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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 18, 1916, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
# ; ... : . .J
VOL. VII., NO. 980. JUNEAU, ALASKA. TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 1916. PRICE TEN CENTS
Greece On Verge of Entering War As Teuton Ally
ENGINEER
OE DEATHS
EXECUTED
EL PASO. Jan. 18.?Col. .Miguel Ba
caralles. a bandit chief, was captured
at Palomas by U. S. cavalry and Car
ranzistas. and today paid the death
penalty for engineering the murder
of seventeen American mining men.
He was shot to death by a firing
squad at Juarez.
Bacavalles pleaded his Innocence.
He declared he was not responsible
for the robberies and murders of Vil
la, and pleaded in rain for as aud
Icntc with General Gavlera. the Car
ranza commandant of the Juarez gar
rison.
An unconfirmed report reached here
that Manuelo Cisnores, a Villa staff
officer, had been captured and also
put to death, as one of the bandit
leaders.
Another report Is current here that
Villa was seen at El Carmen a week
ago. and that on that occasion he ad
vised his followers to kill all foreign
ers. including Americans, "who dared
to cross their path."
TYPHUS EPIDEMIC.
EL PASO. Jan. IS.?American ar
my surgeons estimate that there aro
over 100,000 cases of typhus In Mex
ico. as a result of impoverishment and
lack of sanitation, especially In the
cities.
U. S. INNOCENTS
WERE LED INTO
THE SLAUGHTER
WASHINGTON. Jan. IS.?Evidence
collected at El Paso by the State De- j
partment agents indicates that the
Carranza authorities at Chihuahua'
City assured C. It. Watson, head of ,
the party of seventeen Americans kill- j
? 1 a week ago Monday, that no escort '
wa? necessary. In that opinion, how
ever. none of the Americans agreed,;
and they had suggested to the i
Carranza authorities the advisability |
of sending troops with the parjy.
The El Paso advices further stated
that the Carranza governor of Chi-<
huahua gave Watson his personal pass
port and that the Carranza immigra
tion authorities at Juarez gave a per
sona! passport for the entire Watson
party.
S'LONG. HIP. OLD BOY!
EL PASO. Texas. Jan. IS.?Hippo!-;
Ito Villa, brother of the Mexican gen-;
oral and former financial agent of j
the Villa forces in Juarez started for
Havana. Cuba., to Join his family and j
that of General Villa. A charge of j
larceny, the last of a number of ac
cusations against Villa, was dismiss
>'d following a preliminary hearing
In a Justice court.
VINING WORK RESUMED
WASHINGTON. Jan. 18.?Resump
tion of raining activities in Mexico
on a broad scale is Indicated in dis
patches today to the State Depart
mrent. The American Smelting and
Refining company, of Mexico, has re
cently purchased 10 engines and 165
railroad cars with necessary equip
ment to provide its own trains, and
ics preparing to operate Its plants
s near to their full capacity as con
ditions permit
ON THE SPOKANE
SEATTLE. Jan. IS.?Steamer Spo
kane. horouchly overhauled and now
equipped with oil burners will leave
at !? o'clock tonight for the North.
Howard Fining, agent for the Pacific
Coast S. S. Co.. at Juneau, will be
among the passengers.
The Admiral F'arragut will again re
enter the Alaska route, having been
temporarily withdrawn to handle
traffic on the Seattle-San F*ranclsco
route. She sails tonight. Among the
passengers on the Farragut for Ju
neau will be T. M. Harr and J. C.
Sceley. A party of engineers for the
government railroad will take passage,
their destination being Anchorage.
Ed. Woods, a copper operator of Fidal
go Bay Is aboard with five horses.
STOCK QUOTATIONS.
?
NEW YORK. Jan. 18.?Alaska Gold
rloscd today at 23. Butte & Superior
75. Chlno 54VJ. Ray 24%. Utah Cop
per 78%.
Copper metal closed at 24 Vi cents.
The most pressing demands of cop
per consumers have been satisfied as
far as possible, though selling agen
cies Lave Inquiries In hand which in
dicate that there Is still a cons'der
able amount of the metal to be pur
chased. There Is no disposition-tc
shade prices, since no one Is anxious
to sell.
