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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, December 02, 1915, Image 1

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TIIK ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. VIL, NO. 942. JUNEAU, ALASKA, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1916. PRICE TEN CENTS -
BRITISH MILITARY LEADER MAKES RECOMMENDATIONS
KRAUSE
TO ARRIVE
TOMORROW
Edward Krause. thought to be the
murderer of William Christie. J. 0.
Flunkett. Ole Moo and a Japanese
watchman at a Wrangell Narrows
Cannery, will reach Juneau tomorrow
afternoon early, on the Humboldt
from Seattle, from where he was
extradited on a charge of murdering
Christie. He is in charge of Deputy
Marshal Cook and three guards. It
is expected that other offlcers will
meet the Humboldt at Douglas and
accompany Krause to Juneau, where
an automobile will be in waiting to
take Krause to the federal Jail, but
the Humboldt may proceed to Juneau
direct if the authorities decide that
this is necessary.
The launch Murrellet returned to
?day from a 10-day search for traces
of Plunkett or his boat, the Lue. Ar
thur Nordley and Lyle Davis said this
afternoon they learned at Windham
Bay that Plunkett had been seen
there, with his boat, "about a month
or six weeks ago," but the date could
not be definitely fixed by the men
with whom they talked, they said.
They also visited Hobart Bay. and
the "hole in the wall." where it was
sal I the I.ue had been seen, but noth
ing was found there.
Others Saw Boat.
The gas boat Bee reports having
seen Capt. Plunkett's gas boat passing
Grand Island, below Taku. on the
morning of October 24. Sunday. The
master of the Bee says he tried to
wave the Lue back, because of rough
weather that was ahead of her. but
she paid no attention to the signals.
This circumstance, together with
the fact that the letter which was
signed by J. 0. Plunkett and receiv
ed by the customs officials was mail
ed from Wrangell October 25. and
the further fact that the skiff that
has been Identified as belonging to
("apt. Plunkett's boat, the Lue. was
found at Petersburg, and the still fur
ther fact that Edward Krauso was
in Petersburg shortly after that time
and took the Humboldt at that place
for Juneau, has caused the theory to
be advanced that the wreck of the
Lue can not bo far from Petersburg.
It is contended by those who hold .
this theory that Krause left the Lue
In Plunkett's skiff, and that he would
not purposely give himself a long
distance row in a small boat.
FAMILIES ARE
MOVING; SLIDE
AGAIN FEARED
???
Fearing a repetition of the great
snowslido of April, 1896. when the
Gilbert Mill was carried away in Sil
ver Bow Basin, the tenants of one of
the apartment houses at the Persever
ance mine have been ordered to va
cate as soon as possible.
The house Is owned by the Alaska
Gastineau Company and is directly in
the path of the old slide. The prin
cipal cause for nneasiness Is the fact
that there is more snow at the Perse
verance at present than there was
last Spring when the last slides oc
curred and the snow Is wet and very
heavy.
Eight families have been residing.
in the house and they will have to
move to Juneau, as there are no more
apartments for them in the camp.
The Gilbert Mill was one of the old
est mills in the Harris mining district,
and was the first mill to be built on
the Perseverance property. The mill
w* * not working at the time of the
slide, but the watchman was burled
beneath thousands of tons of snow
and wreckage and his body was not
found until late in the summer.
NEW FOUADLAND
-GOES DRY BY
FIVE TO ONE
??
ST. JOHNS. New Foundland, Dec.
2.? The official count shows that
the drya won the New Foundland
election on the question of prohibi
tion by fire to one. The prohibition
vote was more than 25.000 .
British Columbia To Settle Own
Matters
VICTORIA. B. C.. Dec. 2.? Premier
Sir Richard McBride when appoached
by a committee of pohlbitlonists,
claiming to represent 33,000 petition
ers for a plebiclte on the liquor ques
tion. which called his attention to
the vote in New Foundalnd and Al
berta. said that "the government will
solve the question iself without im
porting legislation from other provin
ces."
