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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, November 29, 1915, Image 1

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VOL. VIL, NO. 939. JUNEAU, ALASKA, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1916. PRICE TEN CENTS
jl y i
? ? * -
INTERNATIONAL WAR DIRECTOR PLAN OF ALLIED CHIEES
? ? - ? ? .. .'y i i>- " " '?
KRAUSC I
TO LEAVE 1
SEATTLE
SEATTLE, Nov. 29.?United States
Marshal Boyle said this afternoon that
he would send Edward Krause to Ju
neau tonight on tho Humboldt, unless
restrained by legal action. The war
rant for the removal of the alleged
murderer or James o. Plunkett, Ole
Moe and William Christie, doubtless
will be signed by Gov. Ernest Lister
early this evening and telegraphed
from Olympia.
Only the Issuance of an eleventh
hour write of habeas corpus by State
authorities can prevent Krause's re
moval on the Humboldt, it Is said. At
3 o'clock Krause's attorneys had made
no new move.
SCREAMS HEARD
MAY HAVE BEEN
"JIM" PIUNKEJT'S
If Edward Krause killed "Jim"
? *unkett, or knocked him senseless j
early on Sunday morning. October 24, ?
as the authorities here believe he
did. it took place about two hundred
yards north of the Juneau city dock,
on a launch, if evidence which came
to light today is found to be substan
tiated. j1
"Jim" Plunkett was last seen alive '
in Juneau Saturday night. October 22. j
He told Victor Manvllle that he was ?
going out with his launch "on a good ?
job." early on the following morn-;'
ing. which was Sunday. ? '
Hear Crlea for Help. (
At about 1:45 Sunday morning A. '
C. Mercer, a photographer who lives '
in the rear of his studio on the water- I
front near the Pacific Coast "0". was
awakened by cries for help, which
camo from the back of the studio, on
the water. Mr. Mercer said today
lie never heard anything so terrible
in his life. The victim seemed to be ^
p.wading for his life, and shrieks of
My God. ' and "Help, murder." fol- '
lowed in rapid succession. Mr. Mer- '
cer dressed and found Offlccr Dan 1
Harrington, who had been down near !
the ^.iwmill to quell a disturbance, j
The two could find nothing. Officer ,
Harrington declares the date was early ,
Sunday morning, October 24.
Heard Gasboat Leave.
J. R. Stevenson, a taxidermist, who
lives a short distance from Mercer's ?
studio, also on the waterfront, dls
tinctly heard a man's cries for help, .
at the same time. Stevenson had been
in bed about an hour, he said today, ,
when he was awakened bv the '
screams: "Help, murder." and "Oh. ,
My God.'" wero followed by several j
groans and then a stfll silence, he J
told The Empire today. Within a very
short time Stevenson heard a gasboat ,
chugging away. He says the sounds
were very distinct, and that he could
not have been mistaken as to what
was said. ,
J. D. Van Atta. a barber residing
next Mercer's also beard the
screaming. He said today that the
sounds were certainly those of a man
who was being killed.
PROTEST AGAINST
FOOTBALL PRESENTED
TO CHICAGO UNIVERSITY
CHICAGO, Xov. 29.? Members of
the faculty of the University of Chi
cago have made a protest against the
continuation of football as a college
sport. The protest 1s based upon a
report that the season closed Satur
day with 16 deaths recorded. The
deaths last year were 15. While it
Is admitted that the changes in the
rules have caused a reduction In the
number of deaths during the last
few years, the charge Is made that
the death toll is still too high to war
rant a continuation of the sport. It
Is urged not only that the University
of Chicago retire from the sport, but
that Its influence be used to induce
other universities, colleges and high
schools.
BRITISH HOLD UP
GLOVE SHIPMENTS
WASHINGTON*. Nov. 29.? At the
request of Senator Atlee Pomerene,
of Ohio, the State Department has
taken up. through diplomatic channels
the complaint of Charles S. Harrison,
of Canton, Ohio. On account of large
shipments of gloves being held up by
the British order-ln-council the Can
ton man finds himself unable to fill
contracts.
? ? ? I
+ WEATHER REPORT *
+ Yesterday. +
? Maximum?3.1 ?