.%-. A.j<. + j. + -?- + -?- + + + + -b4
?V WEATHER REPORT. 4
? ? *? 4
?> Maximum?31. 4
+ Minimum?16.
4? Partly cloudy. ?}
INTERVENTION
! DEMANDED IN
U. S. SENATE
WASHINGTON. Jan. 18.? Senator
James Hamilton uewls today asked
that his resolution directing the Pres
ident to Interveno In Mexico bo re
ferred to the foreign relations com
mittee.
| Senator Borah of Idaho suggested
; that the resolution be acted on at
? once. "The resolution might Just a$
; well be withdrawn for any good that
j it will do American citizens being
i murdered in Mexico." he said. "This
Senate ought to take a decisive step
Immediately, notifying the de facto
government !n Mexico that we are
ready to use the armed forces of the
United States to protect our people."
borah attacks | british blockade { .... J
WASHINGTON. Jan. IS. ? In a
speech in the Senate this afternoon
Senator William E. Borah of Idaho at
tacked the British blockade of Ger
many insofar as it interfered with
American shipping.
BRADY TAKES OATH.
WASHINNGTON, Jan. 18.?Senator
! Brady of Idaho took the oath of of
! tice today.
WASHINGTON'S
RICHEST WIDOW
HAS REMARRIED
SEATTLE. Jon. 18.?There Is a re
port in circulation today and generally
credited that Mrs. Hugh Rood and Dr.
Nevin H. Pontius, who has recently
beeen acting as private secretary,
have been married quietly and gone to
Europe on their honeymoon.
Mrs. Hugh Rood Is a widow, her
husband having been one of the vic
tims of the Titanic disaster. She was
also aboard the Titanic but was oue
of the first to leave in a life boat set
aside for women first. Mrs. Rood Is
the richest woman in the State of
Washington, her income being over ,
$500,000 yearly. She recently pur
chased the Washington apartments on
Second avenue' whTcnTilso includes the
premises occupied by the Moore the
atre.
Dr. Pontius, is a well known dentist
and has been twice divorced. He re
sided at the Hotel Sorrento until he
became private secretary to Mrs.
Rood.
During the holidays Mrs. Rood an
nounced that she was going to make
a trip east and shortly after Christ
mas departed for Portland, thence go
ing to San Francisco. It is reported
that the wedding of the two followed
[shortly after the couple left here.
Mrs. Rood besides being socially in
clined is a thorough business woman.
Several months ago she was stopping
at the Perry Hotel and made a slight
request. The ckrk denied this and
she asked who owned the hotel. Be
ing informed she disappeared for sev
| etal hours then returned. Entering the
hotel, she went immediately to the
J clerk and agaiu demanded that her re
quest be granted. Much to the sur
prise of the clerk she stated that it
must be done immediately as she was
owner of the establishment. Such
proved to be the case, she having
made the purchase for cash, within a
few hours.
INSURANCE RATES
LIKELY TO GO UP
! BOSTON, Jan. IS.?The Bank Line
I steamship Yeddo, recently reported as
. torpedoed by a submarine In the Med
: lterranean was valued with her cargo
at more than $1,500,000. As the Bos
ton underwriters are heavily Inter
ested In her cargo the probable re
sult will be another advance In in
surance rates !u the Mediterranean.
CHRISTIAN SCIENTISTS
BUY REAL ESTATE
BOSTON. Jao. 18.?More than $250
000 worth of property on Huntington
Avenue and Norway street, close to
the Christian Science church, was
bought Tuesday by the Shawmut Real
Estate Trust, which is financed by
members of the church. The Trust's
purposo 1s to control the choice of
tenants.
SKAG WAY TO PL A Y
ARCTIC BROTHERS
BASKETBALL TEAM
-4?
SKAGWAY, Jan. 14. ? The White |
Pass Athletic Club members are feel
ing very high and mighty theso days
over the fact that the basketball
team has been recognized by tho Arc
tic Brotherhood team in Juneau.
Hal Johnston, chairman of the
t sports committee for the club re
? reived a letter froxp James P. Momb,
? chairman of the athletic committee
? for the Arctic Brotherhood at Juneau.
? Inviting the local aggregation to
i come to the Capital City and bo taken
i on for a series of games.
