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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, October 05, 1916, Image 4

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
JOHN W. TROY, . . Editor and Manager
Published every evening except Sunday by the
EMPIRE PRINTING COMPANY, at Second and MaJn
Streets. Juneau, Alaska.
Entered as second-class matter November 7, 1912.
at the postoffice at Juneau, Alaska, under the Act of
March 3. 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Delivered by carrier In Juneau, Douglas, Treadwell and
Thane for $1.00 per month.
By mail, postage paid, at the following rates:
One year, in advance $10.00
Six months, in advance 5.00
Three months, in advance 2.50
One month, in advance 1.00
ADVERTISING RATES ON APPLICATION
Subscribers will confer a favor If tbey will prompt
ly notify the Business Office ol any failure or Irregu
larity In the delivery of their papers.
Telephone for Editorial and Business Offices, 374
Authorized Local Agent9
Douglas and Treadwell. Miss Lena White; Thane.
Ed. Morgan; Perseverance. Hans Hollmer
CIRCULATION OVER 2.000 DAILY
SWORN CIRCULATION STATEMENT FOR THE
WEEK ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1916.
The daily average circulation of THE ALASKA
DAILY EMPIRE for the week t iding September 30.
1916 was 2.143 copies.
The circulation for each day of the week follows:.
Monday 2,263
Tuesday 2,112
Wednesday 2,118
Thursday 2,117
Friday 2,112
Saturday 2.161
Total 12.S85
The foregoing is a truo and correct statement of
the daily circulation of the ALASKA DAILY EM
PIRE for the week ending September 30. 1916.
JOHN W. TROY.
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2nd day
of October. 1916.
W. A. HOLZHEIMER. Notary Public.
THE CONVICTION OF KRAUSE
The conviction of Edward Krause of first degree
murder for slaying and robbing James Plunkett, a
Juneau pioneer, is a matter for congratulation, and
credit will be freely extended to United States Dis
trict Attorney James A. Smlser and those who have
worked under him in marshalling the evidence and
presenting it to the jury, and to the unflinching per
formance of the jurors. In fact, the conduct of all the
Krause cases is entirely creditable to the United States
officials and the others who gathered the evidence,
link by link until a chain that will lead to the scaf
fold. if last night's verdict stands the tests of the
higher courts, was woven?and it is creditable to the
citizenry taat furnished the jurors and general moral
support.
No one who has followed the evidence in the
Krause cases can escape the conviction that one of
the arch-criminals of the century was run to
earth when the men who were sent on the trail ot
Krause after the disappearance of William Christie
a little over a year ago got in their work. Five
times he has been placet^ on trial for felonies since
that time, and five convictions have resulted. It is
stated that facts that would sustain 32 further in
dictments?37 in all?have been dug up by those
who have conducted the investigations. If the theatre
of the Krause career had been on the Atlantic sea
board where the population is dense, in the field of the
newspapers of national fame, there w-ould not be a
hamlet in the land where his face would not be fa
miliar to the people and where his name would not
be linked with those of the master fiends of the ages.
With four murders, and perhaps five, traced to his
hands, and many other crimes, including robbery,
forgery, impersonating an officer, impersonating his
own murdered victims, and other diabolical acts, he
will go down in the history of Alaska as the worst
of all her criminals?not excepting "Soapy" Smith.
It adds to the feeling of security in the North
to realize that we have the officials and the disposi
tion to follow such a criminal to the bitter end. It is
creditable to Southeastern Alaska citizenry that five
juries have promptly and unhesitatingly found verdicts
of gui'.ty after hearing the tales of crime. In all the
?>0 men who have sat upon juries that have tried
Krause there has been not one with maudlin or un
balanced sympathies to prevent the irresistible and
unerring march of justiae. The time has passed when
men can murder and steal in the North with im
punity.
The Empire joints in the congratulations to all
those who have had to do with the five convictions
of Edward Krause. They have done a great deal
to add to the stability of Alaska's political lnstitu- i
Hons, and to the security of her society.
