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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, October 30, 1916, Image 4

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
JOHN W. TROY, . . Editor and Manager
Published every evening except Sunday by the
EMPIRE PRINTING COMPANY, at Second and Main
Streets, Juneau, Alaska.
Entered as second-class matter November 7, 1912.
at the postoffice at Juneau. Alaska, under the Act of
March 3. 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Delivered by carrier in Juneau, Douglas, Treadwell and
Thane for $1.00 per month.
By mall, postage paid, at the following rates:
One year, in advance, $10.00
Six months, in advance 5-00
Three months, in advance 2.50
One month. In advance 1.00
ADVERTISING RATES ON APPLICATION
Subscribers will confer a favor If they will prompt
ly notify the Business Office of any failure or Irregu
larity in the delivery of their papers.
Telephone for Editorial and Business Offices, 374
Authorized Local Agents
Douglas and Treadwell. Miss Lena White; Thane,
Ed. Morgan; Perseverance, Hans Hollmer j
CIRCULATION OVER 2.000 DAILY
SWORN CIRCULATION STATEMENT FOR THE
WEEK ENDING OCTOBER 28, 1916.
The daily average circulation of THE ALASKA
DAILY EMPIRE for the week ending October 28,
1916 was 2,375 copies.
The circulation for each day of the week follows:
Monday 2.400
Tuesday 2,389
Wednesday 2,359
Thursday 2.362
Friday 2,383
Saturday 2,366
Total 14,249
The foregoing is a true and correct statement of
the daily circulation of the ALASKA DAILY EM
PIRE for the week ending October 28, 1916.
JOHN W. TROY.
Subscribed and sworn to before me. this 30th day
(NOE)?The Development Number sales and over
1.000 copies sold for free distribution are NOT in-j
eluded in this circulation statement issued by THE
EMPIRE?EDITOR.)
RESPECT FOR THE PEOPLE
The men who have respect for the honesty and
integrity of the "poor workingman" are those who tell
the truth to them and submit the facts for their judg
ment with confidence in the result. It is no evidence
of respect for workingmen to tell them cock-and-bull
stories about bogy men. to attempt to arouse envy
and resentment in their breasts toward those who
employ them or those who are engaged in other
classes of employment.
There is all the difference in the world between
the big and manly way in which Senator Sulzer has
presented his case to the working people of Alaska
and the manner of campaign that has been conducted
by the Wickershamites. Sulzer has appealed to the
working classes as he has to all classes, as citizens
of Alaska, and to them he has set forth the same
program that he has set forth to the others. He
stands for self-government as a basic principle, and
asks^yt^^it.. be applied to Alaska as a condition prece
dent to the solution of Alaskan problems. On the
other hand Delegate Wickersham. Sutherland and
others have been appealing to prejudice and passion.
Sulzer has made his campaign in the open. The others
have set all manner of malicious reports in circulation
through subterranean channels. Sulzer talks from
the platform and throught the press. Others talk in
whispers behind closed doors, and send poison adrift
from concealed sources. Sulzer talks from the public
records, Wickersham and Sutherland harrangue about
"mangy politicians," "dirty bunch of politicians," "loaf
ers." "the gut of graft," "fish trust." money, etc.
We submit the case of who should be chosen
Delegate to Congress to the men and women who are
here to make Alaska home, and a fit home in which
to rear children and a country where it will be good
for those who will bear their names in the future
to live.
ELECTION BETTING
Betting on elections is bad business. It is as
much worse than betting on baseball as elections are
more important than baseball. Betting on elections
commercializes contests which should be decided on
issues. When men put up money on an election they
have a financial interest in the result. They go out
and try to make their money win. They do not go
to the polls and vote their judgments and conscien
ces, and leave others to do the sr.me. They try to
force ballots into the box irrespective of the con
science beind the ballot. It is bad business?particu
larly is that the case when one bets on results which
involve his own vote. That is why there are laws
agaiust election betting in many States.
