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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 19, 1916, Image 4

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
PUBLISHED BT THE EMPIRE PRINTING COMPANY
JOHN W. TROY, Editor and Managsr
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
One year, by mall. In advance 110.00
Six months, by mall. In advance. 6.00
Per month, delivered - 1.00
Entered as second-class matter November 7. 1913.
M the postofflce at Junean, Alaska, onder the Act of
March 3. 1879.
JOGGING ALONG
WTille the disgruntled and the Adullamitos howl
and rage In other sections of the land, mostly because
howling about existing conditions is their chief stock
In trade, this section of Alaska goes merrily along,
producing wealth from the mines, and developing a va
riety of other resources. Of course, the pessimist, the
knocker, and the kicker are not unknown; nor will
they have totally disappeared until the miltenium is
ushered in. and that time is so far away that nono of
us are vitally interested in It. Thore is opportunity j
however to hurry along its advent by making the proper
use of our time and energies.
"Life ain't in holding a good hand, but In playing
a poor hand well." said a desert philosopher: and, if
each Alaskan were to play the hand dealt him to the
best of h!s ability, there would be a notable decrease
In the pessimistic ranks. The trouble is that few will
do it. They are too much engrossed in wondering what
the other fellow's hand is like, or what he may have
up his sleeve, and so they disqualify themselves from
making the most points out of their own hands. The
man who succeeds in any walk of life is not necessar
ily the most brilliant or gifted; It is rather the patient
digger, the man who makes himself efficient In his line
of work; the envious, the grouch, the knocker, the mal
ingerer are to be pitied because they are enemies of
themselves rather than of those with whom they asso
ciate or come in contact
HEALTH CONDITION'S GOOD
The Empire is glad to note, through the medium
of report* of the city and territorial health officers,
that health conditions In Juneau arc good, generally
speak'ng. The period of la grippe and a few other spor
adic diseases, has passed, and normal conditions again
prevail. It is true, we opine, that there are a few who
are stilt afflicted with corns and bunions and bolls, and
some may even have an excess of bile, but even these
will pass If the proper prophylactic be applied?all but
:he bile, perhaps, which to a greater or lesser extent,
is always In evidence. However, seriously speaking.
Alaska Is among the healthiest of all lands and climes.
There are few epidemics to be chronicled at any time
among the white inhabitants, and these arc growing
rarer year by year among the native population: but
if *uch epidemics should happen, they are quickly con
trolled. which reminds us that Alaska physicians, as a
rule, are skilled and up to date and know well how
to grapple with disease. In this they are aided by u
cl'mate whose air is pure and bracing, and which repels i
the bacteria so deadly in less favored lands. The health
fulness of Alaska is illustrated in the children, forj
nowhere on earth can healthier, happier and rosier
types be found than in the different Alaska communi
ties
It is wonderful how prone to exaggerate ar?- a5
a people. Here we havo been going along, believing
that the United States has been contributing, for many
years, something like $300,000,000 per annum to foreign
-hip owners for carrying our freight to and from Eur
ope. Now the statement is made (and it is apparently
authentic, that in 1914 we paid $46,000,000 for this
purpose, and this sum is believed to be a fair average
of what has been paid for years past; and not all of
the amount goes out of the country, as some of It is
?pent here for dock charges, ship supplies, and so on.
"No roan in public life understands the tariff bet
ter than Theodore Roosevelt"?(Writer in the Philadel
phia Public Ledger.) As shown by the fact that for
seven years he sidestepped it with marvolous agility.
Germany's record of conquest in conspicuously at
the front in this war. She and her ally, Austria, seem
now to have added Montenegro to the list. Belgium
was the first to fall before Germany's prowess, then
Serbia and now Montenegro. Besides, Germany con* '
trols about ono twenty-fifth of Prance, and all of Rus
sian Poland.
