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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 13, 1916, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. VII., NO. 976. JUNEAU, ALASKA, THURSDAY, JANUARY 13,1916. PRICE TEN CENTS
Washington Clamors to Avenge American Murders
THREE ARE
CLIMBING
FOR PLUM
A friendly campaign Is being wag
ed by Postmaster Earle L. Hunter,
Deputy Marshal James L. Manning,
and Zlna M. Bradford, for the local
postmastershlp. Although a Repub
lican. Postmaster Hunter Is recelv.'ng
tho endorsement of numerous busi
nessmen, for reappointment when his
term expires In April.
On tho other hand. Mr. Manning
who was chief clerk under Postmast
er Hunter before appointed deputy
marshal, has had plenty of support
and his hid for the office will bo ac
companied by an abundance of en
endorsers. It Is indicated. Mr. Man
ning Is a brother-in-law of Charles
M. McGrath. a prominent Sitka dem
ocrat. and Is also a member of that
party.
Mr. Bradford's petition to Washing
ton Is signed by a large number of
businessmen, including members of
the Democratic Club. He Is endorsed
for the place by hl3 uncle, Xational
Comm'tteeman Z. R. Cheney, and by
Marshal Harry Bishop. He Is inter
ested in the Sanitary Grocery and
has been a resident of Juneau for six j
years.
U. S. CABLE
IS REPAIRED
LATE TODAY
Three cheers and a ttger almost
lifted the celling of The Empire of
fice at 4 o'clock this afternoon vhen
Operator C. F. Roberts. In charge of,
the United States cable office tele-;
phoned that the motor barge Wakena !
had spl'ced the break In the army ca-.
We at 3:30 o'clock this afternoon.
Sitka Immediately got into com
munication with Seattle and tho "cria- i
Is" again has been passed.
!
? PLENTY OF WATER +.
+ ? +
?fr Mayor Reck said this after- +,
+ noon that by tomorrow n'ght ?
+ there will be plenty of city wa- +
+ ter in the mains. He said: ?
+ "We have investigated the sit- +
?> uatlon and today found that *
+ the main Intake was higher ?
? than {Tie water level on the +
+ large north spring. The trou- +
+ ble will be repaired tomorrow." +
? ?
*+ + * + + + + + + + + + + + +!
CORPORATIONS FILE WITH
THE SECRETARY OF ALASKA
Three notices of corporations and
two corporations naming their agents
were rece'ved at the office of the
Secretary of Alaska today. The F. C.
Ramos Company, a fishing corpora
tion existing under the laws of Ore
gon fllo.I their articles. F. C. Barnes
v. is named as agent and he is located
at Lako Bay. Alaska. The notiflca-1
tion also bears the signature of F.
Colllson.. as secretary of the com-;
pany.
The Columbia Northern Fish'ng
a: Packing Company, organized under j
th" laws of Oregon, filed articles of
Incorporation with the secretary's of
fice and named F. Matheson. agent
of the company, at Wrangell. K. H. J
Joseph Is vice-president of the com-:
pany and Harrison Allen is secretary.;
One al'en corporation, the Alaska ;
Venture Syndicate, limited, filed Its
articles, also financial statement as
required by the Territorial laws, with
the secretary of Alaska. The syndi
cate exists under the laws of Great
Britain and Is permitted to do busi
ness In England and elsewhere.
NEW MOON SHINES ON NEWLY
WEDS EXTENDING BEST WISHES
With the rays of the new moon
shining through the windows, as if
in its silent but only manner it had
of showing its well wishes. Mrs. A.
D. Grove and Louis A. Burns wero
joined in the holy bonds of wedlock
at the manse of the Presbyter'an
church, last night. Rev. J. B. Stev
ens officiating. The wedding was
private. Both of the contracting par
ties are well known on both sides of
the channel.
B-R.R.R?COLD WEATHER!
?? - .
KANSAS CITY. Jan. 13.?The mer
cury has dropped from 35 to 60 de
grees within the past 36 hours in Kan
*r? M' -'ourl. Oklahoma and Nebras
ka and Texas.
The entire Middle West today is
enveloped in a terrible snowstorm,
and great damage will be done. It is
feared.
+ ?