By the next mail a letter will go
forth accepting the in 'Station and it
> is not at unlikely that a game will be
> played early in the month of Febru
? ary.?(Skagwav Alaskan.)
John McLoughl.'n leaves tonight for
> Sitka Hot Springs, to spend a well
> earned vacation.
SHIP BILL
READY TO
St PILED
WASHINGTON. Jan. 18.?A tenta
tive agreement on the terms of the
ndmnlstration shipping bill which will
be preseuteii to Congress at this ses
sion was reached today at a confer
ence between President Wilson and
Chairman Alexander of the House
marine committee.
.Mr. Alexander said lie would intro
duce the bill early next week and be
fore doing so will make it public.
The bill is known to Include provision
for a shipping board to regulate rates
in much the same way as the inter
state commerce commission regulates
railroads and also provides for the ac
quisition of ships which may be used
as naval auxiliaries. "The bill will be
much better and stronger than the
one which failed in the last Congress;"
said Alexander, after his conference
with the President.
"DEMONSTRATION" SHIPS
WILL HELP NEW BILL
NEW YORK. Jan. 18.?A Washing
ton special to The Herald says that
Senators and Representatives who
are dubious concerning the success
of the Administration's shipping bill
admit that a very strong argument
in its favor will be the proposal to
build ships for demonstration purpos
es. The scheme of the administration
advisors, who are drafting the meas
ure. is to install Diesel oil engines in
the vessels and thereby, it Is oxpect
ed, operate them at a cost much less
than steam vessels of the same tou
nago.'
+ +
* FOR NAVAL ACADEMY. +]
? ?+
+ Washington. Jan. IS. ? An ?
+ appropriation of llvo million +
* dollars for a naval academy in
* tho State of Washington was +
+ proposed In a bill introduced *
* by Representative Humphrey +
+ today. +
+ l
* + + + + + +-+-*? + + + +?-?? ? + >|
EXTEND MANN ACT
TO ALASKA NOW
WASHINGTON, Jan. IS.- The ex
tension of tho Mann white slavery
act to Alaska, the canal zone and the j
Insular possessions Is proposed In a
bill introduced yesterday by Senator
Overman of North Carolina. *
For Drydock
Senator Jones Introduced a bill for!
$3,000,000 for a drydock at the Pugct'
Sound Navy Yard.
FREDDIE WELSH
IS OUTPOINTED j
PHILADELPHIA, Jan. IS.?Eddie
McAndrews of Ph'ladelphia outboxed
Freddie Welsh, the lightweight cham
pion, in a six-round bout here last :
night. McAndrews had a big shade I
of four rounds, and held the title hold
er even in the other two rounds.
COLD SPELL ON
SOUND IS BROKEN
SEATTLE, Jan. 18.?The cold spell j
was broken this morning, a light rain j
falling. The temperature rose to 50
degrees, after ten days of bitter cold, j
MORAN AND WILLARO
SIGN FOR A BATTLE
KANSAS CITY, Jan. 18.?Jesse Wll
lard, heavyweight champion, and
Frank Moran, today signed articles to
tight In New York probably on April
15th.
u\?e. nuiviva nARu
TO GET MONEY FOR
ALASKA RAILROAD
?? -
WASHINGTON, Jan. IS.?Secretary
Lane's request for an appropriation of
$2,000,000 for continuing work on the
Alaska railroad was considered by
the House appropriations committee
today, at the urgent request of Chair
man Edes, of the Alaska railroad en
gineering commission.
Secretary Lane appeared before the
committee and renewed his request
for the appropriation, explaining that
the funds for the current year were
insufficient. The appropriation will
likely be Included in an urgent defi
ciency appropriation bill to be passed
this week.
GIRL'S MEMORY VANISHES.
SEATTLE. Jan. 18.?Minnie And
rlfs, 18. a high school student, was
found unconscious on the shore of
Lakt Washington today. She had
waded into the lake and her memory
Is gone. She Is the ward-of Mrs. S.
L/Frye, her parents having been di
vorced. Tho case is puzzling physi
cians.
PANKHURST ADMITTED
WASHINGTON. Jan. 18.?Mrs. Em
mellne Pankhurst, detained as an un
desirable alien at New York yester
day, today was ordered unconditional
ly admitted to the United States.
