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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, October 13, 1916, Image 2

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I PHONE CITY I
: 1 3 2 DOCK i:
I A La Graff Grocery |
I HEADQUARTERS
: For most reliable Brands of goods at lowest pos- i:
: sible Prices. J!
- >
? Best Flour. 49 pound Sack $1.95 <>
X Best Ranch Eggs, per dozen 50 \
? Barton's Sugar Cured Bacon, per pound 27VaC
X Bartons Sugar Cured Picnic Hams, per pound 15c o
? Twenty pounds Best Potatoes . .45
X Twelve pounds Best Carrots 35 V,
? Pink Salmon, two cans 25 ?
? Best Salt Port, per pound 16 <j
? Fifteen pounds best Granulated Sugar, X
? ?WITH? ' f
^ Three pounds best Fresh Ground Coffee 2.00 X
? Best imported Sardines (in pure Olive Oil) two cans 25 ?
I FREE DELIVERY !
? * X
? ?
NEW YORKERS FORM
PROTECTION LEAGUE
FOR EMERGENCY CASE
NEW YORK. O-t. IS.- For the
protection in case of emergency of
vast quantities of wealth represent- ^
ed by money, jewels, securities and1
commercial papers stored in vaults
and strong boxes throughout the fi-1
nancial district of New York city,1
the Wall Street Home Defense
League has been organized with
officers and membership of about
100 men. -ohn Winfield.^ Scott Is
captain commanding the organization
The members of the league met for
the first time today for drill and
instruction.
Since their discovery In 1870 the
diamond mines at Klmberly have
yielded an average return worth
nearly $20,000,000 per annum.
TROUBLE OF
LABOR BOTHER
THE LEADERS
Creation of a National
Board of Mediation
and Conciliation
Side-stepped.
STUDYING SITUATION
Congress Must Act but
in what Manner Is
Question to Be
Decided.
WASHINGTON. Oct. 13. -The cre
ation of a national board of media
tion and conciliation, with the broad
est powers, but Just short of the
right to enforce compulsory arbitra
tion. may be the outcome of the
action of President Wilson in invit
ing suggestion j to reconcile labor j
and capital. ? I
Labor leaders, Senators and Rep
resentatives, are studying the situa
tion carefully. Organized labor lead
ers are chary of endorsing any plan
that may tie their hands in enforc
ing demands through a "strike, la
bor's greatest weapon. Most of tlx
labor leaders believe a Federal me
diation board would be a first step
toward compulsory arbitration.
President Wilson and advisors
are convinced some method of me
diation must bo decided on by Con
gress in the immediate future. Just
how it will have to be worked out
through the modification of all plans
30 far suggested is a question. The
President had hoped that the for
mer Federal commission on indus
trial relations would huve found the
way out, but Congress ignored Its
recommendations as "too radical."
Much of the data it compiled is
available for a new Federal body If
named. The President is expected
to dwell at length on this subject
in his message to Congress next De
cember.
JAPAN AGREES
TO ANNOUNCE
CHINA DESIGNS
Statement of Purpose
to Stop U. S. Opinion
is Concession
to Be Made.
WASHINGTON, Oct. 13 - Japan
Intends making concessions to pub
lic opinion iit the United Stales, ac
cording to confidential advices re
ceived by the state department offi
cials.
The new Japanese cabinet will
scon make a statement of it; Inten
tion:; and officials here state that
il will be most concilliatory. Ag
gressive action in China will be de
fended on the ground that it is
necessary because of the failure of
China to rule certain provinces with
a strong hand, but the statement
will insist that the 'open door" pol
icy to which the United States is
pledged bp rigidly adhered to.
Due to Unfavorable Comment.
The action of the cabinet is due
to realization that the appointment
of Premier Terauchi lias caused un
favorable comment in the United
Slates.
The* new premier stands squarely
for large Increases in the strength
of the army and navy, but officials
here say that the foreign policy will
not entail Increased aggressiveness
in dealing with the United States.
CARNIVAL WEEK
IS PLANNED BY
ARCTIC MEMBERS
Tho new trustees of the Arctic
Brotherhood at their meeting last
night started things rolling for the
next six months and the first ring
nff was anounced for a week of car- ]
nival to be held beginning Monday,
S'ov. 13th. The committee decided
that the "13" instead of being a
loodoo would be the opposite charm.
J. II. Marshall was apointetd a
committee of one to make the ar
rangements and ho will anounce a
committee which will have full
:bargc of this big week.
It is the plan of tho A. B.'s to
iiavc all kinds of extra attractions
nnd new features and will be on the
jrder of a regular old country car
nival, instotad of being on the street
nowever, will be held in the hall.
tl is expected that the affair will
je a success from every standpoint.
jJ7IIY use airty nana and gravel
when you can get good clean
land and gravel at the Juneau Sand
ind Gravel buukcrs? Gravel and
jar sand $1.75 per yard. At Tread
well, $1.60.
