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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, December 20, 1915, Image 1

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^-5 THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. VII., NO. 967. ' JUNEAU, ALASKA, MONDAY, DECEMBER 20. 1915. ' , PRICE TEN CBtfe
Abandonment of Dardanelles Campaign Is Indicated
FAIRBANKS
MAN DIES
IN BIG FIRE
FAIRBANKS. Dec.., 20.?When the
California Block was'totally destroyod
by f re yesterday afternoon. George
Saloff, a Russian, was burned to death
property worth about $45,000 went up
in smoke and for a time the entire
block was threatened.
The fire was caused by an explos
ion. due to faulty fixtures In the gas
system used In lighting the building.
The building was a mass of solid
flames before an alarm of fire was
sounded. For a time the entire block,
and the Northern Commercial Com
pany's plant were in serious danger,
but valiant work on the part of the
firemen confined the flames to the
California block, which was complete
ly gutted. The California saloon lost
its rock and fixtures, and with the;
building places its loss at $35,000. Jack |
Hcaly's grocery, which occupied ?pace
in the bnfTding. reports a loss of over
f." onn The Northern Hotel wasVmly
slightly damaged. ?
saloff lost h.'s life in the lavatory.
He had evidently suffocated. Hfe
body was recovered. It was fou^d
near the door.
The weather was exceedingly cold,
?he thermometers registering 30 de
gress below zero. Fortunately no
wind was blowing.
The burned building was built in
the early days of the camp by Al.
White, of Valdez. and was formerly
owned by Fred Martin of Anchorage.
It is said this afternoon that the loss
1? partially covered by Insurance. i
STORM TAKES
LIVES Of TWO
NEAR WRANGELL
WRANGELL, Dec. 20.?As a result
of the terrific storm that has blown
here since Thursday. Charles Yuccock,
? veil known native is dead, grave
fears are entertained for the safety
of his companion. George Kelly, and
< onsiderable damage is reported from
various fishing camps.
Yucook and Kelly left Dee^ Bay.
on Vank's Island for Wrangel! during
the storm last Thursday. Their boat
was found Saturday a total wrock. and
with its cabin carried away. Searchers
f >und Yucook's body on the beach at
Vank's Island. The body was clad
only in underclothing and a life-belt
v strapped around it. Yucook had
swum ashore and died of exposure,
as he was fifty feet from the water,
and was lying under a tree. Kelly's
fat? is unknown.
Yucook's body was brought hero yes
vrdav. he leaves a wife and sever
al children.
LITTLE INTEREST IS SHOWN
IN ANNEXATION ELECTION
The annexation election passed off
very quietly today, only 24 votes be
ing cast at 11 o'clock this morning.
Very little interest in the result is be
ng taken. The votes cast aL thaC
time were divided as follows. City.
Ift; Tide FJr.ts cectlon, 10; Gold Belt,
and the Nelson Park Addition. 0.
The city was placarded Saturday
night, the hand bills protestlng>galnst
the election, but without any apparent
effect on the result. The polls were
open from 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
The three o'clock this afternoon the
count was as follows. Gold Belt and
Scatter Tract. 21 votes. City 24 votes.
Tide Flats 30 votes. Nelson Park Ad
lition. 7 votes. The indications are
t'.at all sections will vote to consoli
date.
Mrs. M. M. Taylor, who has the
honor of being the first election judge
?ver to serve in the city of Juneau act
??d as a judge for the Tide Fiats sec
tion.
CITY OF SEATTLE
BRINGS CHRISTMAS MAIL
Brlng'ng 300 sacks of mall. 160 tons
of freight for Juneau and 160 tons of
freight for Tread well, the steamer
City of Seattle arrlvetd at noon from
the South This is the first mail to
?-Hve f^oni the States for four days.
The arriving passengers on the Seat
Co were Mrs. R. W. Smith. Ethel Col
lins. Mrs. B. L. Meyers and child, Mrs.
H. G. Feller. Olaf Lystad and Burdette
A. Winn.
MRS. STRONG VERY ILL
Mrs. C. Cylde Strong is critically
ill at Seattle, according to word re
ceived here today. She left here a
week ago. for California, for the bene
fit of her health. Mr. Strong may
leave for the South on the first boat.
