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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, December 27, 1915, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1915-12-27/ed-1/seq-5/

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I First National Bank I
OF imvgtAnnii ? I
United States Deposits $100,000.00 |
Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits over.. 100,000.00 ]
1 DN1TED STATES DEPOSITORY I
OPEN SATURDAY EVENINGS UNTIL 8:00 O'CLOCK j
THE FIRST TERRITORIAL BANK~
Douglas, Alaska OF ALASKA 26 Front St., Juneau
INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS, a ?
AND ON TIME DEPOSITS <>
j l
- -
1 GROCERIES AND |
| MEN^GOODS I
Alaska-Gastineau Mining Co.
THANE, ALASKA <:
i ? |
+ < ? i
? ?~J
0
In the heart of the commercial activity of JUNEAU
n is to be found the sign of the
f S Electric Shoe j
which means the best shoe repairing shop in Alaska.
j. NELSON'S SHOE STORE
| "PRICES THE LOWEST"
I ALASKA MEAT COMPANY jq?> reck, |
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL BUTCHERS |
? Manufacturers of all kinds of Sausages. Our Hams and ?
; Bacon are Home-Smoked. I
! FINE POULTRY FR?r
Koll llr>? fraah ?nd curmi mmU-Govanunant Impacted. Try our Wild Rooo Lju I
Frye-Bruhn Market
mr
The BERGMANN
Newly built and newly furnished, modern In oil respects, steam
heated, electric lighted, hot an d cold water In every room; bath on
every floor. Including a shower bath. 8anltary conditions perfect.
Ointng room In connection.
o*i55*5555555555555il^555555555555;
II f * Ty THE HOUSE OF |
jLouvre oar good uquors i
The Famous Waterfill and Freazier Whiskies ^
1 MOVING PICTURES EVERY EVE. 8 TO 12 O'CLOCK
E. S. HOLDEN. MANAGER
- ?.v,miiUr',wn?TA!VHaiiiMI IB IIImi \mm\ i'i ,i m isima
; ; 11; !; 11 i n i! 1 ! i M 1-1 i- H mil i i- m i i n i iw m m i 1111 > t rt
WE'VE GOT IT! I
: EVERYTHING in the line of WINES, LIQUORS, CIGARS ;?
f JUNEAU LIQUOR CO., Inc.;!
I "The F'amily Liquor Store" ? Phone 94 ? Free Delivery. ;;
i i ; i ! i l l l II 11 l l I I Hi 111 III 111 1 III 111 III 1 111 1 1 I I
1
r-hcidclberg Liquor Co.-, ||
* J ==INC0RP0RATED== ]
Largest Stock Beat Brands of J [
?> Imported and Domestic Liquors
?? and Wines for Family Use. <1
Free Concert Every Evening 7 Till 12
' Free Delivery. Mail Orders a Specialty. Telephone M6 <'
? : ?
^ 'w"w"w
-k: ? : ; 1111 m 111 m 111 ii n I ill ill ill in in nil in i nil
v nil mh-i 111111111 ii n 11 mninii i in n . i. ,
j| The grotto i!j:
I C. R. BROPHY
! Distributors of Hijjfi Glass, Doable
Stamp Whiskey, Wines and Cordials
||T Olympia and Rainier Beer
! v 95 FRONT STREET TELEPHONE NO. 210 ;;!!
T!' i111111; t!; 111111; 111; 11111! i m h i i i; m i n 11::
4.1 ? i i : 11 ii 1111 ii in m i ? ii i in in in 111 n m m 11 m i ?.
Come and Hear Charles Close, High Class Entertainer
j J W. A. FERGUSON
SUCCESSOR TO McCLOSKEY
GOOD WHISKEY. GOOD BEER. GOOD TREATMENT
^ DRAUGHT BEER 10c
g 99 FRONT STREET TELEPHONE 92
BAR IS ROBBED;
SEVERAL ARRESTS
EOR INTOXICATION
The Montana Bar was burglarized
at an early hour Christmas morning
by a gang ot men and the cash reg
ister; containing the silver receipts
of the day, was carried away. The
burglars were evidently after money
only as none of the stock was touched.
