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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 14, 1916, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. VII., NO. 977. JUNEAU, ALASKA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1916. PRICE TEN GENTS
Martial Law at El Paso; ashington Is Warlike
COMPLETE
RULE EOR
ASSEMBLY?
Has Delegate James Wickersh&m
Introduced a bill in Congress provid
ing a full territorial form of govern
ment for Alaska? Has be. in this bill,
sought to give the Territorial Legisla
ture control of the fisheries}
While the cable was "down.1' this
news, if it be true, evidently was lost
in the shuffle, but according to a
Washington dispatch to the Seattle
Post-Intelligencer, on January 4, Del
egate Wtckersham has done this.
The dispatch is signed by Ashmun
Brown, a well-known corretpondent.
and reads as follows:
"Introduced by Delegate Wick
ersham of Alaska:
"Providing full territorial gov
ernment for Alaska and otherwise
enlarging the powers of the legis
lature: appropriating $200,000 to
complete the road from Ruby to
Long creek and the preserve the
fisheries of Alaska and give addi
tional power over the fisheries to
the territorial legislature. This
latter bill willl be vigorously op
posed by the bureau of fisheries
and the department of commerce."
If it is passed by Congress and j
signed by President Wilson, Honse
Bill 46 tS. another measure Introduced j
In the Congress by Delegato Wicker
sham of Alaska on December 14 is a
step, however long or short, towards
giving Alaska's Territorial Legisla-1
turc enlarged powers.
A copy of this bill was received to
day by The Empire. It asks Congress
to give the Legislature control of the
schools, the Alaska fund and the in
ane. the care of the latter, however,
depending first upon the construction
of i - iff asylum in the North.
The Text or mil.
The bill was referred to the House
committee on the territories, and or
der I printed, in its entirety it reads
as follows:
"A bill to amend an act of Congress
entitled "An act to create a legisla
tive assembly in the Territory of Al
aska. to confer legislative power
thereon, and for other purposes.' ap
proved August 24.1912.
"Whereas House Joint Memorial
No. 12. adopted by the legislature of
Alaska at Its second session on April
14 and 21. 1915, prays Congress that
the legislature of the Territory of Al
aska be given legislative Jurisdiction
and control over the schools In the
said territory and be given authority
to alter, amend, modify and repeal
the laws providing for taxes on busi
ness and trades therein. atyi that
moneys composing the 'Alaska fund'
now paid into the treasury of the
United States be paid by the clerks
of the Di>trict Courts of Alaska into
th> treasury of the Territory of Alas
ka to be disbursed under the direc
tion of the territorial legislature:
Now:
"Be it enacted by the Senate and
house of representatives of the Unit
ed States of America in Congress as
<"mb!ed. that in addition to the pow
ers conferred on the legislature of the
Territory of Alaska by the act of Con
gress entitled "An act to create a leg
islative assembly In the territory of
Alaska, to confer legislative powers
thereon, and for other purposes." ap
proved August 24. 1912. the said leg
islative assembly of the Territory of
Alaska Is hereby empowered and au
thorized to alter, amend, modify, or
to repeal the act of congress entitled
"An act to provide for the construc
tion an dmafntenance of schools, and
the care and support of Insane per
sons in the District of Alaska, and for
other purposes' approved January' 27.
1905. and the several acts amendatory
thereof: that so much of said act as
...... ?*??#! Oiirvrtnrf nf In.
.-cm-* i" v... ?.?.v ?
sane persons in the District of Alaska
shall not be repealed until the said
Territory has constructed an asylum
for the safe keeping of the said Insane
persons and shall have provided by
sufficient appropriations for their care
and support.
"Sec. 2. That on and after July 1.
1917. all moneys derived from and col
?>rted for lituor licenses, occupation,
or trade licences outside of incorpor
ated towns in the Territory of Alas
ka and now paid in to the 'Alaska
Fund' in the treasury department of
the United States. In pursuance to the
act of Congress of January 27, 1905,
and the several acts amendatory* there
of. shall be paid to the territorial
treasurer of Alaska by the clerks of
the District Courts in Alaska, and the
legislature of the Territory of Alaska
Is hereby authorized and empowered
to appropriate and expend the said
funds for territorial uses."