3,000 QUARTS
OF FIREWATER
CONFISCATED
SEATTLE. Jan. 18.?Ciity police
and deputy sheriffs during the last
36 hours confiscated three thousand
quarts of beer, and five hundred quartt
of mixed liquors, tore out the furniture
of two soft-drink saloons, and raided
tho Cecil Hotel and tho fashionable
Hnlnier Club. At the Cecil Hotel the
greatest (ache of the forbidden intoxi
cants wa( uncovered.
Sheriff Robert Hodge and his depu'
ties conducted the raid on the Rainier
Club, under instructions from Prose
cutor Lundln, and 400 quarts of var
ious liquors were seised, although no
: arrests were made. Most of tho liquor
confiscated was taken from the
rooms. Tho deputies entered from
three points, ono group going in on
the Marion Street side, another on
the south side, and another on the
main entrance, Fourth Avenue. The
house manager had no keya to the
rooms and the deputies forced the
doors. One trunkful of liquor was
t'ouud.
It is believed that the liquor will
be poured away, aud that the club,
and Blrkcl Brothers, managers of the
Cecil, wilt not be prosecuted.
The officers\assert that fixtures are
being made with secret containers
for tho storage of liquor.
PRESIDENT'S NIECE
TO BE DEBAUNTE
?*?
WASHINGTON. Jan. 18?The White
House is to have a debutante this
winter. Miss Alice E. Wilson, daugh
ter of Joseph Wilson, tho President's
brother, who lives in Baltimore, will
be a White. House guest most of the
winter, and many parties and dinners
and posslbjy a ball will be given In
her honor. Miss Wilson is slcuder
and graceful. She has a wealth of
golden hair and dark blue eyes.
+ | ; +
COti. HOUSE LEAVES.
i
LONDON, Jan. 18.?Co!. E. M.
House, coufldcntlnl advisor and
personal friend of President Wll
| son, left today for Franco. He
conferred with Ambassador Pago
and several United States con
I suls while In England.
I
+ *
AUTO TOLL IN NEW YORK
NEW YORK, Jan. 18.?According
to statistics, a person Is struck by an
automobile in New York every 75
minutes and one of every 30 of tlie
victims dies.
CARNEGIE TO SUMMER
AT NOROTON, CONN.
PITTSBURGH, Jan. 18.? Andrew
Carncgio will not open Sklbo Castle,
Scotland, next year, for ho has ar
ranged to spend the coming summer
at Noroton. Coun., the estate of the
late Anson Phelps Stokes.
PREPAREDNESS IS
URGED AT CIVIC
WELFARE LEAGUE
WASHINGTON, Jan. 18.?President
Samuel* Gompers of the American
Federation of 1-abor addressed the
National Civic Federation today, ad
vocating adequate preparedness for
national defense.
Seth Low, president of the federa
tion. In his address of welcome yes
terday, also appealed for prepared
ness on u large scale.
Henry Brcekenridge, assistant sec
retary of war attacked those who arc
opposing war preparedness, In a
speech before tho women's depart
ment of the federation. He branded
| tho opponents of national defense as
i "advocates of poltroonery and coward
i Ice.
CIVIC WELFARE WORKERS
CONVENE IN WASHINGTON
WASHINGTON, Jan. 18.?The Na
tional Civic Association opened Its
sixteenth annual meeting yesterday
with prominnct civic welfare work
ers from all over the country pres
ent.
GARRISON URGES
ORGANIZED SUPPORT
TO DEFENSE PLANS
NEW YORK. Jan. 18.?Secretary of
War Garrison addressed a bankers'
i banquet last night. Ho appealed to
the people to organize in support of
the administration's program for na>
tlonal defense, and asked tho aislst
ance of the bankers in moulding pub
lie sentiment toward this end.
? ? ?
1 '
TANK OPEN TONIGHT.
Tho Arctic Brotherhood swim- i
| ming pool will be open to mem- !