WORKING MEN NOT FOOLS
One of the absurd things in connection with the
Alaska campaign is to hear Wickersham and his co
horts contend that the Wilson administration Is con
trolled by the "Interests." They must think Alaska
workingmen fools. President Wilson gave us the
Clayton anti-trust law, the eight-hour Adamson law,
the labor commission, the trade commission, the anti
child labor law, the rural credits law, and the reserve
act. and he gave us Brandeis and Clarke on the Su- 1
preme Court. In fact, practically all the opposition
there is to the re-election of the President come3 from j
the Wall Street interests and the envious Colonel. ;
Labor is supporting him solidly throughout the Na
tion. Yet we have Wickersham and a few claquers j
going about the streets and trails of Alaska claiming
that the "Fish Trust" controls President Wilson and
the Administration!
The Empire does not believe that the Aalska (
workingmen are as big fools as Wickersham and his j
supporters take them to be! (
I J
NO WONDER
It is no wonder that The Colonel's condemnation
of President Wilson's way of settling the railroad 1
strike and assertion that he ought to have settled it J,
the way "I settled the coal strike" did not make a <j
hit in the Middle West, or other sections of the coun- c
try. The Colonel let the coal strike proceed for five 1
months, permitted the people in the large cities to E
reach a freezing condition, and finally called out
troops in many places. President Wilson settled the a
railroad strike before it started, the railroads never ^
missed a schedule, workingmen. not only employed ?
at railroading but employed in factory and farm which 0
depended upon continuous transportation facilities, ,
never lost a day's work, the crops were all moved,
and the wheels of industry never stopped. There was
no suffering and no loss of time or capital.
Sulzer stands for construction; Wlckorsham for
destruction. Sulzer is a developer. He has added to
Alaskan production. He has mado Alaska larger by
making room In It for more people to live and prosper.
Wlckersham has been an office-holder. Ho has not
secured any constructive legislation. Ho has retarded
development. He has spent his time trying to set
class against class, faction agalust faction, section
against, section. He would have the people remain
In a chaottic condition. He would keep them quarrel
ling. He is opposed to the settlement of issues. He
would rather fight over them.
Out at Valdez Delegate Wlckersham set forth
another claim of achievement. He said that be had
secured the division of the old Third Judicial Divis
ion, by having the Fourth Division, with headquarters
at Fairbanks, established. The bill dividing the Third
Judicial Division was passed before Wlckersham be
came a Delegate to Congress. Like most of tho other
Wlckersham claims, this one withers before the truth.
Four years ago when the Alaska organic act was
up for debate in Congress Wlckersham said that he
was satisfied with the federal fish laws. He had then
been Delegate for four years and the fish laws had
been In force for six years. He ought to have known
what he was talking about. Are the voters satisfied
with the sort of regulation and government the Wlck
ersham party has given us?
There was a time when people supported Dele
gate Wlckersham because they could come nearer
| Mupporting self-government for Alaska that way
j than by any other course of procedure that was offered
to them. That time passed a long while ago. No
one is supporting Wlckersham because of American
t principles of government any more.
There are three parties in Alaska?the Democratic
party, the Republican party and the Wickersham party.
The latter party has been in the saddle for eight
years. Are you satisfied with the result?
Do not forget to go to the Coliseum Theatre to
night and hear the Democratic candidates for the Leg
islature and road commissioner speak on the issues
of the day.
A vote for Wickersham is a vote to secrificc the
advantages of self-government for the luxury of hav
ing a $7,500-a-year official mud-thrower.
I A vote for Sulzer is a vote for self-government,
a vote of self-confidence and self-respect.
UNWORTHY ASPERSION
(Iditarod Pioneer)
Mr. Wickersham says that President Wilson "per
sonally pledged" the "full Territorial form of gov
ernment" to Alaska in his message to Congress on
December 2, 1913. He reverts again and again to this
"pledge." and speaks of "the unfriendly action of the
Wilson administration in opposition to giving Alaska"
that form of government.
The aspersion cast upon the President by Wick
ersham is unworthy of a man of his attainments and
ability. Nothing Is more inexcusable, even in politi
cal controversies, than wilful misrepresentation. Mr.
