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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 12, 1916, Image 1

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' 1017
THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. VII., NO. 975. JUNEAU, ALASKA, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 12, 1916. PRICE TEN CENTS
Montenegro Being Crushed by Austro-Hungarian Army
INVESTORS
WILL COME
RECK SAYS
Mayor John Reck returned on the
Jefferson this noon from a short trip,
south, thoroughly exhlllarated and
ready to plunge Immediately into his
vast personal business and at once
take up certain municipal affairs.
Mayor Reck left Juneau the day be- j
fore Christmas and reached Seattle
four days later. During his trip south
he only visited Seattle and TacomaJ
but in that time studied the financial
situation.
"There Is plenty of money in the
southern banks," said Mayor Reck
"for every legitimate proposition. Mon
ey is looking towards the north and
Juneau in particular. Everywhere I
went I was asked about the business
condition of not only Juneau but of
other parts of Alaska. Alaska seemed
to be the goal for which the working
man and the investor expect to reach.
Bankers have been thoroughly alive j
to the good results obtained from Al
askan investments and their clients
have always been advised to seek prof
It in the north. This spring and sum
mer will see many substantial in
vestments made In Juneau and the
surrounding country.
On the Water Question
?' * - ?kn* mitnh V?o o hnnriMi.
11 apycurs iuai uium
ed since I left. At Ketchikan I f ret
learned of the water agitation. I road
in The Empire the propositions sub
mltted and the views expressed by
my colleagues in the council. I can
tell you right now. I am against a sec
ond water system In Juneau. If there
? Is any probability of the city purchas
ing the present system, I am with
that scheme. The city would then
have an income at the start. We are
now Just safely emerging from our
financial obligations and a new wa
ter system to be built by the city
would place us in a bad financial con
dition. I d'd not learn while in Seat
tle when .Mr. Lewis would come north
but I certainly believe the special
committee should consult hfm upon
hi ?* arrival and insist that he better
the system or enter into an agree
ment for its sale to the city of Ju
neau.
One Phone System Enough
"I notice' that an application has
been made for another telephone sys
tem. I do not know why we need
another system. I believe in one good
system, but at that, if anyone can
convince the city that they havo the
capital sufficient for the installation
of another system, a franchise could
be granted. The new concern would
be the loser, not the city. If results
believed for were not attained.
"S'nce returning here this noon. I
have been asked If I would continue
my meat business. I can say right
now. that hereafter I will devote the
greater part of my attention to my
duties as president of the First Na
tional Bank, but I will also retain my
ownership of the Alaska Meat com
pany and supervise Its operation.
That you can say Is conclusive."
CIVIL SERVICE QUIZ
FOR POSITION OF MATE
The U. S. Civil Service Comm's
slon announces that a mate examina
tion will be held January 28. 1916.
to fill existing vacancies as first and
second mate. $1200 and $1080 per an
num. respectively, on both the steam
er "Jacobs" and the steamer "Davis"
at Fort Gibbon. Alaska. The age
lim'ts for this examination are 20
to 50 years. Applicants who desire
to be considered for first mate must
have license for the Yukon river; for
second mate experience on the Yukon
river is required. Applicants with ex
perience in Alaskan waters, other
than Yukon river, will be considered
for vacancies mat may occur else
where. if they hold the proper licens
es. Applicants for this examination
should fie application Form 1800,
which may be secured from the local
secretary of the Board of Civil Ser
vice Examiners, Surveyor General's
office. Juneau. Alaska with the sec
retary. 11th Civil Service- District.
Seattle. Wash., by January 28, 1916.
The examination consists only of fil
'ng Form 1800. together with the re
quired license.
CARPENTERS MEET FRIDAY
The score of carpenters who decid
ed to organize a local last Monday
night will hold another meeting Fri
,??v in the dining room of
the Circle C.'ty Hotel. A. J. Raber.
the secretary, stated today that all
business and tradesmen of Juneau are
asked to attend the Friday night
meeting and learn for themselves
Just what the local carpenters are
desirous of doing. Late yesterday
and during today Secretary Raber
was occupied much of the time by
taking signatures of carpenters who
signified Intention to Join the local.
Mrs. George Zlegler. wife of the su
perintendent of the Juneau Water
Company returned today from Seattle.
-a * + * + + + + ? + ?? ??> + + a + ?>
+ +
+ THE WEATHER ?
Wednesday, Jan. 12. 4?