+ Minimum?30. +
Cloudy: snow. *
+ Precipitation. .07 In. 4?
+ Today +
+ Maximum?34. *
+ Minimum?29. 4?
+ Cloudy: snow. +
+ Precipitation. .10 In. +
?????????????????
NIGHT LETTER
RATE MADE FOR
ALASKA CABLES
Uncle Sam has given Alaska a night
letter rate ovor the army cable.
Effective December 1. night letter
messages will bo accepted, giving the
sender fifty words for the same price
as charged during the daytime, for
ten words.
Charles F. Roberts, operator in
charge of the local cable office, an
nounced today, as follows: "Next
Wednesday the 'night letter' rate be
comes effective over the Washington
Alaska military cable and telegraph
system, under the same conditions as
now prevail over the Postal and West
ern Union Telegraph companies.
This rate permits a person to send
50 words for the same price as is now
charged for a regular ten word 'day'
message. The messago must bo in
English, as a higher rate is charged
for code messages. Those messages
may bo filed at the cable office at
any hour during tho day, and up to
the closing hour at night They arc
sent immediately upon being filed but
are held at point of destination un
til the following morning when de
livery is made. As an example, a
fifty-word *nlght letter' to Seattle will
be $1.61; to Chicago, $2.36; to New
Vork, $2.61, etc."
WOMAN CARRIES OUT
SUICIDE PACT: MAN
SWIMS BACK TO LAND
HOQUIAM. Wash., Nov. 29. ? As
die outcome of what the police believ
ed was a suicide pact, the body of;
Mrs. P. T. Murray is in the morgue
??ere and her husband Is in the city
fail, awaiting action on his case. The
:oup!e jumped into the Hoqutam riv
?r from the Poison Logging company's
lock. When they reached the cold
water, the police say. the man lost his
lerve and swam ashore. The wife
lrowned and her body was recovered
?y dragging.
MANN NOT TAKING
ORDERS FROM WILSON
WASHINGTON. Nov. 29.?President
Woodrow Wilson Is lining up the forc
js in support of his national defense
>rogram and recently invited the sup
tort of the Republicans to insute the i
tassage of the measure. He summon
a?*? T ?- jj OaWrumi; of New
Hampshire. leader of the Republican *
forces in the upper house and Repre
sentative James R. Mann, of Illinois,
eader of the minority in the House
jf Representatlvces, to a conference
it the White House. Representative
Mann, in an Interview published Sat
arday. says that he is participating
In a non-partisan campa.gn for great
?r national defense, bnt that he will
refuse to take orders from President
Wilson regarding national defense,
which he regards as one of the most
Important measures ever coming be-1
tore Congress.
QUAKES SAID TO
CAUSE PANAMA SLIDES
LIMA. Peru. Nov. 29.?Director ot'
the seismographlc observatory herej
says that he has discovered the cause
of the seismic disturbances constant-1
ly occurring with undulations from
west to east. He attributes to the'
disturbances the slides In the Panama
canal and says that they happened j
during the proximity of the equinoxes.
? ? ?
VALDEZ LOSES
WHARF CASE
VALDEZ, Nov. 29. ? Judge
Fred M. Brown decided against
the City of Valdez today in the i
wharf case, reversing the action
of the municipal court,. He held
that the City Council had no
authority or control over pri
vate wharf property. He also
held against the city for taxing
wharf property outside of the
city limits.
CHICAGO MAIL IS
COLLECTED BY AUTOS
CHICAGO, Nov. 29.?The new au
to truck service for mail collection
has been started. The street railway
mall cars, now in use in the city
will be discarded and all of the sta
tion collection will be done by auto
trucks.
ANOTHER BIG ORDER
FOR WAR MUNITIONS
XEW YORK. Nov. 29.? The La
Belle Iron Works has taken a contract
for about 2,000.000 steel rounds and
billets, which will bo used in manu
i facturlng war munitions. Dispatches
' from Pittsburgh place the value of
! the order at $12,000,000. The com
pany Is already working to full ca
pacity And must enlarge its plants
to fill the new orders some of wtych
are not to be filled until 1917.
'NATION-WIDE MISSION/
OPENS AT JUNEAU
The Nation-wide Mission opened at
: Trinity Church last evening with a
: good attendance and an Interested
; congregation.
