
BANKER IS MURDERED.
LOS ANGELES ? W. S. Windham,
former banker and merchant of Pas
adena. was assassinated In the terri
tory of Topic, Mexico, a telegram
which was recelv d here today said.
No details were furnished.
OFFICERS IN PRIEST GARB.
ROME?According tov news from
Athens, Albany has been overnn for
the past threr months by men in the
- garg of Catholic missionaries who
f have beer, discovered to be Austrian
? army officers, sent there, it is said, to
> prepare an Insurrection timed to co
incide with the invasion of Serbia.
AMMUNITION LANDED.
I BUCHAREST? The Germans have
- discharged a thoucand wagon ioadB of
- ammunition in various cities along the
Danube river.
ANCONA'S DEATH LIST
REDUCED; WARNING Of
VESSEL IS IN DISPUTE
LONDON, Nov. 11.?England today
[ heard t*o version* of the sinking of
the Ancona. One came from Malta,
I which said passengers declared warn*
ing was given the Ancona. The other
came from Tunis, In which the captain
of the Ancona was quoted as saying
that hln vessel was not warned ex
cept by shelling.
The Malta version came from the
correspondent of the Evening Stand
ard. Survivors, the correspondent
said, declared the submarine gave suf
ficient warning. They related that
the submarine overhauled the liner
after a long chase and Its command
er, signaling, gave the captain of the
Ancona a brief respite to permit the
removal of passengers. In the mad
rush for safety, men, women and chil
dren overwhelmed the small boats,
several of which were overturned be
fore they could be lowered. Many of
the occupants of the lifeboats fell In
to the sea and were drowned as the
boats wore descending from their da
vits.
The correspondent further said that
passengers of the liner declared that
shots were fired around the steamship
by the submarine, apparently to hast
en the loading of the lifeboats, but
the shots only added to the panic of
the passengers.
"NC WARNING"?CAPTAIN.
The E.tefanl News Agency caoiea
from Tunis that the commander of
the Ancona, who reached there to
day, de.'iared the submarine gave his
vessel no signal stop and that the first
sign of the presence of the hostile
craft was when she began to shell
the Ancona from a distance of five
miles. One shell, the captain stated,
grazed the steamship, whereupon the
Ancona'u engines were reversed and
she was brought to a dead stop.
Another Tunis dispatch said that
the submarine, after sinking the An
cona, shelled half of the lifeboats, kill
ing a woman, two children and a man,
whose bodies are now at Bizerta.
OVER HUNDRED L08T LIVES.
Acorri.ng to almost complete re
ports, eighty passengers lost their
lives. Df this number over twenty
were Americans. It Is positively
known that at least 380 passengers
were sa/ed, and revised lists showed
that tho vessel carried 480 passen
gers and a crew of over 200 men. It
believed that about fifty members of
the crew perished. Many of the cas
ualties were due to the gunfire from
the submarine, which shelled the life
boats at a range of two miles.
A lifeboat wth twenty-seven surw
ors has reached Cape Bon, at the en
trance of tho bay of Tunis.
LANSING TO
WAIT UPON
All TACTS
WASHINGTON, Nov. 11.?Secretary
of State Robert Lansng announced
this afternoon that he must have more
facts before acting officially in tho An
cona matter. Ambassador Thomas N.
Page at Rome cabled today that of the
twenty-3even Americans aboard the
liner the only known survivor was
Mrs. Cecil L. Greif.
Death List 149.
A cablegram from American Consul
White, at Naples, said that tho Socl
eta Italia says that 347 persons on
the Ancona were saved, and that the
death list probably will be 149, with
the chances bright of having more
survivors reported when full lists are
checked up.
Another dispatch from Naples says
that Pnsqualo Laurine, an American
citizen, lost his life by drowning from
one of the last boats to bo launched.
LINER "FRANCE"
ALSO WAS SUNK
PARIS, Nov. 11.?Nown was mado
public last night that the French lin
or Franco was torpedoed and sunk by
a hostile submarine in the Mediter
ranean sea last Sunday. The Franc
was a vessel of 4,000 tons and was
usod in the South American trade.
She belonged to the Maritime Line
of Marseilles. The crew was saved.
GREECE TO
RENDER AID
TO THE ALLIES
ROME, Nov. 11.?M. Coromilas, the
Greek minister to Italy, has formally
assured Boron Sonnino that Grccco
would continue to render valuable aid
to the Allies.
ENGLISH FORMING
NEW GENERAL STAFF
LONDON, Nov. 11.? The London
Daily News parliamentary corres
pondent. says' that the government
during the last two months has been
engagr>d in the creation of a new gen
erojl staff to supervise the prosecu
tion of war by the armies in the
j field.

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