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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 17, 1916, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. VII., NO. 979. JUNEAU, ALASKA, MONDAY, JANUARY 17, 1916. PRICE TEN CENTS
Montenegro Quits World's War, Berlin Asserts Today
LIBRARY
FUND GETS
BIG BOOST
Over eleven hundred dollars Is tho
amount secured by the nine ladies and
gentlemen of Juneau who were out
last Saturday securing funds with
which to operate the public library.
The committee will continue its work
during the coming week and It Is be
lieved. according to B. D. Stewart
that at least $1,250 will be the total
amount raised for the relief of the li
brary.
There were three committees at
work Saturday. One committee, com
posed of J. C. McBrlde. Mrs. B. D.
Stewart and Mrs. HI C. DeVIghne. se
cured $300 with promises of more to
come The second committee, Z. R.
Cheney and Mrs. A. P. Kashevaroff
brought In over $150. The third com
mittee consisting of Judge Robert W.
Jennings. Mrs R. E. Robertson. Mr.
Stewart and Superintendent of
Schools L. D. Henderson, returned to'
the committee rooms late In the af
ternoon with $620. its district having
been the business section. The above
amounts were in cash or checks but
did not include promises which were
fulfilled during the evening hours or
The city was completely atstncteu
and the committees covered the
ground thoroughly. Every member
of the committees reported that the
citizens responded nobly and mani
fested the greatest Interest In the
movement and the library In general.
The people seem determined that the
library shall bo ma'ntalned and every-;
body protested against its decease.
Another prominent feature con
nected with the soliciting of funds was
that the citizens are almost unani
mous that the city should take over
the institution and operate It as a
part of the city's affairs. And right
on top of this assertion, many of the
citizens declared that they would^not
vote for any person as a member of
the nert city council, who would not
agree to the proposition.
Mr. Ste\vart stated this morning
that many transients, who secure ben
efits at the library, were of course
unable to be reached for voluntary
contributions. Many have at various
times expressed the pleasures they
have occasioned by having access to
the library*, and for that reason a
contribution box has been placed in
the library and any donations may be i
placed In this.
The committee, collectively and in
dividually, desire to thank tho con
tributors for their free will offerings.
Such a glad and happy response to
their labors were certainly appreciat
ed. Not a tight wad was located and
in most cases the strings of the
purses were already unloosened await
ing the call of the committee.
* ' f
CITY HEALTH GOOD.
The epidemic of sickness j
which for a very short time pre- I
vailed In Juneau has safely |
passed. There are practically '
no new cases of scarlet fever or
typhoid. Several symptoms de- !
1 veloped last week but the little '
germs turned out to be some- 1
thing else.
The above were the state
ments made today by Dr. H. C.
DeVlghne, who in the absence of
Dr. Bev's. is acting Deputy Com
missioner of Health, and Dr. j
Dawes, city health officer.
Last week it was reported [
' from several sources that both '
scarlet fever and typhoid were {
prevalent in the city but when '
all rumors were mn to earth, j
there were nothing to them.
There are. however, many i
cases of whooping cough and '
chicken pox among the chll- I
dren. but there is nothing re
markable about that fact. The [
! diseases are known as infantile !
necess'ties, and prevail any
where. generally anytime.
Even the La Grippe microbe. 1
which wiggled around this vicin- I
Ity for several weeks, has two- 1
stepped out. and the cases he '
left are now convalescent.
Summing up the general health !
' report for the city of Juneau it |
' can be *ald that jt is excellent
for this t'me of the year.
I * I
4 4.
NEW CITIZEN IS MADE.
Frederick Wigg. a native of Canada,
s this afternoon a full fledged citl
3 n of the United States. He safely
passed the examination before Judge
Jennings. Elmer Stromshog of Swe
den. was no so fortunate in his appli
cation and h's admittance under the
folds of Old Glory was postponed for
three months.
+ WEATHER REPORT. *
+ ??? *
+ Yesterday.
+ Maximum?33. +
+ Minimum?19. +
+ Clear. ?
+ Today. +
+ Maximum?35. +
?> Minimum?16. +
* Clear.