School Acts Nullified
It will be remembered that the two
school acts passed by the last legis
lature were nullified, the authorities
at Washington deciding that Congress
first must ratify acts pertaining to
(Continued on Page 1)
++++++*+44*4444*
? ?
* THE WEATHER +
+ ? ??+ +
+ Friday, Jan. 14. 4
+ Maximum?39. 4
?> Minimum?19. 4
+ Clear. 4
VON PAPEN IS
SUSPECTED Of
j SEATTLE PLOT
LONDON, Jan. 14.?Copies of cor
respondence secreted among his ef
fects were seized by British naval of
ficers toddy from Capt. Franz Von
Papen, recalled German military at
j tache at Washington, which the au
I thoritles said, show that Von Papen
made payments to Seattle just prior
| to the explosion of the dynamite In
Elliott Bay, which shattered plate
glass windows on nearly every down
town business block.
Von Papen refused to make any
statement regarding the correspond
ence.
The authorities have cabled a re
port of thetr findings to the United
States government.
The Seattle explosion destroyed a j
shipment of powder consigned to the
Russian government.
LANE'S BOARD
LOOKS LIKELY
WASHINGTON. Jan. 14.? "Never
! was the time more propitious for se
curing the ennctment of Secretary
Lane's proposal for centralizing the
government authority over Alaska in
board control, than at present." said
George McClellan. an attorney of Se
attle, yesterday.
McClellan had just come from
lunching w.'th Representative Lloyd
of Missouri, chairman of the com
mittee on the territories, when he j I
made the remark.
MANNING NOT
A CANDIDATE
Deputy Marshal James L. Manning j
withdrew today from the race for {
the postmastership. leaving Postmast
er Hunter and Z. M. Bradford the on
ly active candidates.
In a statement to The Empire Mr.
Manning said:. "I want to thank the
friends who endorsed my candidacy,
and I appreciate highly the support <
prom'sed me in the event I had con- '
tinued to he a candidate.'
? ? ? <
j
CONGRESS PLANNING
RAILROAD LEGISLATION |
WASHINGTON, Jan. 14.?While the (
railroads are not anxious for any leg- i
lslatlon by Congress this session. It |
Is possible that two or three measures
affecting their interests will be en
acted. One of the most Important ot |
these Is a joint resolution provldlug
for the sitting of joint committee ol j
the House and Senate for the purpose d
of fulfilling the President's suggestion i
of conduct'ng an Inquiry Into railway j<
laws and the transportation problem ' j
in general. President Wihon, as will I
doubtless bo remembered, urged "a j
thorough canvass of the whole ques-11
tlon as to whether our laws as at i
present framed and administered are
as serviceable as they might be In the
solution of this problem."
FIRE DESTROYS
CHURCH RAZED IN
ITALIAN EARTHQUAKE
?+?
ROME. Jan. 14.?The cathedral at
Sora was destroyed by flro today
while services were In progress
throughout Italy, commemorating the
earthquake at Avczano and Sora.
A year ago fire destroyed the statue
of SL Restttua. Sora's protecting
saint, which was the only object In j
the church of Sora which escaped,
the earthquake.
U. 3. INVtN IUHS OUT
BILLION AND A HALF
BACK IN SECURITIES
NEW YORK. Jan. 13.?The Times'
present estimate of the aggregate of
American securities bought back by
this country since the war started at
$1,550,000,000, distributed as follows:
Great Britain $950,000,000
Germany 300.000.000
France 150,000.000
Holland 100.000.000
Switzerland and other countries
50.000,000
Including pre-war selling it Is es
timated that Germany has sold $1,
000.000.000 of American securities.
These purchases have been reduced
by $75,000,000. the amount this coun
try must send abroad yearly for In
terest and dividends.
KING COUNTY LEADS THE
ENTIRE COUNTRY IN DIVORCES
SEATTLE.?King County leads all
coanties in the United States In the
number of divorces granted in pro
portion to population, according to
Superior Judge Frater. Washington
has for years been ahead of all oth
er states in number of divorces grant
ed and will maintain its record for
the year just closed. In K'ng coun
ty this year 1,695 divorces were grant
ed. an increase of 14 over last year.
In 1915 marriages numbered 3,343. n
decrease of 309 from 1914.