When United States Marshal Erwiu, of Fairbanks,
was in Juneau last week, he told The Empire that tho
entire country appeared to bo experiencing a wave of
preparedness, some for, some against, but all discuss
ing the policy. Mr. Erwin also stated that United
States Senator Jones, of Washington, was opposed to
preparedness. His statement was borne out by Seattlo
papers which have reached Juneau. Tho Seuttlo Times
is going right aftor Senator Jones on the issue. In the
past five editions of the Times, on tho first pago, has
appeared a form which states "Washington is FOR pre
paredness." The Times requested all of its renders,
who believed in the issue to send this form with their
name und address to Senator Jones in order that ho
might find out what the consensus of opinion was of
the people of the state.
WASHINGTON'S DRY LAW
Washington has now been dry sixteen days, and
Judging from the editorial expressions of the newspa
pers, the provisions of the statute are being enforced
without trouble.
The Tacoma Ledger commented on the transition
from "wet" to "dry" as follows:
The transition from "wet" to "dry" in this stato
was marked by au abundance of good humor. Every
body had his little Joke about it. Even tlfte saloonkeep
ers, whq will be most affected froift tho standpoint of
livelihood, took it good naturedly. In the last "wet"
days they were so busy selling to persons who were
stocking up against the "dry" season that they hardly
had time to think about It. Moreover,- the liquor deal
ers had done most of their thinking about It months
ago. They had more than a year's notice of the ter
mination of their business. The "dry" law was initiat
ed by petition early in 1914 and was referred to the
electorate and approved by It in November of that year.
So there were about 14 months between enactment of
the law and the practical taking effect. Hope was, no
doubt, entertained that the courts would flud tho law
unconstitutional, though the hope was probably faint,
because thoso engaged in tho business were well aware
of a widespread tendency stringently to restrict the li
quor traffic.
Under the new law the county auditor issues per
mits to adult citizens for the Importation of limited
amounts of liquor or beer. For several weeks to como
the number of permits is likely to be small because of
the supplies laid in by families In the last few days.
There be persons, who like a little on hand for medi
cinal purposes but who would feel some embarrassment
In going to the county auditor's office for a permit. They
as well as persons who like a little for other purposes
as well ns medicinal, did a great deal of shopping on
the day preceding the "dry" New Year. Retail and
wholesale estnblisments did an enormous business be
tween Christmas and New Year so that by tho night
of December 30. or 24 hours before the taking effect
of the "dry" law. there was little left.
Now will come a test of how the law works out.
It would be unreasonable In view of the experience of
other "dry'" states, like Ma'ne. for example, to believe
there will be no violations. The law has "teeth" in
it, and the violator will assume heavy risks.
It is tho law and should be obeyed as other laws
are obeyed. The statements of various officials show
that they will labor earnestly and conscientiously for
Its enforcement. That is as it should be.
The Spokane Spokesman-Review published the fol
lowing editorial:
Spokane deserves credit for the orderly way in
which tho arrival of the New Year and the coming of
prohibition were celebrated.
Drunkenness and disorder were less than on pre
vious New Year's eves. There was gaiety, hilarity even,
but little disorder and practically no rowdyism. The
number of thoso who "celebrated" in downtown cafes
was unusually large, but unusually decorous. Practic
ally all were out for a legitimate evening of orderly en
tertainment.
The polce force had made elaborate preparations
to cope with disorder, but. though commendable, they
proved to be little needed. The good order was tho
result of the orderly spirit and intention of practically
all of the celebrants.
One thing proved by many New Year's eve parties
in the cafes was that lack of intoxicants does not k'll
Joy or prevent decent merriment. All of the good time
can be saved without needing any of the booze. The
town will not go into mourning because it can't get
alcoholic Joy-makers.
The manner in which the New Year was ushered
in speaks well for the enforcement of the new prohibi
tion law. The sentiment of Spokane people is for
obedience to the law and this city has plenty of legiti
mate pleasures and industries so it doesn't have to de
wend on strong drink either for its prosperity or its
happiness. It Is a city of clean resources and clean liv
ing. It needs no commiserations over the "dry" law.