LOS ANGELES
UNDERWATER;
DAMAGE LARGE
LOS AXGELES, Jan 17.?An all
night downpour has turned the streets
of Los Angeles Into rivers and traffic
Is paralyzed. It was still raining hard
at noon today.
I The city Is practically Inundated,
and but few cars are running. The
1 Pacific Electric Company's service to
Ocean Park. Long Beach. Venice and
! other beach points, has entirely
' stopped and all trains aro late.
Reports from many points are that
other Southern California cities have
'suffered from the deluge, and steam
[ and electric lines aro tied up. Heavy
damage has been inflicted on proper
ty. The rainfall is the heaviest in
two years.
SAN DIEGO SUBURB
RESIDENTS RESCUED
FROM THE HOUSETOPS
SAX DIEGO. Jan. !.?.?Police au
tomobiles were rushed to Old Town
; at 4 o'clock this morning to rescue
residents from second story windows,
following the sudden rise of the San
j Diego river, which is swollen to its
: highest point iu many years. Two
men were taken from the top of a
house which had been undermined by
the stream.
BROTHERSSAY
THEY KILLED
RICH PARENTS
CHICAGO. Jan. 17.?Irving. 32. and
Herbert D.. 20. brothers, were arrested
yesterday for murder and an hour lat
er they confessed they had planned
and mudered their father. Furman D.
Updike, a millionaire board of trade
operator, and their mother as well,
because they believed they were to be
disinherited, and tho fortune left to
their sister.
The plot was revealed by a hidden
dictagraph, the disc of which was con
cealed in a garage at the rear of the
Updike residence.
? ?
* STEAMER SAILINGS. *
* ?+? ?
+ SEATTLE. Jan. 17. ? The *
+ steamers Admiral Farragut, +
+ Spokane and JefTerson were +
+ scheduled today to sail for the -J
+ north tomorrow night. Tuesday. *
+ Jan. 18. The Victoria, with +
+ freight only, is billed north +
+ Wednesday night. The Alame- *
+ da and Northland will sa'l ?>
+ Thursday und the Al-Ki will be +
+ entirely overhauled in time to +
+ sail next Saturday night +
* *
VICTORIA TO COME NORTH
SEATTLE. Jan. 17. Tho steamer
Victoria, the flagship of the Nome
fleet will be taken from her berth in
the East waterway and will be loaded
with railroad supplies for Cordova. Re
turning she will bring south a cargo
of copper ore.
CANAL OPENING IS
NOW SET FOR MARCH 1
WASHINGTON. Jan. 17.?It is pre
dicted that the Panama Canal will
be open again for business on March
1st.
TERRITORIAL CASE WILL
NOW GO TO SAN FRANCISCO
In all probability Judge Jennings
will sometime today sign a bill of ex
ceptions in the well known case of
Charles A. Sulzer. and others, against
Walstein G. Smith, treasurer for the
Territory of Alaska. This means that
the case will then go to the court of
appeals at San Francisco. The case
is of interest to every one in the
N'orth. It evolves about the right of
the First Division to spend the pro
fits of the timber sales of the Tongass
forest reserve. It will be remembered
that this question started one of the
hottest lights in the territorial legis
lature.
BIG CASE TO BE APPEALED.
?+?
Judge Jennings this morning signed
a bill of exceptions in the famous wa
ter case of the Alaska Juneau Gold
Mining Company against the Alaska
Ebner Company. The case will now
of Appeals at San Francisco. Attor
go to the United States Circuit Court
neys Winn and Hellenthal & Hell
enthal are the representatives of
those Interested.
McTAGUE CASE IS PLACED
AT FOOT OF THE CALENDAR
?
The caso of McTague against Sales,
set for hearing before Judge Jennings
this morning, was given a hard shufTlo
and placed at the end of the calen
dar. Attorney Robertson stated that
his client was unable to appear ow
ing to the fact that there was no mo
tive power at present between Wran
gel and Juneau. Judgo Jennings
granted the delay and the case may
come up before the end of the term
If oooortunitv arises
YUAN'S ARMY
DEFEATED BY
REPUBLICANS
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 17.?Sixty
thousand revolutionary troops defeat
ed the forces of Emperor Yuan Shi
! Kal in an action fought in the pro
jvinco of Szc Chucn, according to a
cablegram received today from Shang
hai by the Ch.'neso Republic Associa
tion.