Tho robbery happened between 1:30
and 3 o'clock in tho morning, ono of
the thiefs concealing hlmsolf in the
telephone booth and after the night
bartender loft opening the back door
for his pals. They socured about
$70 In Bllver and $15 to gold.
The robbery was discovered by
Charles Melinc, the porter, when ho
arrived at 3 o'clock to clean up the
place. The back door was standing
open, and thinking tho bartender was
In tho office writing letters, he wont
about his work. ? littlo later ho no
ticed the absence of the register and
gave the alarm.
Register Carried Away
At 1 o'clock Andy Lang, the bar
tender In charge, closed the placo and
after looking In each of tho lavator
ies locked up an dleft When Mollno
arrived at 3 o'clock, the door was op
en and the register was gone. That
several men were Implicated In tho
affair Is Indicated by the fact that tho
register weighs about 175 pounds, and
was lifted over a high board fence In
the rear of the building, after having
been taken through the back door.
Yesterday a small port of the register
and a 25-cent piece were found in tho
alley back of Valentine's Building.
As soon as the robber}' was discov
ered, Petor Carlson, the owner was
notified and came down down from
his home and an Investigation was
made by him, assisted by tho police
officers, but no cluo as to the Iden
tity of the miscreants could be
found. I
Arre?t in Saloon Row
Prank Vlcintinl was arrested short
ly after ten o'clock Friday night by
Deputies Manning and Clark, charged
with attacking John Bleletto with a
pocket knife. The fight started In
The Kentucky Bar, and the men were
rushed to the street by the saloon
force. Before they could seriously
damage each other they were taken
Into custody by the officers. Bioletto
was badly cut on one hand, but oth
erwise was unhurt. Vlcinltinl was
arraigned beforo Commissioner Mar
shall yesterday but the date of hlB
preliminary hearing has not been de-.
termined.
The city police officers were keptj
busy separating would-be fighters and
sending drunks about their business,
but on the whole It was a very quiet
Christmas, considering the police
statement that there was more drun
l^eness about town than for several |
years.
Carl Danlelson was arrested at the
City JaiL for slipping a pint bottle
of whiskey to one of the prisoners
while he was visiting him. He was
sentencod to pay a fino of $25 by
Magistrate Pettlt this morning. John
Henry, H. Williams, Louis Collins.
Wm. McGlnnls and Jose Chahors were
all arrested by the city police for be
ing drunk and disorderly and this
morning were assessed fines ranging
from $5 to $25.
City Marshal Sliter stated this
morning that these were the only
drunks who the police could not
quiet. "We gave them every chance
during the holiday and only arrested
those whom we positively could not
make behave," he said.
LANE ON NEED
OF SIMPLICITY
IN GOVERNMENT
WASHINGTON, Dec. 18. ?In his
forthcoming annual report Secretary
Lane says that the government should
continue its sympathetic co-operation
in the development of Alaska. He
urges that the confusion In adminis
trative actions in Alaskan affairs
should be abolished. "It would be
too hazardous a thing to surrender
these resources to local control or dis
posal, for those who have lived in
any new country know how oasy it Is
to grant away water front and power
sites, forests and other exceptional
resources to those who aro offering
large sums for quick improvement.
Yet this should not drive us into a
policy that makes slow administration
a necessity.
"The confusion in administration ac
tion in Alaska is well known. I have
tried to give it currency that it
might haston the establishment of
some method of coordinated control
of Alaskan affairs, primarily in the
hands of a resident commission but
always in touch with and responsive
to the wish of Congress and the Pres
ident through one of the departments.
That land has a mysterious charm,
a pull which affects all who see it
and those, too, who know only indi
rectly in Its largeness, its grandours,
and its economic poslbilities. This
could not be better illustrated than
by the number of applications for
places which were received~~by the
Alaskan Engineering Commislon.
