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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, November 23, 1915, Image 1

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VOL. VLL, NO. 935. JUNEAU, AYASKA, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1915. ^ PRICE TEN CENTS
GREEK LEADER BITTERLY ASSAILS BRITAIN'S ACTIONS
NETERER REFUSES TO
HOLD KRAUSE; LAnER
INSTANTLY REARRESTED1
SEATTLE, Not. 23. ? Judge Jere
miah Neterer decided this afternoon
that he had not the power to order
Ed want Kmuse'a removal to Juneau
to answer a charge of kidnaping Wil
liam Christie. Krause was immed
iately rearrested on a state warrant
charging him with being a tugutive
from justice and will be held until
the extradition papers from Governor
Strong of Alaska r.-ach Governor Lis
ter.
Krauae In City Jail.
The warrant charging Krause with j
being a fugitive from a kidnaping
chargo was served by Constable
James Shannon and Detective Ralph
Jones, and was sworn to by U. S At
torney Clay Allen. Krause was taken
to tho city jail.
Judge Neterer held that nnder Sec
tion 1014 of the Roviced Statues of the
United States, under which the orig
inal warrant was drawn. Krause could
not be removed, but that he could be
sent back to Alaska upder. another sec-.
tien. In short, the cenrt ruled that;
there is a line of demarkation be
tween the laws of Alaska and the
general laws of the United States,
and that kidnaping as charged in this
instance is not an offense against
the United States. Allen, owing to'
the Importance of getting Krause.
charged and tried in Alaska as quick-!
ly as possible, will not appeal from
the court's decision, he said, although
he thinks the court erred.
Attorneys Grab Money.
Krause sat unmoved throughout the:
proceedings. His rearrest was no sur
prise, for Allen, in open court several |
days ago said ho would be at once
taken into custody again if liberated.,
The proceedings, however, enabled
a voria itpotifrmnfta nnd tt
G rat tan O'Bryan. Krause's counsel,to:
annex $300 in cash which was being;
turned back to the prisoner. The at
torneys also sought his two bank
hooks, one calling for $1400 and the
other calling for $1300.
Moe Never Heard From.
Though Ole E. Moe doubtless was "
long ago murdorcd. with Krause. so
far as the world knows, being the
last man seen in his company, the
auditors of King and Kitsap counties
continue to receive letters respecting!
his real estate holdings in the two
counties, signed O. E. Moe. Both aud
itors have so reported to the federal
authorities.
The letters are typewritten, and in
the opinion of the authorities were
the work of Krause, but many letters
written by Moe's relatives remain un
answered. No reply has ever been;
received from Moe save one. which
Krause wTote for Moe. claiming that
he did so because the latter had a
sore hand.
Krause Clever, Doctor Says.
Four years ago one of the most!
prominent physicians In Seattle board-1
ed his private yacht and sought rest
and recreation in the waters of South
eastern Alaska. He passed two or
three months at a place where Krause
happened to be building a boat and
the two men became well acquainted,!
Krause frequently being a guest
aboard the physicians yacht Once. I
in the course of a long conversation, j
Krause stated to this physician that
he had at one time been in the Unit-j
ed States army. The physician tuked,
the name of the company and other;
particulars, but Krause closed like a
clam.
The foregoing Information was giv
en the federal officers by the Physi
cian today. This doctor declared
Krause to be one of the best-read
men he had ever conversed with and j
said that Krause is accomplished in j
many ways, that he has a great fund
of information and that he can con
verse intell'gently on any subject
-PREPAREDNESS" SCHEME
ON AMERICAN FINANCIERS
SAYS HENRY .FORD
DETROIT. Mich.. Nov. 23.?Henry
Tord says: "The preparedness pro
gram is really a plan to keep the mu
nition factories busy after this war
ends. In reality war is a device of
the big financiers, the biggest cow
ards in the world. Those fellows run
if you drop a hat. but they don't care
how much the other fellows?the lit
tle ones?fight or how many are kill
ed. It Is the little fellows who pay
for these wars, and the wars only
increase the burden upon the little
fellow, while making the big one al
ways more powerful and wealthier.
The newspapers of the world could
end the present conflict in two months
time. Unite the newspapers of the
world in a campaign for peace, and i
the men, who feed the war mills of
death and the women who must bear
the burdens and the sorrow of homo
will, of their own force, end armed
conflict."