The Rev. John A. Buchanan, pastor
of the Presbvterlan Church at Thane,
returned foday on the City of Seattle
from Ketchikan, where he delivered
a lecture on "Color Photography" be
fore the Ketchikan Lyceum.
K Abercrombie is registered at the
Occidental.
+ * + *?> + ?*?*??>?? h * *
+ ?
+ THE WEATHER *
* For the past 24 hoars, ending 4
+ 3:00p. m. today: +
+ \ . *
4? Sunday. December 19. ?>
* Maximum?40. ? +
Minimum?33. .?
?> Cloudy?Rain. +
+ Precipitation?.45. in. 4*
+ *
?b Monday. December 20. ?
?J- Maximunk?37. 4
+ Minimum?34. *
* Cloudy?Ra'n. *
4- Precipitation?.30 In. ?
*??????+????*???
BANK BANDITS
ESCAPE; ONE
SHOT TO DEATH
PORT TOWNS END. Dec. 20. ?
Swimming across the swift Snoqual
mle river and taking to the thick of
the woods, the three surviving mem
bers of tho gang of four bandits that
held up the State Bunk at Duvall elud
ed a large posse of deputy sheriffs
and armed citizens Sunday night.
Early Sunday morning, after the cap
ture of the fugitives was thought cur
tain, no attempt was made to find
the body of the fourth robber, who
was shot and killed while ho was cling
ing to a post In the middle of tho Sno
qualmle river, all efforts centering on |
! the search for the other three bandits,
j The other robber was shot and des
perately wounded as he jumped oft i
j the bank. After firing several shots
i at his pursuers he started to swim j
; toward the other shore. Midway in
the stream he paused and clung to t.*.e
post. There la a wiro fence stretched
across tho river at this point and It
is believed there w!U be no difficulty
In recovering the body.
The Duvall Bank was held up by,
four robbers Saturday night. A sack
containing about five hundred dollars
in silver was stolen.
? y + j
I
CHAMPION ENLISTS.
I I i
SASKATOON. Dec. 20.?John- [
I ny O'Leary. Seattle lightweight '
and champion of Canada, and
| William Madden, his manager,
| enlisted Saturday for the front, j
O'Leary and Madden will be pri
1 vates In the 64th Overseas Bat
1 l&lion and will go into training !
? at once.
+ ? ?
HI GILL TO TRY
AND BEAT ENEMIES
SEATTLE. Dec. 20.?With the hats
of Councilman O. L. Erickson and
former Councilman Austin E. Grif
fiths in the Seattle political ring as
active candidates for the mayoralty.:
Mayor Hiram C. Gill told friends yes
terday that he would seek re-elcction.
"I'm going to be like the Kaiser."
Mayor Gill laughingly said. "1 shall
unsheath my sword."
Griffiths and Erickson are two of
the mayor's most bitter political en
emies.
AMERICAN NOTE
TO AUSTRIA IS
TO BE LAST ONE
CHICAGO, Dec. 20.?That a peace
pact in the baseball league war was
actually signed at tho conference in
New York last weelc and that only the
details remain to be worked out at
the meeting in Cinc'nnatl Tuesday be
tween representatives of the Federal
circuit and members of the National
Baseball commission was the state
ment made here today by a man fi
nancially interested in the peace
terms.
It is believed certain in Chicago
that the result of tomorrow's confer
ence will mark the end of the Federals
at terms satisfactory to President
James A. Gllmore. of that league.
MECHANIC TURNS
ROBBER. IS SHOT:
DIES IN HOSPITAL
SEATTLE. Dec. 20.?John B. Woel
fle, & mechanic, died yesterday. of
w^nds inflicted by F. C. West, a
laundry drive1.*, whom he sought to
hold up. Woelfle leaves a wife and
two babies, the oldest whom is 20
months.
"BILLIE THE HORSE"
DYING NEAR KNIK
?? ?