WELCOME TO MR. GRIGSBY 1
i
Southeastern Alaska will welcome the coming of ]
George B. Grigsby?Alaska pioneer, leading lawyer 1
of Nome, former mayor of the Westernmost American '
municipality, idol of the people of Seward Peninsula, |
and fine Alaska citizen. Mr. Grigsby, who ar- ;
rived in the capital city last night, will open his i
campaign in the First Division with a speech here *
tomorrow night at the Coliseum, where he will handle j
the issues of the campaign without glove9. He is
said to be the best platform speaker in the Terri
tory. His personality is attractive. His ability un- y
disputed.
Mr. Grigsby is the candidate of the Democratic ?
party for Attorney-General of the Territory of Alaska, r
and he brings with him to this Division a reputation, p
earned by hard work and retaining by unfailing in- '
tegrity of purpose, second to none in Alaska. The p
voters of Juneau 3hould not miss the opportunity to n
hear him. He will tell them many things that they Is
should know. And, his standing in the Territory as 0
a former official, a citizen ar.d a candidate for high ?
office, entitle him to a hearing from those of all t<
political parties. a
The Coliseum should be filled to overflowing b
Friday night. p
DISARMAMENT IN TEXAS n
al
We imagine that the freeborn citizens of Texas ly
will read with considerable interest a suggestion from
New London. Conn., that neutral zones. 30 miles wide h'L
on each side of the border be established and patrolled to
jointly by the troops of Mexico and the United States, ti
the inhabitants on both sides to be disarmed. It is
said this suggestion come3 from the Mexican commis- jc
sioners, and if it does, we conclude that they have j to
not reckoned sufficiently upon Texas. The people down
there are inclined to be proud and stand upon their
constitutional rights, ono of which is to bear arms.
They havo not been invading Mexico and the State
has exhibited no incapacity to hold its people to an
observance of the rights of Mexico. Therefore Texas
is very likely to Inquire why a strip of its territory
20 miles wide and as long as the international boun
dary should be put under martial law. We fancy the
inquiry will be difficult to answer.
The Fairbanks Times, urging people to be Repub
licans, says the Republican party has been Alaska's
good friend and that it is the party that is pledged
to Alaska's welfare. So? The Republican National
platform does not mention Alaska. Candidate Hughes
devoted 20 words to the Territory in his Seattle
speech, and then to say only that he would like to
see tho Territory developed. In the East Republican
campaign orators are attacking the Wilson adminis
tration for its extravagance In building a $35,000,000
railroad in the Territory.
Democrats should not fail to attend* the meeting
of the Juneau Democratic Club tonight. Those who
attend will have an opportunity to meet Mr. Grlgsby,
the party nominee for Attorney-General.
Save Friday night for the Grigsby rally?at the
Coliseum?It will be free to all.
COAL FROM ALASKA
(New York Times)
Now there is news from Alaska of more import
ance to our people, and possibly more Interesting,
than the report about the work of Stefansson's Can
adian exploring expedition that was sent to the Times
from Nome last week by Dr. Anderson. He end his
associates are bringing to Seattle, with a collection
of Eskimo folklore and cat's cradle games, some speci
mens of copper which they found. But the copper de
posits are not in the United States Territory, being
situated a little east of Alaska, and they have no
commercial value because they are practically inac
cessible. We have an abundance of copper in Alaska,
at places where it can easily be mined and shipped
to our Pacific coast states, which received $26,000,000
worth of it last year. And wo also have in Alaska an
enormous quantity of coal. The news we are going
to say something about relates to this coal and a rail
road.
The first trainload of coal from the famous and
very extensive .Matanuska coal field was brought down
by rail to tidewater, at Anchorage, a distance of sev
enty-one miles, on the 16th. This railroad is a new
one that our government has been building with money
appropriated by Congress. When the Matanuska
mines or deposits were reached last week the achieve
ments were celebrated with as much warmth of ap
preciation as could be found in so cold a country. A
party of enthusiastic citizens was carried to the coal
fields from Anchorage in a special train chartered b;
the little city's chamber of commerce. In this party
were officers of the Engineering Commission which
supervised construction of the railroad, and the Rev.
Peter Trimble Rowe, Bishop of Alaska. They saw the
first trainload of coal beginning its journey to the
port of Anchorage and a ship.
