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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 19, 1916, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1916-01-19/ed-1/seq-3/

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GENERAL HOSPITAL
WILL BE OPENED
ON FEBRUARY 1
An Empire reporter was accorded
the courtesy of a visit through tho
new Juneau General hospital yester
day. with Charles A. Siefert, the su
perintendent of tho hospital. Tho hos
pital is a model institution, judging
from its present appearance. It will
bo opened to the public for Inspection
on and after February 1, and tho pub
lic has been cordially invited to visit
It
The Hospital In Detail.
As you enter tho hospital .you step
Into tho hall or corridor which is ten
feet wide and extends to the roar
rooms on the ground floor. On tho
right is the general office of the hos
pital: next to this is tho prlvato room
of the superintendent. Tho next room
will be used as a library, and adjoin
ing this Is a large roof twice the size
of the ordinary rooms which will bo
used as a billlar room for the use of
convalescent patients. Opening off
the billiard room and at the extreme
rear on the right side is a room which
will be fitted up as a smoking den
for the use of the patients who are
ablo to move about.
On the left at tho front of the cor
rider Is tho reception room, where tho
patients can receive their visitors.
Next to this room 13 the reception
room of Doctor Pallister and adjoin
ing this is the doctor's prlvato office.
Then comes a small hall leading to a
side entrance, where tho supplies will
be received directly into tho receiving
room and adjoining this room is a
cold storage room. Off tho main cor
ridor it the rear is a large hydraulic
elevator, which will accommodate a
stretcher on wheels; this elevator
runs up to tho roof and will bo util
ized to take the patients up to the
roof, which will be enclosed with
glass and made into a roof garden
next summer.
Tho large corridor on tho ground
floor has tho corners at the top round
ed out. which was done for sanitary
purposes, but gives the impression of
a dome and greatly enhances the ap
pearance.
Going up a broad stairway, one
comes to the second story, which has
'our front rooms arranged into two
suites with a largo arch between the
two rooms composing each suite.
X-Ray Room Provided
Back of these four rooms are two
regular rooms for patients. On the
left side next comes a 100m fitted up
tor electrical treatment, which will
contain an X-Ray and other acces
sories.
tl?A nlnwofftP nvy ihfl rlcrhf
Vl^UOilW IUC VlVKUUl VU VUV ? l0tiv
or bay s'de of tho hospital is the
main operating room, which has every
known modern appliance that could
he secured.
Adjoining the main operating room
on tho rear and connected by large
arches are two smaller operating
rooms. All three of the operating
rooms are tiled up eight inches from
the floor, and hnve tap3 in the cen
ter for letting the water run off af
ter wish'ng down tho floors.
To the extreme rear and left is
situated the pharmacy, with an anaes
1 thotlc room between it and the larger
operating room.
Between the pharmacy aad on the
left side connecting with the small
hal is the laboratory, which will also
contain three of tho latest Improved
' -"teril'zers.
j Going up another flight of stairs
one comes to the dining room for the
patients, which is situated over the
operating room.
To tho right at the extreme rear
of the third story is the room for the
chef, to the left of this is the d'nlnr
room for the hospital staff; between
this room and the kitchen proper Is
the diet kitchen, which is fitted up
with electric ranges, etc.
The kitchen is at the extrcmo rear
to the left, and is connected with s
room which is almost fllled with the
large modern range and a large sink
for washing tho dishes. A dumb-wait
er runs from tho kitchen down to the
basement.
On each floor, which consists o'
concrete two inches thl:k throughout
the ent'ro building, are placed twe
toilets and each floor also has twe
or more bath rooms.
The concrete floors make the room?
absolutely sound proof, besides being
sanitary.
The whole iuterior, both plastered
walls and the wood-work is covered
with a substance which facilitate?
cleanliness, as the walls and doors
can be washed down with either a
hoso and water or with soap and wa
ter. The build.'ng is heated by hot
water.
HOWARD MALONE RETURNING
Howard A. Malone is expected tc
return on the Northwestern from Val
dez. For the past year Mr. Malonr
has been at Anchorage, but ho camr
out Just before the freeze-up. Hi
mother is visiting her daughter, Mrs
Allen Chamberlin, at Perseverance
for a few weeks.