Wickersham knows, as every citizen should know,
j that even the President of the United States cannot
"pledge" any legislation. He can recommend legisla
tion, and he can use the tremendous power of his
office in furthering legislative action; but that is as
far as his powers extend, adn these are seldom used
except on matters of the greatest gravity. In his
message of December 2. 1913. President Wilson said:
A duty faces us with regard to Alaska
which seems to me very pressing and very
imperative: perhaps I should say a double
duty, fir it concerns both the political and
material development of the Territory. The
people of Alaska should be given the full Ter
ritorial form of government, and Alaska, as a
storehouse, should be unlocked.
There is a decided difference between a pledge
and a recommendation. But compare that straightfor
ward declaration of the duty of the nation toward Al
aska with the meaningless statement with "which Mr. '
Hughes, whose professed follower Mr. Wickersham
is. dismissed the whole subject of Alaska in his
Seattle speech. Said the Republican candidate:
You have a great Empire in Alaska. I
want to see it developed.
?iNBMH _______
DO YOUR OWN' THINKING
(Ketchikan Progressive-Miner) 1
One of the greatest faculties worth cultivating, is ?
the faculty of thinking for ourselves. If we think
for ourselves, we invariably act on our own lntl&tlve. ]
We don't depend on Bob, Jack or Frank to tell us ]
what to do. ]
The cultivation of that faculty has been much
encouraged of late years, yet it is far short of ,
what it should be. We have had several examples j
of that lately. A strike is the child of unthinking ;
people. The great war is the child of the unthink- j
ing mass who allowed the big fellows to do the
thinking, just the same as the walking bosses do
for the strikers. Just the same as the reformer does. '
In the political world the same condition exists. I
There are some who want to dictate. They allow their .
mind to run away with the notion that they are all
wise, when as a matter of fact they are only trouble
makers. We have a few in Alaska. Fortunately, we
are acquiring the habit of thinking for ourselves. We
don't allow the grouchy, the fault-finder to direct our
actions. We have learned to distinguish the differ
ence between the pessimist and the optimist; the
lover of peace and the troble breeder. It's a good
thing, too.
The comedy portion of the political campaign al
ready is in evidence. The Anchorage Star carries at
the head of its editorial columns the names of the
nominees of the "Progressive Democratic" party. The
name of James Wickersham for Delegate heads this
nondescript ticket. It is probable that really "pro
gressive" Democrats will find no reason for support
ing a candidate who is opposed to President Wilson. .
who certainly is entitled to be termed "progressive," ?
if ever a public servant was.?(Iditarod Pioneer.) 4
14
-A man will spend the greater part of his time and
iioney roaming the hills searching for gold, while
lundreds of thousands of golden dollars are allowed
:o swim the waters of the bay unmolested. Hump
>ack salmon bring a good price, and we have hun
ireds of thousands of them running up Lowe River
ind Siwash Creek. Get busy before some firm from
he States grabs your opportunity.?(Valdez Pros
jector.)
It is a feather in the cap of Candidate Sulzcr
hat he is the first aspirant for Congressional honors
o come out for the subdivision of Alaska into Con
gressional districts. Now that he has declared hlra
lelf, his opponents will likely be clamoring for seats
in the same wagon. There Is a glaring possibility
hat the present Delegate will be advocating the same
neasure within a week.?(Douglas Island News.)
Dog fish are being eaten as a delicacy back East,
,nd appear in the markets under fancy names. We
iave dogfish in unlimited quantities and the meat is
iner than that of the tuna, which is now being
anned extensively for salads. Why not form a
ompany to can dogfish.?(Valdez Prospector.)
f , ? ' *
* CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMEMTS ^ ^
? ?
i
- I
?"Leap Year" is the legendary Time when women are privileged to "ask" for
what they want. It applies to the search for positions as well as of husbands.
*? I ' ?
People with
"PAY-DAYS"
The people who have pay-days
are the rulers of the world. They
keep "the wheels going:' around"
in every line of busines and in
dustry.
When you "lose your pay-day"
which will happen sometimes
from reasons not affecting your
skill or worth as a worker, the
hunt for another market for your
service jumps to the status of
serious and important business. It
should be done in a business way.
To want advertise and to answer
want ads is the business way!
EMPIRE ADS HAVE THOUSANDS OF READERS
'?