This is good news for Alaska and for the people
and industries of our Pacific Coast States. There
is no end of coal up there. The cost of coal in
Oregon. Washington and California will be largely
reduced. East year wo received nearly $67,000,000
worth of copper, canned salmon, furs, gold and silver
from this great northern Territory, which was bought
in 1S67 for only $7,200,000. Hereafter much will be
added for coal.
THE MALAMUTE
(Seward Gateway)
When wo have lived for some time in Alaska we
pay little attention to the extraordinary place occu
pied by the malamute in Alaskan life although the
brute permeates almost every phase of it. He is to
Alaska what the camel is to Arabia. He is indigenous
to the soil of the Territory. He gives local colors to
stories of Alaska as a kangaroo gives it to Australia
and long ago Alaska would have probably enshrined
him as its national and only beloved emblem if he
were only pretty enough and could conduct himself
with anything approaching gentility.
It is impossible anywhere in the whole length
and breadth of the Territory to get away ifrom him.
Touch at Petersburg or Wrangell or Ketchikan for
the first time coming north and you hear his chorus.
Steam down the Yukon river, up the Takhini, the
Tanana, any of them and the first intimation you
receive that you are approaching a village comes
from the malamute answer to the steamer whistle.
Travel the trail and you either have him along as
your best friend or you must hide your bacon to
keep some stray specimen from eating it. Enter a
modern town and he runs between your legs on the
sidewalk.
me maimute is a peculiar beast. un tno trail
he is man's best friend. He has made the gold
discoveries and the consequent development of the
Territory possible. The malmute has opened Alaska
to man. The other side of the Malamuto. however,
is that he is a treacherous wretch. Over and over
again when he is traveling in packs he has taken (
human lives. Near the city of Nome a few years 1
ago a pack almost completely devoured a boy in his ;
teens. But he is not to blame for all this. He prob
ably threw the boy down first in play and then saw 3
no harm in doing the rest. He is only a dog.
In nature he is just like the Territory and its
Native inhabitants. For this reason he is worth
jtudying. Ho Is an uncultivated type of dog a3 the 1
Territory and the Territory's Natives are uncultivated.
No three things in this world harmonize with such
poetic perfection in their three different spheres
as the wilder parts of Alaska, especially near the
aouth of the Yukon, and the Native and the Mala- 1
nute. Each of them is possessed of an uncanny t
peace of exterior and of a latent and fatal fierceness.
Nothiug can kill so quickly as the wilderness when I
it becomes aroused and of the Malamutes and Na
:ives the same holds true. The Maiamute is not j
>nly indigeous to the land but he is part of it. He s
trows as naturally out of it as weeds grow out of
incultivated ground. Let us hope that as the coun- 11
ry and its original inhabitants only need care to
lourish the Maiamute only needs the same to make *
lim an animal of which we might be proud.
Wickersham was a good Delegate, probably, ten
ears ago. But times arc changing rapidly and Wick
s as far behind the times as it is possible for a
nan to be and draw his salary. Our opposition to
dm is derived from the fact that the Territory needs ...
lew blood. Sulzer would be more popular in a Re- -1
ublican Congress and wield more influence in mat- ^
era pertaining to the good of the Territory than ?
rould Wick, who i3 living in the dim and "musty" <?
ast. A business administration calls for a business *|
ran at the head of Territorial affairs. Wickersham o
$ not a business man; he belongs to the old school ?
f demagogic politicians. Sulzer has made a success ^
f his business as a miner; Wickersham has made o
failure of his business as a politician. Is it wise ?
3 continue to waste our time in Congress by electing J |
man who has nothing tcr commend him in the past <?
ut his faculty for making enemies??(Valdez Pros- *>
ector.) < J
It should always be remembered that people make <>
'sources; resources never make people although they <?
:tract them. A country's resources are not what is ^
ing latent in the earth but are what the people <.
in produce from the earth. Get the people and you <?
in get everything the country has. Alaska might
ive to import certain articles as every country has < ?
import but, she can export meat as well as Argen- < >
na or Australia, timber as well as Norway, and a <>
ousand other commodities a3 well as other cour.- < ?
ies. But Alaska will have new resources that we J*
? not now dream of if the people were only here < >
find them and develop them.?(Seward Gateway.) -M
f ??? *
*W * CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMEMTS ^ ^ ?