Ben Tillman's pitchfork, also knows no brother. ?
(New York World.)
4 +
I !
WAR SIDELIGHTS.
I
+ *
A Bucharest correspondent of the
London Dally Mall wires that several
arrests have been made In connection
with at> unsuccessful plot instlgntod
by German agents to blow up the res
Idences of Take Jonescue and M. Lll
Ipescuc and other prominent men who
are known to be favorablo to the al
lies.
The landstrum, of German third-line
troops had a Christmas of mingled
homesickness, mourning and Jollity.
Each compnny decorated its mess hall
with tinsel and pictures of von Hln
denburg and the Kaiser "in the pro
portions of two to one," declares the
Times correspondent. A hugo Christ
mas tree, an eight-piece band and a
choir of twenty voices, all of the men's
production, graced the occasion, and a
feature was a stirring talk by the cap
tain, who spoke of home and their
; duty.
Francis N. Balch. a Bostoi. attornoy,
who has recently returned from Lon
don. says: "I fear that England feels
in her secret heart that our love foi
profits In this war has overshadowed
our regard for national honor." Eng
land feels, he says, that the United
States should have intervened in the
case of Belgium as was dojie in Cuba
on the ground that International law
and humanity demand protection ol
the oppressed Belgians.
A Hague dispatch states that Amor
icans and other neutrals have beet
further rcstrlctod from entering Ger
many. Holders of passports in fu
turo must proceed personally to th<
German diplomatic or consular office
must prove the urgency of the journo:
submit business papers and furnlsl
names of persons whom it is proposei
to visit.
Acting on protest of hotel keeper;
in middle Germany against an advance
of one cent a quart in me price m ?.
beer, a German commander of the R
11th corps has forbidden any increase R
declaring that proposed advances are T
unjustified. It is said that brewers
arc .realizing dividends of 16 percent S
to 24 percent on their businoss.
C
The big British liner Arlanza was 0
sunk off the Russian port of Arch- G
angel, probably by a floating mine on
Dec. 10. Excepting the Lusltanla and N
Arabic tho Arlanza is the biggest boat T
sunk by mines or submarines since M
the beginning of tho war. Sho was D
owned by the Royal Mall Packet com
pany, had a displacement of 16,044 T
tons, and was built in 1912. Y
T
Edward Morlac, of San Francisco,
who has been a sergeant in the French A
Foreign Legion, says tho French gov- (.
eminent is intont on building a fleet
of 15,000 aeroplanes, each capable of ?
carrying six men, two Hotchkiss guns
and a half-dozen 60-pound bombs.
A London dlspntch claims that the
archduke's palace in Vienna was
stormed Christmas night by a mob
armed with axes and pitchforks, as a
protest against the squandering of
food in elaborato entertaining. Riots
also occurred at Chemnitz, Germany.
A Salonikl correspondent of the
Paris Temps says that King Constan
tino of Grecc<> has again offered the
premiership to ex-Premier Vonezolos,
and that tho latter declined.
London correspondence says tho Al
lies, counting men actually at the
front, have about 6.000,000 to the ene
my's 5,000,000, but this superiority has
been almost reduced to equality by
tho strutegy of the past year and by
the special conditions of the Italian
theatre, which has enabled 300,000
to 400,000 Austrlans to hold up the
Italians.
Following the establishment of the
maximum benzol prices, the German
government has forbidden contracts
for this commodity to run boyond the
duration of the war. Tho manufac- I
turors were taking long-time contracts _
at mnxlmum prices to got the benefit I
of war prices in peace times.
CONTRIBUTED
Juneau, Alaska, Jan. 15. ^
To Those Who Would Knock:?
Come all you knockers and henchmen
Come out and fall in with tho bunch ,
Get out where tho people can see you
Do you got mo; bo wise get tho hunch.
Hatchets were made to cut wood with -
Hammers wore made to drive nails.