SEWAltD, Dec. 9.?William Elliott,
i better known all over Alaska as
"Billie the Horse" is now lying very
dangerously sick In a cabin nearj
Knlk and is expected to die, and yet
he refuses to take a.'d as he would
rather die alone than suffer what he
thinks would be the humiliation of
accepting charity. Tom Finnegan,
who arrived with the man last even- i
ing, says that men went out to the
cabin to bring him in where he could
get good treatment but that he re
fused point blank to accept the of
fer and he still rema'ns in the cabin
in what is thought a very serious con
dition. Billle has been In almost all
the camps of the territory and is very
well known.?Gateway.
COPENHAGEN?Field Marshal von
Mackensen was twice pounded during
the Sen-Ian campaign, according to
letters from Berlin. A bullet fired by
a Servian sharpshooter at Belgrade
went through his arm and two days
later a spent ball struck him in the
shoulder.
WOMAN DEFEATS HUSBAND
IN CITY CLERK ELECTION
REPUBLIC. Dec. 9.?The city elec
tion yesterday passed quietly. There
were two tickets In the field, the
Citizens' and the Nonpartisan. The
Citizens' won. with the exception of
one candidate, that for clerk, in which
Mrs. Eva B. Cale beat her husband.
J. C. Cale, Incumbent, by thirty-three
votes.
Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Cale formerly
lived at Port Angeles.
CARRIGAN AND OLTS
WIN SHOOT TROPHIES
A. C. Carrigan won the White Fly
er trophy for the first time and Or
ville Olts won the DuPont trophy at
the shoot of the Juneau Gun Club
held on their range in North Juneau
Sunday. Tho shooters were. King,
Olts. Dickinson. Murphy, Goldstein,
Banbury, McBride, Carrigan, Fry,
Truesdell, Carter and Fisher.
LANEISMS
SPARKLE
IN REPORT
WASHINGTON. Doc. 20. ? Among
other gems contained in the annual
: report of Socrotary Franklin K. Lane,
of the interior department, is the fol
lowing, the keynote of which is de
, velopment:
"It is not a figure of -speech to say
that every American has it in his
heart that he is in % small Bonse a
discoverer; that ho is joining in the
revelation to the world of something
that it was not before awaro of, of
which It may some day mako use.
Men work for what they think worth
while and If they Qnd their joy In
proviug that land has coal or will
ralso wheat, or that a refractory ore
may be reduced at a practicable cost,
and toll abcut it proudly, they may
be serving themselves, but they are
also serving the world. A clerk in
a store or a mechanic in a mill may
not consciously -engage in any enter
prise which makes this appeal, but
when ho learns that the government
of which he is a part has within a
year opened a town on tho shores of
the North Pacific which has now near
ly throe thousand inhabitants and has
driven a railroad nearly forty miles
inland toward the Arctic Circle?on
its way to the coal fields of the Mat
anuska and the gold fields of tho Tan
ana?he has a feeling tho he. too, is
participating in making this new
world. One might say that this was
nothing more than sentimental pride,
but there is a truer and perhapk more
dignified word for this and it is qual
ity. It is an expression of the Ameri
can Instinct for improvement. We
have a passion for going into the un
known for answering puzzlos that arc
put to us. Our Imagination is chal
lenged by difficulties and tho result
has been a century 01 growin, wmcn,
In Its magic and Its largeness, casts a
spell upon tho mind.
"Alaska Territory, containing per'
haps 400,000,000 acres of land. Is now
a great body of the public domain, is
heavily mineralized and is n land of
unknown possibilities. One gold mino
there has recently erected a mill of
6,000-tonR daily capacity, with ore in
sight to run the mill fifty years at
least"
VIRGINIANS
BID WELCOME
TO WILSONS
HOT SPRINGS, Vn.. Dec. 20.?When
President and Mrs. Wilson arrived
here Sunday morning, to spend their
honeymoon, the guests at the Inn gave
them a real charivari, many promi
nent people staying at the hotel join
ing In a parade in which the musical
Instruments were tin pans and make
shift tom-toms. President Wilsoif said
he would stay here for several days.
THIRTY GUESTS
WERE AT WEDDING
WASHINGTON. Dec. 20. ? Mrs.