DEMAND BRITISH |
APOLOGY, IS PLEAj
SHANGHAI, Chlnn, Oct. 13.- The
American Chamber of Commerce of
China ha? sent to tho State depart-1
ment at Washington a petition Tor
immodlato action to prevent further |
interference with American mnliH
and punishment of the censor. The
petition states that up to the end j
of August the British authorities |
have opened and censored 144 sacks
of official, registered, business and
private mail, and "that certain parcel
post packages, acordlng to report
of tch United States postmaster, bore
every appearance of being rifled in
transit from the United States post
! ul ageucy in Shanghai."
JURY EXCUSED UNTIL MONDAY.
Judge Jennings this morning ex
cused tho members of tho petit
jury until Monday morning ut 10
o'clock as no case on the docket Is
ready for trial before that time.
; Tho EMPIRE?nil the news all tho
' time, when it is news.
*????
HUNDREDS OF
OFFICERS FOR
ARMY NEEDED
Vacancies Have Occurred
Owing to New Act of
Reorganization in
Army Plans.
EXAMINATIONS ARE HELD
WASniNGTON, Oct. 13.?The first
of the examination* for second lieu
tenant In the army, ;n which grade
there are 1.000 vacancies to be filled
as the result of the new army re
organization act, has been complet
ed. Boards will be convened at
Port Monroe, Va., and at Fort Leav
enworth, Kan., to mark the exam
ination papers of candidates for pro
visional commissions.
Tho board at the former placo
will have to do with the papers ot
Const Artillery Corps, while the
candidates for appointment to the
board at the latter place will mark
the papers of candidates for the
mobile army.
The boards will classify the candi
dates into eight groups, us follows:
Graduates of the naval academy,
enlisted men of the regular army
and officers of the Philippine Scouts,
members of the Officers' Reserve
Force, officers of the National Guard,
honor graduates of distinguished
colleges, honor graduates on honor
schools and distinguished institu
tions, graduates of other colleges
and members of the organized mil
itia of not less than three years'
creditable service, and, finully, nil
other candidates.
The lists of those qualified will
be prepared according to these
groups, the members to bo arranged,
in order of merit in accordance
with the percentage attained by them
as a general average.
GERMAN FORCES HAVE
TAKEN DANUBIAN ISLAND
BERLIN. Oct. 13?Troops of Field
Marshal Mackensen by a surprise at
tack obtained possession of the Island'
In the Danube northwest of Slslova,
It was announced officially today.
They captured six guns and the Ru
manian troops on the Island.
A potato flour factory recently
opened at Stockton, C&l., is the
first factory of that nature on the
Pacific Coast.
proITbitTon's
ways are
vaim
A Dry Town in Dry Alaba
ma Produces 30 "Blind
Pig'' Saloons in a One
Day Investigation.
TOWN NOT AS BIG
AS FAIRBANKS
Town of Four Thousand
Population with 30 Sa
loons Paying No License
and Helping None.
(PAID ADVERTISEMENT.)
MONTGOMERY, Ala., May 19.?
In a raid upon the "Blind Pig" sa
loons of Girard, Russell county, to
day .representatives of the attorney
general's office .seized $300,000
worth of whiskey, beer and gin,
which they found in the thirty sa
loons of that town.
(Girard is a typical prohibition
town. Having only 4214 popula
tion and supporting only one week
ly paper, supposed t oho tied tight
l>y prohibition, the authorities in a
lay uncover thirty saloons which
pay no liccnso or taxes to the com- ,
munity and are engaged in demon- ,
it rating prohibition does not pro- (
(libit but makes liquor selling more ,
profitable and more general.)?
Fairbanks NowB-Miner, May 19,
(916.
HOME RULE IN
IRELAND SAFE
SAYS LEADER
Conscription Will Not Be
Forced?Ireland Must
Remain in a Sane
Condition.
WATERFORD, Ireland, Oct. 13.?
In a notable address to his con
stituents hero, John Redmond, the
Irish Nationalist loader in Parliament,
declared thut despite the recent re
bellion, "with nil its inevitable after
math of brutalities, stupidities and
inflamed passions," home rule for
Ireland is safe if Ireland remains
sane.
Redmond also declared that con-*
scription could never be forced upon
Ireland, adding:
"I cannot bring myself to believe
that malign through the influences at
work arc, the government will be In
sane enough to challenge a conflict
with Ireland on this subject. Con
scription for Ireland, far from help
ing the army and the war, would be
the most fatal thing that could hap
pen. It. would be resisted In every
village in Ireland. Its attempted
enforcement ,woul be. a scandal
which would ring around tho world.
It would produce no additional men."