Buy nil your goods hero In JUNEAU. 1
Don't have them come thru the malls, i
Walk down the street with your head *
up.
Don't let your lower lip droop,
When walking around keep your chest (
out ,
Don't stroll around with a stoop.
Bo a good sport here in JUNEAU,
Don't spend your chango across the
Bay,
Tho merchants In town here can us?
It;
You'll get it all back some day.
This is some city, our JUNEAU.
Some little burg?well I guess;
Plenty of sunshine and flowers,
? Everything horc is the best
? Send what you ralso here, To JU
NEAU. v
? Don't trade it to some point outside.
< Wo can uso all that you have hero.
' We'll buy all your goods with much
i pride.
I
Go take a look around our city;
Think of tho strides we have made,
i Knockers we know didn't do it.
> Just the live ones not afraid.
'o'll have an AWFUL largo city
Ight In our midst some day,
ail roads, street cars and bridges;
lie time isn't so far away.
kyscrapers we'll have by the hun
dreds,
hurchcs, colleges, buildings of state,
rchnrds, sweet meadows and ranches
EE. Won't that be grcut.
oth.ng too big for our boosters,
akc off your lint to tho bunch,
len that get out and do something;
oosters that sure have tho punch.
uko It from me, all ye dead ones,
ou'll all be sorry some day,
hat you citing too D long to your
hantmors,
nd couldn't see JUN'EAU that way.
I. A. A. Jr.) by It. W. EDWARDS
When I had things to trade or sell,"
said B., with candor real,
I used to walk and ride for miles
To make a simple deal.
Jut now when I wish llko results, I
do not have to roam,
Vn Emplro Want Ad does tlio work,
"While I remain at home."
Classified Advertisements
JANITOR 8ERVICES
Day and Night Janitor service and
vlndow cleaning. All work promptly
ittended to. Monthly rates. Phone
!28. GORDON & THOMAS. 11-24-tf.
FASHIONABLE DRESSMAKING
All of the latest and most artistic
ieaigne. Thoroughly experienced and
competent dressmaker. Mrs. M. Has
lam. room 12. Maloney Btdg. Phono,
Ml. 9-lMm
SECONp HAND FURNITURE.
STECOND HAND FURNITURE?The
Exchange, opposite Circle City Hotel,
will buy. sell or exchange anything in
tho furniture line. All kinds of repair
ing. manufacture mattresses and fur
niture. 12-1-tl
LOST AND FOUND
LOST?Watch fob charm with flHh
er maiden emblem. Valued nt keep
sake. Finder return to Curtis Broth
erton, at Orpheum; reward. 1-18-tl
LOST?Brown puppy, .1 months old
Return to 114 Front St. l-191tf
THE BOY who took tho Kiddo slei
from the school basement !s known
Return same and avoid prosocution
1-19-lt.
p) OUqj\qij^
A WWical tfPciorit \
A /ifurfti ?tout ot \
H 'JrUJWfltt AVnrnjffi<n,\
& $CMOJ? txwbcfflju W(s\
M <b> - UCA I
j^S fflmit Jrt. tfVOr^ ^uuiy l
SotsfuJ -tut A>?tastA 1
\ 0\ & ^ Wt> - root \
You Can't
Lose
SPECIAL SALE
DiAMOND BRIQUETS
Act Quickly If You Want to Save $1.50 a Ton. for the
SPECIAL PRICES End this Week.
I6'00 Per Ton
At the Bunkers QUICK DELIVERY
Order from Your Regular Teamster or Direct
CLEAN. EFFICIENT, ECONOMICAL
How's Your Heating Apparatus? If It Is Sick or Ailing,
Send for the Coal Doctor. He'll Fix It. No Charge.
PHONE 4
Pacific Coast Coal Co.
a H. WILBUR, Jr., Agent.
OLDEST BANK IN ALASKA
1. 40. Irijrrn&a lank
E8TABLI8HEO 1681 INCORPORTEO 1814
DEPOSITORS IN OUR 8AVINQ3
DEPARTMENT ARE REQUE8TED
TO.PRE8ENT THEIR PASS BOOKS
FOR ENTRY OF INTEREST DUE.