Edith Bolting Gait, member of a
prominent Virginia family and a de
scendant of Pocahontas became the
bride of Woodrow Wilson, the Presi
dent of the United" States. Saturday
evening. The ceremony took place
at Mrs. Gait's home .'n the fashionable
district, at 8:30 o'clock, the service
being read by the Rev. Herbert Scott
Smith, rector of St. Margaret's, the
church which Mrs. Gait attended. The
Bev. James H. Taylor, pastor of the
Presbyterian church wh!ch_the Presi
dent usually attends, also was pres
ent ? I
Thirty guests were present. With
the exception of Dr. Cary Grayson,
tho President's physician. Joseph P.
Tumulty, secretary to the President
and Miss Gertrude Gordon, the bride's
Intimate rr:en<l, tno guests were nu
relatives of President Wilson or Mrs.
Gait, by blood or marriage.
Formality Was Lacking.
Simplicity was the principal ele
ment of the wedding arrangements.
President Wilson reached Mrs. Gait's
home at 6 o'clock and dined with his
daughters and the bride. As ho en
tered the Gait home, the President
passed through a lane of the curiosity
seekers who were kept back from the
home by policemen. guests to
the wedding also were'scrutinized by
tho crowd, which numbered several
hundred.
No bridal march preceded the cere
mony, and ushers and attendants also
were dispensed with. Guests said it
was moro like a quiet home wedding
than that of the chief executive of
i the nation. The President and Mrs.
Gait knelt on a prayer rug during the
wedding ceremony. The brido wore
a traveling suit, of blue serge. Follow
ing the ceremony a buffet supper was
served. The bride cut a huge wedding
cake without the usual ceremony.
Leave For Virgtnla.
President and Mrs. Wilson left at
10:30 for the railroad station by au
tomobile and left for Hot Springs, Va.,
in the President's private car. which
was attached to a special train.
Hundreds of wedding presents were
received by the President and his
bride. They came from all points in
the United States, Hawaii, tho Philip
pines and Alaska.-in spite of the re
quest from the: President that none
should be sent except those from rel
atives.
WAS MRS. LINCOLN'S-NEPHEW
SPRINGFIELD, 111.?Albert O. Ed
wards, a nephew of Mrs. Abraham Lin
coln. and for 19 years custodian of
the Lincoln homestead here, died sud
denly today.
BRITAIN'S
POSITION
REPEATED
WASHINGTON, Doc. 20.? Further
arguments in support of Great Bri
tain's restrictions upon commerce at
tho expenso of American trade wero
submitted to the State Department
by tho British embassy, In u memor
andum made public today with a letter
of transmittal to Secretary Lansing
from Sir Cecil Spring-Rice, tho Eng
lish ambassador.
The memo, which Is supplementary
to the note on tho same -subject hand
ed Ambassador Walter H. Page last
summer by the London foreign office,
reiterates the asacrtion that incroases
in British trade with neutral countries
have been infinitesimal when com
pared with the' growth of similar
American trade.
WITHDRAWAL OF
FEDERAL LEAGUE
IS PROPHECIED
WASHINGTON, Dec. 20.?The Unit
ed States' "last word" to the ^Austrian
government, over tho Ancona case,
went forward to Vienna today. Gov.
eminent officials do not expect Aus
tria to recede from her position.
PARCELS POST
STOPPAGE IS
CONTROVERSY
BERLIN, Dqc. 20.?Sweden has pro
tested to Great Britain against stop
ping the parcels post service between
Sweden and tho. United Statos. ?
BRITAIN ANSWERS
LONDON, Dec. 20.?The War Office
stated today that much of the par
cels post packages stopped wbllo on
tho way from the United States con
sisted of rubber, directed to a German
agency in Sweden. ?
LANSING PROTESTS
WASHINGTON. Dec. 20.?The Unit
ed States has protested to Great Bri
tain against Interference with parcels
post shipments between this country
and Sweden. Secretary Lansing an
nounced today.