EXTRA INSPECTOR
FOR NORTHWEST URGED
WASHINGTON. Dec. 2. ? It was
learned today that the department of
commerce will urge an amendment
to the present steamboat inspection
law to provide eleven inspectors in
stead of ten as now provided. The ad
ditional Inspector would be located at
Seattle, and would have jurisdiction
over Seattle. Portland. St. Michael.
Alaska, and Juneau, Alaska.
? ?? + + + ??? + *?>?????
+ +
* THE WEATHER ?
+ For the past 24 hours, ending +
* 3:00p. m. today: *
+ +
?r Maximum?42. +
* Minimum?34. +
+ Cohxdy?Rain?.85 in. +
+ " ?
REWARD NOT |
DUE CARLSON
BISHOP SAYS
KETCHIKAN. Dec. 2.?Erlck Carl-,
son. manager of the Northern Hotel
lodging department, who was one of
tho men who talked with Edward
Krause during the time he was mas
querading here two weeks ago as Ole
Moe, has been refused the $500 re
ward posted for ".Miller," and has been
sharply reprimanded by United States
Marshal Harry A. Bishop for falllug
to report his Information sooner than
he did.
Carlson demanded the reward as
soon as he learned Krauso had been
taken from the Jefferson at Seattle."
The reply he received was as follows:
Juneau. Alaska.
Juneau. Alaska.
November 19, 1915.
Mr. Erlck Carlson.
Ketchikan. Alaska.
Dear Sir:?
1 am in receipt of your letter or
the 16th Inst, claiming the reward of
$500.00 for information leading to the.
arrest of Krause and enclosing affi
davit of yourself and McQulllian In
connection therewith.
In reply I wish to advise that the
reward was for the arrest of one
Miller who took William
Christie from Treadwell on a pur
ported subpoena for attendance on
the District Court at Juneau, and was
not for "Information leading to the
arrest." You had knowledge of
Krause's presence in Ketchikan, and
had you arrested him and he proved to
bo Miller (which there is very little'
doubt he is) you would have been en
titled to and would promptly have re- ,
celved the reward of $500.00. but you
waited until he departed from Ketchi
kan and then, as you claim, reported
the facts alttibugh your affldavis
shows that you conversed with Krause
over the Christie matter and you must
have known that he was at least want
ed by the authorities of the Federal
Government.
There is a serious question wheth
er you are not yourself liable to pros
ecution for not divulging your infor
mation promptly on learning same.
Very respectfully,
H. A. BISHOP.
D. S. Marshal.
SEATTLE SLEUTHS
WILL GET REWARD
*
In all probability Detectives Ben
Cornielson and Ralph Jones of Seat
tle will receive the reward of $500 for
arresting Edward Krausse, it was said
at the United States Marshal's office
today. On information first published
in The Empire, and cabled to Seattle
by local news correspondents, Cor
nielson and Jones met the steamship
Jefferson and nabbed the fugitive as
he was coming ashore. The officers
had not been instructed to meet the
Jefferson and did so on their own
volition. The United States marshal
at Seattle had no representative to
meet the steamer, it is said.
Marshal Bishop has received appli
tions from others who seek the re
ward, including Louis Matson of Ket
chikan, Thomas Strand, who writes
from Seattle that he pointed out to
the officers, and Carlson.
BADLY BURNED
BY EXPLOSION
WOMAN MAY DIE
Mrs. Walter La France and her two
small sons were severely and pain
fully burned late yesterday afternoon
when a bucket of coal tar. which had
been put in the oven to soften, ex
ploded as Mrs. l^a France opened the
door.
A carpenter who has been working
on the roof of the La France house
on Wflloughby Avenue had asked that;
the tar be warmed up so that It would
be soft enough to use and the woman
put it In the oven. When the door
was opened the tar-gas exploded and
deluged Mrs. La France with the1
scalding syrup-like liquid. Her cloth
ing caught Are at the same time and
screaming she ran out into the street
and threw herself Into the mud in
her effort to put out the flames. The
two boys who were standing near
| were badly but not dangerously burn
; od about the face and hands.
Mrs. La France was rushed to St.
Ann's hospital where she has been
suffering the most intense agony. Dr.
P. J. Mahone who has charge of the
case, stated today that practically all
of the skin had been burned off her
lower limbs, and right side and arm.
as well as her face. The flesh is
not seriously burned except in a few
places, but th^ enormous loss of
skin may prove fatal.