JANUARY FIRST, NINETEEN SIXTEEN
4 4 4
Good Wholesome, Home-Made
Bread Is to be had of
Mrs. M. C. Wise,
422 Calhoun Ave. Phone 2132
4 -4
The Real ;i
: BEER j
Is Made at i
t Juneau ;;
DRINK IT
i! * h
j[ Eagle Brewing j;
j Company
For The i:
4 ?
Particularflousewife i:
PLACE CARDS ;;
TALLY CARDS
PLAYING CARDS o|
SCORE CARDS \\
STATIONERY ;;
CORRESPONDENCE ?
CARDS ?>
< ?
BOOKS j J
BOOK ENDS ;;
JAPANESE ;;
BASKETS J;
CANDIES ?
MAGAZINES ! I
i >
C.E. Cartwrigfit i:
STATIONERY AND OFFICE
SUPPLIES ??
< ?
NEXT TO POST OFFICE
?
AUTOMOBILES
TIRES AND TUBES
OP ALL SIZES
TIRE ACCESSORIES
OF ALL KINDS
CEMENT
CEMENTLESS PATCHES
SKID CHAINS
DRIVING GAUNTLETS
BUMPERS
BRAKE LINING
TIRE PUMPS
ELECTRIC AUTO LAMPS
FITTINGS
ELECTRIC CIGAR
LIGHTERS
OILS
GREASES
PAINTS, ETC.
FORD AND OVERLAND
AGENCIES
Complete Stock of Ford Parts
and Accessories
J NI 0 N IRON WORKS
Classified Advertisements
WANTED?Mlacellaneoua
WANTED?By colored man, day or
hour work, porter, house cleaning,
window cleaning, waiting table, tend
ing furnace?any work. "Porter," care
Empire, 1-13-flt
COMPETENT girl desires house
work. Address "G. D.," care Empire.
?l-8-3t.
WANTED?4 or 5-room furnished
houso. For young couple. Address
P. O. Box 123. 1-19-tf.
HAVE YOU A BICYCLE?
YOU'RE LUCKIER THAN ME
I WANT TO BUY ONE
IF IT'S CHEAP.
Address?114 Front. St. 1-19-tf
NOTICE.
WANTED, to sell shoe shining par
lor; owner callod away. Must sell
at once. Rent paid until Nov. 1st
Address E. B. D., Empire. 1-17-3L
ROOM8 FOR RENT
CLEAN, Well vontil.ted rooniB?the
best In Juneau; 25c, 25c, and 50c, at
the Central Rooming Hour, Front
Street. tf.
ROOM FOR KENT?114 Mnlnt St. tf
FOR RENT?Single room for gen
tleman, steam heat, hot and cold run
ning water. In prlvato family. 115.00
per month. P. 0. Box 473. 12-30-tf.
LARGE Furnished room, with or
without hoard. Home cooking. Over
Juneau Liquor Co. 1-13-tf.
SPECIAL WINTER RATES ?'Best
rooms in Juneau, steam heated, hot
and cold water in every room. Strict
ly up to date. Come and see them.
Orplicum Building. 12-21-tf
HOUSE8 AND FLAT8 FOR RENT
FOR RENT?Furnished Two-room
house-keeping ' suite. Reasonable.?
335 Franklin. 1-12-lm
FOR RENT ? Four-room modern
bouse. Furnished. Corner 6th and
Park Ave. 12-24-tf.
FOR RENT?Unfumrshod five-room
house. Call office of Jneger & Eric
son, Seward Bldg. 1-13-tf.