?
I
^ ?Usually a task or quest want-advertised is a task or quest ac
complished.
?'-? "" '
Pat Interest in Your Ads
. t
PUT INTEREST INTO YOUR ADS
?AND EARN "INTEREST" ON
YOUR DIVESTMENT. Tell the
facts about the place you offer for
rent. Tell the things which are of
INTEREST to people considering
the problem of a new home. For
INTEREST in your ads may mean
interest on your investment in prop
erty. If yon need it we wil aid
you to put INTEREST in your ads.
EMPIRE ADS HAVE THOUSANDS OF READERS
Fuller Bull Say?
w /-. f*.
Copyright, 1010, NewtyaprrKroturoBorTlco,
?yilK beat way to kco* & ooorot Jft MH
1 farj>l It. ^ ' . j
I FOR SALE?Miscellaneous J
WITH SOMETHING TO OFFER
to an Investor?some proposition
whicli will stand the fire test of
analysis?you can make classified
advertising your broker in securing
needed capital.?EMPIRE ADS have
THOUSANDS OF READERS.
Fumed Oak dining set, bed room set,
kitchen dishes, utensils, 318, 4th st.
? (o-5-tf)
? ?
UNCALLED for SUITS for sale. \
$5.00 and up.
Club Tailors. 71 Front St.
* +
FOR SALE?Good payablo room
ing house; low rent; center of busi
ness district. Will give lease. Have
business elsewhere. Owner, Empire.
?(Oct.o.)?
FOR SALE? One G-horse power
Pelton water wheel.?Cheap for cash.
W?Empire. S20tf.
FOR SALE?EFFICIENCY
FOR SALE?Correspondence schol
arship. Efficiency never goes beg
ging. The person who can do posi
tively and thoroughly something that
is useful is always in demand. AD
DRESS SCHOLARSHIP, Enip.re. tf.
FOR SALE ? DEVELOPMENT
NUMBER ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
FOR 1916?'The best Illustrated pub
lication concerning' resources of Ju
neau and surrounding country. Price
25 cents at Empire office and News
Stands. tf.
SS50.00 UPRIGHT PIANO for sale.
Price ?1S5. Cash buys It, and it Is a
snap. Call at McKanna ftSheldon's (
Second Hand Store E Third and Gold
Juneau. o7.
WHY ARE ADS 1
IMPORTANT
TO WOMEN?
j ;
The woman who studies <
the ads never fails to make ! .
a dollar buy a dollar's worth
of any commodity whatever. j
And, often, she makes it buy t
more than that.
>.t! ' ? -? ?
His Locality.
"Can you direct me to where I'll f
Ind a good plumber?one who nev- $
?r leaves his tools behind, does an r
rour's work in exactly 60 minutes, t
ind never leaves a leak after him?" a
"Oh, yes, sir, I can tell where -
rou'll find one."
"Where is he," a
"In our local cemetery."?(Balti- s
nore American.) ^
Thoughtful Hubby. a
"My dear, I wouldn't lift that r
icavy tub. You might injure your tl
tack. Let mo lift it." b
"But you have on your new Palm c
leach suit."
"Poor economy, my dear, to risk
njuring a million dollar woman to w
avc a $7 suit."?(Kansas City Jour- "i
al.) ol
? ? ? ai
+ di
We still sell new and used 1 ?
heaters and repair stoves at D
reasonable prices. in
SANITARY PLUMBING Pi
425 Willoughby Ave. Phono 443. d?
Next to Femmer & Ritter
?? 11
I WANTED?Miscellaneous
* <
WHEN YOU ARE OUT OF WORK
you arc somewhat like a car which i
has jumped off tho tracks. The ac- i
cident may not have impaired your :
usefulness in any wuy?but, like
the car, that usefulness is hampered
until you GET ON THE TRACK ,
AGAIN. To find the new position?
to get Into the forward-making ranks
once more?advertise; advertise con- ,
vincingly, frankly, persistently. EM
PIRE ADS HAVE THOUSANDS OF j
READERS.
11
WANTED?Experienced man to op
en oysters. J. Raymond, opp. Oc- ?,
cldental Hotel. 07.