The mission resumes this evening
i at 8 o'clock, and the sermon will be
| on the subject. "The Love of God.
; and How Wo Are Treating It"
WILL ASK
FOR BOND
ELECTION
? ,
The Juneau municipal authorities
hevo determined to ask Congress fori
authority to vote on the question of
bonding the city Idr $100,000 for the
purpose of securing money with whlcii
to build a new modern school house
on tho site of the present school
house on tho block bounded by Fifth
and Sixth and Seward and Franklin
streets. The plan to have tho build
ing erected by a private corporation
and leased to*"thu school district in
such a manner that the rentals would
finally pay for the building when it
would become the property of the
schools again has been decided to be
untenable.
"No fictitious arrangement could be
made that would obviate tho reality
that the school district would be con
tracting a debt," said a member of
tho city council in discussing the plan
that has been proposed for the school
authorities to give a lease on the
school site to a private corporation
which would borrow $75,000 or more
if needed to build a school building.
"If the transaction were a genuine
one. the lease price, in order to pro
vide the money that would be neces
sary to pay for the school building,
would be so high that it would be
subject to attack. It it were not a
genuine one and were fictitious, it
would bo subject to attack on - the
ground that the municipality has been
forbidden by the municipal Incorpora
tion act and by -the organic act to
contract any kind of an Indebtedness
beyond the anticipated revenues tor
tho year. This is tho statement of
lawyers who have looked into tho
matter.
"Tho result of an attack would be
that the banks or others who had
provided the money would not have
good security for their loan. It is far
different from the bridge proposition
or from the proposition to purchaso
a public utility, for Instance, where
the corporation and those who loaned
to it would have a revonuo producing
property for their security 1n tho
event of any contract with the city
being held to be illegal. No one but
the municipality would have any use
for a school building.
Some of those who believe that a
svt.?k .?? i. ahsntate and Im
mediate necessity urge that tnc
council and the school board should
adopt resolutions asking Congress to
authorize the municipality to vote up
on the question of bonding the city,
and to send the resolutions with a
full statement of tho case to Delegate
James Wlckersham. and ask hLm to
introduce and secure tho passage
through Congress, if possible, of the
authorization.
In support of tho feasibility of this
plan, it is pointed out that Valdez
secured the authority from Congress
to issue bonds for a dyke, and it is
urged that the history of the past and
the certalnlties of tho futuro are such
that the permanency of Juneau is
better established than was that of
Valdez. *
The school authorities agree that
Juneau's school facilities aro now far
from being adequate. Tho rooms are
over-crowded, and the equipment in
sufficient. It is said that if it wore
not for the fact that students are bo
ing cared for in other schools, it
would be absolutely impossible to
make the room that Is now avail
able answer the purposes of all. This
being tho case, it is confidently be
lieved that there would be no trouble
at all to convince Congress of the nec
essity for tho bond issue.
GERMANY AND
AUSTRIA FORM
TREATY AGREEMENT
LONDON. Nov. 29.? Tko (Morn
ing Post correspondent at Berne,
Switzerland, wires:
"I lear nfrom Vienna that German
has succeeded In inducing Austria
Chamber of Commerce at the.plenary
meeting to agree virtually to all her
demands regarding future cnonomlc
and commercial union between the
Austrian and Gorman empires.
"This union treaty is to have as
long duration as possible, and is to
contain a clause providing that the
Austro-German commercial policy
shall he based on a unified plan, and
that both countries shall negotiate
and conclude in common all cormcr
cial treaties with other states. Pref
erential tariffs between Austria and
Germany have also been provided for,
and these are eventually to pave the
way to complete free trade between
the' two empires.
"The two contracting parties have
the power to add to their number?
that is. to incorporate other states
into the alliance.
"It is stipulated that Germany and
Austria must agree before beginning
peace negotiations, upon the economic
demands they Intend to put forward,
and include Hungary in the Austro
German economic treaty. The exist
ing arrangement between Austria and
Hungary is being romodelled."
NEW YORK, Nov. 29.?Alaska Gold
closed today at 24%, Chlno at 59%,
Ray at-25%, Utah Copper at 79%. and
3utte & Superior at 73%.