When that body left for Alaska in the
spring the numbor was 38,000, and
most of those who applied were not
out of work but already held posi
tions with railroads, in banks, on
farms, or in city offices or some city
shop. They wished a taste of the
life of this new land. Thore are many
more with the same doslre, somo of
who will make Alaska richer by their
presence and find happiness in search
ing out the land."
Wants New Mining Laws.
1 The secretary also refers to the ne
cessity for a new set of mining laws.
"The old code," he says, "is so elabor
ate and complicated that the best of
brains can not tell what the law is.
The truth seems to be that between
mining engineers and mining lawyers
the rules of the game have been re
fined into obscurity; and If Congress
were to say to the President that he
might select thiee men familiar with!
mining laws and miners' difficulties
to suggest a new mining code to Con
gress, It would, I believe, be giving
In earnest a new froedom to the min
ing industry."
National Parks as an Asset
The United States furnlshoo play
grounds to the people of this country
which are, we may modestly state,
without any rlvalB In tho world. Just
as tho cities are Boeing the wisdom
for the nocessity of opeu spaces for
the children, so, with a very large
viow, the nation has been saving from
Its domain the rarest places of gran
deur and beauty for tho enjoyment of
the world.
ALASKA COPPER OUTPUT
GROWING AT RAPID RATE
WASHINGTON, Dec. 11.?In those
days of rapid consumption of copper
In the manufacture of munitions of
war and tho consequent high prlco of
that material, there la more or less In
terest in anything throwing light on
tho American copper supply.
During the last flfteen years the
Prlnco William Sound region, Alaska,
has become an important copper pro
ducing district, and the number of
productive mines there is constantly
Increasing. The Ellnmnr district, a
part of this region, has been the
sceno of active mining since 1900, and
in order that accurate information
concerning this area should be avail
able to the public, the geological sur
vey has recently prepared a detailed
report on it.
This report contains excellent topo
graphic and geologic maps, on a scalo
of about a mile to an Inch, and illus
trated by numerous platps and fig
ures. The discussion of the history
of the district nnd Its geography are
Interesting to the lay reader; the
treatment of the nreal and structural
geology, and the discussion of their
bearing on tho distribution of the oro
deposits, as voll as the description of
tho mines nnd prospects, are more
technical.
Tho geology of the Prince William
Sound region, it Is said by govern
ment experts, Is highly complex, and
the attempt to read the geologic his
tory of this part of America from the
rock formations as they now appear
encounters many difficulties. Tho al
most complete absence of life in the
Alaskan oceans during the period of
deposition of many thousand of feet
of sediments has left tho rocks prac
tically devoid of fossils, which are so
valuable in determining tho age of
rocks.
New Conclusions Reached,
Nevertheless, the succession of the
rock formations of Ellamar has beon
determined, and their determination
should aid in deciphering the geology
of other parts of Prince William
Sound. Some now conclusions, It is
announced, have also been reached
concerning the origin of the Ellamar
copper deposits.
The administration apparently has
abandoned the railroad securities bill
of the last Congress, and will not
urge it during the coming session.
The bill Is known as t^e Rayburn bill,
and waB advocated In substance by
the Interstate trade commission. As
part of the administration trust pro
gram it passed tho Houso more than
a year ago, but was held up In the
Senate.
It is assumed here that despite the
administration's a'titude at this time
an aggresslvo effort will be made to
put the bill through Congress this
winter. Not only the railroad broth
erhoods, but leading railroad man
agers. officials and financiers have
urged tho enactment of this piece of
legislation.
Friends of the Rayburn bill are now
saying that the evils of over-capltall
aztion have been recognized by Con
gress since 1886; when Senator Cul
ium made a notable report fh which
he characterized excessive capitaliza
tion as "a mortgage upon the com
merce of the country.
Fedoral Approval Provided.