ALLMETAL WEATHERSTRIPS?
Olts &. Gitpatrlck, Contractors. 12-14tf
iwiimi?iimi ?milium in
PRACTICAL HINTS
ON CONCRETE
CONSTRUCTION
During the course of an Illustrated
lecture relating t" concrete construe
tlcn on the f. ~ra. the speaker, who had
traveled thr< -gl cut all the Important
sgricultural districts cast of the Miss
issippi taking nrtcs aud photographs
jf various examples cf concrete con
struction on hundreds of farms, was
tsk? d what proportion of Ja m work
of this character resulted in failure.
Ho replied *lat failure; were exceed
ngly few, and th*t If farmers were
nztructed as to the U3e of v-oper ag
gregates. failures wct.ld bscciae prac
Ici'lly unknown.
The following instructions concern
'ng good concrete havo been prepared
for the use of fanners, who will find
hem convenient as referenco data. If
strictly observed they will insuro sat
isfactory results.
Aggregates to Be Used In Concrete
Construction
The sand, stono and gravel usually
'ound upon the farnj. lands of the
United States are generally suitable
'or concrete construction provided
the following precautions are taken:
1.?These aggregates must bo free
'rom vegetable matter, dirt, or other
'orelgn substances.
2.?When using bank-run gravel,
the sand must be separated from the
tones or pebbles by screening thro
i Vi-inch screen.
3.?In small concrete structures,
such as drain tile, fence posts, etc.,
the coarse aggrcgato (crushed rock
or gravel) should range In size from
% to Vi Inch. For larger work, such
is silos, barn doors, ordinary founda
tions, etc, coarse aggregate should
range form 1 % Inches to 4 Inch.
4 ?The sand used should be hard,
coarse, and clean, and graded from *4
Inches to fine, with the large size pre
dominating. Use great care in hand
mixing. It is economical to buy a
?small machine if the farmer Intends
to use concrete In large quantities.
Hand Mixing.
1.?Size of measuring box for sand
should be 2 feet square by 1 foot high
thus containing 4 cubic feet.
2.?Load sand on wheelbarrows and
wheel onto mixing board.
3.?Fill sand-mcasuring box, lift box
and spread sand four Inches thick
over board.
4.?Take two bags of cement, place
contents as evenly as possible over
?sand.
5.?Turn the sand and cement over
until thoroughly mixed, so that no
streaks of sand or ccmont appear. _
6.?Spread the mixture of sand and
cement out carefully, place measuring
box beside it. and fill twice with stone
or gravel, then empty onto sand or
cement mixture and mix thoroughly.
7.?Add three-quarters of required
amount of water slowly and evenly,
at same time mixing the mass.
8.?Continue mixing, adding bal
ance of water when dry spots appear,
until whole mass has been turned over
three or four time. This should be
sufficient. After final turning shovel
Into compact mass ready for wheel
ing to place.
Dank-run Gravel.
Bank-run gravel is sometimes used
as it comes from tho bank. This is
wrong, as no two placos in a bank
will have the same proportions of
sand and pebbles. It is, therefore, al
ways essential when using bank-run;
material to screen the gravel from
:he sand and rcmbc in proper propor
ions.:
Give The Empire an opportunity to
luote you prices on printing.
DELEGATE WICKERSHAM IS
AGAIN ON THE WAR PATH:
HAS FEARS OF MONOPOLY
TACOMA , Washington, January 4.
?Delegate Wlckershara is of the
opinion that a movement Is on foot
to grab the salmon fisheries of Alas
ka and that 'he effect of a bill now
pending before Congress would be to
facilitate efforts of Chicago meat
packers and allied Interests to get
possession of one of the richest re
sources of the territory.
The fisheries of Alaska are worth
conservatively speaking, $400,000,000,
and Wlclersham believes that If the
meat packing Interests and affiliated
capitalists get through congress the
bill that Is started In the grind they
will get the Alaska fisheries.