Copper metal is at 20.
KERN IS
AGAIN TO
BE LEADER
WASHINGTON, Nov. 29.?Sonator
John W. Kern of Indiana was re-elect
ed chairman of the Democratic sen
ate caucus and floor leader, by unan
imous vote today at a conference of
the Democrats of tho upper house of
Congress. Senaor Key PIttman of
Novada was elected secretary of the
conference, to succeed Senator Wll
lard Saulsbury of Delaware, who said i
he wished to relinquish tho office.
Seleation of vicc-i&alrraan, presi
dent pro-tempore and (he senato com
mittee assignments vWere postponed '
until Wednesday.
? ?? i
GRAND JURY IS
CALLED TO HEAR
CROWLEY CASE '
? f i
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 29. ? The '
feodral grand jury was called into ses- '
sion today to take evidence in the <
case of Fay C. Crowley, alleged engin
eer of dynamite plots against shipping '
on the Pacific Coast.
Louis J. Smith, characterized as 1
tho Ortie E. McManlgal of tho case, 1
Is believed to bo on his way here I
from tho East, In charge of federal <
agents. <
<
WILSON'S ADDRESS <
WILL POINT OUT I
BOMB OUTRAGES <
1
WASHINGTON. Nov. 29.?President 1
Wilson's forthcoming address to Con- '
gresH will call attention to the explo- 1
sion8, flrcB and other crimes alleged <
to have been porpctratcd on Amori- I
can Industrial plants.
WASHINGTON
WILL BE WET
ITJS BELIEF
SEATTLE, Nov. 29?Though rumors I
liavo been flying thick nnd fast for <
three weeks that the Washington i
State Supreme Court has decided to i
declare the prohibition law In this j
State Invalid and unconstitutional, es
pecially the Initiative and referendum ,
?^<w>_ofi.heiuaw. no decision has been 1
rendereur The opinion has been ex
pected dally for two weeks. It Is
known that Chief Justice George E.
Morris Is writing the decision which
many believe will be announced to
morrow.
Betting Odds Against Law.
, PORTLAND. Ore., Nov. 29. ? Tho
betting here Is two to one that the
Washington Stato Supremo court will
knock out the prohibition law in that
State. The impression has prevailed
here for some time that the court |
stands five to three against the law. j
HUGHE'S NAME
OMITTED AT HIS
OWN REQUEST
LINCOLN. Neb.. Nov. 29.?Tho Sec
retary of State has decided that tho
telegraphic request of Justice Charles
E. Hughes that his namo shall not
appear on the Republican ticket as
a candidate for President in tho pri
maries next Spring entitles him to
have It omitted, and the name will
not appear among those of the Presi
dential candidates.
Roosevelt To Run
LINCOLN, Nob.. Nov. 29. ? The
name of Theodore Roosevelt will ap
pear on the ballot as a candidate for
President on the Progressive ticket
at the primaries in this State next
year. Tho name was filed two years
ago.
M'Call May Contest
BOSTON. Nov. 29. ? Tho McCall
element of the Republican party in
Massachusetts will contest with the
Weeks-Lodge-Crane-Gardner element
for the control of tho delegation to
the Republican National convention.
If they win they will present Gov.
Samuel W. McCall as a candidate for
President
It is hoped that McCall would bo
satisfactory to Massachusetts Progres
sives.
Ohloan Picks Burton.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 29. ? Repre
sentative N. E. Matthews, of tho Fifth
Ohio precinct, who is the only Ohio
Republican .*f the lower branch of
Congress now in Washington, is great
ly enthused over what ho regards as |
a fine prospect that the Buckeye
State will get the next Republican
nomination for tho Prosidoncy.
"I believe," he said today, " that
Senator Burton io in a better position
to win that nomination than any oth-.
or man who is montioned.
"All of tho Republican elements in
OhJo are for Burton, and-I expect to
see team work that will sustain the
state's reputation for effectiveness in
the national- arena."
GREECE MAY DISBAND
ARMY IN NEAR FUTURE
ROME, Nov. 29.?An Athens dis
patch says that a decree ordering the
demobiliratlon*"of the Greek army will
soon bo issued. Only 50,000 men will
bo kept \mdor arms.