1 bers and their wives and famil
j ies, this evening promptly at
J 7:30, Instead of Wednesday as
j announced yesterday. By the
! completion of repairs and im
provements in record time the
natatorium*s reopening was put
?j I abend a day, and a large num- j
j ber of the members are plan- I
j ning to enjoy a plunge tonight. 1
? i i
4 4
GERMANY
, WILLING
fOR PEACE
t S
BERLIN, Jan. 8.?Tho Wolff AJffi?*
[ quoting from the Swiss newspaper,
jNcuno Zuorlcher Zcltung. of Zurich,
, gives tho following terms upon which
. Germany is said to be willing to mako
peace:
A minimum indemnity of $4,015,000
. 000.
Tho restoration of Germany's col
. onles by England.
1 Tho separation of Folnnd from Rus
sia and its institution into a separate
state.
The evacuation of Belgium aud
France by Germany.
Part of the indemnity would rep
resent a transfer to Germany of Rus
sia's indebtedness to France. Anoth
er section would be represented by
an nnnunl payment to Germany by
Belgium of an amount equal to the
sum hitherto expended by Belgium
upon her military establishment.
Tho article states that Germany
would insist upon maintaining a gar
rison in Belgium to insure tho pay
ment of that country's share of the
indemnity.
That the German consor allowed the
publication of the terms and the close
ness of the relations between the
News Agency and the German gov
ernment are regarded ns significant.
Prince Von Buelow who has been
spoken of ns a possible German peace
envoy hus geen in Switzerland for
many months, only returning to Ger
many last week.
PEACE TRIBUNAL
PLANS ARE BEING
FULLY ORGANIZED
NEW YORK. Jan. 18.?'The "World
Wide" court for the judicial Investi
gation and settlement of all questions
of fnternntlon disputes, recently or
ganized here. Is going ahead with its
plans to meet In Louisville, Ky? dur-1
Ing the second week in April, and for- i
raer President W. H. Taft, the honor
ary president, expects tv;o -hundred
delegates to attend the session In
Louisville.
John Hays Hammond is vice presi
dent. and other members of the league
are John Wesley Hill, General Secre
tary; Alton 'B. Parker, Brnlnbrldge
Colby, Charles Lathrop Pack and Dr.
Joseph Silverman. Vice Presidents;
Charles W. Fairbanks. Oscar S. Straus
Lawrence Y. Sherman and Governor
Woodbridgc D. Ferris, Honorary Vice
Presidents; Henry Clews, treasurer;
Kmcrson McMlll'n. Chairman Execu
tive Comraltttce; James Spoycr. chair
man publication committee; Dr. Jere
miah W. Jenks, chairman Speakers'
committee.
REPORT RESULT OF INJURY
WASHINGTON*. Jan. IS.?The death
rate In the United States among ba
bies of mothers who work outside the
homes far exceeds the Infant mortality
where the mother is not so employed.
This Is brought out In the nnnual re
port of the Federal Children's Burenu,
which Is conducting an Inquiry into
the social and economic causes of
babies' deaths.
SHIPS CAUGHT IN ICEi
BERLIN, Jan. 18.? Reports from
Copenhagen say that more than 100
ships, chiefly American, British and
French, have been caught In the ice
In the White Sea and will have to
pass tho winter there.
HOLLAND RESIDENTS
DONATE HOSPITAL TRAINS
BERLIN, Jan. 18.? Announcement
Is made by the Overseas News Agon
cy that several hospital trains have
been donated by residents of Holland
to the Central Powers. The first
tra'n will be placed in operation next
week.
TO 8ELL FROZEN MEAT
PARIS, Jan. 18.?In view of ehe
refusal of the regular butchers to
sell Imported frozen meat, which is
cheaper than the home product, the
city council has voted a credit to en
ablo co-operative societies to open 60
meat stores in Paris for the exclusive
sale of frozen meat.
"PURELY POLITICAL"
?+?
LONDON. Jan. 18.? Robert Mills
? Simpson, a surgeon serving with the
Canadian forces In France, was re
manded in Bow Street Court on charg
? es in connection with the receipt of
$100,000, the property of the Province
of Manitoba. Simpson said the mat
ter was "purely political."
OUTCH SHIP FOUNDERS
AMSTERDAM. Jan. 18.?The Dutch
trawler Erin has foundered in conse
quence of an explosion of a mine
which was caught in her nets. Three
of the crew were killed.
EX-OFFICIAL DIES.