FOlt RENT. 2 anc J room furnisher
housekeeping suites; reasonable, "Tht
cosy comer of Juneau" Cliff Apart
monts. near court house: 2-1-1ro
FOR RENT ? Furnished 4-room
house, 619 East Btrect, phone 79. 19-3t
FOR RENT ? Nowly furnished
housekeeping rooms $8.00 and $10.00
per month. Seavlew apartments. 1-19-t
FOR RENT?Furnished cablne. soo
Femmer & Ritter. 1-17-tf
FOR SALE?Miscellaneous
<? *
* FOR SALE +
+ Two story house on 60-foot +
+ lot. In saloon limit. Front 8L. +
* Douglas. A bargain. e
* 1-3-tf. NICK DABIZINOVICH +
+ + + -3- + + <? + <? + ? + + + ? + +
SAFE?Flro and burglar proof safe
for sale cheap. In fine condition;
good ns new; on terms If you wish.
Call and see same at Mondham &
Ostrom. 90 Front Street. 9-17-tf.
SAFE?Fire proof safe for sale
cheap. In first class condition. Terms
if you wish. Can bo seen and all In
formation at W. H. Case Curio Store,
Juneau, Alaska. 9-lC-tf.
FOR SALE?The Hamburg Inn, del
icatessen and grocery*, with lots 8 and
9 In block 1, Chllberg addition to
Seattle, for $9,000. Paying business,
ground Is 50 foot front with meander
(Ule line of about 150 foet. Dance
hnll In connection with building. Ad
dress 4025 Al-KI Avenue. Seattle, for
further particulars. l-15-16t
LINOLEUM..?..Printed and Inlaid.
Your old rugs and linoleum taken In
trade. Chaa Ahdcrson, 321 Franklin,
next to Clare's Grocery. 1-4-8.
FOR SALE?Practically new house
hold furniture; rugs and sowing ma
chine. Enquire 224 Fourth SL 1-6-tf.
RESTAURANT8 AND CAFES
OWL CAFE open day and nlgnt
Rest meals In town. Chop 8uey and
Noodles, Chinese stylo. 187 Front 8L
j 9-9-6m
j SEATTLE RESTAURANT ? Chop
Suey and Chinese Noodles Bent out
J on special orders. Prompt, quick ser
j vice. Box Beats tor ladtea. 58 Front
Phono 3-4-3 ?-9-6m
DYEING AND CLEANING
WHEN OTHERS FAIL to please
you call 177, the Capital Dye Works,
for French Dye Cleaning, etcam clean
ing, dying and pressing. We have
pleased others and can please you.
C. MELDNER. professional cleaner
and dyer. if
THE CLOTHES WE CLEAN, press
or repair-speak for themsolves. Furs
cleaned; hats cleaned and blocked.
Our service Is at your command. The
Rcnovntory. Phone 394. tf.
PUBLIC STENOGRAPHERS
JUNEAU'S TUBLIC STENOGRA
pher, Mrs. E. C. Hazelton. 421 Gold
stein Building. Res. 16 Cliff Apats.,
Phono 209. ll-4-6m.
AUTO REPAIRS
U-AUTO REPAIR and vulcanize
at the Juneau Garage. Wo do night
and day work. Next doer to Empire
office, phone 262, G. E. Collins, Propr.
9-10-6 m.
TURKISH BATH8
HILLSIDE BATH HOUSE?Turkish
Needle, steam, sthowor and tub baths,
dry and steam heat, 218 Front fit.
phone 163. 11-16-tf.
! CITY BATHS. Steam, shower, tut
. and Turklch baths. Emma E. Burko
. proprietress. 329 Front Stroot. pbon<
316 11-lB-t
Classified Advertiseme
PHV8ICIAN8 and 8UR0E0f
Dr. Boris, phone 1172. 11
DR. L. 0. SLOANE
Office Phone 18
House Phone 297
8H0E MAKER*.
CITY DOCK 8H0E SHOP?1
shoo tinker, shoes of all kinds
repaired, only first class mr
used; work called for and d<ll
phone 294.