SUB STOPS
SHIP THEN
GIVES AID
NEW YORK, Nov. 29.?A Turkish
submarino stopped the British passen
ger ship B&rulos in the Mediterran
ean, and after twenty-five had boon
drowned, assisted in rescuing many
of the two hundred and fifty passen
gers who had jumped overboard in
panic, according to Mrs. Eleanor
Franklin Egan, on eye-witness, who
arrived from Europo yesterday on the ?
Rteamhhlp New York.
Mrs. Egan said: "On the submar
ine's dock I saw a number of men
with an ofilcor whom I took to be un >
Austrian. The aubmarlno had her
collapsible lifeboat out and the sub
marine crew were pulling people out
of the water on to her deck. Tho
officer was holding up his hands,
shouting to tho pooplo in the water to
be calm. I heard bim say in perfect
English: 'For God's sako go back
to your ship, we are. not murderers'."
Mrs. Egan told newspapermen that
she witnessed many heart-rending
scenes. "One woman," sho said, "who
md lost her threo children by throw
ng them overboard, went stark mad
in tho steerage. On the boat was a
troupe of Japaneso acrobats. One
of them, a woman, with an infant
:hild was seon trying to cling to the
side of the ship. She was surrounded
jy other passongeiy. A rope was
hrown into her hands but looking
lp, she exclaimed: 'Don't mind me,
[ belong to no ono and have no one
to care for me, help someone else.'
With theso words sho passed the rope
to another woman and with her babe
n hor arms, sank out of sight."
NEAR EAST
EMBARRASSES
THE ALLIES
LONDON, Nov. 29.? The war in
Serbia and the Near Cast situation
continues to present the most embar
rassing problems of the war against
the Teutonic Allies. While the French
and English are holding their ground
In South Serbia, and the Serbians
arc continuing to present formidable
opposition to tno nfvaaiug nusumrei
man and Bulgarian armies, the sltua
Hon is admittedly grave. The Jnvad-i
ers have punished the Serbian forces,
which have been practically cleared
from northern and central Serbia, se
verely. and apparently today tlioy
arc able to send enough men Into
the country to defeat the combined
forceB that are now on Serbian soil.
Therefore, the defense of Serbia
depends upon the ability of the Eng
lish, French and Italians to reinforce
tholr armies now In that country, or
the entrance of Greece or Rumania
or both In tho war. In order to Justi
fy a strong reinforcement of the Al
lies' forces in Serbia, there must at
least bo hearty co-operation on the
part of Greece In the forwardiug of
men and supplies from Salonikl. Rus
sia's attack on Bulgaria has been slow
in developing, and it is feared that
It cannot bo depended upon to relieve
tho situation on account of tho rapid
ity with which eventualities are oc
curring in Serbia.
i
Greece to Aid
While she Is not expected actively
to participate in the war until a do
cl8lve_chcck shall have been delivered
to tho Austro German and Bulgarian
forces in Serbia, there seems to bo
the utmost confidence at the London
war office that Greece will place no
obstacle In the way of tho Allies in
their defense of Serbia. However* a
new phase of tho situation has de
veloped in the refusal of Greece to
consent to tho withdrawal of the Ser-'
blau, French, British and Italian fore-:
es now In Serbia Into Greek Mace
donia, sol that they would bo near
their base at Saloniki, and thus trans
fer the battlefield to Greek territory.
This May Not Be Mattrlal
Information received from the front
Saturday night and yesterday that
the Serbians have checked the invad
ers and retaken Krushevo, and that
the French have actually gained ter
ritory in tho region near Krivolak
may rcako it unnecessary to withdraw
from Serbia at all. The Allies have
large forces at Saloniki, and more
en route there, which could be trans
ferred to Serbia quickly, if assured
that there would be no hindrance to
the transportation of ammunition and
supplies.
It is believed that If the invaders
can be forced to quit advancing and
entrench that it would be a very
short time until Greece and Rumanhj
would enter the war. This would
permit a rear attack on Bulgaria, and
it is believed, result In an early re
treat of the AustnvGerman forces bnck
across the Danube.