WANTED?Three steady boards- !
ers, home cooking. 303 Gold St. ol2 ?
-J.? if, ^
HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR [
Men's Cast-off Clothing, Guns,
Jewelry and Diamonds.
i
CLUB TAILORS, 71 Front St. f
a
Phone 451.
* * j
WANTED?An Experienced, well- 1
trained maid for second work. En- -
luirc Mrs. P. R. Bradley, Tel. Tread
well 10. tf. t
a
WANTED?Experienced girl. Call- J
'ornla Fruit Company. tf. I
WANTED?100 Men To Get Their
suits pressed by the month for p
62 V?c each. Moon Bros., Phone -
?int. a8tf
. _ ?.
? $
, PALM READING J *
PALMIST?Como *o the palmist.
tell you about work, business, mar
?iage and the future. Get your for
une told. 306 Front Street. 4-5-lm. r
FOUND
a
FOUND?at A. B. Dance Hall,
told handled umbrella and at tank, jj
;old bracelet stick pin and other c
niscollaneous Jewelry. Can be had n
iy proving property and paying for -
id. 06.
? ? i
MRS. ALICE SHERROD, a gradu- "
te of the celebrated Dorothy Adams
Ichool of Health and Beauty Cul- n
ure, of New York City, is In the _
ity for a ifew weeks and is a guest _
t tho Gastlneau hotel. Mrs. Sher
od makes no charges for consults- j(
Ion and can be seen between the -
ours of 3 and 6 p. m. Club and so- +
lety ladies especially invited. o5.
TWO IN ONE?The ""EMPIRES
ay for everybody. The EMPIRE'S
ids" keeps the housewife informed
t all sales and tho news columns
re Tight up to tho minute on the *"
iy's news. ?
ry Cleaning, Sponging and Press
g of clothes for men and women,
rice Reasonable. .1 will call for and
diver. Repairing.
JOHN TOKVINEN,
2 Franklin St. Phone 252.
f FURNISHED ROOMS ]
FOR RENT ? Nicely furnished
rooms reasonable. Mrs. H. P. Han
son, 8th and Calhoun, abovo Gover
nor's House. oG.
f HOUSES <5. FLATS FOR RENT I
? ?
EVERY VACANT STORE MEANS
OPPORTUNITY FOR SOMEBODY.
The owner of such property should
get the facts about this opportunity
to the attention of the right people
?and he will secure for a tenant
i man who will make money in that
location?who will pay a good rent
al, and pay on time, and who will
add to the business activity and
prestige of the neighborhood.?Em
pire Ads have thousands of readers.
FOR RENT?Four room cottage
with bath room and range. Thom
18, Juneau Tdwo Co. oC
PRINCESS HALL for rent for pri
vate parties and dances. Rates rea
lonable. Apply the Misses Sandusky,
it Bergmann Hotel or Hall office, nl
FOR RENT ? Furnished and
lousekocping rooms and hand
aundry. It. Empire. o21
FOR RENT?Frostily renovated
wo room furnished apartment 3rd <
ind Gold street, over Sheldon & ,
itcKanna's store. Also single rooms,
^hono 167. tf.
FOR RENT?Five room flat. Ap
ily Goldstein's Emporium. S13-tf.
COMPLETELY Furnished Apart- ?
nents. Everything ready to move in. ,
18 and up. Close in; good view. All
utsido rooms, Phono 228. Au/44.
MANICURINQ
MANICURING and furnished
ooma, 634 Sewart street Jel9-lm ^
SEWING MACHINES, needloo, oils
nd repairs at I. J Sharlck's. 6-16 ti
FOR RENT, Z ana 3-room furnished
ousekeeping suites; reasonable. "The
ozy corner of Juneau." Cliff Apart
lents, near Court House. 2-1-lm.
STORE FOR RENT, formerly oc- ,
jpled by Juneau Hardware Co., *'
ront street. Dhone 303. a3tf
FOR RENT?Good location, five
jom house and bath, 316 Fifth St.
-(olO.)
Headquarters Tor undysmith Coal. 4
jneau Transfer Company. Phone 48 *i
?? .;.
Gastineau Transportation Co.