GALLINGER SAYS SENATORS
LOOKED FOR VETO OF
.LA FOLLETTE SEAMEN'S BILL
NEW YORK, Dec. 2. ? The New
York Sun has received from Senator
Jacob H. Galllnger of New Hampshire
a statement in whidh he asserts that
the approval of the La Follette Sea
man's measure was facilitated by as
surances received by "certain Sena
tors" that President Wilson would ve
to it.
STOCK QUOTATIONS.
NEW YORK. Dec. 2.?Alaska Gold
26%. Chino 53%. Ray 25%. Utah
77%. Butte & Superior 73%. Copper
metal Is at 20.
"CABARET" TONIGHT.
Tonight is the date of tho Elks'
cabaret-dance, for Elks and their la
dles. It is being given in Elks' hall,
in honor of those who took part in
the Elks' show recently.
COIN WILL
FLOW INTO
TERRITORY
Figures compiled from data In the
office of Territorial Treasurer Smith
and by J. H. Cobb as attorney for the
Territory show that thirty-five of tho
canning companies that have entered
into the agreement to abide by the
decision in the test tax case which is
now in the courts, have made their
returns showing the amounts of taxes
paid by them to aggregate $115,905.58.
These figures do not include figures
from the seventeen canneries of tho
Alaska Packers' Association, which
have not yet been fully clmplled ex
cept for the year 1914. The tax due
from tho Alaska Packers for that
year totals $41,072.04. Tho remain
der of taxes due will undoubtedly
bring the total to at least $200,000,
according to a statement made by
Mr. Cobb today.
"There are eighteen canneries op
erating in Alaskan waters who have
not entered the agreement"to -abide
by the test suit," said Mr. Cobb, "and
of these only one has paid the tax.
Proceedings will bo started at an
early date against the remaining de
linquent for the purpose of compell
ing them to pay the tax due."
Details of the mining taxes are not
all In but it is believed that when the
Legislature is again in session there
will be a surplus revenue on hand
that will total $200,000 above all ap
propriations made.
RECORD CHICAGO
BANK DEPOSITS
?+?
CHICAGO. Dec. 2.?The total bank
deposits here aggregate $1,160,000,000
or $40,000,000 above the last previous
call date, and the largest ever report
ed officially. The actual high record,
however, occurred Just before this
autumn's crop movement.
McADOO WANTS COMPTROLLER
OF TREASURY TO REMAIN
WASHINGTON. Dec. 2.?Secretary
of the Treasury W. G. McAdoo will
oppose the recommendation of the
federal reserve council that the office
of the comptroller of the treasury
be abolished.
SYRACUSE BEATS THE
OREGON AGRICULTURALS
PORTLAND. Dec. 2.?The Univer
sity of Syracuse team defeated the
Oregon Agricultural College football
eleven 2S to 0 on Multonomah Field
yesterday. The Easterners scored 14
points in the first quarter by playing
the Corvallis aggregation off its feet.
JEFFERSON SAILS.
?+?
Southbound passengers on the Str.
Jefferson this morning included the
following who were booked from Ju
neau: Mr. and Mrs. Nell Ward, Will
iam Albight, Thomas O. Nelson and
seven second class for Seattle.
Suit has been filed by Edward Har
rigan against Frank Goggin to re
cover the sum of $195 alleged to bo
due for services rendered.
AMERICAN SHIPPING
IS GROWING
BOSTON, Nov. 14. ? The United
States is now the second largest mer
chant marine-'nation of the world,
owning and operating about 6400 ves
sels, aggregating over 8,700,000 tons,
compared with Great Britain's own
ership of 11.350 vessels, aggregating
about 21.300.000 tons, and stated that
of the total of 8,700.000 tonnage of
vessels owned and operated in the
United States, about 2,500,000 tons
operated on the Great Lakes.