+ TUE WEATMER +
+ Thursday. Jan. +
? Maximum?36. +
Minimum?15. +
'> Clear. +
Irate cutting
is opposed by
s.s. companies
SEATTLE, Jan. 13.?Officials of Se
attle steamship lines and transcon
tinental railroads who met hero yes
terday to consider reduction in the
i through passenger rates between ports
in Aalska and the East as a result
of the rates quoted by the Grand |
Trunk Pacific, failed to reach an
agreement.
Of the $10 difference In the rates
between the Canadian road and the
rate from Seattle, the steamship com
panies refused to absorb $4.00, al
though the railroads expressed a wil
lingness to reduce by $5.00 their
rates.
Fare via Seattle Higher
The fare from Ketchikan to the
East is $16 higher than via Prince Ru
| pert. From Juneau to the East via
Prince Rupert, and the Grand Trunk
Pacific the rate is $10 cheaper than
via Seattle and the American trans
continental lines.
From Skagway the rate to the East
is $14 lower by way of Prince Rupert
than via Seattle.
"By an adjustment of passenger
fares to meet as nearly as possible
'those In effect via Prince Rupert
tho Seattle railroad and steamship
lines should make a new effort to pro
tect Seattle as the gateway to Alaska"
said Harry Brandt, general agent of
the passenger departments of the Pa
cific Coast Steamship Company."
May Confer Again
Another conference may be held In
the near future. The lines represent
ed yesterday were the following:
The Great Northern Railway Com
pany: Northern Pacific Railway com
Dany, Oregon-Washington Railroad &
Navigation company, Ch'cago, Mil
waukee & St. Paul Railway company.
Canadian Pacific Railway company,
Pacific Coast Steamship Company.
Southern Pacific Railway Company,
Alaska Steamship Company, Paclf'c
Alaska Navigation company, and the
Border Line Transportation company.
ALCOHOL SELLING
JAPANESE ACCUSED
OF MANSLAUGHTER
SEATTLE. Jan. 13.?S. Takona. a
Japanese druggist. who Is alleged to :
havo sold unlabeled wood alcohol
which caused the death of seven per
sons, was made a defendant to man-!
slaughter charges in the super'or
court yesterday.
The Information against Takona
was filed by County Prosecutor Lun- ?
din.
-- ?
CONTRACT IS CLOSED
FOR NEXT SEASON'S
ANTIMONY SHIPMENTS
SEATTLE. Jan. 13.?The American
Yukon Navigation Company have Just
closed a contract with WT. R. Taylor. I
of Kantlshna. Si Scrafford and the
Northern Commercial Company of
Fairbanks, for the shipment out via
St. Michael during the coming season
of 3.000 tons of antimony ore for
treatment at plants at San Pedro.
BIG COAL PROPERTIES ON
BERING RIVER TO BE OPENED
SEATTLE. Jan. 13. ? The Alaska
Petroleum & Coal Company, which re
cently received patent to 160 acres of
coal laud in the Bering River section,
i Is planning to begin work in the
spring on the development of their
coal land and oil holdings in that
section.
According to the reports of the en
g'neers made to the Alaska Petrol
eum & Coal Company, the coal claim
contains not less than five million
tons of merchandable coal. The com
pany also proposes to build 17 miles
of railroad from the coal mine" to
tidewater.
It is also stated that former United
States Senator George Turner will
shortly Institute su't against the gov
ernment for patents to the other coal
claims in the Bering river region,
claimed by the company, and to which
patent has bew% yaled.
ALASKA COAL COMPANY
WOULD PUILD RAILROAD
?t?
SEATTLE. Jan. 13.?The Alaska
Petroleum and Coal company, of which
Clarke Davis '.b manager, announced
yesterday that It had decided to con
struct a-rallroad from Goose City, on
Goose Bay. Southeastern Alaska, to
thecompan.v'8 property, a distance of
i seventeen miles.
Mr. Davis asserted that the com
pany expected to expend $75,000 at
once on the construction of coal bunk
ers. after which oil wells will be dril
led on their properties.
REVOLTERS SLAIN
HONGKONG. Jan. 13.?Reports from
Tarn Sul. Potonga, Pockle and Tentz
are that many Chinese revolutionists
have been slain In a series of engage
ments between the revolters and Im
perial troops.