Give The Empire an opportunity to
i a note vou nrlces on minting
SCHOONER
LOST NEAR
OMMENAY
SITKA, Alaska, Jan. 14.?Tho Amer
ican schooner Volanto, In tow of the
gas boat Pindar, and bound from
Petersburg to Sitka, was lost at sea
near Cape Ommenay, and tho crew,
which was saved, arrived in Sitka to
day. They will go to Juneau on the
next steamer.
Tho Volante, u vessel of 125 tons
had gone to sea loaded with salt, nets,
barrels and other equipment for a
herring fishing cruise, and tho catch
was to have been cured hero.
The Volante was 87 feet long and
25.6 beam. She usually carried a
crew of five men. She was built in
1891 at North Bend, Ore., and was
registered at Seattle. She was a fa
miliar figure in the fishing Industry
In tho North Pacific.
McCLUNG'S PRIMARY PLANS
TO CHOOSE DELEGATES MAY
BE TRIED OUT IN MISSOURI
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo., Jan. 14.?
When the Democratic State Com
mittee of Missouri meets In St. Louis,
in February, Chairman D. C. McClung
will submit to it the question of wheth
er a primary or a convention shall
be called to elect delegates and al
ternates to the Democratic National
Convention and to select a member
of the National Comm'ttee.
This will be the first suggestion
ever made to elect the national dele
gates and the National Committee
man from Missouri by the primary
method. Heretofore theso selections
have lt,een mado by the convention
plan.
Should a primary bo called it will
not be under the general primary
law of the state, but under rules and
regulations prescribed by the State !
Committee.
NITROGEN PLANTS IN
U. S. ARE ESSENTIAL
TO PREPAREDNESS
WASHINGTON, Jan. H.^-The Unit
ed States is dependent for its powder!
manufacture upon Cli'le. In time of
war. therefore, unless this country
irontrolled the seas, the powder sup-1
ply would soon be exhausted. For j
that reason, it is believed the United !
States may take steps to provide eith
er government of private plants for
the manufacture of nitrogen from the
*ir, according to expressions In the
House of Representatives.
FREIGHT CONGESTION
IS ABOUT ENDED NOW
NEW YORK. Jan. 14.?The rairoads;
ibout New York are beginning to Bee;
the end of freight congestion due to j
embargoes placed against export
goods. Mihl weather has also helped, i
Five million bushels of wheat is still
iwaiting bottoms to conve^ !t to Eu-:
rope. The New Haven railroad is op
erating 44.000 freight "cars compared |
with 32,000 n year ago.
VANCOUVER TO RAISE
$400,000 IN TWO WEEKS
VANCOUVER, Jan. 14.?The local
committee of the patriotic fund is to
start a campaign on January 16th to
raise $400,000.
*+++??++++++++!
+ +
4- INCREASE MILITIA +
* ??*??? *
* WASHINGTON. Jan. 14. ? ?
<? Senator A. B. Cummins of Iowa *
* introduced a bill today to reor- *
+ ganlze and increase the Nation- +
* al Guard. +
* *
? + + + + * + * + + ?-S- + + + *
BELGIAN DENOUNCED
CAVELL EXECUTION;
BODY IS FOUND
AMSTERDAM* Jan. 14.?Cels. a Bel
gian spy who denounced the shooting
of Miss Edith Cavell by a German
firing squad. was assassinated, ac
cording to news published by The
Telegraf today.
The article said that Sels' body
was found in a street of Schae.'beck,
near Brussels, with two bullet wounds.
FOR CORDOVA BUILDING
WASHINGTON, Jan 14.?Secretary
McAdoo has asked the appropriation
committee for $500 for the commence
ment during the rest of the fiscal
year of a public building at Cordova.
BUTTERS IS NEW
MANAGER OE THE
A. 8. BUILDING
.Manager W. Grant Johnson, of the
Arctic Brotherhood building, resigned
his position today, and will be suc
ceeded at once by F. W. Butters. The
latter is a well known Alaskan, who
has had previous experience in club
managcmenL He formerly was a clerk
in the Cain Hotel.
Mr. Johnson does not expect to
leave Juneau.
GERMAN TARS
ARRESTED AT
POWDER CITY
WILMINGTON, Del.. Jan. 14.?