Tne rouowmg lame gives vessel
tonnage of the principal maritime
nations of the world as of June 30,
last:
Nation No. Vessels Tonnage
Great Britain 11,353 21,274,068
United States 6,410 8,710,648
Germany ... 2,166 4,706,027
Norway 2,174 2,529,188
France 1,539 2,285,728
Japan 1,155 1,826,068
Italy 1,177 1,736,545
Holland 809 1,622,547
Sweden ....... 1,462 1,122,883
Russia 1,256 1,054,762
Austria 433 1,018,210
Greece - 510 908,725
Spain 642 899,204
Denmark 835 S54.996
Theso figures include only vessels
i of 100 tons .gross and upwards.
Most of the shipyards in the United
States are now running full, there be
ing under construction about 36 gen
eral cargo steamers, aggregating 175,
000 tons, and some 22 bulk oil steam
i ers. aggregating about 223,000 tons
making a total of approximately 400,<
000 tons exclusive of government ves
sels, barges, scows, tugs, etc.?(Bos
ton News Bureau.)
FUNERAL TODAY.
Funeral services were held this af
ternoon at the Catholic church foi
Peter Rogulj. who was killed at the
: Perseverance mine Tuesday when h<
j fell in front of a moving ore train
A large body of friends attended th<
services at the church and accom
, panied the body to Evergreen cerae
tery, where interment was made.
CORDOVA. Nov. 22.?The first bit
snow fall of {he season occurred las
night, and the shovel brigade wai
busy this morning ^clearing the side
walks of the mantle of white whicl
covered them.?(Cordova Times.)
BRADLEY NOW
HEADS JUNEAU
GOLD PROPERTY|
'The mauagoment of the Troadwell
and the Alaska Juneau mines was
separated yesterday when Philip R.
Bradley was succeeded as superin
tendent of the Troadwell mines by
Russell G. WajTand. formerly assist- I
ant superintendent of that company, c
Mr. Bradley, former superintendent of r
tho Treadwell and Alaska Juneau t
mines has become general superln- \
tendent of the Alaska Juneau mine c
and will devote his energies to the j
development of that property. Mr. f
Bradley will rotaln connection with
the Treadwell mlnos, however, as con- I
suiting engineer. t
L. H. Metzgor, formerly connected 1
with the Goldfleld Consolidated and 1
other Nevada properties In which John t
H. Mackenzie is Interested, has sue- I
ceeded Mr. Wayland as assistant sup- 1
erintendent of the Treadwell mines. *
Ho arrived on the AI-Ki Saturday.
Mr. Bradley 1ms been connected "
with tho Treadwell mines since early
In 1914, and succeoded Robert A. Kin- j
zio as superintendent of the Treadwell
and Alaska Juneau mines a little more 1
than a year ago. He Is a brother of
F. W. Bradley, president of the two 1
properties. Before coming to Alaska (:
he was engaged In mining in Call- '
fornla. Like his brother, F. W. Brad- 3
ley, he Is a graduate of the University v
of California.
Russell G. Wayland, the now Troad- '
well superintendent, has been with c
j tho Treadwoll mine for several years, 11
i and a little more than a year ago he c
succeeded E. P. Kennedy as assist- !"
ant superintendent.
The separation of the management ^
of the Treadwell and Alaska Juneau 1
mines was found necessary on ac- '
count of the active construction and 1
development work that Is being In- 3
augurated on tho Juneau side of tho ; u
j channel, which hereafter will require i
practically all of the attention of Gen- ^
| oral Superintendent Bradley.
ITOW TO DIE
FEBRUARY 181
v
Unless the president of the United
j States intervenes, or the supreme
court orders a review of the case, O.
Itow will be hanged in Juneau on
Friday, February 18, by the United v
States Marshal, for tho murder of
Frank Dunn, at cannery ?
? m juty. lviz.'
For the second time since he was
convicted three years ago of Dunn's 1
1 murder. Itow this morning heard pro- '
nounccment of sentence to die on the *
gallows, in expiation of his crime. ?