LONDON, Jan. 18.?Arnold Morloy
former postmaster general, died hcr<
I* this morning.
!PERSIA ATTACK
IS OFFICIALLY
DENIED AT BERLIN
WASHINGTON, Jan. 18.?Secretary
Lansing announced today the eBrlln
foreign ofllco had Informed Ambassa
dor Gerard that all German submar
ines In the .Mediterranean had report
ed that none was concerned In tho de
struction of the Persia.
GERMANS REMOVED
FROM U. S. STEAMER
SAVANNAH, Ga., Jan. 18?The Am
erican schooner Isabella, while lying
at Bridgetown, Barbadoes, was board
ed by British soldiers and two mem
bers of her crew suspected of being
Germans were removed, tho schoon
er's captain reported today.
VON BERNSTORFF PAID
MONEY FOR VON PAPEN
I LONDON Jan. 18.?Tho authorities
say that further evidence found in
! Capt. von Papente effects proves that
Ambassador von Bornstorit repeatedly
! placed money to the credit of von
Papon in the Itiggs National Bank at
Washington.
CONSCRIPTION IS
JUSTIFIABLE, 8AYS
THE LONDON 3LOBE
LONDON, Jan. IS?"No one but a
fool or a frantic will question the
Justice of compulsory service," says
tho Globe. "It may be regrettable,
but it is necessary. Such a measure
would have an admirable effect up
on our Allies."
Tho Evening Standard expresses
the belief that a decision to put con
scription into force would be popu
lar, saying: "Most people would be
glad, to get the war through on vol
untary lines If possible, but tho na
tion desires a vigorous prosecution of
the conflict."
Tho Star, a government orgap. re
fuses to view conscription favorably.
It says: "The great war has made
possible the impossible, has made
credible tho Incredible, has made
thinkable the unthinkable. Conscrip
tion is a slippery slope. Onco a na
tion steps upon It, there Is no place
for rcpeutanco."
BRITISH CASUALTIES
LONDON, Jan. 18.?The British cas
ualties recorded In lists published dur
ing the month of December amount
to 1,001 officers and 17,548 men. The
lists arc the complete returns from
all fronts.
BULGARIANS MUTINY
?"5*?
PARIS. Jan. 18.?The Eleventh Bul
garian Infantry Heg'ment, staMoned at
Oumuldzlna Bulgaria, has mutinied,
according to Information reaching the
Athens correspondent of the Petit
Journal.
REDMOND NOT TO QUIT
IRISH LEADERSHIP
LONDON, Jan. IS.?Johu Redmond
caused to be published today a dental
that lie would resign tho leadership
of the Irish Nationalist party.
| ALLIES PLACE BIG
WAR ORDERS IIERE
??
NEW YORK, Jan. 18.?The World
says that tho Allies have placed tre
mendous new war orders in this coun
try. some calling for the continuous
delivery for the next two years. One
company Is said to have secured $200.
000,000 additional contracts In the last
few months. Tho Bethlehem Steel
Corporation has war orders for five
years' straight delivery. The MIdvale
company, through W. E. Corey_cIosod
a $30,000,000 shell contract with the
French government last week and
now has $100,000,000 of orders on their
books. The Pressed Steel Car Com
pany has secured $14,000,000 steel
freight car orders from Russia, tho
payments to bo made through
the sale of Russian 5 per cent,
bonds by tho National City Bank. The
Colt's Arpis Company Is sold 6 years
ahead.
TURKEY WOULD BORROW
FROM GERMAN EMPIRE
LONDON, Jan. 18.?A Control News
dispatch from Constantinople says
that the Turkish government has ask
ed Parliament for an authorization to
borrow $87,000,000 from Germany.
RELIEF TO RED CROSS
NOT TO BE HAMPERED
WASHINGTON, Jan. 18.?Informal
assurances that the British order re
stricting American shipments of hos
piLul supplies to the Central Powers
is about to bo modified have been re
, ceived by tho Red CrosB Society and
? preparations arc beiug made to Bend
through the\caaipment moat needed
HELLENIC GOVERNMENT
ENCIRCLED BY ENTENTE,
| KING'S DEFEAT LIKELY
LONDON, Jan. 18.?Announcement
that Greece Is to enter the war on the
side of the Teutonic alliance Is hourly
expected in England and It is believ
ed Ijjre that troops of the entente
powers will soon occupy Athens.