The Rayburn" bill would place con
trol of tho issue of railroad socuiltlcs
in the hands of the Interstate Com
merce Commission, which would be
tantamount to having the government
place the seal of its approval on stock
and bond Issues of the future, thus
Insuring a ready sale nnd stable
prices. President L. E. Johnson, of
the Norfolk & Western Road, In. a
recent statement earnestly advocates
the enactment of the proposed legis
lation.
The guidebooks to Western travel
Issued by the government explain
some things wh.'ch at first sight seem
inexplicable. Ogden canyon?a deep
craft through tho towering Washatch
Mountains, overlooking tho Great Salt
Lake. Is one of tho show places along
the Oregon Short Line, yet many of
the thousands of people who have en
Joyed them moro and they first read
the little statement of geologic his
tory given In the government guide
book of tho Overland route.
Cut in 8olld Rock.
Ogden Canyon, a deep notch with
bare digs of hard pink quartzlto on
both sides, according to government
experts, was cut in tho solid rock by
tho rivor which flows through it Run
ning water carrying sond and gravel.
It is pointed out, acts as a saw or file,
and, given time enough, can cut
through the hardest rocks.
Ogden River was flowing west along
Its present course, say tho scientists,
before the lofty Wasatch Mountains
came into existence. The raising of
the mountains wont on slowly for
ages, so slowly that the river kept its
place by cutting a deep and narrow
canyon straight through tho block of
the earth's crust as It rose.
In no other way, say tho geologists,
can wo rationally account for a rivor
rising on one side of tho tangc and
flowing directly across It. Movement
of the mountain mass has continued
down to the present time, it is pointed
out?at least thero hoc been recent
disturbance along the base of the
Wasatch rango, as is shown by faults
which traverse the lake doposits and
the modern alluvial aprens.
Some of the breaks are so new, say
Investigators, as to be devoid of vege
tation. The upward movement of the
mountains has been so continuous
that the river has had no opportun
lty to widen its valley, a task which ;
It will begin as soon as the mountains 1
cease rising.
SEWARD WOULD LIKE
TO OWN DEPOSITARY
SEWARD, Dec. 13.?In order to
facilitate the handling of funds used
in connection with the construction of
i the government railroad, an agitation
has been started fcr the establish
ment of a government depositary
here. Under the present system near
ly $1,000,000 was paid out in this city
and nt Anchorage last summer to
merchants and others who were un
able to cash their checks.
Tho trouble Is due to a failure on
the part of the U. S. treasury depart
ment to make an agreement with the
local national bank. The government
officials demanded the usual Interest
on deposits, but as the bank has to
pa}- $G per thousand on coin shlppetf
from the United States, it 1b contend
ed, It would lost by tho transaction.
It is expected that several million dol
lars will be paid out hero next sum
mer and the present check system
will result In much confusion and do
^
BLEWETT QET8 THREE
YEAR8' BAOEBALL CONTRACT
Robert L. Blewett, whose re-elec
tion as president of tho Northwest
Baseball League was conceded, was
surprised by being offered a contract
for a three years* term at the meeting
of tho team owners rccotly at Seattle.
Raymond May Quit Seattle.
It is stated by Seattle newspapers
that Tealey Raymond, who has been
with tho Soattlo Jeam In tho North
west League for the last seven years,
and who has been its manager for the
last several years, will leave Seattle
for Spokane. In tho seven years that
"Handsome Tealey" has been with
Dugdalo's aggregation tho latter has
won three pennants?1909, 1912 and
1915.
May Be Eight-Team League.
Tho Northwestern League is con
sidering enlarging Itself from a six
team to an eight-team league, by the
addition of Butte and Missoula. If
Aberdeen, which has forfeited Its
franchise, does not make arrangement
to enter the game, another town must
bo secured to takes over her franchise.
FIRE DEPARTMENT 8AVE8 -
GAS BOAT FROM FIRE
The City fire truck was called out
Christmas by an alarm from the City
Dock and saved the gas boat San An
tonio from total destruction, as well
as eliminating the danger to nearby
property. The San Antonio wns Just
ready to leave the dock and In start
ing the engine backfired, setting the
oil In the bilge ablaze. The boat was
loaded with 1,000 gallons of gasoline
but on account of the prompt atrlv
al of the fire truck the flames were
extinguished without much loss. The
actual damage amounted to $40.