T. R. BABBLES
AT WILSON AND
! - HIS POLICIES
i NEW YORK. Dec. 20.?Under the
; title "Sins of tho Wilson Admlntstrn-!
j tlon." former President Theodore!
i Roosevelt finds vigorous fault In the
i January number of the Metropolitan j
magazine with the Mexican policy, the i
submarine question, Henry Ford and
other pacificists, and accuses Presi
dent Wilson of appropriating to his
own use the Roosevelt policies on pre
paredness.
The Colonel makes a further accu
sation that the President has made
! an "about face," by "proclaiming one
policy In Mexico which Is not to be
feared In a military way. abroad, or
in a national way it home, and anoth
er policy about Germany, which can
control many votes In tho United
States, as well us take care of Itself
j against the United States, on land
jand sea."
GARY BANQUETS
MOOSE LEADER;
POLITICS BUZZ i
NEW lURKf UCC. ZU.?roiilicui cir
clos are buzzing over a dinner at the
hqpie of E. H. Gary, chairman of the
United States Steel Corporation, at
which -former President Roosevelt was
a guest, Friday night.
Numerous friends of Colonel Roose
| velt also were present, among them
being colonel Perkins.
MINING MATERIAL
ON THE "EVANS"
SEATTLE, Dec. 20?With 28 pas
sengers and a cargo including several
hundred tons of mining machinery
and lumber for the Alaska Juneau
mine at Juneaa. the steamship Admir
al Evans soiled North at 7 o'clock this
morning.
Passengers included Mrs. H. M.
Smith for Thano. and Andrew Graguh.
Ben. Bovik. Mrs. George Butzer, Mrs.
Rose Miller. B. Klegman, Mrs. Harry
Malono, E. B. Dudden, T. H. Kershaw,
Mrs. A. Bradley and E. L. Joffe, for
Juneau.
COPPER ADVANCES
NEW YORK, Dec. 20.?Copper met
al went up to 20% cents a pound to
day. Alaska Gold closed at 26%, Chi
nl at 63%, Ray at 28%, Utah at 78%,
and Butte & Superior at 65%.
?- ?]
DAILY
"GO I N G S"
The Empire asks the indui- I
gence of the advertisers who?o !
copy we were unable to find I
j space for. Until wo have our
| new press Installed it is almost 1
| impossible to print ten pages in
1 a day. Gentlemen, wc approc- !
i iate your kindness In thinking !
i first of the
j EMPIRE
> | "All the news all the time." I
i ? 1
SURRENDER
OE VILLA IS
IMMINENT
EL PASO, Dec. 20.?Au agree
ment was reached, and tho pa
pers were be!ng signed at noon to
day whereby the Villa faction con
cludes peace terms with the do
facto government of Carranza.
The Mexican conference was held
between Consul Garcia, for Car
ranza, and two former lieutenants
of Villa, at tho consulate in El
Paso. Villa himself is now in
Jaurez. having arrived suddenly
this morning. The signing of the
peace agreement eliminates Villa
from Mexican affairs and final ar
rangements for his entry to the
United Statos soil are being per- |
fected.
WASHINGTON. Doc.-- 20. ? That
President Wilson's Mexican policy is
about to bo vindicated by tho surren
der of General Pancho Villa and his '
band of lnsurrectos, to Venustiano 1
Carranza, is tho belief that prevails
in Washington today. Positive news
has been received from Mexico that
Villa is about to surrender tho rem
nant of his army to his conquerer. i
Tho Stato Department today decld- i
ed that Genoral Villa shall recoivo
tho asylum accorded all political ref
ugees should he enter the United
States, and General Frederick Funs
ton, commanding tho United States
troops on tho border has been instruct
ed to so inform tho Mexican chief.
Grant "Judicious Amnesty"
Following a conference today In El
Paso, botween representatives of Gen
eral Carranza and General Garcia, the
Carranza consul at El Paso, the fol
lowing statement was Issued to the ,
press: "We are arranging for the sur
render of Villa's army. Villa has left '
for Chihuahua City and probably will 1
enter tho United States tomorrow. His 1
followers will be granted amnesty in- '
8ofar as tho demands of Justice may 1
bo complied with."