Four members of the German navy
who escaped from the lntcrnod Ger
man converted cruiser Prlna Eitel
Frlcderlch at Norfolk were arrostod
by government agents hero today.
Two of the Germans were employ
ed on a United States dredger en
gaged In the work of constructing for
tifications. All four were boarding
at a house close to the big works of
tho DuPont Fowder Company.
The authorities are Investigating
the throe recent explosions at the
Hagley plant of the DuPont Company,
slnco the arrest of tho German sail
jors, In an offoft to determine wheth
er or not they had a hand In them.
'Two of tho explosions are said by
DuPont officials to have been the
work of Incendiaries.
DEFENDERS OF SALONIKI
SOON TO TOTAL 200,000
PARIS, Jan. 14.?General Bonnal, a
French military expert, discussing in
tho Intranslegeant the situation at
Salonikl. mentions the German state
ment that the French and British
forces at tho Greek port now number
i72,000 officers and men and are In
creasing, and says:
"Tho joint army soon will reach
200.000. They are occupying a semi
circle around Salonikl, which Itself Is
just beyond range of the henvlost gun
? those carrying shells eighteen to
twenty miles.
"Thirty days of intrenching have now
given the defensive works a certain
solidity so that 200,000 men. with am
ple food and munitions and supplies.
?nd re-Inforcements availablo by the
open sea routes, should be abla to re
sist an army consisting of two to four
times their number."
SNOWSTORMS TIE
UP 8. P. TRAFFIC
SACRAMENTO, Jan. 14.?Owing to
a heavy snowstorm which has swept
the Sierra Nevadas today, passenger
and freight traffic East over the
mountains has Oeen suspended by
the Southern Pacific railroad.
MINING COMPANIES
GIVE WAGE INCREASE
DULUTH. Jan. 14?All the larger
mining companies operating in the
Minnesota and Michigan iron Iron re
gions have announced today a 10 per
cent, pay-increase, effective February
1.
McNEELEY GALLANT
AS PERSIA SUNK
WASHINGTON. Jan. 14.?It Is re
ported in consular dispatches from
Alexandria that when the liner Per
sia was torpedoed and sunk U. S.
Consul Robert McNeeley at Aden, one
of the victims, gave his seat In a boat
to a woman and two children.
THOUSANDS FOR JEW8.
NEW YORK, Jan. 14.?The Joint
Distribution Committee of the organi
sations raising a fund of $5,000,000,
Jor Jewish war sufferers in Europe
decided at a meeting here to cable
to various war-stricken sections more
than $500,000, nearly all the cash on
hand.
SHOCKS REPORTED
WASHINGTON. Jan. 14.? Govern
ment seismographs yesterday record
ed an earthquake shock. Indications
being that it was about 2700 miles
inland. No reports were received
from other points.
STOCK QUOTATIONS
NEW YORK. Jan. 14.?Alaska Gold
cleared today on the stock exchange
at 25%, Chino at 54%, Ray at 24%,
and Utah at 79%.
Copper metal remained at 24%.
GREAT COAL SUPPLY
PITTSBURGH. Jan. 14?A Wilkos
barre special says that thousands of
tons of anthracite coal are being
stored In that district before agree
ment between operators and mine
workers expires on March 31. The
coal in storage far exceeds what* it
was four years ago when the miners
and operators renewed their agree
ment. The Miners' union comprises
moro than 90 per cenL of the men
employed In and about the mines.
HANK'S GENEROSITY
DETROIT, Jan. 14.?It is reported
that Henry Cord will give another
$2,000,000 to aid his peace work. At
Kirkwall he sent 600-word aerograms
to each belligerent ruler and his bill
for wireless messages amounted to
$50,000 during the voyage of the peace
ship In Europe.
GOTHAM ECONOMIZING
NEW YORK. Jan. 14.?The Times
declares that a great wave of economy
is manifest in New York state and
that the wage earners are Impressed
with the Importance of savings. Now
York savings banks now hold $1,791,
524,000. an increase of $18,311,000 dur
ing the year.
KAISER'S
ILLS CALL
HIS SISTER
LONDON, Jan. 14.?A w!rcl08n dis
patch received from Romo bays that
Queen Sophie cf Greece has been sum
moned to the bedsid cf her brother,
Emperor William of Gcrmr.uy, whose
illness ia described as ecrious. The
Queen, the mosengo, bays, i3 to depart
from Athens nt once, for Berlin.