Representative Charlos C. Carlln, of
Virginia, Introduced the bill on the
opening day of congress. It was re
ferred to the ways and means commit
tee. Wlckersliam's first move will be
to try to have the bill referred to the
commltteo on territories.
The bill provides that "In lieu of
all other federal or territorial license
fees and taxes" every person or com
pany engaged in fishing shall pay a
: certain stipulated nominal license
fee, including $100 per annum for each
! fish trap site, from three to six cents
a case of canned salmon, according
| to the grade, and other small charges.
Wlckersham holds that this lang
| ungo not only would make It Impos
sible for the territory to tax the fish
ing Industry on large holdings, In
cluding about $12,000,000 worth of
shore property, canneries, etc., but
that it probably would relieve the Ash
ing interests of payment of the fedor
al corporation incomo taxes. Tho bill
thus describes a Ash-trap site:
Each Ash-trap site shnll consist of
a reserved area In tho water, rectang
ular In form. Tho size (to be deter
mined by the locator) shall not bo
A SPANISH CLASS
has been started at Thane. The
Treadwell class have resumed their
studies. A second class will start here
beginning Jan. 20th. Those wishing
to study should enroll immediately.
Mrs. L. S. Coombs, 229 Franklin. St
1-13-61
" ? I
moro than 1000 feet ono way or more
than 3000 feet the other way. A trap
may bo built anywhere within the lim- |
Its of such aroa. The general course |
of the trap shall be lengthwlso of the
trap site. Nor. more than one trap
or other Ashing appliance may bo con
structed or operated at the snmo time
within the limits of an)- such reser
ved area. There shall bo clear side
spaces or passago ways of not less
tbnn 2,600 feet laterally between the
trap sites and clear end spaces or pas
sage-ways of not less than 800 feet
endwlso between all fish-trap sites,
and between all constructed traps.
Wlckeruham has calculated thnt un
der this language every fish-trap site
can bo made to covor 279 acres. In
other words, for a license fee of a
paltry $100 tho exclusive fishing right
to 279 acres Is conveyed.
Another section of the bill reads:
Prom and after the location of any
trap site and after tho approval there
of by the secretary of commerce the
claimant therof and his heirs, execu
tors, admlnlstvators, successors and
assigns shall havo the exclusive right
thereof to occupy, maintain and fish
the same; to renew tho llconso there
of year by year until abandoned, for
feited or terminated through opera
tion of law; to mortgage, sell and
transfer such rights during the time
as he or they shall comply with the
laws of the United States pertaining
thereto.
It Is asserted that this would en
ablo the meat trust to send locators
to tako possession of tho trap sites
or, If it did not care to do that, it
could buy of other locators and se
cure a monopoly.
There are Indications that the bill
will create as big a furore as other
measures in preceding congresses,
which, it was alleged, were designated
to procure monopolistic control of Al
askan coal deposits.?(Tacoma News)
ELKS TO DANCE ON
JAN. 27, COMMITTEE
18 HARD AT WORK
Juneau Lodgo No. 420, B. P. O. Elks
will danco at an elaborate ball which
will bo given in Elks' Hall on January
27. The committee, consisting of Mrs.
Guy McNaughton, Mrs. Charles D. Gar
field and Mrs. Angus Mackay. Is work
ing on the arrangements, and an
nouncement is made that the hall will
be especially decorated for the event,
and the appointments will bo superb
it Is expoctcd.
Each memoor of the lodge may In
vite one gentlemen, the number of in
vitations being restricted owing to the
small size of the hall.
PUEBLO NEWS NOTES
About 60 cords of wood have been
hauled this week for heating purpos
es at the Pueblo. Donny O'Connor Is
doing the hauling.
The heavy fall of snow has made
the travelling between tho Pueblo
mine and Whltehorso a very slow,
tedious process. One tip-over has al
ready been reported.
Several days were spent In cleaning
off the winter's Bnow from tho Pueblo
residences. During the mild spell the
melting of this snow caused some
slight damage and considerable an
noyanco inside.