News of Villa's determination to quit
tho war camo from Chihuahua, where 1
a council of war of his governors and 1
genorals was held. It Is said that j
Villa's chief advisors recommended 1
peace and a telegram from Villa's 1
wife, who Is in Los Angeles, also was j 1
brought to bear in influencing him. |j
4? i t j '
I
DOVES ARRIVE . | '
I I
CHRISTIANA, Dec. 20.?"Ev
ery nation in the world will
1 soon look up to the American 1
I peace pilgrims as having taken ' '
the Initiative In stopping his- i '
1 torv's worst war; the landing I 1
! of tho American peace expedl- ' I
' tlon In Europe will be record
I ed as one of the most benevo- I
lent things the American Ao- I '
public over did," said Henry ' i'
! Ford as he stopped ashore on | j1
1 Norweg'an soil yesterday, from ' 1'
' the Scandinavian-American lln- !
I er Oscar II., bearing over a hun- ' j
1 dred peace advocates from the !
United States who are making ' 1
the trip to neutral countries at I 1
r Ford's expense.
I I !|
* - ... *,i
MANY CHANGES IN
GOVERNMENT SHIPPING BILL
?+?
WASHINGTON, D. C., Dec. 18.?
Thcro arc marked differences be
tween the present shipping bill draft
and tho one defeated last session,
chief among which Is the practical
elimination of governmental owner
ship features. The present bill pro
vides for a shipping board and forma-til
tlon of a corporation, to stock ofj I
which any private Individual may sub
scribe. The ships and part of their i
complement will bo In a way a naval ]
reserve force.
BRITISH NOT TO
MAKE LOAN SOON
LONDON, Dec. 18. ? The London
Times says that tho "British govern- .
ment has no Intention of raising a <
fresh war loan until tho new year is
well advanced. It Is not expected
that any new taxation will be Imposed
during tho present financial year. Con
ferences are still being held concern
ing mobilization of Atforlcan securi
ties. The treasury has decided to
adopt a plan of borrowing, with the <
option, in certain cases, of buying.
GERMANS ARE
THROWN BACK;
LOSSES LARGE
LONDON, Dec. 20.?Indications of
the long expected offensive by the
Germans in Flanders, whore the mass
ing of Teutonic troops has been in
progress for several weeks is con
tained in the oflfcial British and
French reports this evening, which
3tdtc tbnt under a cloud of gas the
Germans today attacked the British
trenches northcaBt 0/ Ypres. Tho
Germans Called so completely that
only a few of them emerged from tbeir
own trenches. Those who did, the ac
counts say, were mowed down by ar
tillery fire.
KING AND QUEEN
OF BELGIUM HAD
A NARROW E8CAPE
l'ARIS, Dec. 20.?Details of a nar
row escapo from death which the
King and Queen of Belgium recently
had, when German airmen threw
bombs on the fishing village where
tho royal couple now roslde, are print
ed today by the Petite Journal.
NO MEAT SATURDAY
VIENNA, Dec. 20.?Tho newspapors
announced today that tho sale of meat
next Saturday will bo prohibited.
LONDON TIMES
HURLS CAUSTIC
ACCUSATIONS
LONDON, Doc. 20.? Tho Daily
rimes, Lord Northcllffo's paper, to
lay renewed its attack on the govern
ment, saying in an editorial: "The
fact that politicians and censorship
have fooled the public Js becoming
more and more known and the long
icrlcs of dlsilluslonments causes a
belief that a mysterious hand is be
hind tho scenes and is protecting Ger
mnny. While beer for British work
men has been curtailed this myster
ious hand has arranged to got for
jcrmany, vln"Denmark. the malt she
needs for making beer." The paper
mggests that no real attempt has
been, or is being made, to punish Ger
many. on land or sea.