SEATTLE MAN SUICIDES
SEATTLE. Jan. 13.?A. C. Kean,
| president of Kean Brothers, realty
dealers, shot himself yesterday with
suicidal Intent, and was dying In a
local hospital last night
SITUATION
! POUL SAYS
DYNAMITfR
LOS ANGELES, Jan. 13.?Matthew
A. Schmidt, convicted on Deccmbor
30 of first degree murder as the ac
complice of James B. McXamara !n
the blowing up of the Los Angeles
Times building here five years ago,
was formally sentenced to Folsom
Prison for life imprisonment today.
The Jury had prescribed the punish
ment Schmidt should receive, the
same penalty imposed on Jnmes B.
McNainara after the latter had con
fessed in court four years ago that
he had placed the bomb that destroy
ed the newspaper plant.
When asked by the Court If he had
anything to say before sentence was
pronounced. Schmidt delivered a ti
rade ngainst Industrial conditions,
which, he said, were "rotten to the
core."
The specific chargo against Schmidt
was of having murdered Charles Hag
erty. ono of the 20 victims of The
Times explosion.
The Court's charge to the jury had
been regarded as distinctly favorable
to the defendant and the verdict
came as a surprise to Schmidt and
his counsel.
David Caplan, another alleged ac
complice of McNamnra, who was ar
rested lust February near Seattle,
shortly after Schmidt had been taken
into custody in New York, is in Jail
?iwa'ting trial also on the charge of
having murdorcd Charles Hagerty.
DETECTIVE IS
THOUGHT TO HAVE
BEEN MURDERED
SEATTLE, Jan. 13.?l'eter Peterson
a Russian Interpreter for tho Burns
detective agency was lured away from
his home In Seattle, by a forged tele
gram on October 15, tho wire sum
moning him to Mount Vernon, appar
ently on business.
Peterson has never been hoard from
Blnce he left, hero and his family is
pos'tlve that he has been murdered
by enemies.
WATER SITUATION ACUTE
AT SEATTLE AND ITS USE
COMMERCIALLY PROHIBITED
SEATTLE, Jan. 13.?The repairs to
the Cedar River water system so fnr
Jinffled all attempts at being repaired
and so scarce has becomo tho water
that the city today absolutely pro
hibited the water's use for commercial
purposes. All hyraullc elevators, both
for freight and passengers, were shut
down. All hotels, business houses
and soft drink places were notified to
turn tho water off from all flush tanks.
The city itself h prohibited from us
ing any water whatsoever for wash
ing of streets. Water wagons are i
hourly going about the high elevations
peddling the fluid to householders. }
ATTEND WEDDING OF HIS
DAUGHTER?MAKES MILLION
SEATTLE. Jan. 13.?Several weeks
ago Dr. Rufus Smith went to New
York City to attend the wedd'ng of
his daughter Margaret to John Davis,
the wealthy real estate agent of this
city. During the honeymoon of the
couple, while awaiting their return
from a short trip to rejoin him on
their way here. Dr. Smith took a
whirl on tho stock market and accord
ing to reports has cleaned up almost
a million dollars on his speculations.
HOW VANCOUVER. B. C. WAS
SAVED FROM TEUTONS
?*?
CHICAGO. Jan. 13.?A New York
special quotes Charles B. Bedell, chief
engineer of the Electric Boat Co., as
saying that a German attempt to seize
Vancouver, B. C., was foiled In the
early stages of the war by the pur
chase of two submarines by the Cana
dian government. The boats were pur
chased by Canada just before the dec
laration of war by England. Off Van
couver at the time, awaiting the dec*
larat'on of wnr, were two Germnn
cruisers, with men on board ready to
land at Vancouver and seize the city
but on the nppearancc of the submar
ines they left hurridly, so the story
aserts.
INCREASE LIKELY
BOSTON. Jan. 13.?The longshore
men's demand for an Increase In pay
with a wage agreement for next year
and a rate of 35 cents per hour, as
paid In New York and Portland, will
be granted by the steamship Interests
here, it is believed. Longshoremen
are now receiving 33 cents per hour
on general cargo and 50 cents per
hour for night work.
IMMIGRANTS FEWER.
WASHINGTON. .Tan. 13.?Accord
ing to available statistics, In the year
ended June 30. 1015, 326,700 imml
1 grants have arrived in the United
| States, compared with 1,218.490 in the
' vear 1914, the smallest total for over
20 years. The excess of al'en arrivals
iover departures was only 50.010 In
11915. compared with an excess In 1914
| of 769,276.