The battle is said to have ended
with the capture niul occupation of
Tuhchow by the revolutionary forces,
who, the cable said, were also threat
ening Cheng Tu. the capital of the
province of Sze Chucn.
Trouble in the province was caused
by an attempt of the military author
ities to put into effect the conscription'
decree made by Emperor Yuan shortly
after Christmas. The revolutionists
were formed Into an array overnight,
to resist compulsory military training.
6,000 GARMENT
WORKERS STRIKE
PHILADELPHIA, Jan 17. ? The
j United Garment Workers, numbering
about 6,000, went on strike today for
j higher wages and better working con
! ditlons.
?
POWDER TRUST PROBE
ORDERED AT WASHINGTON;
WASHINGTON, Jan. 17.?The De
partment of Justice recently began an
; investigation to determine whether
the DuPont, Atlas, and Hercules Pow
der companies, tho three units into
which the Supremo Court dissolved
the old DuPont Powder Company,
were obeying the terms of that do- j
cree.
BURKETT ANNOUNCES NAME
LINCOLN. Neb. Jan. 17.? Former j
Senator Elmer Burkett has announc-'
ed his candidacy for the vlce-prosl
dency on tho Republican ticket. Mr.;
Burkett will immediately open head
quarters Bmi seek support throughout.
I tho West.
WOMEN CLERKS NOW
GET NO LOWER THAN
$8:50 FOR WEEK'S WORK
?+?
BOSTON. Jan. 17.?Practically all
the large Boston stores have accepted
the decree of the minimum wage com- i
mission which requires that women
employees in retail stores receive at
least $8:50 weekly.
TAX CASE UP NEXT MONDAY.
?4?
The right of the City of Juneau to
sell property for delinquent taxes will
possibly have a new angle presented .
next .Monday. The various cases
have been postponed from time to <
time, but next week something will i
be doing. Attorney Heilcnthal. him- 1
self moved for the postponement this |
morning, to allow Attorney Faulkner
to enter an objection for one of his
clients.
DAMAGE CASE STARTING
IN THE DISTRICT COURT
The case of V. A. Paine, as adminis
trator of the estate of Andrew Peter
son against tho City of Juneau, start
ed this morning before Judge Jen
nings. J. H. Cobb is representing the i
plalnt'fT and Attorney S. Hollenthnl
is looking after the city's interests. <
The following Jury was drawn to i
hear the case: F. H. Smith, B. D. i
Blakeslee. J. T. Stephens. J. W. Dud
ley, Carl E. Lund, Carl W. Hnrring
ton, Everett Bradford. H. T. Tripp, Al- i
fred Peacock, W. R. Wills, R. E. Da- ]
vis, and J. A. Sloan.
A motion was made this afternoon j
for a non-suit, which Judge Jennings i
took under advisement until tomor- j,
I row morning.
NEW COURT CALENDAR.
Tho calendar In the United States
District court was again switched;
about this morning. Following the
case of Paine vs the City of Juneau,
the suit of Lucy Linderman against
Jimmy Young will be brought to
trial. This is a case of restittulon of
premises, the property Involved be
ing near the city dock. The attor-1
neys are J. G. Held and Hellenthal &
Hellenthal.
The case of the Alaska Supply Co. i
vs Mrs. Ole Orsen will be the next j
on the proceedings. This Is for the I
recovery of raonoy. and hinges about
the failure of a shoe repair shop of!
Tony Blahtamne. The Alaska Sup
ply Co. alleges that Mrs. Orsen went
good for the purchase by Tony of tho
furnishings of his shop. A failure
happened and only a small amount of
tho purchase price had been received.
Shacklcford & Bayless represent the
Supply company and the defendant !b
represented by Z. R.-Cheney.
SMALL DWELLING AFIRE.
A telephone call summoned the Are
truck on a quick call last night out on
Willoughby avenue. Sparks ignited
the roof of a small dwelling near tho
government native hospital, but be
fore the Are boys had arrived tho
Aames had been extinguished. Tho
loss was nominal.