TYPEWRITERS AND TYPEWF
SUPPLIES
THE BEST work* can be obi
by calling the REMINGTON
stenographer. Phone 289?Offlc*
loney Building
tVE MAKE nil of our type
qppplfes and therefore they ar
best that money can buy. "REN
TON TYPEWRITER CO."
HAVE you seen the 'REMING
thnt won the "GOLD MEDAL"
"PANAMA EXPOSITION?" It it
"NOISELESS" Lut Is "DURABl!
REMINGTON TYPEWRITER C
SECOND HAND typewriters <
makes Including Underwood ar
C. Smith's, which wo have trad*
can bo bought cheap at the "
INGTON OFFICE.
BAKERIES
PEERLESS BAKERY ? Our a
"Quality Firat." Insist on Pe<
Bread. It Is worth the anney -
Front St., phone 222. i(
Whon you want something ?
thing?In Printing that Is really
let The Empire do the work for
PROFESSIONAL.
THE VICE-CONSULATE OF N'
WAY AT JUNEAU. ALASKA
sends money to Norway with
charge. Residues of estates In f
way collected and estates of r
weglan citizens In Alaska adm
tered at small cost. All trani
tlons quaranteed by the Norv
Ian government.
WM. BRITT.
Vice Consul For Norv
William Pallislcr, M. D.,
SpvialUt in tho trtmtiwnl of
nod doformltioa of the ?ye and
? node and throat
Offio.l fourth FJonr. fjolddtrln Iluil
Office Phono 160. Glawea Fiuoj
i: Dr. E. H. &ase
DENTIST
!' I and 3 Goldstein Building
(, Phone B6.
(, Hours, 9 it. m. to 9 p. m.
MISS ALBRECHT
OSTEOPATH
SwedUh Medical Gymnaatici
pert treatment irfvon in all rrqu
. maasage, diet and mechanical therape*
! Room* ilOGoldatein Building. Phone If
I . ___
DR. H. VANCE j
OSTEOPATH
5 and 6 Malony Bldfl., phone 4
Hourt 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
1 I
+???????????+?+
? OR. LEONARD P. OAWES
? Surgeon and Physician
? Office First Nat. Bk. Bldg
? Honrs 10 to 12 m; 1 to ?
? and 7 to 3 p. m.
f Phone 2802; Res. 2603
+?*???+???+???
Any Broken Spectacle Lena
duplicated and fitted (or $1.1
made by best lense makere. a
matter what you paid for ycj
i kIbphob originally.
I. J. SIIARICK
Jeweler and Optician
4 ? f
111 111 111 11II111 III III '?
:: White & Jenn;
;; 0ENTIST8
!! Rooms 8.9,10, Valentin* BM*
PHONE 178
.. Tfxxi. n. White. T?r. Board, Llcenae No
.. Chas. P. Jenna. Ter. Board, Ltoon?o No
Tl 1 I 1 1 1 Mil 111111111 1"H
+
+ GEORGE IRVING
? Attorney-At-Law
?f 307 Goldstein Building
?f Telephone 1903.
*
+ 4. + + * + ** + * + + + +
PIANO TUNE
ROY R. JACOR8
PrfKtickl Adjusting. Rrsrulatin* and Tun
Graduate of Now England Conxervaton
Music. Reference: Chtckerlng Factory. I
tcr & Waldo, Minneapolis; Eilers Music H<J
Portland. NOW WITH
Juneau Music House
Piano Tune
GEORGE ANDERSON, Expert. T\
ty years experience. Factory repre
tative for High Grade Pianos
Player Pianos. Address Box
'Phone 143.
IIII I I I I I I I I I I I I IM I H I I
;;.Time to Warm Up
| | Winter Is here?
' ? Build a cozy fire of
1 ? Ladysmith or T A * I
! South Prairie t U I
> They are the best.
] j They make lots of heat ant
i < ? little cinder and ash.
, ; ; PHONE 48
JUNBAO TRANSFER CO
> < 11111111111 u1111111111
> Th? Kmnlrft Is n. nrndnrnr of di
(J lug that will escape the waste baa

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