ROCKEfELLER
MUST AGAIN
STAND TRIAL
; WASHINGTON, Jan. 13. ? It was
lcrned on positive authority today
that the government will again proso
cute William Rockefeller and four
other directors of the New Haven
railroad, under the Sherman anti
trust laws.
Six of the former directors at New
York Monday wero found not guilty,
and the jury disagreed in the case of
five others, Including Rockefeller, af
ter a trial lasting several weeks. The
chargo was criminal violation of the
Sherman law.
Blames The Lawyers
Rockefeller did not testify during
his recent trial, because of lllnoss. In
his depositions, however, he placed
: tho responsibility for the alleged un
lawful acts of which ho Is accused
chiefly on Edward D. Robblns, formor
general counsel of the New Haven,
i Robblns, who became counsel in 1907,
wns described In tho depositions as a
man "who by reason of his learning
and great experience In railroad mat
ters. wns supposed by Mr. Rockefel
ler to bo peculiarly well qualified to
advise tho board with respect to the
legality of tho various transactions
proposed to It from time to time."
\ The deposition added that other
"lawyers of standing" advlsod tho
board, and that "In addition there
wore always on the board a number
: of lawyers of distinction, to whose
ludgmeaf on questions of law tho lay
members were accustomed to defer,
and that he, Rockefeller, was never
advised and never supposed that any
ucqulsltlon for which he voted was
In violation of the Federal anti-trust
act or wns open to question under
I said act."
^AManlra^ti HAD I */4
Rockefeller denied that he had ever
entered or formed a conspiracy to
monopolize the commerce of New
England, and Bald that the various
properties taken over by the new
Haven during his servico as a direct
or were not In pursuance of a "pre
concerted plan." but on account of
"special circumstances which Immed
iately Induced tho acquisitions." In
voting tor them -?he exercised hit
best Judgment, "act'ng In the bellof
that the acquisitions were In the best
interests of the New Haven Company
and of the servico In which It was
engaged." In no case, he sworo, had
he profited personally thereby.
Of the negotiations which led up :
to the New Haven traffic agrcoment
with the flrnnd Trunk railway of Can
ada!! Rockefeller professed fgnoranco
and said that he had been distinctly
told bv Charles S. Mcllin that the
agreement had nothing to do with
the abandonment of the Grand Trunk's
extension In New England, which the
Government alleges was a condition
of the agreement. He nverrcd Ignor
ance, also, of tho Metropolitan Steam
ship transactions.
?> 4- + * + + +?> + + + + + + + ?
?> 4
? NARROW ESCAPE +
? FOR PREMIER +
4- ' ??? +
4- TOKIO. Jan. 13.?Count Ok- +
? uma, the Jananese Premier, +
<? had a narrow escape from *
? death today nt the hands of as- +
<? sass.'ns. Returning from the +
f royal palace shortly after mid- +
4- night Count Okuma's aide saw +
? two men skulking near a build- +
4- lng and a warning shout came -F
F just In time. Two bombs wcro +
4- hurled bt Counr Okuma, ono +
+ exploding near him. He was +
? not Injured. The assassins os- +
+ caped. *
+ *
FRENCH FORCE LANDS
ON GRECIAN ISLAND
???
ATHENS, Jan. 13.?A French expe
ditionary force has landed on the
Greek Island of Corsln and a protest
is expected to be filed by the Hellen
ic government Immediately.
DANUBE TRAFFIC LARGE.
? ?+?
LONDON, Jan. 13.?Belgrade cor
respondence declares that Danube
traffic Is exceptionally heavy. It Is
-laid that commerce commenced -while
there was yet firing along the banks.
For the first two weeks only military
supplies came down. A day's traffic
averages about C300 carloads. It is
estimated that five days' traffic will
amount to over a million tons.
SALEM REBUILT.
SALEM, Mass., Jan. 13.? Since tho
great fire of eighteen months ago,
Salem has restored 1870 buildings,
valued at 16,000.000, it Is published'
here.
NORWAY BORROW8
NEW YORK, Jan. 13.?The Nor
wegian minister of finance has ar
ranged with the National City Bank
of New York for a 6 per cent loan of
$5,000,000, redeemable In seven years.