Four of the Kaiser's sons nro at
his bedside, recording to a news spec
ial from Amsterdam. They are Crown
Prlnco Frederick William, Prince Ad
albart, Prince Joachim and Prince
Eitel Frederick.
The lact official announcement from
Berlin regarding the Kaiser's illness,
was issued at Christmas and read as
I tallows :
"Emperor William has postponed
tho trip he had planned making to the
western front, tho Oversees News
Agency announces, a slight indisposi
tion making it necessary for him to
remain in doors for a few days."
The Agency's announcement des
cribed the Emperor'c ailment as "a
slight inflammation of the cellular sys
tem."
Emperor William has been free from
illness, bo far n3 reports have indicat
ed. since early last year, the last pre
vious report of his illness having been
circulated in January, when he was
| said to be returning to Berlin because
j of throat trouble and as suffering
from a chill. There was no official
confirmation, of tho ??cports. however,
and nothing more war, heard.
JAPS CROSS OCEAN
TO PRINCE RUPERT;
SENT BACK HOME
PRINCE RUPERT. B. C., Jan. 14.?
Some lmilde stuff is coming to light
about the famous sail of "the Japa
nese fishermen" across the Pacific
ocean. The Jnpa, It will be recalled
were found on the Queen Charlotte
Islands last summer. They told a
story ot" nhipwrcck and general hard
ships. It was a deep son yarn with
all the trimmings.
What Is probably the real version
has just appeared In the China Free
Press as well as In the Osaka Main
Ich!. Tho eight Japs, who belonged
to Utsuml Mura, JChlnc Prefecture,
conceived the Idea of reaching Ameri
ca. They bought a fishing schooner,
the Intention being to smuggle In.
Supplied with rice, sweet spuds and
water, they loft tho coast of Shlkoku
In June and after sailing 45 days, they
made the Queen Charlottes.
They were brought to Prince Rup-;
ert. exnmlned and sent back to Ja-;
pan.
ITALIAN KING WOUNDED?
BERLIN, Jan. 14.?Victor Emanuel
of Italy has been wounded by an Aus
trian grenade and Is now !n the hos
pital. It Is stated by the Overseas
News Agency. It attributes Its Infor
mation to a traveler who has just re
turned from Italy.
BRITISH SUBMARINE LOST
LONDON. Jan. 14.?A British sub
marine sank off Texel Island, Holland.
The Dutch cruiser Noord Brabant res
cued the crew and landed them at
Helder.
JEWELS LOST ON PERSIA.
LONDON, Jan. 14.?A Cairo dis
patch to the Evening News says
that the jewels of the Maharajah of
Kapurthnla, valued at $4,000,000.
were lost nbonrd thc?ntoamor Persia.
The members of the marahaja's suite
were aboard the ship, and the mahar
ajah himself Intended to join them at
Port Said.
TO COMMAND "PAT'S"
LONDON. Jan. 14.?Col. Buller has
left Shorncllffo for France to resume
command of the Princess Patricia's
Canadian Light Infantry.
"HOUSE" IS OPEN
OTTAWA, Jan. 14.?The Dominion
House opened yesterday. The govern
ment will ask a twelve month exten
sion and It Is believed that the Lib
erals will assent.
BOYCOTT BACHELORS
PAJ1IS, Jan. 14.?Young unmarried
women in the province of Brittany
(Bretagr.e) have formed an associa
tion to boycott all bachelors who fail
to enlist.
? ?
+ NO POWER; ?
+ PAPERS LATE +
* ?+? ?{?
* The local delivery of The Em- *
* plre was delayed this evening *
+ owing to tho low water pros- *
?f sure in the office. The news- *
+ paper press Is operated by that ?
+ power, and while repairs.were +
+ being made on the water sys- +
? + tern today the pressure was +
+ reduced. +
* 4
DEATH CALLS
HUERTA, FORMER
MEXICAN LEADER
EL PASO, Jan. 14.?General Vic
toriano Hucrta, former provisional
president of Mexico, died lato last
night, surrounded by tho immediate
members of bis family. Dr. M. P.