? Maximum?34. +
+ Minimum?20. *
? Clear. , *
? + + + + + ? +
'MRS.W.M. EBNER
PASSES AWAY
IN CALIFORNIA
Mrs. William M. Ebner. for many
years a resident of Juneau, passed
away in Los Angeles lost night, suc
cumbing to an illness of over a year's
standing. A message was received
this morning by the Behrends Bank,
from Mr. Ebner, announcing that the
end had come. While t was goner
ally known that Mrs. Ebner's health
was not improving, it was not known
that she was so near death and tho
announcement was a keen shock to
a wide circle of friends here. She
was 50 years old and is survived by
her husband and a daughter, Mrs.
Howell H. Kennedy, of Berkeley, Calif.
Six years ago Mr. Ebner was forc
ed to move to California, for the!
benefit of Mrs. Ebner's health. Al
though she loved Alaska, and wanted
to make here home in Juneau perma-!
nently, Mrs. Ebner continued to a'l
here, and the family finally settled in
Hollywood, a suburb of Los Angeles.
Within a short time Mrs. Ebner's
health returned, and twice she visited
Juneau with her husband, the latter
having mining interests here. She
expressed the hope on the occasion ,
of her last visit here two years ago
that at some future date she could
return here to reside.
The funeral likely will take place ]
in Los Angeles, although no announce- |
ment to this effect was contained In ?
the telegram received here.
GOVERNOR URGES
INSANE ASYLUM
IN THE NORTH
In his annual report Governor
Strong deals with the insane problem
as follows:
"The insane persons of Alaska are
cared for at Morningside Sanitarium,
under a contract entered into between
the Sanitarium Co. cf Portland. Ore.,
and the Secretary of tho Interior.
The number of Alaska insane under
treatment on June 30, 1915, wa3.1S0,
of which 165 were males and 24 fe
males. There were 12 patients re-1
celyed at Morningside during the
quarter, 5 were discharged. 3 died,
and 3 escaped.
- The Alaska Legislature at its 1919!
session passed a joint memorial cri
ticizing the methods of the Sanitarium
Co. in the treatment of the Alaska
Insane patleuts, and a memorial was
adopted for presentation to the Con
gress asking, among other th'ngs,
that a permanent asylum be estab
lished at some point on the Pacfilc!
Coast of Alaska to which the Alaska
Insane patients can be removed from
the interior of Alaska for permanent
care and custody, unless sooner dis
charged. and to which institution the
Alaska insane now in tho Morningside
Sanitarium can be removed. Copies
of this memorial have been transmit
ted to the Department of the Interior.!
"Morningside Sanitarium is inspect
ed frequently by inspectors of the De
partment of the Interior and tho gov
ernor of Alaska. The latter visited
this institution in November last and
his findings were made the subject
of a special report to the department.
The number of patients confined in
the sanitarium is Increasing, and with
the Increase of populatlon-in the Ter
ritory the number of Insane will un
doubtedly becomo larger from year
to year. 1 therefore have to renew
the recommendation embodied in my
report for the last fiscal year where
in it was stated that the t'me had ar
rived when some provision should be
made for the care of the Insane with
In the Territory. It Is to be expect
ed that this recommendation will
meet with the opposition of the pres
ent contractors, the San.'tarlum Co.,
but It Is submitted that such opposl
tlon Is based on commercial reasons
and not upon humane considerations.
The contract system of caring for the
Insane of any country is Inherently
bad. no matter with what fidelity the
provisions of the contract are sought
to be carried out. The contract sys
tem. from both humane and ethical
standpoints, is unsound. It has been
urged that the climate of Alaska Is
'such as should, for humane reasons,
If no other, be sufficient argument
'against caring for the Insane of Alas
ka within the Territory. This argu
ment is a specious one. It has no
basis In fact, for It will be admitted
by the disinterested that climate
alone will not effect a cure of men
tal disease. The climate of Alaska,
however. Is not productive of Insanity
any more than the climate of Wash
ington and Oregon, and the confine
ment of patients In a well-conducted
Institution located In the Territory
would be conducive to both the men
tal and physical comfort of the In
mates. Most of these patients know
no other home than Alaska and the
'riends they have are for the most
part In the Territory, and. therefore.
It Is believed that greater Interest
would undoubtedly be shown In their
welfare were the ycared for In Alas
ka. There are a number of towns on
the southern coast where the climate
Is inviting the year round and where
there is less rain, and at least as
much sunshine, as at Portland Oro.