East and West Situations Satis
factory -
The Allies are having no difficulty
in holding their positions along the
front in Belgium and France, and
thoy are constantly making gains,
small In any one place but of consid
erable importance in the aggregate.
Each week ilnds the French and Brit
(Continued on Page Six)
TEUTONS SAY
! SERBIA NOW
IS CONQUERED
BERLIN, Nov. 29.?'With the reoc
cupation of Rudnik, the capturo of
2700 Servian prisoners and the flight
of the scanty remains of the Servian
army Into the Albanian- mountains,
Germany's operations against Serbia
have been brought to a close, soys an
oiflclal statement, Issued today by the
Gorman general staff.
There operations open complete
communication with Bulgaria and the
Turkish empire, It is asserted.
KAISER MEETS
AGED RULER OF
AUSTRIA-HUNGARY
BERLIN. Nov. 29.?Emperor Will
lain arrived In Vlanna today and paid
a personal visit to Emperor Franz
Josef. He was received at the rail
road station by Archduke Charles
Francis, heir to the Austro-Hungarlan
throne. Archduke Franz Salvatore,
and Archduke Charles Stephen. An
immense crowd gathered to greet the
German leader. It Is reportod from
Vienna that the meeting between the
emperors took place in Schoenbrunn
Castle was a most cordial one, al
though the monarchs could hardly
master their emotions.
PEACE TALK IS
USELESS AT THIS
TIME, SAYS PARIS
? 4*
PARIS. Nov. 29.? French newspa
pers and statesmen agree that it
would be usoloss for President Wood
row Wilson or any other neutral to
move in tho Interest of peace until
the German army shall have been de
feated at all points. "Thore can bo
no guarantee of peace -in Europe as
long as Prussian militarism contin
ues to prevail in Germany," said an
official of the foreign office, who ad- j
mltted that he was quoting Premier
Briand. "France, Great Britain, Rus
sia. Italy and Belgium have paid dear
ly in life luid treasure In preparing
themsekves to beat down a military
machine that Germany has been two
score of yearR Increating. Why should
the final conflict be postponed, now
that we are prepared, until some fu
ture time when It would probably
cost us more to roach what wo have
attained In the last sixteen months
than we have paid in this Instance.?"
The official added that there is ab
solutely no division in sentiment
among the people of tho countrlos
that arc allied In the war against
Gorman militarism and absolutism.
"Thoset of all shades of political opin
ion In all of them insist that the dis
armament of Germany must be the
result of tho war before ear can bo
given to overtures of peace," he said.
Continuing he declared:
"It Is significant that alT these pro
ceedings In behalf of peace are pro
ceeding from Germany, Austria and
Turkey, and not from France, England
Russia. Italy. Belgium or 8erbia."
I V '
PEACE CAMPAIGN
IN UNITED STATES
WASHINGTON, Nov. 23. ? That a
systematic cnmpalgn to influence tho
United States to move for peaco In
Europe Is In progress In the United
States^ and that it is being waged
with the knowledge and consent of
German and Austrian representatives
in this country is the belief of offic
ials and newspaper men in this city.
Thus far, Austro-Hungarian societies
have been most active In pushing the
propaganda. Mmo. Schwimmor, a
wealthy Hungarian, who has been en
deavoring to promote peaco, and with
that end in viey Is urging President
Wilson to take the initiative, conferr
ed with tho President Saturday af
ternoon. She says that at least two
neutral European countries arc ready
to co-cperato with tho President should
he take the Initiative.
TERRE HAUTE, Ind., Nov. 29.?
| Thomas Ferguson, county auditor
elect of Vigo County, was Indicted to
lay by the grnnd Jury, charged with
i embezzlement of funds of the school
township of Lost Creek.
ALLIES TO
HAVE WAR
MANAGER
LONDON, Nov. 29. ? Tho Daily
Chronicle assorts today that a great
was council in which Lord Kitchener
and tho leading generals of all the
allied forces will take part, is to be
hold in Paris, and that this fore
shadows tho organization of an Inter
national stafT to direct the future op
erations of the war.
Partial confirmation of the Chron
icles' story reached London from
Paris this evening, shortly after
Lord Kitchener arrived there. When
Bnglnnd's war director reached the
French capital, on his return from
Athons, he was given a great ovation,
thousands of people going to the rail- 4
road station to greet him.