NIP PLOT TO SHIP RUBBER
NEW YORK, Jan. 13.?Government
detectives have unearthed an alleged
nlot to supply Germany wlfh rubber
by having women travelers carry it
in their trunks, and eight boxes with
! 3,500 pounds of rubber were seized
| last montb, it is said.
AUSTRIAN
NET BEING
TIGHTENED
PARIS, Jan. 13. ? Montenegro's
plight today Is said to bo serloiis, with
the Austrlans advancing on ?etljne,
tho capital, from the seaport of Cat
taro. and Funda.
Advices rocclved today were that
tho Austrian forces have reached
Michltz, five miles from Antlvarl, an
Important seaport, which Is beiiyt bom
barded from land and sea. 'At the
same tlmo a strong hostile force Is
Invading Montenegro from tlio; East.
Advices from Constantinople are
that the Turks have completely routed
the British forces from SedduT.
GERMANS RAID
ALLIED BASES
AT SALONIKI
LONDON, Jan. 13.?A squadron of
twelve German aeroplanes, armed
with explosives and incendiary bombs
bombarded Salonlki at dusk yester
day. inflicting great damage on the
military camps of tho French and
English.
Tho air raiders set out frqm the
German army headquarters in the
neighborhood of Strumnltza and 18 1
bombs were dropped by the Invaders,
with generally accurate markmanshlp.
Allied aeroplanes, surprised by the
attack, were some few m'nutes In an
swering tho attack, but two of the hos
tile fleet were brought to earth, one
by a French aeroplane ancj the other (
by the fire of a British anti-aeroplane i
gun. , i
The balance of the Teutonic flyers
returned to their base.
'? 1
SEVENTY KILLED; <
TEUTON POWDER
STORES EXPLODE
BERLIN. Jan. 13.?A German am
munition depot in the Southeastern
section of Lille, France, has been :
blown up, acording to an announce- I
ment of the war office Ir. an official
communication issued last night. Sev- <
enty wero killed and forty injured and i
a large amount of munitions destroy
ed.
ANOTHER AT DUPONT
WILMINGTON. Del., Jan. 13.?An
explosion occurred yesterday evening
at the Haglcy plant of the Dupont
Powder Company, the third within 48 i
hours. ,
??? ? ,,
GERMAN SEA CAMPAIGN
DESTROYS 731 SHIPS ;
BERLIN, Jan. 13.? 'It is stated on f
competent German authority," says (
the Overseas News Agency, "that ,
since the beginning of the war to ,
the end of November last 734 enemy
ships, with a total tonnage of 1,447,
628 tons, wero destroyed. 1
Of these 568 with 1,070,492 tons, (
were destroyed by submarines and j
93, with 94,700 tons, by mines.
"Of the ships destroyed 624, with ^
231,944 tons, were British, which
means a loss of 5.9 per cent, of the
total British tonnage."
PARIS PAPER SAYS
GERMANS ARE LYING i
PARIS. Jan. 13.?The Figaro says j
that representatives of a German cop- (
ra-tradlng firm have been telling pro- 1
dlglous yarns to natives of the South ]
Sea Islands, declaring London wns ,
razed by the Germans, Australia rav- |
aged by typhus and New Zealand en
tirely quarantined.
PORTUGUESE PLAN TO
BUY INTERENO SHIPS
PARIS, Jan. 13.?A Lisbon special |
declares that a Portuguese company,
allied with British shipping Interests ,
is said to be forming to purchase the
German vessels Interned In Portu
guese ports. Welsh m'nes arc suf
fering from a dearth of bottoms to ,
export their product and Import pit
props. While the United States In
eight months Increased Its coal ex
ports 3,000,000 tonB, Welsh exports
decreased 3,500,000 tons.
CANADIAN JAPS TO FIGHT
OTTAWA. Jan. 13.?Major General
Sir Sam Hughes, Canadian Minister
of Militia, has received from British
Columbia a proposnl to organize a
regiment of Canadian Japaneso for
service In Europe. One thousand Jap
anese who have been naturalized In
Canada will be enlisted at onco, un
der the proposal, and sent over seas.
Not only will the ranks be made up
entirely by Canadian Japaneso, but
the officers will bo naturalized Jap
anese. 4
8IMPLE, ISN'T IT?