You saw it first In The Empire.
*
+ *
* WEATHER REPORT <?
+ ?+? +
+ Maximum?40. *
4. Minimum?35. ?
CLEAR! ?
IJUNCAU FEDERAL
JAIL TO RECEIVE
EDWARD KRAUSE
Edward Krause of Petersburg, can
ddlate on the Socialist ticket for the
House of Representatives, Alaska Leg
islature. In 1914, will be behind the
steel bars In the United States jail in
Juneau within ton days. It is believ
ed. The activity of the Seattle offi
cials In collecting evidence against
tho prisoner has resulted, friends of
Krause's alleged victims say, in weav
ing a net of circumstances about the
prisoner that ho cannot escape, nnd
friends of Captain "Jim" Plunkett,
Ole Moe and William Christie say
they will not rest until justice Is done.
It Is said that when Krause Is ex
tradited. Chief of Detectives Char'es
Tennant of Seattle will como North,
to appear against him. It was Ten
nant. according to tho Seattle papers,
that drew from Krause, bit by bit,
statements exceedingly domagipg to I
the prisoner and it is thought that the I
third degree was applied by tho
sleuth. l|
It Is declared taht when J. E. Moul
ton and an officer from Ketchikan
searched Krause's launch In Ward's <1
cove, where the fugitlvo had left it, ?
a recently-used gag was found, in ad- il
dition to a shot-gun said to be Jim
Plnnkett'8. and high-power shells and
rifles in large numbers. Letters
found in the boat indicated that
Krause had a secret code by which
he communicated to persons unknown.
There is a story to the effect that a 11
vertitable Black Hand society of which
Krause was tho head was in exis
tence in Southeastern Alaska, but this ? I
ft * -*? 1 no * I
report nan nut una uuiuc vui ao jw.
It Is said thnt the Socialists have <
taken steps to defend Kratise. Krauc- ?
tunas, former Alaskan Socialist lead
er. and the standard bearer of that i
party In an unsuccessful campaign
for delegate, is one of Krause's law
yers.
FOUR GAS BOATS
SWAMPED IN STORM
While riding at her moorings near i
the Pacific Coast dock Friday night
the gas boat Greyhound was torn free |
by the Admiral Evans, her owner al- i
leges, and Jammed against the E. A.
Hegg with such force 'hat the Grey- 1
hound was sunk. In a wreck report.
filed yesterday. Captain Peter Mad
sen. owner of the Greyhound and of
the Hegg. states that the Greyhound I
was almost entirely submerged and
that she drifted out Into the channel
and was finally picked up about two I
a. m. by the gas boat Independont.
Madsen claims that the damage done
to the Hegg as the result of being
jammed by the Greyhound, amounts
to $200. Only the engineer was aboard
at the time of the accident. The boat
and cargo are valued by Madsen at
$3500.
"Clare" Swamped.
Report has been filed of the wreck 1
of the gas boat Clare, which was |
bound from Doloml to Ketchikan on
November 9th and was swamped in
a heavy sea after her engine had
broken down. The boat is valued at
$1500 and at the time of her wreck
was carrying $450 worth of canned
and salted fish. M. E. Lane, her cap
tain. reports that the accident oc
curred near Wedge Island.
The Grubstake Also.
Captain John Keller of Ketchikan '
has sent An a report of the wreck
of the gas boat Grubstake which was
bound for Ham Island from Ketchikan
and was swamped In a -heavy sea on
Nov. 17. The Grubstake was carry
ing a cargo of household godd~ which
was damaged to the extent of $150.
?? ? ? ... ,
JAPANESE PLAN
GREAT EXPANSION
IN PACIFIC TRADE
NEW YORK, Nov. 23. ? Japanese
steamship interests have perfected
plans for enter the trans-Pacific trade
on a big scale and American steel
makers aro expecting Inquiry for
plates and shapes for a fleet of 65
steam vessels of various tonnages,
i ranging from 3,000 tons to 20,000 tons.
I Estimates of the amount of steel that
will be placed in this country for Jap
anese boats range from 250,000 to
1.000,000 tons.
POOR BOY IN BIG
EASTERN STEEL DEAL
PHILADELPHIA. Nov. 23.? J. L.