And for the first time since he was ''
arrested, the little Japanese showed '1
emotion. When asked by Judge Hob-!1
ert W. Jennings, through an lnterpre-j!
ter. If ho had anything to say, Itow re- (
plied that ho had nothing to say,
but upon hearing the date of his ex
ecution his head dropped and ho mut- '
tered to the interpreter that he "was
sorry that one of the boys at the can
nery tried to run away." This was the
motive for the crime. Dunn was going <
to Jump his contract at the Dundas <
cannery, because of unwholesome Hv- <
Ing conditions, and Foreman Itow had I
been told that Frnnk wns going to i
Blip away at night. It was then that (
Dunn was hauled out of a bunkhousc <
land held by two Japanese while Itow i
ran him through with a keen-edged c
sword.. Ed. Fushlml, oue of the ac- S
complices, got twenty years for man
slaughter and N. Nakayama. the other c
alleged accessory, escaped trial when c
the main witnesses wore discharged i
after How's trial. '
John H. Cobb, counsel for Itow, has i
sixty days In which to file appeal to 1
the.supreme court of the United States <
and It Is believed he will take this I
action. The Clfcult Court of Appeals
affirmed the judgment of Judge P. D. j |
Overfield, of the trial court.
: SUEZ CANAL TRAFFIC
SHOWS GREATER BUSINESS; I
NE7W YORK, Dec, 2.?A London I
cablo says that the traffic through i
the Suez Canal continues to be abso- i
lutely uninterrupted in any -way. No* I
tiflcation of the-receipts is received in j
London Daily. On Saturday and Sun
day laBt they totalled $114,000, com- i
pared with $94,0Q0 for the same two
days in 1914. The rumored closing
of the canal is attributed by shipping
interests to German sources.
POPE ABANDONS PLAN
FOR CHRISTMA8 AMiSTICE
PARIS. Dec. 2.?A dispatch from
the Vatican says that the Pope has
abandoned his plan whereby he In
tended to request thnt an armistice
be declared among the warring na
tions during the Christmas holidays.
RUSSIANS ARE TO
DRIVE AT GERMANS
?' THROUGH BALKANS
PARIS, Dec. 2.?Lord Kitchener who
? has -just returned from the Balkan
? states says that the Russians aro de
. voting every energy In their prepar
ation to make a drive at the Germans
through tho Balkan states.
JUDGE JENNINGS
i TO PAY TRIBUTE
TO ABSENT ELKS
Judge Robert W. Jennings will de
liver tho eulogy to "the absent broth
I era" at tho annual memorial exer
; cises of Juneau Lodge No. 420. B. P.
O. Elks, in Elks' Hall next Sunday ev
ening at 8:30 o'clock, it was announc
ed today. The public is Invited to
attend.
s The music will be a feature with
1 the Elks' orchestra of fourteen pieces
s and a choir of sixteen voices. Soloists
r will be Waldemar Engberg, Ed Keith,
i Miss Crystal Snow and Mrs, L. P.
Dawes.
FORD SHIP
IS DENIED
PASSPORTS
WASHINGTON. Doc. 2. ? Henry
lord's peaco mission to Europo was
lealt a severe blow today when Sec
etary Robert Lansing announced
hat the members of the party who
vore planning to sail on a ship
ihartored by Ford would not bo given
>assports for safe conduct tQ belli
jerent countries.
Tho announcement from the State
Jepartment was that passports would
>e issued only to neutral states In
Surope, Secretary Lansing contcnd
ng that aliens cannot enter any of
he belligerent nations. Without the
lassports, the members of Mr. Ford's
jarty, including William J. Bryan,
vlll not bo able to go to Germany,
Russia, France, Italy. England, or
my of tbo lighting nations. Under
ho ruling the peace advocates will
iave to go pnly to Norway. Sweden,
)enmark or Holland, or abandon tho
rip.
Secretary Lansing made it plain
hat passports are given to Amerl
an citizens for belligerent countries
inly when their business made it ab
olutely necessyy to-visit there, or
irhen they were Invited by some gov
rnmcntal agency in those countries,
lo cxplainod that no distinction was
icing drawn between the members
if tho peace party and other Ameri-1
An citizens and !that the general
ule of the state department was be
ng applied. The ruling, however,
vas generally interpreted ns mean
ng that the United States does not
cgard unofficial missions In an ef
ort to mnke peace by private par
ens, as "business of an urgent cliar
ietw." ? II
ADMIRAL ASSURED
AMERICAN LIVES
WILL BE PROTECTED
TOPOLOBAMPO. Dec. 2.?Adequate
protection at once of American lives
nd property in Sinalon was demand
ed from Genernl Munoz. a Carranza
ommander, by Admiral Cameron Mc
tae Wlnslow. commanding the Pa
iflc" fleet, who arrived here today on
lis flngship. the U. S. S. San Diego.