Sailing from Hunter and Dick
inson float Tuesday at midnight
for Skagway and way ports.
Sailing Friday at midnight for j .j.
Jualin, Comet and way ports. ! .
: *
N
FOR SALE -
THE t
New Crescent
Hotel
AT ANCHORAGE *~
4*
Uaaka. 25 Furnished Rooms, I
no Baths and Sample Room. j
sk any of the Commercial men |
'ho make Anchorage and they !
'Ill give you the Information
ou desire.
Reason for selling ? Sickness *
i family.
F. W. REDWOOD & CO.,
Proprietors,
nchorage, Alaska |
i
f TURKISH BATH3 J
HILLSIDE BATH HOUSE?1Turkish
Needle, Steam, Miowcr and tub baths.
Dry and steam beat 218 Front St.
Phone 163. 11-16-tf.
Home-cooked meals, $30 per mo.,
also rooms, over Juneau Liquor Co.
?nl.
f BOARD and LODGING J
GOOD homo cooking and pleasant
rooms at reasonable rates. Mrs. E.
Emmons, Bay View House, formerly
the St. George. Ag7.
JUNK DEALERS
? ?
United States Junk Company bays all
kinds f metals and rubber. J. W.
Felix, manager; Cash Cole's Bam,
Phone 3(42. 2-29-tf
* +
^ PROFESSIONAL I
^
HARRY C. DEVIGHNE. M.D.
Rooms 2, 3 4, Malony Bldg.
Juneau, Alaska
Office 2302?Phones?Roe. 2303
+
?
DR. P. J. M A H O N E
412 Goldstein Bldg., office phone
822; house phone 823.
Juneau Alaska
* l>
* ?
WILLIAM PALLISTER, M.D.
Physician and Surgeon
Specialist in the treatment of
diseases and deformities of
the eye and ear, nose and
throat Glasses fitted. Offico
Juneau General Hospital.
Phone 600
+ ?
*? ?
OR. O. A. GRIFFIN
DENTIST
Specialist on Pyorrhoea and Pro
phylactic work. All work guar
anteed. Consultation Free.
336 Gold Street
?J- ?
4
OR. L. 0. 8LOANE
Office Phone?1-8
House Phone?2-9-7
4 4
4
OR. LEONARD P. DAWhS
8urgeon and Physician
Offico First Nat Bank Bldg. ..
Hours 10 to 12 m.; 1 to 4;
and 7 to 9 p. m.
Phone?2Zt2; Res.?2605.
? 4
? 9
DR. A. J. PALMER
? ? ? ?
Physician and 8urgeon
108 Second 8trcet
Office Phone 4f3
h 4
:? +
Phone 453.
Dl.. MARTIN DAMOURETTE
Physician and Su.*geon
Microscopic and Bacteriological
Examinations
San Francisco Bakery Block.
? 4
T
DR. E. H. KASER
DENTIST
1 and 3 Goldstein Building
Phone 56.
Hours 9 a. m. to 9 p. m.
-?? 4
? +
DR. E. J. HALFORD
DENTIST
Soward Building
Front & Franklin - Phono 193
+
Phono 176. '
WHITE & JENNE
Dentists
Valentine Bldg. Juneau
?
?
MISS ALBRECHT, Osteopath
Swedish Massage, Medical Gym
nasties. Expert treatment given
in all cases roquirlng masBago ,
diet and mechanical therapeu
tics. Rooms 410 Goldstein Build
ing. Phono 282.
+
?
I
M. 8. 8UTTON
Architect
113 Decker Building
Phone 111?Juneau, Alaska
4.
KAZIS KRAUCZUNAS
LAWYER
Office New Cain Hotel
*
OlJcit Bank.
In Alaska
EslahlishcJ
1891
Incorporathil
1911
SAAlaaAAAS
The
B. M. Behrends
Bank
JUNEAU, ALASKA
RESOURCES ABOUT $1,500,000
CONSERVATIVE ENOUGH TO
BE ABSOLUTELY SAFE.
LIBERAL ENOUGH TO SUIT
ALL FAIR-MINDED PEOPLE
B. M. Behrends T
President 4
? j. r. wiiii*: X
Vice President T
(i.McNaughton ^
Cashier X

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