Replogle. who has porchaaed 240,000
| shares of Cambria Steel from the
Pennsylvania railroad, is said to rep
resent a syndicate of nine others. As
sociated with him in the purchase are
R. D. Coleman and J. H. Weaver of
Philadelphia, and E. V. Babcock and
F. J. Lanahan of Pittsburgh. Replogle
is 38 years of age. Twenty-seven
; years ago he was water boy for Cam
bria.
Everybody reads Empire "adl"
COAL LOST
WHEN DOCK
CAVES IN
One thousand square feet of the Al
aska-Juneau wharf collapsed early
this morning under the weight of 150
tons of coal discharged by the steam
ship Despatch last week. Dp until a
late hour this afternoon Engineer
Kenneth White had not estimated the
damage. A force of workmen is re
moving the tanglo of lumber and pil
ing. and repairs will be speedily made.
The cool will bo a total loss, and in
addition a shipment of railroad ties
was lost. The portion of the dock
which suffered was the southwest
corner.
A preliminary survey of tho wharf
showed the balance of the dock to be
in no danger.
? ? ?
DEMOCRATS TO
ARRANGE MAJORITY
COMMITTEE ASSIGNMENTS
WASHINGTON. Nov. 23?Democra
tic members of the ways and means
committee will meet in Washington
city November 29 to take up tho or
ganization of the new house of rep
resentatives. The committee will
havo its recommendations, including
the chairmanships of principal com
mittees, roady when the Democratic
caucus meets December 4, two days
before tho opening of Congross. Rep
resentative Kitchln, of North Carolina
already chosen by the caucuses for
chairman of the ways and means com
mittee, plans to come to Washington
several days before tho meeting.
LONDON FUR SALES
SHOW COOD ADVANCE
WASHINGTON. Nov. 23?An Amer
ican consular report on the London
October fur sales Bays:
Prices of most classes of skins of
fered showed an appreciable price.
According to the British press, ad
vances of 50 per cent, on rates paid
it tbo March series of sales were se
cured for cross for, whlto, gray, and
kit fox, 40 per cent, for red fox, 30
per cent, for fitch nnd Japanese fox.
25 per cenL for beaver, 20 per cent.:
for mink, 15 per cent for Btone mar
ten and silver fox. and 10 per cent
for marten and otter.
Theso Increases are said to havoi
been due to considerable demand both
In England and neutral countries,
rather than to the scarcity of the of
ferings. America was a keen buyer
of all classes of furs, notably skunk
!ind lynx. 1553
A slightly disturbing feature was
the Board of Trade announcement of
the Inclusion of furs In the list of
goods which may not be exported to
neutral countries except under li
cense. This. It Is stated, may teud
still further to ralso prices.
BREITUNG WANTED TO
PURCHASE ALL GERMAN
INTERNED STEAMSHIPS
NEW YORK, Nov. 23.?Edward N.
Breltung. ownor of the Hamburg
American liner Daclo. which was sunk
by a German submarine, had intended
to purchase practically all Interned
German ships in this country and put
them under the American flag. The
seizure of tho Dacla, while on a test
voyage with a cotton cargo after tho
vessel had been transferred to Amer
ican registry, balked the plan.
ENCLISH ADOPT FA8HION
TO SUIT 8ITUATION
LONDON. Nov. 23.? The dyestuff
problem is being settled in England
by the adaptation of fashions to nec
essities, according to the United
States consul Clayborne at Bradford.
Everybody is wearing grays, because
these can be had in fast colors, while
other shades cannot be relied upon.
PRIVATF. BANKERS IN
NEW YORK MAKE GAIN
NEW YORK, Nov. 23.?Tho 75 pri
vate bankers under tho supervision
of the Now York State Banking De
partment had $14,094,273 in resources
on Sept. 25, as aglnst $13,792,495 on
June 23. During the same period de
posits Increased from $132,372 to $7,
636,434.
MEN WIN DISPUTE
FROM BAY 8TATE ROAD
BOSTON. Nov. 23.?Tho Bay state
Street railway arbitration board re
convened to Interpret a disputed point
In the award relating to granting of
one-half cent per hour Increase from
Oct. 1, 1915 to men receiving the min
imum wage of $2.25 a day. The ques
tion was decided In favor of the men.