General Munoa gave assuranceo that'
>uch protection would be afforded.
SIR HIRAM IS NOT
INTERESTED IN HUDSON
MAXiMlO?V. O. ACTIONS
BOSTON. Doc. 2.?A letter from Sir j
lirnm Maxim in London to the Bos-;
on Johrnnl says that he is in no way
:oncorned with the $10,000,000 Maxim j
Munitions Corporation of his brother
ludson In this country, and claims
?rcdit for the invention of smokeless
lowdcr and other explosives general
y given to his brother in America and ;
leclares that he is the only Maxim
vho ever invented a gun.
YEW BILL FOR "SHIP
PURCHASE" IS DEVELOPING
4*
WASHINGTON. Dec. 2.?Creation,1
>f a federal board with Jurisdiction
>ver uoep water trafllc similar to that
.?xercised over the railroads by the j
ntcrstate Commerce Commission,
md the appropriation of $50,000,000
'or the construction cf merchant ships
leslgncd for use as naval auxiliaries. I
ire proposed In a new shipping bill
lrafted after conferences between j
Secretaries McAtfoo and Rod field.
The tentative bill was submitted to- \
lay to Representative Alexander,
ihalrman of the house merchant ma
?ine committee. From this bill, it
vas said, will be developed the ad
ministration's shipping measure to
;ako the place of the one which fall- j
?d of passage at the last session of
Congress.
PITTSBURGH STEEL COMPANIES
TURN DOWN APPLICATIONS
PITTSBURGH, Dec. 2.?Agents of
Lho French government have been try
ing for several days to place an order
for 9,000,000 hand grenadeB. but with
little success. Most of the foreign
agents are now In the Pittsburgh dis
trict trying to buy steol products and
number more than at any time in the
history of the city. Shipments to
China have been unusually large lur
ing the past few woeks.
GOVERNMENT MAY
BUILD BATTLESHIPS
WASHINGTON, Dec. 2.?Because of
the apparent failure of private bidders
to keep within the proposals of $7.
300,000 limit of cost set by Congress
for the hulls and machinery of battle
ships 43 and 44 the construction of
both vessels may be undertaken at
the government navy yards.
? ? ?
NEW YORK TERMINALS
SWAMPED WITH FREIGHT
NEW YORK. Dec. 2.?New York
terminals are swamped with foreign
freight, and shippers are diverting the
traffic to Bsoton and other ports. On
tho West Shore Road loaded cars
stand on practically every side track
from New York to Buffalo. 7,000 cars
in all. * In spite of this, 4.G00 cars a
day are moved in and out of New
York.
AMERICAN SECURITIES
* MAY-BE MOBILIZED
LONDON, Dec. 2.? Tho London
Times believes the government is ten
tatively considering the plan to "mobi
lize" American securities held private
ly. in preparation for the possible nec
cssity of seeking anothor'loan In the
[United States within the next few
months.
The public is invited to attend th<
Elks' Memorial Services Sunday. 8:3(
p. m. ? 12-2-31.
TEUTONS NOT
TO BROOK ANY
FAVORITISM
ATHENS, Doc. 2.?Representatives
of Austria and Germany have inform
ed the Greek government, according
14, newspapers here, that if the de
mands of the quadruple entente are
granted, the central empires "will
cpasc to consider Greek Macedonia as
a friendly territory."
ITALY WILL NOT
MAKE PEACE UNTIL
4 HER ALLIES RATIFY'
??MM >
PARIS, Dec. iI.?Italy gave her ad
herence Monday to the London agree
ment of the other entente allies, not
to conclude separate peace without
consent of France, Russia and Eng
land, says a Milan dispatch to Lc
Matin today.
ASQUITH SAYS TOTAL
BRITISH LOSSES 600,000
LONDON, Dec. 2.?Fifty-three Brit
ish ships were sunk by England's en
emies during November, with a total
loss of 646 lives, it was announced
today.