Give Tho Empire an opportunity to
n tint A w?tt rtrleoa nn nrtnMna
BANDITS
WILL GET NO
QUARTER
WASHINGTON, Jan. 17.?President
Vcnustlano Carrauza today renewed
bis assurance to the United States
that he would mako every effort to
punish those responsible for the mur
der of seventeen Americans near Chi
huahua last week. Carranza told U.
S. Consul John B. Sillimau, in reply
to tho State Department's demand
that the nnjrdercrs be run down, that
lie had Issued orders for tho immed
iate pursuit, capture and punishment
of those responsible for the crimes,
and according to Consul Sllllman's
report, Curranza announced ho was
about to Issue a decree permitting any
cltlzen of Mezican nationality to shoot
the bandits without any formality.
In diplomatic quarters It Is confi
dently expected that Great Britain
will again suggest to the United
States that unless foreigners are
protected !n Mexico that European
nations will be compelled to consider
steps to protect their own interests.
DEPUTIES QUELL
RACE RIOTS AT
SOUTHERN FORT
EL PASO, Jan. 17.?Rioting between
United States soldlors and Mexicans
at Port Hancock Saturday night
caused an appeal from citizens there
to the sheriff at El Paso for police
protection.
Citizens and soldiers were cleaning
out the Mexicans, telephone messages
from Fort Hancock stated, and a half
dozen deputy sheriffs with sawed-off
riot shotguns were rushed by automo
bile from El Pnso to quell the disor
ders, *
All Americans at Madera aro now
reported safe, according to word re
ceived today from Chihuahua City. A
telephone message to this egect had
been received from Cusihulrlachic.
* + + + ??* + ? + + + ? +
? STEAMSHIP AFIRE. ?
? VIGO. Spaiu. Jan. 17.? The +
Belgian s^-amshlp I.lllo is ajlrc ? + 3
200 miles off this port, accord- +
* lng to wireless dispatches re- +
* ceived today. +
*+++*+?+*??++++*
BOY IS KILLED
UNDER WHEELS OF
SEATTLE AUTO
SEATTLE. Jan. 17. ? Death last
night claimed tho 5-year-old son of
It. L. Adcock, who was run down by
an automobile driven by Frank Leek
enby. Lcckenby is vice-president of
the Charles H. Lilly Company, and In
the machine with h'm were the Misses
Mercla Stewart and Bertha Irwin.
Tho Adcock boy lived but a short
time after the machine struck him. ,
As a result of the accident Leckenby
Is in a hospital, having collapsed af- '
tcr he learned the child had died.
FAVORS THE TIGHTENING
OF SCREWS ON GERMANY ,
1 I
LONDON, Jan. 3.?Thomas Gibson
Bowles, who changed his political coat
and subsequently reverted to his orig- (
Inal faith, will be the Unionist candi
date for tho parliamentary seat of St.
George's made vacant by the recent
elevation of Sir Alexander Henderson
to the peerage. ,
Mr. Bowies' role In the house of ,
commons, to which In view of the
present system of uncontested elec
tions he If. "ure of being returned, will
be agitation for tho sterner use of
Great Britain's sea power in the pros
ecution of tho war.
lie contends mat tne navy's grap
pling Irons are hampered by fear In
some of tho government departments
of offending neutrals, and he wishes
to see more complete stoppage of sup
plies reaching Germany through neu
tral countries.
Purser Louis Coughlin has return
ed to his duties with the Pacific Coast
Company, and Is aboard tho Senator
on her present trip.
+ *
* THE +
* SPIRIT +
* OF *
* 1910. 4>
* ?*
? The year 1916 will be one of *
? greater prosperity to our cltl- 4
?> zens and community alike, for 4
+ the fundamental principle of 4*
4? community advancement is 4
4? based upon Co-operation and 4
? Buylngat-Home, and this spirit +
4* is being manifested by our peo- *
+ pie more today than at any 4*
? other time in tho past. A firm 4
? resolution to sd continue will 4
? ultimately mean individual sue- 4*
? cess and a Greater Gastincau 4?
4* Channel. +
? The Empire iis offering prizes *
? of $26 in tho Buy at Homo ?
? movement. See advertisement +
4- in today's Empire for partlcu- <?