With the Alaska Insane cared for In
'he Territory*, more d'rect supervls
'on would be exercised by this orflce
md other officials, both of the Fed
(Continued on Pane Six)
T. R. BOOM !
FORG.O.P.
LAUNCHED
CHICAGO, Jan. 12.?The Progres- !
slvo National Committee yesterday j
chose Chicago as their convention j
| city, and announced that the conven- j
tlon would bo held Juno 7. Tho plat- 1
; form will declare strongly for adequata
war preparedness. ]
Members of the national commltteo ,
express the hope that the Progres- i
' slve and Regular Republicans agree 1
on the same candidate, and it is be
lieved that Colonel Roosevelt will bo
tho choice of both conventions. A 1
dispatch from Albany quotos Col.
Barnes, Roosevelt's ancient enemy,
as announcing that In view of the pos
sibility of Roosevelt being a candi
date. on the Republican ticket, he
will not go to Chicago as a delegate, '
but will attend the convention as a 1
member of tho national committee. J
Roosevelt wired the Progressives
yesterday urging that the Issue of the '
campaign bo preparedness. He said:
"Americans shall Insist on prepared
ness and will demand that every man '
within our borders be nn American
and nothing more."
AMENDMENT OF PROHIS IS
READY TO SUBMIT TO THE
LAWMAKERS OF THE NATION '
- :<
COLUMBUS. Ohio. ? Prohibition;
lenders hore havo made public the 1
exact form or the proposal for a con- '
stitutlonal amendment which w!ll be 1
submitted to congress for adoption, 1
thereby submitting In turn the ques- (
tlon to the General Assemblies of the '
various states. The amendment pro- *
posed reads:
"Section 1. Tho sale, manufacture
for sale, transportation for sale, and
Importation for sale of Intox"eating 1
liquors for beverage purposes In the 1
United States and all territory sub- 1
ject to tho Jurisdiction thereof and '
exportation thereof are hereby pro- '
hiblted. (
"Section 2. The congress or the 1
slates shall havo power, Indcpend- f
ontly or concurrently, to enforce this 1
article by all needful legislation." ,r
It Is pointed out in a statement '
which has been Issued that the 1
emendraont docs not propose to pro- 1
hlblt the manufacture, distribution or (
use of alcoholic l'quors for mechanl- (
cal. medical, scientific or other pur
poses. ,
A sweeping provision Is contained
'n the second section, which Is de
signed to enable the states to go
as far as they wish In passage of
drastic laws, as well as to require {
congress to go to all lengths it sees '
fit to make prohibition a reality.
GOVERNMENT WILL TRY
TO SAVE MILLIONS IN
MINE WASTE MATERIAL
,
WASHINGTON*. D. C.?Industrial "
achievements by Amer'can manufac-1
turers since the outbreak of tho Eu
ropean war are recounted In detail
In the annual report of tho Bureau
of Mines Issued by Director Man
ning. : J
The report tells what the bureau.
Is doing to aid In development of min
eral Industries by suggest'ng new and j
j better methods of manufacture, by ^
stopping the waste of valuable min
eral resources, and by suggesting j
uses for material thought of no value.;
It says manufacturers already are
saving millions of dollars by use of;'
waste material and that new Indus-'
tries havo been created to manufac
ture what was formerly Imported. (
Developments of the coal tnr dye (
Industry, discovery of a new process
for reducing rad'um and devising of
a practical scheme for drilling natur- '
al gas wells by which waBte Is pre-! (
vented are described In detail.
COMMERCIAL MEN ARRIVE
Several commercial men arrived on
the Jefferson today. Among them
were J. E. Moulton. of the Seattle ,
Hardware Co.. J. H. Nlchoalds of Ar
mour & Co., A. Shyman, Jack Klssell.
O. It. Hart, H. L. Morris and J Rohr
back.
U. S. MARSHAL ERWIN HERE
United States Marshal L. E. Erwln.
of the Fourth D'vislon, arrived on the !
JefTerson and will remain at the Al-1
askan Hotel until the next steamer
'or the Westward. Mr. Erwln has!
lust returned from a trip to Washing-'
ton and while there explained satis-;
factorlly certain small charges that:
had been preferred. Mr. Erwln will '
go into Fairbanks.