Continuing, the Irish parliamentary
leader said:
"The mere throat is paralyzing re
milting, which, mark you, is not
dead as some pcoplo say. The latest
figures indeed show that from the
(Into of the rising (Master Sunday)
until September 6,000 recruits were
derived.
"This demand for conscription is
not a genuine military demand. It Is
a base device put forward by men
who want to injure and discredit
Ireland's political future."
STEAMER WITH BIG
MUNITION CARGO IS
OFF FOR ENGLAND
NEW YORK, Oct. 13.?Defying
submarines that might be lurking for
big game the steamship Adriatic,
queen of tho British munition fleet,
sailed for England last night carrying
10,000 tons of war supplies. Careful
plans wore made for tho Adriatic's
dispatch through the new danger
zone.
Trees that grow the highest have
the most pointed leaves.
NON-PARTISAN MOVE
FOR SENATOR SULZER '
STARTS AT KETCHIKAN
KETCHIKAN, Oct. 8.?Thero was
a very generous atendance at the
Council Chnmbers last night In the
furtherance of the candidacy of Sen.
Charles A. Stilzcr, for Delegate to
Congress.
The meeting was non-partisan In
character and met with the approval
of all those In attendance, and in
dorsed Senator Sulzer as the favorite
son of Alaska.?Ketchikan Progress
ive-Miner.
">-<-?
"A.." the News All the Time."
The Empire
Development
Number
COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF ALASKAN RE
SOURCES
CONTENTS:
40 PAGES ? PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED
FIRST SECTION
Page 1.?Mining and Its Bearing on the Future of Alaska, by
Bartlett L. Thane.
Page 2.?Alaska Juneau Gold Mine?History and Develop
ment.
Page 3.?Mining Development in Alaska, by William Mo
loney. Territorial Mining Inspector.
Page 4.?Development of Treadwcll.
Page 5.?Water Power of Alaska, by C. L. Andrews.
Page 7.-?Development Work on Alaska Juneau; Finland vo
Alaska.
Second Section
Tage 9.?The Fisheries of Alaskan Waters, by C. L. An
drews.
Page 10.?Alaska Is America's Greatest Producer of Furs.
Page 11. ?Agricultural Development of Alaska, by C. B. Walk
er. Register of I'nited States I^and Olllce.
Page 12.?Farming in Alaska, by C. L. Andrews.
Page 14.?Scenery and Glaciers ot Alaska, by C. L. Andrews.
Page 15.?Where Fan I Go Near Juneau?
Page 10.?Flowers on Mount Juneau, by Rev. John B. Stevens.
Third Section
Page 17. The Development of Juneau, by B. D. Stewart,
Mayor of Juneau.
Page 18.?The Financial Condition of Juneau, by Harold II.
Post, Cashier of the First National Bank; The
Progress of Alaska, by Charles D. Garfield.
Page 20. -Alaska, a Land of Wonderful Resources, by George
K. Forrest, former Mayor of Juneau and pioneer
business man.
Page 21.?Historical Sketch of Southeastern Alaska, by C. L.
Andrews.
Page 22.?Juneau Fire Department, by Sim Freiman, chief of
the Juneau Fire Department.
Fourth Section
Page 25.- Pointr of Interest about Skagway; The New Skag
way, by Andrew Stevenson.
Page 28.?Facts about Alaska's Topography.
Page 27.?Alaska Transportation, by A. S. Dautrick; Notes
on Climate of Alaska.
Page 28.?Douglas, the Island City, by Miss Lena White.
Page 29.?Douglas Island Schools, by Miss Lena White.
Page 30.?Gastineau Channel Churches.
Page 31.?Juneau and Douglas Fraternal Orders; Alaska the
Last Great Game Resort of America.
Fifth Section (
Page 33.?The Proposed Gastineau Channel Bridge; Road Work
of the Alaska Road Commission in Southeastern (
Alaska.
Page 34.?Juneau Real Estate. I
Page 36. -Alaska Railroad and Wagon Roads, by J. L. Mc
Phcrson, Manager Alaska Bureau of the Seattle <
Chamber of Commerce.
Page 37.?Juneau Public Schools, by L. D. Henderson, super- 1
intendent of Juneau Schools.
Page 38.?Traveling Salesmen of Alaska, by Harry J. Raymond.
Page 39.?Alaskan Art Curias, by Albert Berry. ,
Page 40.?Channel Athletics, by M. S. Perkins.
At EMPIRE OFFICE and NEWS STANDS ? 25c
,j.
COBB ADDING |
HYPOCRISY TO
, PARTY TREASON
oral was aeon and interviewed yesterday, having hut re
recently returned from a awing to the westward.
Me was asked if lie had anything to say about the charges
made by Grigsby alleging political treachery to him, and
I that he had been rewarded by Governor Strong with the
appointment of attorney general for having voted dor
President Wilson, and thereafter had knifed the party
which gave him the appointment.