Schuster, his physician said death
was caused by clrhhosls of tho liver,
aggravated by confinement. One of
IIuerta'8 last requests was that he
bo burled In Mexico. He was 61 years
old, and was born In Chihuahua.
Gen. Hucrta, who had been HI for
i some time with what tho physicians
described as jaund!co, was operated
on January 1 for gallstones. It was
aunounccd after tho operation that
the physicians found symptoms of a
more complicated disease than was
formerly disclosed, and a second op
eration was performed.
Huerta has been confined at the
; Port Bliss military prison on the
charge of conspiracy to start a new
revolution in Mexico. Recently the
authorities permitted his removal to
j his home In this city when it was
said he was suffering from Jaundice.
He apparently recovered and was
taken back to /ort Blisrf. Suffering
a relnpse, ho was again removed to
his home for the operations.
Gen, Iluerta succeeded President
Madcro In Mexico after the coup
de-etat which resulted In the deaths
of Mudcro and Vice President Suarez.
Huerta later went to Spain. He was
arrested at Newman, N. M., last Juno.
Upon arraignment on the conspiracy
charge he waived examination and
was held for the federal grand Jury,
which convened at San Antonio, Tox,
January 11.
Huerta was a soldier all his life,
and until President Porflrlo Diaz wns
overthrown, had always been ranged
on the side of the party In power.
When he was 17 years old Huerta en
tered Chapultepcc Military Academy,
from which he was graduatod with
high honors In 1876. He was com
m'ssloned as a second lieutenant of
engineers, having shown marked abil
ity for' this branch of-the service. In
1901 he took command of tho troops
sent to quell the Yaqul Indian up
risings and participated In the cam
paign in Yucatan ngalnBt the Maya
Ind'nns. Promotion to the rank of
brigadier general followed. As a re
mit of military successes against
Pascunl Orozco, Huerta was promot
ed to be mnjor general by President
Diaz In 1910.
BRYAN ANTFORD
ON PERMANENT
PEACE TRIBUNAL ]
THE HAGUE. Jan. 14.?At a meet
ing today the Ford peaco delegates
elected the following American mem
bers of a permanent peace bonrd to
It In Europe Indefinitely with the
purpose of using all efforts to settle
tho war:
William Jennings Bryan, Henry
Ford, Miss Jane Addams, of Chicago.
Dr. Charles F. .Aked of San Francis
co, and Mrs. Joseph Fels of Phila
delphia.
BE CAREFUL, MISS '
ADDAMS URGES THE
MILITARY COMMITTEE
WASHINGTON, Jan. 14?Miss Jane '
Addams, noted peaco advocate, ap
peared beforo the House military com
mittee yesterday and urged that It
take no snap action toward war pre
paredness. TThls Is not tho tlmo
for a panicky demonstration for mili
tarism," Bho told the committee. "It
Is foolish to think of the United
States being In dnnger of war and
you should use extreme caution be
fore acting."
Miss Addnms advocated a commis
sion to study military needs.
? ? ?
ROOSEVELT WOULD
SEND WOOD WITH
ADEQUATE ARMY
NEW YORK, Jan. 14. ? Theodore
Roosevelt's solution of the Mexican
crisis was summed up today in an In
terview ho accorded newspapermen.
"Send General Leonard Wood with
an adequate force to Mexico immed
iately, to restore order exactly as he
restored order in Cuba after the Span
ish-American war," he said.
NO CONFIRMATION
THAT BANDITS WERE
CAUGHT IN MEXICO
WASHINGTON. Jan. 14?Tho State
Department had not received confir
mation today of the report that Jose
Rodriguez and General Amicdo, VII
llstas, had been captured and ordered
executed for the American murders.
VILLISTAS RAILROADED
.EL PASO, Jan. 14.?Miguel Lom
bardo, Manuel Banda, Juau Prioto.
Medina Vlenlta and several other Vil
la adherents, were arrested on vag
rancy charges yesterday, but were
later released nnd escorted to the city
I llm'tB i Thev are hnnnd North
CONGRESS
ASKED TO
INTERVENE
WASHINGTON, Jan. 14.?Aa a re
sult cf lawlessness, pillage and mur
der in Mexico Senator John D. Works
of California introduced today a reso
lution authorizing and directing the
President to intervene In Mexico, "to
establish and maintain a government
there until it is safe to withdraw."