BERLIN, (via London), Jan. 13. ?
On the authority of Emperor William
the name of the Polish fortress town
of Novogeargievsk, which was cap
tured by the Germans last August, has
been changed to its historic Polish
name, Modlin.
MUTILATED
BODIES ARE
IN EL PASO
EL PASO, Tex., Jan. 13.?That Gen.
oral Jose Rodriguez, a Villa staff of
ficer said to have Issued the com
mand for the execution of seventeon
Americans, principally mining men. at
Chlhuuhua has been captured near
Madera, by a posse of Americans, Is
the gist of a report recolvcd here this
afternoon. The message stated that
a number of the Rodriguez men were
killed but that other Amorlcans In
hat vicinity are calling for help, as
the bandit band is large.
Citizen Regiment Is Threatened
A plan la afoot to form a regiment
of 1,000 Americans and enter Mexico
for the purpose of running down all
the bandlta responsible for the mas
sacre of the Americans. The plan
had gained momentum late this af
ternoon, and It Is possible that it
will be carried out.
Mutilated Bodies Arrive
The bodies of the seventeen Ameri
cans killed by the Villa bandits reach
ed here this morning. They were In
a mutilated condition, and had been
stripped before the chots were fired
Into them.
+++*+++*4++***++
* +
* HUERTA DYING +
-?? 4* t
4- EL PASO, Jan. 13.?General +
+ Vlctorlano Huerta is dying. +
-!- The last sacrament was admin- +
istered last night. The ex-dlc- +
* tator of Mexico has been un- +
4* conscious for several hours. +
?> +
*+++??+*????????
LINERS HIT MINES
ROME, Jan. 13.?The Italian steam
ers Cltta do Palmcro and Crlndlst
nave been sunk In tho Adriatic Sea.
ifter striking Austrian mines, tho ad
miralty announced. Fifty lives were
lost when the Crindist went to the
!>ottom, but the passengers and crew
af tho Paimero wero saved.
RUSSIA PREPARES TO
INCREASE HER REVENUE8
*
I'ETROORAD, Jan. 13.?Tho Rus
sian finance ministry lias prepared a
liill providing for a general Incrcaso
n direct and indirect taxation. It Is
?xpected to result In an Increase of
?ovenues of 636.000,000 roubles, or
(about $318,000,000.)
MOTION TO REJECT
CONSCRIPTION LOST
BY A BIG MAJORITY
? ?
LONDON, Jan. 13.?A motion to re
ject the Asquith modlf'ed conscription
jill in the House of Commons was ov
rwhelmlngly defeated yesterday af
crnoon, the vote being 431 to 39.
True to their promise, tho Irish Na
ionallsts were lined up on the major
ty side.
The bill affects single men, bache
ors and widowers without dependent
?hildren. It Is expected that 6.000,000
men will be recruited under Its pro
visions. after It becomes law.
Miners Oppose It
A meeting wns held today of mem
jers of the Miners' Federation of
Ireat Britain and a resolution was
jassed unanimously, opposing tho bill
irovidlng compulsory military Bcr
vlce.
VISCOUNTESS ARRESTED
LONDON, Jan. 13.? Viscountess
Marguerite Do Malstre, an American
married to a Hungarian nobleman,
ivas bound over in two sureties. In
ho Richmond police court on the
'barge of being an alien enemy. The
Hscountess, who is separated from
lor husband, pleaded that she violat
ed the military regulations through
uadvertance.
FRENCH SOCIALISTS FIRM
PARIS, Jan. 13.?The SoCTaHsts of
Paris and of this district met in prl
rate session, and, It Is reported, vot
pd almost unanimously that France
diould pursue the war so as to ron
ler tho defeat of Imperialism in Ger
many more effective, as the resolution
put It, and peace more durable. It Is
stated that the vote was 6,000 In fa
cor of tho resolution to 100 against
It
WILSON AGAINST
COMPULSORY FORM
OF MILITARISM
WASHINGTON, Jan. 13.?President
Woodrow Wilson has made It known
that ho Is strongly opposed to a com
pulsory military sendee in the United
States, and In conversation with cor
respondents indicated that tho ad
ministration believes It can raise an
adequate army without making con
scription a part of the regulations.