KILLED DEER?ARRESTED
Louis Ryan was arrested by Game
Warden McDonald at Dpuglas today
on the charge of k'lllng deer out of
season. McDonald took his man be
fore United States Commissioner
Marshall this afternoon and Ryan en
tered a plea of guilty. On account
of his boat having sunk during the
night Ryan was allowed to return to
Douglas but will appear tomorrow for
sentence.
mm ?
W. F. Robrbach, the hat mau, ar
rived on the Jefferson and is at the
Alaskan.
RUSS BANKERS
GOME TO U. S.
SEEKING LOAN
NEW YORK, Jan. 12.? Two Rus
sian bankers are on 'their'way to the
United Statos, seeking a 2100,000.000
loan for the Russian government, ac
ceding to The World today. It is
said that tho terms of the loan will
be similar to those under which tho
balf-bllllon dollar loan to Franco and
England was made.
J. P. Morgan and other financiers
prominent In tho underwriting of the
Anglo-French loan doclined today to
comment on th<J announcement in Tho
World.
RETIREMENT OF THE AGED
EMPLOYEES OF GOVERNMENT
SOUGHT BY POMERENE
WASHINGTON, Jan. 11.?Senator
Pomerene will draft a bill some time
this month providing for a contribu
tory retirement plan for Federal em
ployees. Ho held a conference with
Herman W. Craven, a member of the
Slvll Service Commission. Other con
ferences arc to be held with Commis
doners Mcllhenny and Galloway. Un
ler tho contributory plan tho burden
would fall both on tho government
ind on the employee.
Senator l'omerene's attention to this
subject, aside from his personal in
terest In It, lies In the fact that he is
Chairman of the Senate Committee
>n Civil Service and Retrenchment.
The conference held recently did
lot result In definite conclusions re
tarding what .-should go into the meas
ure. Senator Pomereno indicated,
lowover, that the measure to be draft
Hi, will follow In principle at least,
lie recommendations made by the
Hivll Service Commission !n Its re
?etly published annual report.
The commission there said:
"In tho establishment of improved
idmlnistrativc methods dtfllculty has
>een found in dealing with superan
mated employees. The commission
loos not regard superannuation as an
mtgrowth ? of tho merit system, but
lcals with tho subject of retirement
jecause of its relation to improved
idmlnistrativc methods. Supcrannua
,!on Is oldor than tho Civil Sorvlco
ict. and any increase is not a result
if the morit system. Examinations
tnd cffloiency ratings tend to mini
nlzc superannuation by exposing in
?apacity that otherwise would be hid
len.
FILIPINO FREEDOM
URGED BY CLARKE
?-5-?
WASHINGTON. Jan. 12?- Senator
lllurke of Arkansas Introduced yoster
lay a resolution to withdraw the sov
;reignty of tho United States from
he Philippines and to recognise an
ndependent government in the isl
inds.
SNOW AND SOLD
EMBRACE STATES
WASHINGTON. Jan. 12. ? Heavy
snows from the Sierras to Kansas
have interrupted traffic ;at several
joint and extreme cold weather is
reported throughout the country.
COLUMBIA ICE BLOCKED
PORTLAND. Jan. 12.?The Colum
bia river Is blocked with ice above
Portland, and navigation on the river
Is at n standstill.
AUSTRALIA WILL TAKE OVER
THE ENTIRE WHEAT CROP
NEW YORK, Jan. 12.?A special to
the New York TlmoB says that Aust
ralia will take over tho entire wheat
:rop of that country in order to as
sist farmers in disposing of their sur
plus. The country has a crop of 150,
900,000 bushels, of which 130,000,000
bushels is available for export.
RECEIVER FOR BIO BU8INE8S.
ST. LOUIS, Jan. 12.?A receiver has
been asked for the Hargadine-McKit
trick Dry Goods Company of St Louis
owner of a 21-Btory office and mercan
tile building covering an entire block.
WOMEN WANT PREPAREDNESS
NEW YORK. Jan. 12.?A campaign
for "preparedness" will henceforth oc
cupy the woman's section of the Am
erican Commlsaion for Relief of Bel
gium, as other agencies are now car
ing for Belgium.
BRITAIN BLAMED
? -
WASHINGTON. Jan. 12.?Represen
tative Fo8b of Ohio declared in the
House yesterday that Great Britain's
violations of the rights of neutrals
were greater than Germany's.