"Such a charge," replied Mr. Cobb, "is an an insult to
the governor. I have no reason to believe that any con
sideration influenced Governor Strong In making the ap
Ipointment other than huving in mind the best Interests
of the territory and the belief that I would conscientiously t
do the work for which I was appointed.
"So far as I know and believe the question of making
the appointment as a political reward never occurred to the
governor and more than it did to me."?(DISPATCH.)
Mr. Cobb is adding hypocrisy to party treachery. He knows
I bettor than lie speaks.
In the first place, Mr. Grigsby no rany one hns saki that Mr. U
Cobb wus "rewarded for political services." No one so under
stands his appointment to the position which he holds. Probably no H
one values his service highly enough to imagine anything of I
I the sort. p
However, Mr. Cobb and everybody knows that he would never
been appointed chief counsel for the Territory if he had not pre
tended to be a Democrat and a supporter of Democrats for offi
cial position. Gov. Strong has said as much?but that was not j
necessary. .Mr. Cobb's sarcastic insinuation that Gov. Strong ?
could not with honor have taken his politics into account when
I appointing him to the place he holds is not only demagogy and
hypocrisy, but a display of mean ingratitude to the man who gavo
him a chance.
No loss hyprocrltical and baseless in truth is Mr. Cobb's fur
ther assertions in his statement in the Dispatch. Quoting: >
"'How about the Grigsby charge that you was a mem
ber of the Democratic party and bolted the convention?'
I "'That is also untrue,' answered Mr. Cobb. 'I was not
a member of the 191G convention. As I was an office holder,
or at least quasi-ofllcc holder, I declined for that reason.
I believe office holders should not be delegates to con
ventions, where their official acts might be subjected to .
criticism.
I" 'Eight proxies for tho Democratic convention came to
me without any request or solicitation on my part. They
were sent to mc from Nome, but I declined to represent
them and turned them over to alternates'."
The records of the convention and convention facts disprove
those sanctimonious heroics. They show that Mr. Cobb represent
ed as proxy delegates In the Democratic Territorial convention
that nominated Mr. Grlgsby. He arrived in the city from the South
I shortly after the convention convened, and was sitting in the Or
pheum th.atre when tho committees were named by Temporary
Chairman J. A. Hcllenthal. lie left the convention hall in a tower
ing rage because Mr. Hellenthal did not appoint him to a place on
one df the committees. One of the marring features of the whole
convention was Mr. Cobb's display of anger in various conversa
tions on the streets of Juneau because he had not been given
place on a convention cpmmitteo by the temporary chairman.
Mr. Cobb Is simply a bolter. He Is a Democratic office holder,
receiving a salary of $5,000 a year because, among other things, he U
pretended lo be a Democrat, and is working against the Democratic
ticket nominated by a convention of which he was a member, at
I least, for a while. If ms left the convention before It completed its
labors, that fact only fixes the hour of his bolting. '
COBB PLEDGED FEALTY.
While Mr. Cobb would never have been appointed chief counsel
for the Territory had it not been that he professed to be a Dem
ocrat. there are many Alaska Democrats who have for years ques
tioned his loyalty to tho party. However, In tho campaign two
years ago he made the direct statement that ho had never scratched
I tho Democratic ticket and never would. He made this statement in
an interview written by himself for The Empire. The Empire's
account of this statement, and the statement In part, printed Octo
ber 2, 1U14 follows:
"Some of the friends of Judge Wickersham ore attempt
ing to make capital out of the fact that J. H. Cobb sat
upon tho stage last Monday night when the Delegate ad
dressed the people of Juneau. The claim has been made
that Mr. Cobb is openly supporting Judge Wickersham's I
(candidacy. A reporter of The Empire asked as to the
facts, and Mr. Cobb said:
" 'I sat upon the stage by invitation which I took as a
personal courtesy to me, and I was glad to show the Dele
gate every possible courtesy In his visit to Juneau. In I (
fact Judge Wickersham i3 a personal friend of mine
whose esteem I appreciate and value. But personal friend- I
ship and social amenity is one thing, and politics is an- i
I other. I NEVER SCRATCHED A DEMOCRATIC TICKET I
IN MY LIFE. AND NEVER WILL. So far from supporting >
Judge Wickersham, if the plans made at the Skagway con- 1 f
ventlon had been carried out 1 would now be stumping tho ? '
interior of Alaska for Mr. Bunnell'."
GEORGE B. GRIGSBY ij
$ DEMOCRATIC NOMINEE FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL
? Mr. Grigsby is a pioneer resident of Nome; a capable law- ^
% yer; a citizen of sterling character and qualifications. HE \ \
% DESERVES YOUR VOTE FOR ATTORNEY-GENERAL. o

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