AMERICANS AFTER
SHEFFIELD STEEL TRADE
NEW YORK, Dec. 18.?Projects of
American hanking Interests to cap
ture Sheffield atcel trade of the world
became known, with the announce
ment ?of the establishment of two
front new steel plants, each control
led by a separate hanking groupL
Baltlmoro and New York financiers
ire promoting one of the enterprises
which calls for the erection of a plant
it Illghlandtown, Md.. a short dis
tance from Balt!moro. ,
Plans for the other plant were filed
it Syracuse Monday by the Cruclblo
Steel Co. and calls for the erection
if steel mills in that city, adjoining
the Sondorson works, already owned
by that company. Combined with the
new plant, these will glvo Syracuse
In tho world for Sheffield grades of
the largest and best equipped plant
steel.
BUILDING WHARF
AT FIDALGO BAY
FAIRBANKS, Dec. 9.?The Alaska
Mine? Corporation, of which E. D.
Relter Is manager, developing copper
properties on an extensive scale at
Fldalgo bay, sent a big shlpmont of
freight to the mine this morning on
the Shamrock.
The company is building a wharf
and ore bunkers at Tldalgo which will
permit of large steamers landing at
any time and discharging or taking
on cargo.' The approach to tho dock
will bo three hundred and seventy
b1x feet long with a T one hundred
by forty feoL?Valdez Prospector.
AMERICAN SECURITIES
COMING FASTER THAN
THEY EVER DID BEFORE
NEW YORK, Dec. 18,?The British
liquidation of American bonds con
tinues on largo scalo. Recent steam
er shipments averaging $10,000,000 aro
expected to bo exceeded on tho suc
ceeding two boats.
LATE NEWS BULLETINS
seattle woman dies
SEATTLE ? Mrs. Willcy, wife of
Capt. George J. Wllley, a steamship
owner extensively Interested .in Pu
get Sound and Alaska salmon canner
ies, died Saturday night In Minor Hos
pital, following an operation. She was
a daughter of Clark Aldridge. a pion
eer merchant.
predicts war's end
LONDON?Lord Derby, director of
recruiting, In a speech Sunday pre
dicted the war would terminate sud
denly, and much earlier than is gen
erally expected. Conscription for sin
gle men who fall to enlist under Lord
Derby's present "plan, is gradually find
ing much favor with the British newo
papers.
boy burned to death
SEATTLE?Morton, tho 6-year-old
son of W. A. Glcason, a member of
the Port Commission, burnod to death
when the Gleason homo was destroyed
by fire yesterday. The boy's pnrents
were bsully burned trying to rescue
tho child from the flames.
Aberdeen woman killed
ABERDEEN, WaBh?Mrs. Frederick
W. Greene, wife of the rector of the
Episcopal Church was run down and
killed and her daughter, Miss Eliza
beth Greene was severely Injured Sun
day by an automobile hearse.
AID-FOR-POLAND DAY
WASHINGTON?An executive proc
)amat!on, designating January 1 as a
day for making contributions for the
reller of Poland was Issued today at
(he White House.
LOGGER RUNS AMUCK
MOUNT VERNON, Wash.? Robert
Lee, a logger, was shot and killed yes
terday by L. B. I?endbettcr, another
loggor employed In the same ramp.
The two men had quarreled. After
kJH'ng Lee, 1.endbotter ran to another
hunkhousc looking for Timekeeper
Gos8. against whom ho bad a grudge.
Not finding him In one of the tents,
hp fired a shot at the mon wltbln. He
was.finally disarmed antf arrested.
RUSS AGENCY AT SEATTLE
SEATTLE?Russia will establlsh'an
agency hero for the forwarding of
Puget Sound and Alaska fish products,
it was learned today.
SUPREME COURT ADJOURNS
WASHINGTON?Tho supreme court
adjourned today until January 3.
BRITISH
QUITTING
GALLIPOLI
LONDON, Dec. 20.?II was announc
ed at the War Office today that the ,
British troops operating in Sulva and
Anzac districts, Gallipoll campaign,
havo been withdrawn, and, tho War
Office intimates, other branches of
tho Gallipoll armies will retire when
practicable.
Part of the allied forces will go at v
onco to Salonika and the remainder to
Egypt. If the Gallipoll campaign Is
abandoned it will releaso 250,000 Tur
kish Holdlers from that theatre.