Premier Asqulth, replying to a par
liamentary question, gave the total
number of British killed, wounded and
missing from the opening of the war
until November 9. as 510,000 or about
600,000 to date.
CHINA NOT ASKED TO
JOIN ALLIES, AND
HAS NO SUCH PLANS ;
PEKING, Dec. 2.?The Chinese gov
ernment made formal denial tonight
that it had considered the possibility
of Joining with the allies, or that it
had been requested to do so.
RUSSIA FORTIFIES BALTIC
ISLANDS; ANGERS SWEDEN
BOSTON. Doc. 2.?A Boston Olobe
copyrighted dlspntch snys that Rus
sia is exercising her "sovereign rights"
In the Baltic by fortifying the Islands
of Anluml, wthln 30 miles of the Swed
ish coast, at the mouth of the gulfs
of Bothnia and Finland. Sweden Is
vigorously protesting. England and
France battered down these Russian
forts In 1854, but they now concede
that their ally has a right to do aB
she pleases.
? ??- /
CAPITALISTS DEVELOP
SULPHUR DEPOSITS
new YORK, Dec. 2.?After an ex
penditure of $1,500,000 New York cap
italists have uncovered sulphur depos
its of vast wealth <ln the district of
Wabigoon, 180 miles east of Winnipeg,
Canada.
U. S. USES THE MOST
OF CRUDE RUBBER
NEW YORK. Dec 2.?The consump
tion of crude rubber in 1915 Is estimat
ed at 90,000 tons, an increase of ap
priximately 20,000 tons over the pre
ceding year and 40,000 tons compared
with 1905. The United States at this
rato Is consuming about 66 per cent,
of the world's production of rubber.
ARCHBISHOP MAY
BE HERALD OF PEACE
ROME, Dec. 2.?The Archbishop of
Cologne has telegraphed the Pope,
announcing thnt he will soon arrive
in Rome as the bearer of Important
communications. It Is believed that
he Is on a peace errand.
JAPAN'S CAPITAL WITNESSES
GREAT MILITARY PAGEANT
TOKIO. Dec. 2.?The greatest mili
tary spectacle of peace times in the
history of Jnpnn took plncc in Tokio
today. Fifty thousand soldiers, in
cluding Infantry, artillery and cavalry
and selected from all parts of the em
pire. were reviewed by Emperor
|Yoshlk!to, In celebration of his re
cent coronation. Ten aeroplanes and
several digigiblc baloons represented
the acrldl branch of the military.
As a signal for further rejoicing
In Toklo tonight, a son was born to
Empress Sakado this afternoon.
PEACE WILL BRING
GREAT DEMAND
FOR STRUCTURAL STEEL
NEW YORK, Dec. 2.?It Is estimat
ed that the demand for structural
I steel materinl by the belligerent Eur
opean nations after the war will be
enormous. Steel authorities declare
that the structural damage to the city
of Lille alone amounts to more than
5300.000,000, about equal to the de
struction of the property in the San
! Francisco fire.
You saw It first In The Empire.
KITCHENER
; OUTLINES
waK plans
?f?
LONDON', Dec. 2.?Lord Kitchener.
England's war engineer, today suV
1 mlttcd to King George, at a confer
, enco in Buckingham Palace, his plans
for bringing the war to a close.
The King assured Lord Kitchener
that Great Britain bos the fullest
: confidence In his management of the
; campaign.
Lord Kitchener informed His Ma
jesty that the allies can win In the
Balkans, but threo times the present
| Anglo-French force now operating
there Is necessary, in addition to the
active cooperation of Russia and
! Italy, by sending contingent* of in
fantry and artillery.
Other recommendations of Lord
! Kitchener, as the result of his trip
to the Balkans were as follows:
1. The Dardanelles campaign must
bo prosecuted to a successful con
clusion.
2. A determined effort must be
made to recover Serbia.
3. Efforts must be mado to hum
ble Bulgaria and break tbo Teuton
Turkish communication, now estab
lished.
4. Pressure must be brought to
bear upon'Greece and Rumania, In
order to Induce King Constantino and
King Ferdinand to Join the war on
the side of the quadruple entente.