Friday tho boiler of the heating
plant sprung a leak. Mr. Vey came
out and planned for tho repairs and
temporary heating. By keeping a dou
ble shift at the fires the leaking was
controlled. Alex Barr and Bill Ford
have been firing this week. Wednes
day temporary stoves were put In and
tho boiler which Is imbedded In brick
was uncovered. The flros are to go
out Thursday and the men hope to
have steam on Friday night.?(Whlte
horso Star. Jan. 14.)
Furs, Moccasins and Baskets of nil
kinds, at reduced market prices.?
WILLS' STORE. tf.
I THE BIG RED SLED j
Leaves Leave J|
Perseverance Juneau ,,
% 12:30 Noon 10:30 a. m. o
6:00 p. m. 4:30 p. m.
t Round Trip, 75c; Single Journey, 50c
SUBJECT TO CHANGE
+ Special and La^e Trips Saturdays and Holidays o
A. H. HUMPHERIES. JUNEAU
* 111 Seward St.
I LADIES!
We will put Half-Soles on your shoes in a neat and
attractive manner at low prices.
MEN'S HALF-SOLES SEWED ON FOR $1.00
NELSON'S SHOE STORE
"At the Sign of the Electric Shoe."
Wo Meet the Price on r* mm /-?? *??
groceries u. M. uiovanncii!
And GUARANTEE the Srano PROMPT SERVICE
' I ?f G??odu'r storeSe" '* PHONE 385
SAVE TIME
. USE THE 1
[New Short Line
To and from EASTERN CANADA, also EASTERN and SOUTHERN 9
UNITED STATES POINTS via
PRINCE RUPERT |
GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY AND STEAMSHIPS
Lowest Fares. Unexcelled Dining and Sleeping Car Service. Elec
trlct Lighted Trains. Observation Cars.
For full Information apply to
H. R. SHEPARD & SON, Ticket Agts. Phone 217, Juneau Alasaa.
' ' ' ??M?LS??P.
t for Seattle. Prince Rupert
* Kett.ikan. Wrar.gell and
* Petersburg. \
'? 6. S. SPOKANE
* Jan. 23rd.
For Skagway and Haines ]
S. S. SPOKANE
Jan. 22nd.
connects at Skajfwajr for J
Dawson and ail Yukon *
River points.
*
> con.nk.ct3 at hbatttj: for
| SAN FRANCISCO, 10S ANGEIES, SAN OlfGO and all California Points <
f Through tictcaUaoki *vrrywhrn> la United Stmt* an.! C?n?uin t
J LOW "ATES>- Lante.t and finct pajb*n*er ?u?n?.r? on P. C. -UNEXCELLED SERVICE t
For full particular* apply ?.?.?? ivc. o
a BRANDT. C. A. P. D.. Skattlc. wajul S. h. EWINO. .\*cnt. Junrao Alaska 4
+ RIGHTS RESERVED TO CHANGE SCHEDULES 1
*
j Border Line Transportation Company
THE JUNEAU LINE
Wo do not o? t0 North or to the West. JUNEAU la our term
inal. Your Interest! are our Interer.ts.
S.S. 'Alki', S.S. 'Despatch', S.S. 'Northland'
C. W. YOUNG CO., Agent#
Phone 217
II ?iiiiiim
I THE ADMIRAL LINE Navigation Co j
Pufctt Sound-California Route. Seattle
to San Kmnciaco. connecting with SS.
Yale and SS. Ha.vard for Southern
Oi'for". ft [ .1-.
ADMIRAL EVANS
SOUTH JAN 23
Pufcrt Sound-Alaaka Route, from Ta
cotna and Seattle for Ketchikan. Pet
crahurx, Juneau. Yukutat, Katnlla.
Cordova. Valdet. Ellamar. Port Wells.
LaTouche. Seward. Cook Inlet. Kodtak.
admiral farragut
west jan 22
IOnrnienN nd the attention of oar employees to Hugh P. Gallagher, Agt.
?iir ?. art? have pleased others. They >uj;ht to plcaee you. Phone "Ad. Line"
! I I 1 1 I I MI 1 ! 1 1 I I M-I-M I-1 11 MM ItH
ALASKA
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
,fv(T S*rvlcr. i ???*? Twkcu ?o S*atll?. "Jaccma. Victoria and Vancouver Through ?