Belgian Coast 8hel!ed
Dispatches from Borlin tell of tho
shelling yesterday by Allied monitors,
of tho German fortifications at West
pnde, on the Belgain coast. The Ger
mans claim to havo driven the moni
tors away by flro from land batteries.
The Germans udmlt the loss of tho
light cruiser Bremen, and a torpedo
boat, whichflwere destroyed by a Brit
ish bubmarino In tho Baltic Sea Sat
urday. The crews of both vessels es
caped.
An air-raid on the German fortress
of Mett is reported from Paris, but
only property damage was done, the
official communique said.
Bulgarian Losses Heavy
A dispatch from Athens estimates
the total Bulgarian losses in the Sor
blan campaign at 130,000 men. \
cannonading heard
off Holland coast
ROTTERDAM, Dec. 20. ? Terrific
cannonading was heard Sunday off tho
Rock of Holland and It was believed
here that several ships were engaged.
von bi8sin0 to quit
ROME, Dec. 20.?General Von -Bia
sing, tho German governor-general of
tho occupied territory in Belgium is
to retire from his office on January
1, on account of ill health, according
to a dispatch today from Antwerp.
AMERICAN RED CROSS
ASSISTANTS ATTACKED;
U. 8. FLAG INSULTED
SALONIKA, Dec. 20.?According to
a story they told today, Mrs. Walter
Farwell, a Chicago society woman,
and Dr. Harry S. Forbes, an American
Red Cross physician wero attacked
when the 'Bulgarians raided the
American Red Cross headquarters at
M on astir. Mrs. Farwell said the In
vaders ripped down the American flag,
and seized the Serbian rollef stores
for their own use.
CANADA SENDS 205,000
OTTAWA. Dec. 20.?It was announc
ed by the government today that Can
ada had sent 205.000 well-equipped
and well-drilled soldiers to the front
slnco the opening of the war.
?????++??+++??+?*
? ?
* * JAP8 GUARD SUEZ? +
* ?+? *
+ LOS ANGELES, Dec. 20.? ?
* That Japan Is giving material +
* aid to the entente allies In the ?
+ European war, not only by sup- +
* plying munitions, but by actual- +
ly guarding the Sues Canal 4
+ with her warships, was stated +
+? hero today by A. M. Papajlan +
+ Bey, former Minister of the In- +
+ terlor, In Egypt. +
* ?
NEWS AND VIEWS
OF EUROPE'S WAR
There are In tho United ^Kingdom
230,000 Jews, of whom 17,000 arc serv
ing, exactly eight and one half per
cent. While another 900.000 Chris
tlans^have enlisted it will bo time to
talk about Jewish shirkers."
Tho sniping record against Turks
at Galllpol! la held by a young Aus
tralian cavalryman named King. 91
hits, of which at least 50 wero clean
kills, was his record for September.
He watches the Turkish lines from a
rifle pit with a teloscope. Ho allows
the Turks to show themselves until
they becomo careless and then opens
fire. Keeping mo rceoru 01 iu? una
by notches on a stick.
18 ships with a total tonnage of 112
082 have been sunk by submarines of
the Central powers in the Mediter
ranean Sea up todato. according to
an official Berlin statement.
ATHENS?When the German Allies
entered Monastir the stnra and stripes
over the Red Cross hospital were
hauled down and the Austrian flag
was raised. The hospital hns been
conducted by American doctors.
How Captains Boy-Ed and von
Papon directed the spending of over
$TC,000,000 to prepare a revolutionf in
Mexico that would put Hucrta in pow
er again and bring that country at
war with the United States is said
to have been learned from a source
close to the Mexican consulate, in
Now York City. Story involves also
Lieut-Col. Rfntelen, for several
months cashier of German secret
agents in this country and Andrew
D. Mcloy. a promoter with interests
in Mexico, who was a scout for Rin
telen. Detailed statements havo been
forwarded to Washington showing ex
penditures of at least 827,000,000 in
tho Mexican propoganda and In other
phases of Gorman activities.
Burdette A. Winn, who has been at
tending tho University of Washington
since the opening of the semester, re
turned today on tho City of Seattle to ?
spend tho Christmas holidays with his ?
parents.
Evorybody reads The Dally Empire.

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