B. Russia must assume tho offen
sive In tho East at tho earliest and
quickest possible time.
6. Artillery and great stores of
ammunition must be rushed to the
BalkanB to offset tho superb equip
Iment of the central powers. ?*
BRITAIN-MAY STOP
P08SIBLE SOLDIERS
FROM LEAVING SOIL
LONDON, Dec. 2.?A British order
In council will soon be issued declar
ing that during the continuance of
the war all Britishers of military age
desiring to leave the United Kingdom
even on a trip, must obtain special
permission. This perassiion will'not
be given without good cause.
RU88IA GETS TROOPS
FOR WAR FROM ORIENT
i TOKYO, Dec. 2.?Russia's last call
; for reservists took 3000 men from Har
bin, Manchuria, a city of 30,000 popu
{latlon. >
GERMANS REDRAFTING
MEN WHO WERE INJURED
?4?
LONDON, Dec. 2.?"It is reported
here that the wounded, lame and deaf
I Germans have been redrafted for ser- ~~
vlco at tho front," sayB an Amstr
dam disputch to the Central News Ag
ency.
t t i
GERMANY WANTS COLONIE8
FOR TRADE PURPOSES
AMSTERDAM. Dec. 2.?The econo
i mic committee of the German Coloni
zation Association at a recent meeting
pnssed a resolution in favor of a big
ger German colonial empire, to lnsuro
Germany needed raw supplies, and a
mnrket for her manufacturers.
ENGLISH WAR BONDS
TO BE FREE OF TAX
TO FOREIGN BUYERS
IX)>*)ON. Dec. 2.?In the British
House of Commons Wednesday a new f
clause was added to tho finance bill,
empowering the treasury to free from
the income tax all foreign holders of
future loan Issues. The imposition of
the Income tax in tho past lias proved
a serious bar to obtaining foreign
subscriptions to loans.
/ ? ^ ?
ALLIES SINK SIX
HOSTILE SUBMARINES *
?*?
LONDON, Doc. 2.?A Naples dis
patch says that passengers from Sal
onika report six hostile submarines
have been captured in the Aegan Sea
by Allied cruisers.
AFGHANISTAN MAY
FIGHT GREAT BRITAIN
BERLIN. Dec. 2.?A Constantinople
dispatch says that Afghanistan is pre
paring to war against the British pos
sessions in India. The fighting on the
Afghanistan-India frontier already has
begun at several places.
SWI8S EXPERT SAYS
5,000,000 ARE KILLED
BERNE, Switzerland, Dec. 2.? Col.
Heusler, a Swiss military statistician,
calculates tho total losses in killed in
the present war at 5,000,000.
LATE NEWS BULLETINS
SALOON MAN DROWNS.
SPOKANE - Jack Strube. a well
known saloon man of Scattl^ jumped
Into the river here today and was
drowned.
JEWELRY STORE ROBBED.
SEATTLE ? Masked bandits held
up a Jewelry store on First Avenue
this morning and secured two trays
of diamonds. They escaped.
PEACE TALK PROMISED.
BERLIN - It was reported today
that the Chancellor soon would dis
cuss the question of peace In the
I RcIchstnK.
MUNITIONS FOR U. S.
SEATTLE.? Orders were received
by the Puget Sound- Navy yard today
to begin the manufacture of 12,600
shellH of 3 and 6 Inch diameter, on
March 1.
CORWIN CHARTERED.
SEATTLE. Dec. 2.?The Bteamcr
Corwin has been chartered for a long
term, by the Southwest Steamship Co
of Los Angeles and will bo operated
In the California-Mexico trade.
CANAL OPENING INDEFINITE.
WASHINGTON ? Colonel Goethah
has reported that it will be impossible
to indicate whan the canal slides will
be cleared sufficient for the reopen
ing of the waterway.
MUTINY SHIP IS DUE.
SAN FRANCISCO ? The Hill liner
Mlnnestrca. on which mutiny has
broken out, will roach hero Saturday.
CASE TO JURY.
NEW VORK?The Hamburg-Ameri
can conspiracy cases were given to
the jury at 3 o'clock this afternoon.

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