ST. LOUIS WILL BID
FOR BOTH CONVENTIONS
ST. LOUIS, Nov. 23.?St Louis has
raised $200,000 to care for the Demo
cratic and Republican National con
ventions If they can be secured. Com
mittees of business men will qttend
both the Democratic and Republican
National committee meetings on Dec.
7th and Dec. 14th, respectively at
Washington, and present the-claims
of the city.
SCHEfFLER IS
GROOMED FOR
POSTMASTER
CORDOVA,- Nov. 23. ? Postmaster
Harry 0. Steel yesterday announced
that he had resigned on November 8,
and at a meeting last night of the
Cordova Democratic Club, a resolu
tion was passed, endorsing the can
didacy of Charles H. Sheffler. Schef
Her is a member of the Democratic
Territorial commltteo, and with Post
master Stoei published the Cordova
Times. Ho formerly was a Juneau
prlntor.
It Is undorstood that the Juneau
Democrats have been asked to en
dorse Schetfler's candidacy, but ac
tion has not yet been taken by them.
Steel glvoB as his reasons for re
signing the fact that Postal Inspect
or Nell reduced tho clerical farce and
cut the salaries ouo third. Steel was
appointed under tbo Taft administra
tion.
YEP, WICK WAS
HERE; BUT HE
WAS EAST ASLEEP
Where Is Wickersham?
No, this Is not tho name of a new
play. It Is a simple, matter-of-fact
question.
Saturday morning at 3 o'clock the
Hicamsnip Auuiirai r,vuut> mutuvu ui
Juneau, on her way to Seattle from
Southwestern Alaska. The Empire
sent a representative to the steamer
to see the delegate. The reporter was
informed tlmt Delegate Wlckersham
was asleep. A few friends of the Del
egate, who called at the steamer were
told the same thing. The reporter
waited until the Admiral Evans went
out but the delegate failed to mako
an appearance.
In its Sunday morning issue, The
Dispatch, local champion of the dele
gate, published that Wlckersham "was
visited by a number of his friends,"
while the Admiral Evans lay at her
dock here. The Dispatch then pub
lished an outline of what Mr. Wlck
ersham cxpccUjl to do at Washing
ton when CoSgross moots.
Today, however, Emery Valontlne,
Mr. Wlckcrsham's right bower In ]
Southeastern Alaska politics, said
Judge Wlckersham was not aboard the
Admiral Evans. "Delegate Wlcker
sham .would never pass through Ju
ucau without getting up," said he. "I
don't care what time of the night-it
was, Mr. Wlckersham would have
made an appearance had he been on
the steamer. Ho has never passed
through Juneau without seeing his
frincds and associates."
Gus Gillcs, F. J. Cox, S. S. Jacobs.
Oak Olson and others who arrived in'
Juneau on tho Admiral Evans say the
delcgnto passed through on that boat.
And, again. The Empire repeats
that Mr. Wlckersham was a pasenger
on the Admiral Evans, that during the
timo the steamer was here ho was i
wrapped In the embrace of Morpheus,
and that ho Is on his way to Wash
ington, having this time, missed his
usual Interview at Juneau.
? ? ?
ANOTHER LARGE GOLD
CONSIGNMENT ON WAY
NEW YORK, Nov. 23.? Another
large consignment of gold is on its
way from Canada to J. P. Morgan &
Co., from the British government. In
October J. P. Morgan & Co.. received
$24,333,000 In gold by way of Canada,
and it wsb said at the time that a
similar shipment would follow. The
now shipment now coming Is suppos
ed be the one referred to.
41 arica..ii1npaii ftain.r
Alaska-Juneau stock was quoted on!
the New York exchange Nov. 15 at
13. However It dropped to 12V6 be
fore the close of the day. Thore were
1,100 shares traded.
Alaska Gold shares traded the same
day wore 6,000.
"HABEAS CORPUS"
DENIED BY COURT
Antonio Hernondez was this morn
ing denied a writ of habeas corpus
by Judge Robert W. Jennings. Hern
andes applied for the writ ten days
ago, after being confined In the feder
al jail on a committment from Ket
chikan which, he claimed, did not
state the crime of which ho was ac
cused and did not accuse him of a
crime under the laws of Alaska.
Hernandez alleged further that the
court at Ketchikan had no jurisdict
ion in his case.