L. Thompson of Seattle is a Juneau
visitor and Is at the Gastineau.
ALLMETAL WEATHER9TRIPS tt
i n 111111111111 iii'H'i 1111 [
:: =THE= ij
MECCAj
i Quality and
Service our ::
MOTTO ::
* JUNEAU DEPOT FOR ::
| MECCA FIZZ
?i"I I I I I M l'TTT'l 1 I I I I I I I I I I i i
C. Petlovlch J. R. McNeil
Old Kentucky 8ar
Hotel In Connection
Steam Heated
Family Ordera Delivered Free
P. 0. Box 577, Phone 91
Front St. Juneau, Alaska '
I I I I Ml IHiMii 1 II II I 111! 1
| THE KINYON'S I
Confections, Lunches, Peanuts ??
T and crisp, buttered pop-corn and ' |
X Hot Drinks !.
t 121 SEWARD 8 T. ;
'* Next Dream Theatre X
M -I -I -l-H-l -l-H-H-l t- ? | | I H I M |.|.
ISHINGLER wanted, on con* 9
tract. A. H." Humpherles, 111 E
Seward St. 4-tf g
Piano Tuner
GEORGE ANDER80N, Expert Twen
ty years experience. Factory represen
tative for High Grade Pianos and
Player Pianos. Address Box 091.
'Phone 143.
BIG CROWD AT DANCE
Turner's Hall was packed to over
flowing Christmas Night, at one of
the moat successful parties of the
Christmas celebration. Dancing con
tinued until 1 a. m. The Turner danc
es are growing in popularity. Tho
music Is always good.
P. W. Davison, of Valdoz, is at the
Castlneau.
j
G. K. GILBERT
PLUMBING and
SHEET METAL WORK*
114 8toond St., Phone 382
...THE... *
> < >
; Manhattan Hotel;;
? ' < ?
; flRST-CLASSTHRKISH BATHS j;
> < ?
? Experienced Attendant, Chlrop- <'
? sdlst. For Ladles, Mondays and <?
, Fridays?Lady Attendant. <?
? < >
> OP P. CITY DOCK Phono 233 \ \
? ^ < >
Rough Dry?55c per do*.
Flat Work?50c per doz.
THANE STEAM LAUNDRY
Phone 175 7-28-tf
No Bone Corset
? Miss and Mrs 8. Zinsir ?
JUNEAC CORSETIERES
Kitting in roar own homo. A perfect fit
la guaranteed. For aprolntments Phono
Address #S Main Street.
MADE IN JUNEAU
Concrete Dry end Watertight Floors end Cal
lers. Concrete plain and ornamental Wall*
and Fence*. Concrete ribbed or travel finish
ed Sidewalk* and Step*. AD work guaranteed.
ESTIMATES AND PLANS FRET.
H. D. BOURCY, I
BoaW Contractor I
NEWCAIN
/ HOTEL >
Pre-eminently the leading hotel
In every partlular of all Alaalcs.
'''ftF.GAIN
Prop, and Mflr.
{OCCIDENTAL
HOTEL
ANDt: ANNEX
Rateo?75c to 12.50 Per Day
Weekly Rates on Requeet
Phono 11
One - Fourth Off 1
On Every Woman's
and Misses
COAT j!
SUIT
AND
SKIRT
in the House
'
B. M. BEHRENDS GO.
INCORPORATED
i: ir you're looking por the nri ? f
:: BEST HOTEL, You're Looking for 1 tie VjaSUlieaU g
J J Hot and cold water, phone, large clothes closets each room. Just T
<> around the corner from every place of importance. X
? t
I
I
I
I
Store open Wednesday
Thursday and Friday
Evenings until 8 p. m.
IC. W. YOUNG COMPANY | i
The Leading Hardware Store I ;

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