FOUR FINAL CERTIFICATES
FOR HOMESTEADS IN ALASKA
ISSUED BY LOCAL U. 8. OFFICE
The first final certificates for home
steads to be issued by tho local Unit
ed States land office wore accomplish
ed today when rights were granted tc
William A. McPherson. Ole Martin
Gaston W. Smnlley. and John D
Johnson. The homesteads are locat
ed in the vicinity of Seward and com<
under the surveys made by tho Unit
ed States government Tho homesteac
UNBIASED
BOARD FOR
THETARIFF
WASHINGTON, Jan. 12.?Presl
Ident Wlson Is giving conHldcration
to tho proposal that he recommend
to Congress tho creation of a non-par
tisan tariff commission. This fact be
came known here today. It was
known that when President Wilson
went to Hot Springs on his honey
moon ho took his memoranda on the
subject prepared by several of his ad
visers In whom ho has confidence.
Since returning the president has in
timated that the advantage of the pro
posal has appealed to him.
It has been pointed out to the Pres
ident that tho business interests of
the country are particularly anxious
to put un end to the serious disturb
aces which arise in authority every
time the tariff is altered. These in
terests desire to escape from their
awkward positions between the upper
millstone, represented by tho Repub
licans, and the nether millstone, rep
resented by the Democrats.
Doubt and Uncertainty.
There is doubt and uncertainty for
months prior to the tariff revision.
The effect on business Is bad. More
over. tho prosont system permits
"Jokers" to be placed in the statute
books with profit for tho beneficiaries
at the expense of the people.
Such a condition could not obtain
under a real tariff commission. A
body such as has been proposed
would be free from influences, would
be, in fact, an economic supreme court
which would investigate and receive
the facts in connection with every line
of Industry and determ'ne thereon the
exact amount of protection which
should be accorded. In other words, a
change In rates would be based upon
scientific facts and not upon political
considerations.
Reflection on Law Feared.
The President has been apprehen
sive that advocacy of a tariff com
mission would bo regarded as a re
flection upon the Underwood-Sim
mons tariff bill. In the shaping of
which he played such an Important
part. He also has entertained the view
that the federal trade commission nnd
tho bureau of domestic and foreign
commerce of the Department of Com
merce have ample powers to investi
gate and recommend tariff changes.
But the Republicans say the federal
trade commission Is in reality a Dem
ocratic body, and that they nre not
represented at all In Its membership.
As appointed by tho President the
committee comprises three Democrats
and two Progressives, consequently
the Republicans hold their doctrines
could not recolve any consideration
from such a tribunal.
As to the bureau of domestic aud
foreign commerce, its personnel, It is
pointed out. Is dependent upon the
whim of the chief of tho department
of commerce.. Its reports and recom
mendations, naturally would be in
fluenced by Its negotiations.
Trade Commission Too Busy.
As a matter of fact the federal
trado commission would be extremce
ly reluctant to undertake the work
of revising the tariff. Its tlmo ?s fully
occupied by Investigations Into ques
tions in connection with corporations
and price fixing. It !s Interesting to
uote that some of the Democratic
members of tho commission, If not all.
are In favor of a tarifT commissin
and have so advised the President.
eiG MISSISSIPPI FLEET
?+?
ST. LOUIS. Jan. 12.? On February
15 a fleet of 38 steel barges will begin
service on the Mississippi river be
tween New Orleans and St. Lonls.
AMERICAN SECURITIES SELL
NEW YORK. Jan. 12.?The Bank of
England Is selling approximately $500,
000 of American securities a day, ac
cording to prominent bankers here,
who are In close touch with the sit
uation both here and abroad.
ESTATE GROWS HANDSOMELY
PHILADELPHIA. Jan. 12.?In the
final adJudlcatloA of the estate of Ct
J. Harrah, former president of the
Midvalo Steel company, who died In
1890. approximately 88,000,000 Is to
be distributed among the heirs, less
a counsel fee of $100,000 to be paid
the attorney for the executors. When
the estate came Into the hands of
the executors $25 years ago It was
appraised at $650,000.
MORE WORK OF THE CENSORS
?+?
NEW* YORK. Jan. 12.? Paris
newspaper guesses on amount of re
cent loan subscription were so exag
gerated they were deleted by the cen
sor. From the heading "Loan of Vic
tory" the first day, the papers chang
ed to "The Victory of the Loan" with
? one estimate of $5,000,000,000 as total
? of subscription. Authorities feared
? some loyal subscribers would refralr
' under impression their subscription!