+ lars. *
4? DAILY EMPIRE *
4* "All the News All tho Time." ?
4? *
CHURCH IS
SCENE OE
RIOTING
SCRANTON, Pcnn., Jan. 17.?Riot
ing between rival factions at the
Church of tho Sacred Heart of Je
sus In Dupont, near here, yesterday,
resulted in the death of ono man, the
probublo fatal Injury of two, and the
serious Injury of a dozen more.
Knives, revolvers and clubs played
a prominent part in the melee, and
several Stato troopers, called to tho
scene, were uraong those injured.
Nineteen arrests were made.
Quiet was reported today when the
men involved in tho rioting wont to
work at the powder works, although It
is feared that troublo may break out
at any time.
THIRD OF CITY
OF BERGEN IS
FIRE SWEPT
CHRISTIANIA, Jan. 17.?A third of
the city of Bergen was destroyed by
lire Sunday. Two lives were lost,
two thousand persons were rendered
homeless and damago closo to $15,
000,000 was caused.
TELEGRAPHIC NEWS IN
A SKELETONIZED FORM
FORT WORTH, Tex. ? xFormcr
Governor Thomas M. Campbell an;
nounceB his candidacy for the Demo
cratic nomination of United States
Senator at the primaries.
NASHVILLE?Tennessee Republi
cans will meet hero May 3 to select
delegates at large to the national con
vention and nominate candidates for
Senator and Governor.
VIENNA? Count Salls-Zcwlo has
been appointed governor-general of
Serbia.
ST. PAUL?Joseph A. A. Burnqulst,
Republican, has taken the oath as gov
ernor.
WASHINGTON?The Senate Judic
lary committee will report favorably
on a bill authorizing the President to
appoint successors to federal judges
tvho Toil to retire when they have
Passed the age limit
LONDON?King George officially
announces the appointment of Emper
or Nicholas, Russia, lleld marshal
In the British army.
ROME?Bulgarian prisoners cap
tured by the Serbians, will be con
centrated at Avezzano. They will in
nil probability be employed to clean
up the debris caused by the recent
earthquake and rebuild the town.
NEW YORK?Congressman Frank
Buchanan of Illinois, indicted on
charges of conspiring to foment
striken In munition plants, has sur
rendered here aud arraigned. He
pleaded not guilty and was released
on $5,000 ball.
LONDON?Official announcement is
made that 390 establishments have
been added to tho munitions works
controlled by tho government. The
total number of these works is now
2.422.
BOSTON?Percy W. Haughton, fa
mous Harvard football conch, has pur
chased the Boston Braves for $500,
900. James C. Gaffney paid $187,000
for the Bravea four years ago.
GERMANS SMUGGLE
AEROPLANES TO U. S.
PACIFIC POSSESSION
LONDON. Jan. 17.?The consuls of
tho Entente Powers have notified
tho Philippine government that Ger
man submarines have been shipped to
Manila piecemeal, in the guise of ma
minery. Tho most rigid customs pre
cautions have been instituted as a
result.
MAN CONVICTED OF WIFE
MURDER?SENSATIONAL CASE
MINNEAPOLIS, Jan. 17.?Frederick
T. Price was convicted hero late Sat
urday afternoon for the murder of his
wife, Mary Frhllcy Price, a member
of a wealthy Minnesota family. Chas.
D. Etchlson. a prominent commercial
man of Chicago was the chief witness
and repeated on the stand the story
told by him after his arrest on n
joint murder Indictment. Etchlson
charged that Price threw Mrs. Price
over a cliff then struck her on the
head with a rock for the purpose of
Inheriting her mone/.
COMMISSIONER ON VACATION.
United States Commissioner Mar
shall will taek two weeks off from
official duties, and with his wife, will
leave tomorrow night for Sitka. Com
missioner Marshall has been busy late
ly with both criminal nad civil cases
and together with his arduous duties
?ttcndlnghls affiliation with the A. B.e.
is In need of a rest and Is going to
take It Judge Jennings will appoint
a substitute probably tomorrow.