"Post" Agitates Peace 8tand.
Tho belief that tho time has ar
rived for tho allies to begin-to define
clear and definite terms of peace, is
expressed today by the Evening Post,
in an editorial, on the ground that
there then would' be less chance of
lossing in negotiations what has been
gained on tho sea and in the Hold.
The Post contends that without "sell
ing the skin before killing the boar,"
It may bo assumed that victory for
the allies is assured, if only bccanso
without unduo strain Great Britain
could maintain a naval blockade in
definitely, and, it is contended, history
has shown that such pressure alone,
in tho end would result in victory.
SAYS AUSTRIA IS
DESIRING PEACE
ROME, Nov. 29.?Austria Is endeav
oring to conclude separate peace, ac
cording to the Tribuna today. Tho re
port is received, according to that pa
per, from a trusted source and tho Tri
buna, for that reason, it says, is in
clined to give it credence.
THOUSANDS SUFFER
IN WARSAW FROM
, RAVAGES OF WAR
WARSAW, Nov. 29.?Hundreds of
thousands of the civilian population
of tho Warsaw district of Poland are
suffering for want of food and a con
siderable percontago of this number
to otnt Homeless, living in -huts, caves,
;and abandoned trenches.
AMERICAN MINISTER
REPORTED KILLED
IN TURK MASSACRE
BASEL. Switzerland, Nov. 29.?The
Rev. Francis H. Leslie, an Amorican,
and other foreigners were killed by
TurkB at Urfa, Mesopotamia, while
trying to defend Armenians from the
Turks, according to a story printed
today in the newspaper Nouvelles de
! Basel.
ENGLAND'S NAVY
BECOMING MORE
POWERFUL DAILY*
NEW YORK. Nov. 29.?Word re- ?
celved by the New York World from
a returning; correspondent ts that nd
(1 It ions this month to the British fleet
are many times greater than the ves
sels that have been destroyed in the
war. One yard? Walker's on the
Tyne?has launched, equipped and
sont to the practice ground for offic
ial test a battleship suporlor in size,
armament, rapidity ofi operation and
resistance powers to the Queen Eliza
beth, the design for which was decid
ed upon last January. In addition to
this, this yard has built a battle cruis
er, stronger than any previously afloat
also decided upon last January, sev
eral very fast light cruisers of the
Arethusa class, and many destroyers,
torpedo boats and other war craft.
The correspondent says that this
is but a sample of what has been ac
complished In ship yards throughout
tho United Kingdom. He says that the
ships that have been launched and
sent into the fleet, and those which
will be added to It within the next
three months constitute a navy more
. powerful than that of any other navy
in tho world.
LATE NEWS BULLETINS
'
PRESIDENT WAS DELAYED
WASHINGTON? President Wilson
returhcd this morning from New York,
where he witnessed the Army-Navy
game. His train was delayed by a
freight blockade. Airs. Edith Boiling
Gait remained in New York.
WHEAT COMMANDEERED
OTTAWA ? Tho Canadian govern
mont has commandeered all hlgh-grad<
wheat in elevators from Port William
on Lakuc Superior, to the AtlantU
coast.
WICKERSHAM TO PORTLAND
SEATTLE? Delegate Wickershan
of Alaska loft" today for Portland
whero he will visit for two days be
fore starting for Washington.
TOURIST HOTEL8 BURNED
LOS ANGELES ? Fire today df
stroved the principal hotols and so\
oral business bouses at Avalon, Cata
I lina -Island.
i ~~?
SPORTING EDITOR DIES.
"SEATTLE?Frank P. Glbb, sporting
editor of Tbo Star, died today of
pneumonia, after a throe-day Illness.
He was 21 years old.
WAREHOUSES BURN
, SAN FRANCISCO ? About *200.
: 000 In damage was done by a fire
. which destroyed several lumber ware
houses in China Basin Saturday af
ternoon.
l
, SEATTLE PIERS THREATENED
SEATTLE ? Federal agents and
Plnkorton detectives are greatly work
ed up over on anonymous letter re
cently received by Dodwell & Com
?* pany, In which the writer threatens
'? to blow up Seattle's waterfront ,

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