Judge Jennings, as basis for his de
cision, stated that it is not necessary
that the exact time, place and char
acter of the crime be stated In the
committment transforming a man to
the Jail here, and that tho jurisdiction
of the Commissioner at Ketchikan
was undoubtedly established.
Her&nandez was Bent here for safe
keeping after having been arrested
on the charge of concealing a person
wanted for the commission of a
crime. The petition for a writ of
habeas corpus was filed after the
grand Jury adjourned without taking
any action in tho matter. Tho court
holds that the Hernandez case is one
to be. investigated by a Ketchikan
grand Jury.
"S
MARKGRAF,
OF TEUTON
NAVY, SUNK
COPENHAGEN, Nov. 23?The Ger
man battleship Markgraf has been
sunk In the Baltic Sea but other than
the fact that she carried 1100 men, de
tails ?were not received.
A Rotterdam dispatch said that
ono of Germany's newest dread
naughts had been sunk by a mlno in
the Baltic Sea, and it is believed that
the messago was describing the Mark
graf. Tho Rotterdam message said
that only thirty-thrco men lost their
lives.
UTAH COPPER
DOUBLES OUTPUT
AT LESS COST
BOSTON. Nov. 9.?Managing Direc
tor D. C. Jackllng of tho Utah Copper
Company, now in tho East, says to
the Boston News Bureau:
"There is no conceivable condition
that can arise that would prevent the
Utah Copper Company from making
I ins production at tho present rate
during tho life time of any one now
living and at a cost below 7 cents
| per pound.
"Our property from ono end to the
other, including a splendid organiza
tion, Is in better shape than ovor bo
fore. Wo ore mining our big tonnage j
easily; in fact, wo aro shipping 27,000!
tons a day with greater easo and with j
frnvor mpn Hinn was ronnired two or I
three years ago to ship half that ton
?ago. Notwithstanding the very much
larger scale of mining operations and
the big additions to our milling facili
ties. wo have fewer men on the pay
roll than in 1912. The mine itself is
in perfect condition. Our stripping
is so far advanced that we can do al
most anything that we desire in tho
way of mining.
"Wo will continue to strip the over
burden at the present rate for anoth
er year or so, but after that tho ex
cess stripping charge will disappear.
At the present time wo are charging
to operating costs 7% cents per ton
of ore agaiust our.' deferred Stripping
charge, but In tho not distant future
It is quito probablo that we will ex
tinguish all accumulations of deferred
stripping items by a charge against
surplus, and thereafter absorb all the
stripping costs in the operating ac
count
"There is little that is new or of
spectacular interest concerning our
property. We aim to make our quar
terly reports complote as to every es
sential detail. Tho stockholders aro
kept regularly informed as to produc
tion, grade of ore, costs, net profits,
:etc. We have a wonderful property
?practically a finished proposition as
It stands today."?(Boston News Bu
reau.)
MINE FOREMAN MARRIES.
Miss Clara Dunbar and George Cat
tanach, both residents of Juneau, were
married at the Presbyterian Manse
this afternoon at 2:30 by Rovorend
J. B. Stevens. Mr. Cattanach is one
of tho foremen at the Perseverance
mine.
ACCUSED OF LARCENY.
Charley Matthews, an Indian, was
arrested last night on a warrant
sworn out by Officer Forsyth of tho
police force, who charged him with
stealing a roll of bedding belonging
to E. H. Kaser and which he Is ac
cused of taking from the SL Nicholas.
Matthews was kept in the city jali
over night, but was taken to tho fed
oral Jail today, his hearing: was set
for 4:30 this afternoon.
John Bezman was this morning: re
leased of a charge of larceny of food
stuffs from a house occupied by Henry
jJeekarn on Lower Front stro/-.. Be:
man w-ts given" a bearing in the Com
missioner's court.
J. W. Rummell has filed suit against
F. B. Duncan to recover 356.30 alleg
ed to bo due on an account for ser
vices rendered. Tho complaint also
asks for costs of action. Rummell Is
represented by George Irving with
whom S. H. Mlllwee Is associated
Chris Tveten, a well known mer
chant of Petersburg, was operated
upon this morning at St. Ann's hos
pital for appendicitis. Mr. Tveten
was in tho hospital several weeks
ago for the same purpose but tho op
oration ha-1 to be deferred at that
time owing to complications. Ho is
retorted as > eating easily today. Dr,
1.. P. Dawes is in chare? 0?.the cane.