RICKARD OFFERS
$45,000 FOR FIGHT
NEW YORK. Jan. 13.?Tex Rtckard.
promoter of the Johnson-Jeffries fight
at Reno, has offered Jess Wlllard
and Frank Mfiran ?45,000 for a 10
round fight here March 3.
t. P. SliackFeford accompanied by
his wife, children and maid, will
leave .on the Jefferson tonight for a
short trip below.
CARRANZA
MUST ACT
SPEEDILY
EL PASO, Jan. 13.?The de
mands of the American govern
ment for retribution In the mur
der of seventeen American citi
zens were conveyed today to Gen
eral Carranza through U. S. Con
sul John R. Silllman at Quere
tra. The document denounced
the slaying of the Americans as
a dastardly crime and calls upon
the Mexican president to immed
iately pursue, capture and punish
the perpetrators of the deed. The
statement closed by urging Car
ranza to Immediately dispatch
troops to other districts where
Americans are in danger.
A dispatch from Washington
says President Wilson and Sec
retary Lansing expect prompt
compliance by Carranza with the
demand that he punish the Mexi
can bandits who killed American
citizens near Chihuahua.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 13.?As a re
sult of the murder of seventeen un
armed Americans In Mexico, Repub
licans in the United States Senate,
have demanded Intervention by the
United States and her Pan-American
allies.
When the Senate assembled at noon
yesterday, the Republicans, through
Senator Jacob H. Gallinger Introduced
a resolution proposing Intervention In
Mexico by the United States and six
Pan-American nations which have ac
ted with It In recognizing the govern
ment of Venustlano Carranza. The
resolution demands Immediate mili
tary action unless Carranza compiles
with the demands of the United States
to protect foreign lives and property.
The resolutions were referred to the
foreign relations committee.
Secretary Lansing Issued a state
ment In which he said that the state
department felt that it had taken ev
ery possible precaution to prevent
Americans from exposing their lives
In the roglon where the Mexican gue
rilla warfare Is now in progress, and
that his advice had not been followed.
"Every step will be taken to see that
the perpetrators of this dastardly
crime are apprehended and punished,"
the statement concluded.
Secretary Lansing telegraphed Gen
eral Carranza calling for a prompt
punishment of the bandits who exe
cuted the seventeen Americans after
taking them from a train at Chihua
hua City Monday. A reply was re
ceived from Carranza, in which the
Mexican president expressed his sor
row at the execution of the Americans
and asked for further details. Every
dispatch from Mexican sources con
firmed the story that the Americans
were murdered In cold blood. Those
killed were from Texas, Arizona and
California, a number of whom were
mining men. Through Ellseo Arre
dondo, newly appointed Mexican am
bassador at Washington, It was ar
ranged to bring the bodies of the vic
tims from Chihuahua to Juarez by a
special train.
Senator Stone of Missouri, chairman
of tho Senate committee on foreign
relations, believes that Intervention
In Mexico Is Justified, but Is anxious
to give President Carranza an oppor
tunity to punish the murderers before
the United States takes drastic meas
ures.
10 OTHERS ARE
SLAIN, REPORT
EL PASO, Jan. 13.?The report was
current in Chihuahua, according to
Americans arriving here today, that
ten more Americans and two English
women lind been killed by Villa troops
at Madero. One woman reported mur
dered is said to have been the wife
of Jack Lcftbridge, a retired British
army officer, and had been staying at
tho ranch home of W. R. Hearst, the
American publisher, near Madera.
Confirmation Lacking
WASHINGTON, Jan. 13.?Up to un
til a late hour today the department
of stato had received no confimation
of the report that ten more Ameri
cans had been slain at Madera, by
VUlistas.
"ABANDON MONROE DOCTRINE
OR PROTECT U. S. INTERESTS"
BOSTON, Jan. 13.?Prof. A. B. Hart
of Harvard University, speaking In
Worcoster said that the United States
"must either give up tho Monroe doc
trine or must mnke preparations to
protect what it believes to be its in
terests."
PREPAREDNESS.
WASHINGTON. Jan. 13?The army
engineering board has recommended
to Congress the federal improvement
of the Connecticut river from Hart
ford to Holyoke at a cost of $1,870,
000. The plan involves the construc
tion of terminals at Hartford, Holyoke
and Ch'copee and also a dock at En
field, to bo constructed by tbe power
interests located there.

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