PRENTISS IS BOUND OVER
FOR ACTION OF GRAND JURY
William F. Prentiss, who has been
charged with offering a bribe, will
this afternoon bo bound over for ac
tion of the grand Jury. United States
Commissioner Marshall rendered this
decision and bail was fixed at $S00.
The complaining witness is R. R. Hub
bard and the case developed at Doug
SAYS KAISER
IS AT ERONT
I WITHTROOPS
BERLIN, Jan. 17.?The following of
ficial communication was issued to
day:
"After his complete recovery, the
Ka'scr returned Sunday afternoon to
the war theatre."
VATICAN HEAR8 THAT
KAISER OPERATED
ON LAST THURSDAY
ROME, Jan. 17.?Tho Vatican has
learned that Emperor William sub
mitted to an operation for throat trou
ble in Berlin Thursday, according to
announcement hero today.
GERMANY PLANS A
NEW DRIVE IN WEST
THE HAGUE. Jan. 17.?Germany is
said to bo making preparations for
a big drive on the west front. Accord
ing to information from Belgium 30,
000 reinforcements are arriving daily
at certain points. 80,000 fresh troops
have arrived on the Arras front, to
1 gether with large quantities of am
munition. A heavy mass of artillery
is being concentrated at Tournal. All
the inhabitants in the vicinity are be
ing ordered out of the firing zone.
The French Report
PARIS. Jan. 17.?The War Office
says: "To tho west of Beronno the
enemy tried to seize ono of our sap
works before Dompierre, but was com
pletely repulsed.
"In the Champagne, in the region
of Fermne Navarin (Navarin farm),
our artillery fire prevented the ene
my from repairing the trenches blown
up by us recently."
TWO AVENUES OPEN
TO TEUTONIC ADVANCE
PARIS, Jan. 17.?A correspondent
of the Journal at Snlonikl telegraphs:
"There are two routes possiblo for a
Bulgar-German advance aga!nst the
Allies. Tho most probable develop
ment Is that they will come by the
way of Dorian and Nevrokop hill, but
there is another way which would
lead to the Allies' flank and possibly
to tho Allies' rear. ?
The Matin correspondent at Berne
says Gen. Jekow, the Bulgarian Min
ister of War declared: "Tho war will
never end, so far as Bulgaria Is con
cerned, so long as there Is a power
ful enemy menacing the Bulgarian
frontiers or tho territory we have
just won by conquest."
That Serbia will have a well organ
ized nrmy of 100,000 to offer to the
Allies within two months Is the state
ment telegraphed from Salonlki by
tho correspondent of the Petit Jour
nal.
? ? ?
Varna Bombarded
? ?
LONDON, Jan. 17.?A Router dis
patch from Athens says it Is semi
officially announced there that Var
na, the principal Bulgarian port on
tho Black Sea. and Traka, have been
bombarded by Russian warships and
that the German troops from Serbia
are being concentrated at Varna.
ABANDONED STORES
FOUND AT GALLIPOLI
BERLIN, Jan. 17.?The correspond
ent of the Lolcnl Anzelger, who has
just visited the Galllpoll Peninsula,
.says: "Everywhere are signs of a
hurried retreat. Unburled bodies arc
scattered about everywhere. The
Turks have enptured enormous quan
tities of preserved meats, flour, rub
ber covers, tents, copper wire, rifles,
ammunition and sanitary materials.
Suvla Bay presented a most wonder
ful picture, with the wrecks of four
stranded British transports sticking
up from tho surface. Many caves cut
Into the rock were discovered, the
most of them being filled with sup
plies. Every day more ammunition
's being discovered, having been dis
carded Into the sea by the British
In their hasty retreat."
MME. SCHWIMMER
ASKS BERLIN FOR
RAILROAD PERMITS
THE HAGUE. Jan. 17.?Mme Rob!
ka Schwimmer and other members of
the Ford Peaco Board, after having
vainly appealed to the German mini
ster at The Hague for permission for
tho Scandinavian peaco delegates to
return homo through Germany, tele
graphed today to Berlin for tho desired
permits.
The recent efforts of members of
the party to cross Germany have been
blocked by the German military au
thorities, with an explanation that the
delegates are undesirable.
Mme. Scliwlmmcr was delegated to
make the flnal appeal to Berlin be
causo of her known Influence In the
Germnn capital.