? were no longer necessary.
HUERTA NEAR DEATH
EL PASO, Jan. 12.?General Hucrtf
1 Is sinking, and very little hope la belt
'AMERICANS SHOT
BY RENEGADES
j AT CHIHUAHUA
EL PASO, Jan. 12.?Seventeen men,
all believed to bo Americana, were
taken from a train near Chihuahua
City and shot by order of General
Rodriguez, a Villa staff officer, ac
cording to a roport received here yes
terday. Only ono of tho "party es
caped death, It is declared.
The news cfimo through belated
refugees from the few districts which
are still under Villa's control, and
full particulars wero not available. It
Is said that tho Americans were lined
up against a wall and shot by a firing
squad of bandits who were in a drun
ken condition.
Carranzlsta soldiers are on the
march toward Chihuahua, and It is
understood Carranza has promised
to avenge tho outrage, if the news is
found to be correct.
TURKEY IS BIG
AID TO TEUTON;
FOOD PLENTIFUL
BERLIN (via London) Jan. 7. ?
"Turkey ha3 an abundance of foods
and other materials of all kinds which
sho can supply to Germany if Ger
many needs them," Bald Dr. Nazim ,
Bey, Secretary of the Young Turks' (
Committee, and ono of Turkey's most (
prominent men, on his arrival at {
Berlin.
"It Is only a question of transpor
tation, which seems to bo in a fair
way of solution.
"There Is no lack of anything in
Turkey. For example we have 30,000,
000 kilograms of cotton which Ger
many can have the moment she solves 1
the transportation problem, not to (
speak of 10,000,000 kilograms of re- 1
lerve supply in the shape of mattresB- 1
es and other articles in Turkish '
homes.
"The same la true of copper. Of
this we have at least 40,000,000 kilo- 1
grams which Germany can have at
any time."
Because of this abundance of nec
essaries and of the progress of mili
tary affairs to this time Dr. N'azlm
Bey predlctts eventual victory for the
Central Powers. He Is certain Ger
many will find a way to effect trans
portation communication viith Tur
key In a short time.
"Such a success will mean Independ
ence for Turkey for the first time,"
he continued. "There 13 Immeasur
ably loss of peace propaganda In Tur
key today than anywhere else. You
must remember that for decades there
has hardly been peace with us, and
accordingly wo are accustomed to con
flicts. We reckon that the present
conflict will last one to two years
more, but we are really Indifferent
as to the duration of the war. In any
event Turkey will bo the last to call ,
a halt.
"Turkey Is enthusiastic for a num
ber of reasons. First she has never
fought previously under such flavor
ublo circumstances. Second, tho
thought of eventual independence sti
mulates the troops tremendously, and.
Third the soldiers are spurred on by i
hatred of their enemies. This hatred
Is engendered by Illegal acts. The
Turks regard tho Allies as real bar- i
barlans, and when captured In a i
wounded condition frequently refuse
lood or drink from their captors, al- <
though when conditions are reversed i
the Turks give their prisoners freely i
| of their food." i
Dr. Nazim uey spoKO caimiy, oxcepi
when the subject of the world's Im
pression of Turkish-Armenian rela
tions was brought up. Of this he talk
ed !n bitter words. America, In par
ticular, he said, bad gained a false
impression In two ways. First. In- '
vestlgators of conditions had not boon
neutral or unbiased. Second, these
Investigators went to the wrong sourc
es for their information?to Greeks,
.Tews, and Armenians, who aro Turk
ish subjects and who have grudges
to air.
"Every time a Turk does some
thing praiseworthy In this world he is
hailed as an Armenian," ho contin
ued, "but every time he commits a
crime or acts basely he Is a Turk?
or something else.".
Thanks to Germany. Dr. Nazim Bey
continued, Turkey had been gradual
ly lifting herself from a sort of flnan
c'ay slough of despond, so that for
the last three months tho government
had been able to pay for all of Its
purchases out of money loaned.
lie summed up tho financial posi
tion of the Turkish Empire as fol
' lows:
"One cannot say the situation Is
good, for our expdVt trade has been
stopped, and consequently our In
come Is reduced. But It is not ser
ious."
? NEWLANDS CRITICIZES
TARIFF AND BANK REFORMS
WASHINGTON", Jan. 12.? Senator
? Francis G. Newlands, a Democrat, of
i Nevada, attacked his party's record
l In tho Senate today, delivering a long
I prepared address. In which he crltl
i elzed the tariff changes and bank
i! reforms.