Mike Panovich who has been in
the hospital for two weeks as the
result of a fall through which he re
ceived a broken collar bone, was
discharged this morning and has re
turned to his work p.' Perseverance
mine.
Gibart Becker, who was injured
early in the summer while working
upon the claims of tho Alaska Gold
Belt Company is in the hospital again
as the result of his accident. Becker
recently filed suit against Charles
Goldstein, charging that one of Gold
stein's employees was responsible for
his injuries.
BALKAN GRAIN
HAS ARRIVED
IN ^GERMANY
LONDON, Nov. 23.?The first con
signment of Balkan grain, principal
ly from Bulgaria, has arrived in Ger
many, according to a dispatch from
Berlin, and it la" reported that the
principal German cities ore celebrat
ing tho event
HOPE HELD OUT
THAT ALLIE8 CAN
REACH SERBIANS
LONDON, Nov. 23.?Latest news
from the Balkans has revived hope In
England that Monastlr may hold out
long enough to cnablo the French and
British forces to effect a junction with
the Serbians, although tho latter are
slowly being beaten down at all oth
er points.
Borlln claims progress for the Gor
mnns in tho region southeast of Prls
tlna, Serbia with the capture of
8,000 Serbians, 44 cannon and 22 ma
chine guns.
KAISER SAID TO
BE READY TO ASK
PEACE MOVEMENT
IXJNDON, Nov. 23.?A dispatch to
tho Pall Mall Gazette from Borno says
there Is declared to be undoubted
foundriion for the report that Em
peror William will make an open of
fer of peace through President Wil
son after tho Emperor's coming stato
entry Into Constantinople.
0 ? ?
MASSACHUSETTS HOUSE i
HAS LARGE WAR ORDER
BOSTON, Nov. 23.?The Wcstfleld
Manufacturing .Company of Westfield,
*Masb., formerly part of tho Pope Man
ufacturing Company, is preparing to
execute a war order for tho machin
ing of shells said to amount to be-i
tween $1,000,000 and $2,000,000.
# * + ,
U. s. NOW HAS LARGE
CONTROL OVER HAYTI
? 4* *
WASHINGTON, Nov. 23.?The Hay
tian Senate has ratified the pending
treaty between tho United States and
j Hayti which gives the Washington
; government a large measure of con
trol over Haytian affairs, particular
ly the national finances.
AEROPLANE COMPANY INCREA8E
CAPITAL STOCK TO $5,000,000
?+_
NEW YORK, Nov. 23.?The Wright
Aeroplano Company filod papers 'in j
Now York State increasing the capi-i
tal stock from $1,000,000 to $6,000,000 j
the par valud being $100.
STRIKE COMPROMISED
NEW YORK, Nov. 23.?The freight
handlers and clerks of the Boston &
Albany railroad, who have been on
a strike for the last three weeks,
have returned to work. The differ
ences were compromised.
NEW ENGLAND WANT8
HIDES FROM INDIA
BOSTON, Nov. 23.?The Now Eng
land Hide & Leather Association will
send special committees to Washing
ton to seek to facilitate tho shipment
of hides and skins to this country
from India.
SWEDEN FORBIDS THE
EXPORTATION OF BUTTER
STOCKHOLM, Nov. 23.?Butter has
been added to the list of -articles
whose exportation is forbidden by tho
Swedish government, thus making an
embargo on the export of food pro
ducts virtually completo.
BOSTON HAS 725,000
POPULATION NOW
BOSTON, Nov. 23.? The recent
stato census shows Boston's popula
tion is in excess of 725,000.
ENGLISH ATTITUDE IS
INFAMOUS, HELLENIC I
MINISTER DECLARES
LONDON, Nov. 23,?The British
j foreign office stated today that no
blockade of Greek ports had been en
' forced as yet.
"The only thing we want Is peace;
you ore trying to forco us to makfe
war," said D. G. Rhallls, Greek minis
ter of Justice and the guiding spirit
In the cabinet of Premier Skonloudls,
in an interviow with the London Daily
Mail's Athens correspondent. "The
British government and the British
pros6," continued Rhallls, "are taking
a disgraceful and an Infamous atti
tude toward us. You are starving us.