? > 'iekrta to San Franciaco
;; JEFFERSON (Southbound) . JANUARY 13 ]
-* NORTHWESTERN (Weatbound) - JANUARY 13 ?
WILLIS E NOWELL. Juneau Agt Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt.
t-.-i-i i ; t i : ; i i l i : ; ; i I i l-l-l 1 I I I I I I 1 1 I I I I 1 1- i M 1 1 I 1-1 II I I I t-f
rw"rr~?-~irrn-wnki iihu lUamaaMCWiiiii'iiin mmmii ?
Canadian Pacific Railway Company
-B. C. COAST SERVICE j
Sailing froic Juneau for Seattle. Vancouver. Victoria, etc.. via Prince
Rupert. B. C.
PRINCESS MAY January 13 and 27.
I
C. P. R. Ticket office*?Orpheum Btdg. and Splckett'a PostofTlce Store.
JOHN* T. SPICKETT. Agent
??
FROM NOW UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE OUR STORE WILL
REMAIN OPEN EVERY EVENING UNTIL TEN O'CLOCK.
i
H.J. RAYMOND CO. PIIQNE 2H ||
The fcmpire
Help You
OThe Empire Printing
Co is a producer of
PRINTING?Good
Printing ? Printing
tliat will escape the
waste basket. ^ ^
Let
The Empire
Serve You
:> The Alaska Grill <>
I * If
I! FULL ORCHBSTRA MUSIC \\
DURING DINNER HOUR
jj U 1:
;; the best appointed place
in town ?
<? <>
^ i>
< ? Best of Everything Served <
" at Moderate Prices <>
?
I * * PEERLESS * ' j
1:CONCERT HALL!:
i; Wines i;
;; Liquors
:: and Cigars i:
o CHAS. CRAGG, Proprietor o
ISLAND FERRT CO.
Gas Boat "Gent"
15CENTS
Leave Juneau for Dougals
6:00 A. M. 2:30 P. M.
7:30 A. M. 3:30 P. M.
8:30 A. M. 4:20 P. M.
9:30 A. M. 6:00 P. M.
10:30 A. M. 6:40 P. M.
11:30 A. M. 7:30 P. M
12:30 P. M. 8:30 P. M.
1:30 P. M. 10:00 P. M.
(Saturday only) 11:30 P. M
Leavo Douglas for Juneau
7:00 A. M. 3:00 P. M.
8:00 A. M. 4:00 P. M
9:00 A. M. 6:26 P. M.
10:00 A. M. 6:20 P. M
11": 00 A. M. 7:00 P. M.
12:00 Noon 8:00 P. M
1:00 P. M. 6:00 P. M.
2:00 P. M. 10:3i- P. M
(Saturday only) 12-JO M.
Leavo Juneau for Thane (via Douglas)
6:00 A. M. 4:20 P. M.
Leave Douglas for Thane
6:10 A. M. 4:36 P. M.
Leave Thano for Juneau (via Dovglas)
6:30 A. M. 5:05 P. M.
SAFETY FIRSiT
THE ALMA
RUNS ON THE FOLLOWING SCHE
DULE TO DOUGLA8, TREADWELL
AND THANE
FAR F 15 C'TS.
Juneau Ferry 8 Navigation Company
Leaves Juneau for Douglas, Tread well
and Thane
6:00 a. m. 1:00 p. m. 7:00 p. m.
7:16 a. m. 3:15 p. in. 8:00 p. m.
9:00 a. m. 4:46 p. m. 9:30 p. m.
11:00 a.m. 5:45 p.m. 11:16 p. oi.
Saturday Night Only 12:30 a. m.
Leave Douglas for Treadwell & Thane
6:10 a. m. 1:10 p. in. 7:10 p. m.
7:26 a. m. 3:26 p. m. 8:10 p. m.
8:10 u. m. 4:65 p.m. 9:40 p.m.
11:10 a. m. 6:65 p. m. 11:25 p. tn.