FRANCE REGULATES
DISTRIBUTION OF COAL
PARIS, Jan. 17.?The French cham
ber qf deput'es has created a depart
ment of the government which will
regulate tho sale, distribution and
prlco of coal. The department will
have power to requisition coal.
SMALLEST
KINGDOM
NOW OUT
OE WAR
BERLIN, Jan. 17. ? The Overseas
News Bureau announced today that
Count Tlsza, Hungarian premier, **ad
announced in the Hungarian parlia
ment that Montenegro had asked fcr
peace. "Montenegro was asked un
conditionally to lay down her arms
and the has accepted," the premie* de
clared.
Austria, according to a press dis
patch from Athens, offered separato
peace to Montenegro on the follow
ing terms: "Austria agreed to guar
antee Montenegro all territorial rights
in Scutari in exchange for the cession
of Mount Lovcen to Austria."
CETTiNJlf
FALLS TO
AUSTRIANS
BERLIN, Jan. 17.?L'onnrmation was
received today of the fall of Ccttln
Je, the Montenegrin cap'tal and re
ceipt of tho news from Vienna, which
said that the Austrlans were in full
occupation of tho city was treated
by the newspapers as the end of tho
campaign In King Nicholas' country.
According to tho Berlin official com
munication today British artillery is
bombarding the Important French
town of Lille, near the Belgian bor
der, which Is occupied by tho Ger
mans, and within the German lines
of defense. Tho communication says:
"So far tho shells have caused only
slight damage."
I************** ? + 4
+ +
* PEACE HOOTED, *
+ CROWD ROUTED *
+ ?+? +
* LONDON. Jan. 17.?A Sunday +
* night peace meeting was ston- *
+ ed. tho banners were torn down +
* and tho crowd routed by an +
* angry mob. +
+ +
COAL FORTY DOLLARS.
ROME, Jan. 17.?Coal went up to
$40 a ton today, the highest In tho
city's history.
AEROPLANES HAVE BEEN
USED AS WAR AMBULANCES
ffr
PARIS, Jnn. 3. ? Aeroplanes were
used for ambulance work for tho first
time on record during tho retreat from
Serbia by tho French mllltay mis
sion, says Henri Barbey, a war cor
respondent of the Journal. Tho Bal
kan mission was at Prlsrend. There
were a number of sick persons. It
was Impossible to carry them on
stretchers, but It was determined not
to abandon them. The French still
had six aoroplanea. They had been
exposed to rain and snow for two
months, but were still In working or
der. Col. Fournler placed on these
aeroplanes the sick men whose condi
tion was most grave, and sent them
by air to Scutari.
STOCK QUOTATIONS.
NEW'YORK. Jan. 17.?Alaska Gold
25%, Butte & Superior 75%. Chlno
54%. Ray 24%. Utah Copper 79. Cop
per mctad Is at 24% cents.
Saturday's Quotations
Alaskn Gold 25%, Butte & Superior
76%, Chlno 54%. Ray 25. Utah 78%.
Copper metal closed at 24% cents.
4 YEP, THEY'RE LEGAL 4
4 ?4? 4
* The story that has gained clr- 4
4 culatlon that mnny persons re- 4
4 cently married In Juneau aro 4
4 not legally wedded, because a 4
4 revenue stamp was not affix- +
4 ed to tho certificate, Is one of 4
4 * those dreams outside editors 4
* like to publish. Tho Epworth 4
4 Herald Is tho periodical con- 4
4- talning tho latest freak. 4
4 According to a ruling In the *
4 office of the Secretary of Al- 4
4 aska no revenuo stamp is re- 4
4 quired on a marriage certlfl- 4
4 catc. This ruling was secur- 4
4 ed June 28. last year, from Col- 4
4 lector of Internal Revenuo ?>
* Williams at Tacoma. Mr. Wll- 4
+ Hams stated that certificates 4
+ did not require any revenuo ?>
4 stamp but if a certificate was 4
4 Issued at tho request of cither 4
4 of tho contracting parties for 4
4 their own private use, this 4
4 would require a 10-cent stamp. 4
4 There has been no change In 4
4 the ruling as known. 4
4 4

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