Only today two more wheat vossels
havo boon stopped by you. Your gov
ernment, having plied fault on fault
and delay on delay, with only a few
thousand troops to help us want us
to step In and die; you want us to
succor you when no English soldiers
have shed their blood in Serbia^?
when scarcely an English rifle has
been flred. We don't wish to be an
other Belgium or Serbia. We love
Serbia, but before attempting to res
cue a drowning friend one should bo
sure that his effort is not morely a
useless sacrifice."
According to a dispatch from Salon
ika, the new Greek promlor will mom
entarily resign, owing to his country's
differences with Great Britain.
King Meets Kitchener.
According to an Athens dispatch to
;tho Paris Temps, Lord Kitchener 1b
quoted as saying to King Constantino:
"England will have four million men
In the field by March, Russia will have
six millions; therefore the war will
end as Germany will be decisively de
feated."
DAW80N B0Y8 ARE
KILLED IN THE WAR
DAWSON, Oct 25.?T telegram re
ceived from Gerald Grestock, of Lord
Strathcona's horse, now in Flanders,
reports that Jack Watt, of Dawson,
was killed by a stray bullet striking
oHaaU onrl enmlnir out r\f tit a hiloV
of his head. He was looked over a
parapet just as the Germans started
to vacate their trenches. He was
burled under the Union Jack with a
cross and a wiro netting above. Watt
and Grestock were the first Klondlk
ers to leave here for the front, im
mediately after the war was declared.
Watt leaves a widowed mother In
England, of whom he was the sole
support Klondlkcrs have been spon
taneously supporting her since he en
listed. Grestock also wlreB that ho
heard In London that Charley Phil
lips, formerly a mounted policeman,
who left last March and enlisted for
, the East African service, was killed,
there. Phillips was in the same com
] pany as Hart tho chief of tho Daw
| son fire brlgado, now in Africa. He
i has three, brothers in tho continental
< armies. Watt and Phillips aro the
] first men from Yukon so far to bo
killed Mn the war.
ON THE AL-KI.
SEATTLE, Nov. 23.?The steam
ship Al-Kl sailed for Juneau last
night. Her passengers for the capital
city include tho following:
William Bosch, J. P. Walsh, J. C.
Dupree and wife, L. B. Ruschor,, A.
?Johnson, Irene PIpp, Helen O'Connell,
Pauline Schuman, A. P. Lynch, Mrs.
A. Goff and daugher, W. H. Robinson
and wife, Etta Bailey, Alex Kouries.
J. H. King, George F. Miller. C. D.
Adams.
For Douglas?L. H. Metzgar, H. C.
Heacock.
EPISCOPALIANS MEET
AT CHURCH TOMORROW
There will bo a final meeting of
the men and women of Trinity church
tomorrow, for report and conference
concerning the mission which begins
Sunday next. The women will meet
in tho church at 3 p. m., and tho men
In tho basement at 8 p. m.
? ? ?
BIG AMERICAN CONTRACT
NEW YORK. Nov. 23.?The Amer
ican Locomotive Company has closed
a contract for 200,000 forgings for
large shells. The amount involved In
the order is approximately $5,000,000.
LATE NEWS BULLETINS
FRENCH STORE BURNS.
PARIS ? The Bon Marche store
burned to the ground today. The loss
is six million.
* ' '
NATIVE SON DECORATED; .
PARIS?Lieut. Charles Sweeney of
San Francisco ;hAs been awarded the
cross of the iSfclon of Honor for "ex
emplar? bravery": in leading a gallant
charge of the foreign legion of the
French army at Navarin Farm, one
of the engagements opening the bat
tle of Champagne.
GREAT COMPANY FORMING.
NEW YORK ? The National City
. bank will shortly announce the for
. mation of a fifty million dollar com<
pany with the leading financiers of
the country as stockholders, to de
velop foreign trado with tho United
states, It was learned today.
BANKRUPTCY PETITIONED.
SEATTLE?The Pacific Alaska Na
vigation Company, 0. Christnach and
C. 8. Hubbell yesterday filed a pe
tition In tho U. S. Court asking that
the ScJdovia Salmon company be
adjudged a bankrupt. It Is said the
Seldovta Salmon Company owes $80,
000.
THEATRICAL PEOPLE DIE.
COLUMBUS, Ga.?Six members of
the Kennedy Carnival company were
killed and many were injured when
tho theatrical special train collided
with a passenger train near hero early
' today.

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