Saturday Night Only 12:40 a ru
Leaves Tresdwell for Thane
6:16 a.m. 1:16 p.m. 7:16 p.m.
7:30 a.m. 3:30 p. m. 8:16 p.m.
9:16 a. m. 6:00 p. m. 6:46 p. m.
11:16 a. m. 6:00 p. m. 11:30 p. m
Saturday Night Only 12:45 a. m.
Leave Thane for Treadwell, Douglas
and Juneau
6:25 a.m. 1:25 p.m. 7:26 p.m.
8:10 a.m. 4:10 p.m. 8:25 p. m
9:26 a. m. 6:10 p. m. 9:65 p. m.
11:26 a. m. 6:10 p. m. 12:10 a. m.
Saturday Night Only 12:65 a. m.
Leave Treadwell for Douglas &. Juneau
6:36 a. m. 1:36 p. m. 7:35 p. m.
8:20 a. m. 4:20 p. m. 8:35 p. m.
9:35 a. m. 6:20 p. m. 10:05 p. m.
11:35 a. m. 6:20 p. in. 12:20 a. m.
Saturday Night Only 1:05 a. m
Leave Douglas for Juneau
6:40 a.m. 1 <0 p. m. 7:40 p. m
8:25 a. m. 4.35 p. m. 8:40 p. m
9:40 a. m. 6:25 p. m. 10:10 p. m.
11:40 a. m. 6:25 p. m. 12:26 a. m.
Saturday Night Only 1:10 a. m.
Twenty-Ride Commutation Tickets
For $2.50
SCHEDULE SUBJECT TO CHANGE
WITHOUT NOTICE
Tom; Taylor C W; Wilson, Alex;
Weber, Max; (2); Wallace Mr and
Mrs Jamea; Young Jlmmie: Cas Per
ino, Dalla Angelo.
The Empire prima more papon and
has by a long way the most regular
paid subscribers of any newspaper In
Alaska. ???
JUNEAU 8TEAM8HIP CO.
United State* Mall
STEAMER GEORGIA
Juneau-S.'tkn Route
Leaves Juneau (or Douglas, Fun*
ter, Ho<)nah. Gypsum, Tenakee,
Kllllsnoo, Cnatbam and Sitka every
Wednesday at 12:01 a. m.
Juneau-Skagvay Route
Leaves Juneau for Douglas. Eagi
River, Sentinel Light Station, Ei
drid Rock Light Station, Comet
Haines, Skagway evory Sunday ?(
12:01 a. m. Returning, leaves
Sitagway the following day at 12:02
a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER
St.Nicholas
1 1 I I 1 I I I 1 I 1 1 1 I I 1 II H-H
Leaves Young's Float for Doug
las, Funter, Gypsum and Ten
akee, Tuesday's at 8 a. m.
For Charter when not on sched
ule.
mmaamammsmammmmtBomk
Watches, Diamonds
Jewelry, Silverware
I.J.bharick
Jeweler and
Optician
McKannaTransfer 8
"fkeight?coal?baggage m
SADDLE HORSES FOR RENT j?
Light And 11***7 Hauling of *11 Kindi N
Office 127-129 Front St.. phone 66 ^
? ^ .?
Pbone 388 Strictly Flrtt CIam
Juneau Construction Co.
Contractors fl Store and olfiea Us- 11
. "ture?. Miaaion furni
ture. Wood turning. Band mtwlntr.
JUNEAU. ALASKA
?.
Whon you want something ? any
thing?in Printing that is really fine,
let The Empire do the work for you.
The Modern Way
g ^ ??? < ?
~ i >
is to eliminate the dirt, dust and germs, making the home !!
sanitary and comfortable, by using an <t
ELECTRIC VACUUM CLEANER I;
You can run your sewing machine for one-fourth of V,
a cent per hour. Life is too short to use up your energy 3!
in this way when you can secure electric power so cheaply. 3!
IRON With ELECTRICITY I
It saves fuel, time and labor. It is cleaner than other fuels, <'
and absolutely guarantees an even, regular temperature, ?>
thus making smoother, better work. !!
~ i >
Alaska Electric ight and Power Co. i|
< i

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