Senator Stone, chairman of the com
mittee on foreign relations, was im
mediately summoned to a conference
with President Wilson.
"Up to this time," Senator Works
said, "addressing the Senate, "Con
gress has permitted all the responsi
bility for conditions In Mexico to rest
with the President; but it Is too grave
a responsibility. We have all sym
pathized with the President and had
hoped that conditions would right
themselves without Intervention. I
very much doubt now that a peaceful
outcome is possible. Congress atone
has the right to declare war and that
is what Intervention means. Congress
should courageously shoulder the re
sponsibility for there is no reason for
dividing the responsibility with oth
er nations or to Impose it upon the
President. I ask that the resolution
be referred to the foreign relations
committee with the hope that it will
take prompt action." The resolution
was referred.
MARTIAL LAW AT EL PASO
Acting under Instructions from the
War Department, General John J.
Pershing declared martial law In El
Paso, at 11 o'clock last night, owing
to the rioting over the resentment
over the murder of seventeen Ameri
can citizens by Mexican banditti near
Chihuahua.
An official dispatch from El Paso
today said that quiet had been restor
ed.
RESOLUTIONS IN
CONGRESS SEEK
DRASTIC ACTION
WASHINGTON. Jan. 14.?in tho
matter of tho Mexican situation Sen
ator Jamos Hamilton Lewis of Illinois'
the majority whip, Introduced a res
olution authorizing the President to
use a free hand with tho army and
navy forces to the extent that they
nro now used in policing Nicaragua
and Haytl.
In a speech on the Mexican situa
tion Representative Slaydcn of Texas
defended tho Administration's recog
nition of General Carranza and said
the time had como for the Pan-Ameri
can Union to restore peace In Mexico.
Murders Deeply Deplored
Ellseo Arredondo, Carranza's cou
sin, and the Mexican ambassador to
Washington, formally assured Secre
tary Lansing of the State Department
that tho Carranza government "deeply
leplorcd the dastardly action at Chl
liuahun," when the Villa forces mas
sacred seventeen Americans, and nd
[led that "efficient action will be tak
en to bring the murderers to Justice."
RIOTING BREAKS OUT
EL PASO, Jan. 14.?Before martial
law was proclaimed last night, ser
ious rioting had broken out. Trouble
started when American aoldiers raid
i-d the saloons, looking for Villa Mex
icans. Fifty soldiers started through
one of tho principal streets and fights
ensued with Mexicans. Several of
the latter were Injured.
The police warned Mexicans to
leavo for places of safety. By 11
o'clock the situation had become such
that General Pershing, in touch with
Washington, ordered martial law
and sentries were placed throughout
the city. The 16th U. S. Infantry is
on guard today.
AMERICANS IN
SOUTH FURIOUS
OVER OUTRAGES
EL PASO, Texas, Jan.-14.?Develop
ments in the Mexican situation have
moved with kaleidoscopic rapidity dur
ing the past twenty-four hours. When
the seventeen mutilated bodies of tko
American victims reached here yes
terday morning from Chihuahua they
were met by a crowd estimated at 10.
000 people, principally Americans.
Feeling ran high, stirred by the ar
rlvnl of the bodies. Americans at
Madera wired an appeal for help "no
matter from what quarter it comes."
Tried to Kill Villa.
Conflrmution has been received of
the report that an attempt was re
cently made to assassinate General
Francisco Villa, near Bustillos, Stato
of Chihuahua. It Is declared that
four of Villa's followers tried to shoot
him. but missed: Villa thcrupon drew
his pistol and killed two of the would
be assassins.
News of the attempt on Villa's life
was telegraphed here from Chihuahua
City by Gen. Jacinto Trevino, com
mander of the Carranza garrison. Vil
la is making a powerful effort to col
lect his old followers and reorganise
his army.
Villa Victory Reported.
General Benjamin Argumeda. in
command of 6,000 Onxaca troops was
reported late yesterday in advices be
lieved to be reliable, to have been vic
torious in a battle at Ecalon with
[3600 do facto government troops from
Chihuahua. The battle was fought
1 Wednesday.

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