Estimates today fix the number of
jtroops France and England have
thrown Into Greece at 400,000. The
troops of the entente powers have
'virtually forged a band of steel on
three eldes of King Constantlne's em
pire, while the fourth side?on the
north?is held by the powerful Aus
i tro-German-Bulgar force.
NOTE TO ATHENS?
; According to advices received to
:day from Berlin, a note to the Greek
! government amounting to an ultima
tum has been presented by the min
isters representing France and Great
Britain. Greece Is required to deliver
the passports to the ministers of Tur
key, Bulgala, Austria-Hungary and
Germany within 48 hours, falling of
which the entente will take neces
sary measures, according to the re
ports current In the German capital.
TROOPS NEAR CAPITAL.
According to early advices from VI
ennsi, the Anglo-French allies are
landing troops five miles from Athens,
preparatory to the seizure of the Hel
lenic government In case the Greeks
fall to comply with the demands of
the entente. The advices intimated
that ex-President Venizelos, who has
strongly favored the cause of the en
tente, will be placed at the head of
the government and King Constantine
dethroned, If the Western allies aic
successful In carrying out their plans.
REASON FOR SEIZURE KNOWN.
London newspapers declared today
that the latest phase of the Balkan sit
uation tells the secret of the occupa
tion last week of the Greek .Island of
Corfu, by a French landing party.
This is part of the entente plan to
blockade Greece the moment hostili
ties are declared, It Is declared.
BERLIN PLEASED
WITH RETIREMENT
OF MONTENEGRO
BERLIN. Jan. 18.?"Berlin news
papers," says the Overseas News
Agency In expressing satisfaction ov
er Montenegro's decision for peace,
"point to the political abilities of
King Nicholas and recall the fact that
tho emperor of Russia had called him
his unique friend."
ANCONA IS BOMBED.
ROME, .Jan. 18.?Four Austrian
aeroplanes dropped bombs on tbo city
of Ancona today, doing slight dam
age.
TURK RETREAT ANNOUNCED.
LONDON. Jan. 18.?It was announc
ed In tho House of Commons today
that the British have defeated the
Turks in Mesopotamia, forcing them
back to Kutelamnra.
SEVENTY MILLIONS DAILY.
PARIS, Jan. 18.?Experts have fig
ured that the battling nations are now
spending (70,000,000 a day on tho
war.
FRENCH PENETRATE
GERMAN TRENCHES
BERLIN, Jan. 18.?Tho War office
says: "Tho French advance at Hrlz
stein broke down under our fire. Two
night attacks were made by tho
French at Hartmanns-wellcrkopf. The
first was repulsed, but In the second
tho enemy succeeded In penetrating
our trenches. Fighting continues at
this place for the possession of a
trench soction. Tho French lost five
officers and 2.000 men in prisoners."
8CHOOLS IN TRENCHES
BERLIN, Jan. 18. ? School* have
been opened In the trenches on the
Austro-Hungarian front, chiefly for
the purpose of giving the men some
thing to do, and relieving the tedious
ness of the long periods of inactivity
during the winter. Tho German lan
guage used In the dual monarchy will
be taught. Similar schools also have
been founded in Belgium.
**?*???*??+?*???
* ?>
* NEW YORK LARGEST *
+ ?.j.? +
+ CHICAGO. Jan. 18.? Now +
+ York City Is now the largest +
+ city In the world, says the Chi- +
+ cago Tribune. London because +
* of losses In war and because ?>
? of n gigantic mistake In est!- 4
+ mating population, must now +
+ admit that tho American me- 4*
+ tropolls Is bigger by a quarter *
? of a million persons. The ex- 4*
* act number of persona In the +
4- county of London, according to ?>
4- tho 1911 figures. Is 4,521,358, ?>
+ whereas New York City in 1910 4
? numbered 4,766,883. Counting ?
+ In "extra London," as London 4>
outsldo tho county Is termed, 4*
<? tho population Is 7,251,358, ?
4> whereas that of tho city of New *
4- York, including Westchester +
4* and New Jersey suburbs, was. +
4* at tho last census, 7,383,871. 4?
1 ?- +

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