FIGHT POSTPONED
NEW YORK. Jan. 12.? The Fred
t Welsh-Johnny Dundee fight has been
II Indefinitely nostnoncd. It was sn.
SMALLEST
KINGDOM
IN DANGER
LONDON', Jan. J 2. ? Montenegro,
smallest kingdom Involved in the Eur
open war, ia being crumpled up by
the Austrian armies much after the
fashion of the invasion of Serbia by
tho Germans and Bulgarians, accord
ing to report# received today from
tho Bankans.
An official dispatch from Ccttijne
says that Mount Lovoen, a Montene
grin stronghold, has failed into the
hands of tho'enemy and that tho Aus
trians arc in possession of stragetic
passes in tho Dinaric Alps. Tho Mon
tenegrin troops, aided by the rem
nants of the Serbian armies, also have
evacuated Berano.
Bitter cold weather has not stop
ped the fierce fighting in Bukowlna
and Bessarabia, according to advices
from Bucharest. No decision has been
reached, although it Is predicted that
tho AuBtro-German force cannot long
withstand the attack of tho superior
Russian forces.
According to Paris' office commun
ique today a German drive is expect
ed on tho Western front, and great
preparations have been made by tho
entente troops to repeal it. Hundreds
of tons of ammunition are passing
through to the trenches.
NATIONALISTS
NO LONGER WILL
FIGHT DRAFTING
LONDON, Jan. 12.?Irish National-.
1st leaders announced in tho House of
Commons yesterday afternoon that
Lho Nationalists would not further op
poso the modified conscription bill
which passed the Commons last week.
It Is expected that the House of
Lords will pass the Asqulth bill at
in early date.
BERLIN INVESTIGATES
UNITED STATES CONSUL
BERLIN, Jan. 12.?Germany Is mak
ing an official Inveat'gation of tho
sf-temenU that Edward Higgles, U
S. counsel at "Stuttgart has made hos
tile remarks about tho Gorman gov
ernmcnL
BAR ASSOCIATION
PRESIDENTS WANT
TAFT APPOINTED
NEW YORK, Jan. 12.?Seven for
mer presidents of tho American Bar
Association have written to President
Wilson, urging the appointment of
former President W. H. Taft to the
vacancy on tho supreme court bench,
caused by the death of Justice Jos
eph R. Lamar.
HAY WANTS MILITIA
INCREASED IN LIEU
OF GREATER ARMY
WASHINGTON, Jan. 12.?Represen
tative Hay of Virginia, chairman of
the House committee on military af
fairs has gono on record ts opposed
to tho military program of tho ad
ministration. Instead of raising nr.
idcouatc continental army, he favors
tho strengthening of tho National
Guard of tho various states. This
could be done without the great cost
of the administration program, ho
assorted.
FAIRBANKS IS TO SUPPLY
FIFTY TONS OF TUNGSTEN
BY PARCEL POST ROUTE
FAIRBANKS, Jan. 12?Approxi
mately twelve thousand dollars will
bo added to tho postal receipts of the
Fairbanks office making It an office of
the second class by tho shipment of
fifty tons of tungsten ore to the out
side by pArcel post. Tho shippers aro
Johnson & Ewers whose mine Is lok
Ing extremely good. Tho lead has
been traced for many hundreds of feet
and a shaft has boen sunk for fifty
feot.
ENGLISH REPORTED TRYING
TO PURCHASE GERMAN STEEL
NEW YORK, Jan. 12.?A Berlin
Overseas News Agency says English
manufacturers during the war have
tried to purchase German steel, but
German works have declined to sell.
From July, 1914, to June, 1916, tho
proportion to German export steel
soles to total business was 22.88 per
cent, while in preceding year It was
45.87 per cent
WHAT DOES THIS MEAN?
WAR FOR TWO YEARS YET?
NEW YORK. Jan. 12.?Tho Italian
government is bidding in the United
StatOB for munitions and supplies for
1917 delivery.
BILL TO CONTROL ALL THE
INSURANCE FIRMS PRESENTED
WASHINGTON, Jan. 12.?Senator
Weeks has introduced by request a
bill to provldo constitutional amend
ments to bring control of all insurance
companies under tho federal govern
ment. It Is said that uniformity in
the Insurance laws throughout several
states would be acceptable to most of
? Via

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