7uller Ball Saysi
(IF THePRtceY
i of Paper Goes h
powN "^<-L M,
<3o ?ACKTo M<
MV OLD
XjRADE^^,
THE high coat of paper haa made
many a nickel novelist go to work.
REPLIES TO "ADS" AT |
EMPIRE OFFICE
E. K.
P.
G.
R.
:: ?::
f FOR SALE?Miscellaneous '
WITH SOMETHING TO. OFFER
to an Investor?some proposition
which will stand the fire test of
analysis?you can mako classified
advertising your broker in securing
neeJcd capital.?EMPIRE ADS have
THOUSANDS OF HEADERS.
+ +
UNCALLED for SUITS for sale.
$5.00 and up.
Club Tailors. 71 Front St.
+ + j
FOR SALE?Complete outfit of
furniture for housekeeping of two
rooms including carpets and bed
ding. Bargain?Will take $40.00. En
quire Douglas Fish Market.
FOR SALE?Marine steam outfit,
complete, 45 h. p. Alony Boiler, two
engines, pumps, shafting, propcllors,
oil burner, etc. Box 942, Juneau,
Alaska. 031.
FOR SALE?Good payable room
ing house; low rent; center of bus!-'
ncss district. WjlL give lease. Have
business eltewhero. Owner, Empire.
?(Nov. 5.)?' 1
? __
FOR SALE? One 5-horse power
Pelton water wheel.?Cheap for cash.
W?Empire. S20tf.
FOR SALE or rent?Cabin and lot
on WiUoughby Ave., Inquire P. J.
Mahone. 024.tf.
f UK 5AL.E?TWO Wilton aud two
Brussel rugs. Practically now. 340
Franklin. 02f>tf.
FOR SALE?Six-hole range; ex
cellent condition. Apply upstairs.
Anderson Apt's. Lower Front Street.
?(030.)
FOR SALE?EFFICIENCY
FOR SALE?Correspondence schol
arship. Efficiency never goes beg
ging. The person who can do posi
tively and thoroughly something that
Is useful Is always In demand. AD
DRESS SCHOLARSHIP Emp.rc. tf.
FOR SAL,E ? DEVELOPMENT
NUMBER ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE |
FOR 191G?The best Illustrated pub- \
icatlon concerning resources of Ju
teau and surrounding country. Price
15 cents at Empire office and News
stands. tf.
When you want something ? any
hing?in Printing that Is really fine,
et The Empire do the work ror you.
NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS. ]
Any subscriber of The Empire
not receiving the paper by 7:30
p. m. will confer a favor by no
tifying The Empire office. Our
telephone number is 374, and a
call will insure the delivery of
the paper by special messenger
the same evening. The delivery
will be prompt if we are noti
fied. Jj
f WANTED?Miscellaneous
+ *
HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR
Men's Cast-off Clothing, Guns,
Jewelry and Diamonds.
CLUB TAILORS, 71 Front St.
Phone 451.
?>
WANTED ? Competent maid for
general housework. Phone 20. 026tf \
WANTED?Two competent maids j
for general house work. Apply Gold
stein's Emporium. 026tf.
WANTED?Girl for light house
work. Phone 429. 028.tf.
Reliable, sober man wants posi
tion, Janitor or caretaker, or fur
nace-man, best of references, phone
125, address W. D. B., P. 0. Box
124, Juneau. nl
WANTED?100 Men To Get Their
suits pressed by the month for
62,/fcc each. Moon Bros., Phono
394. a8tf
MANICURING
MANICURING and furnished
rooms, 634 Sewart street Jcl9-lm
Queer Preference.
"It is very odd that baldhcadcd
men always want to sit in the front
of tilt theatre."
"Yes, one would think they'd want
to get further away from the flics."
?(Baltimore American.)
r a
WHY ARE ADS
IMPORTANT
TO WOMEN?
E?
Women who study the ads
know that PRICES are mere
ly relative. They {five to
VALUES a proper place. '
They know that mere cheap
ness in price does not mean I
economy?not necessarily. ; i
.! i "
a lt%
LEARN TO DANCE AT 1
PRINCESS HALL (
Beginners given special attcn- '
tion. For appointment call at \
office in Hall or 'phono Miss | <
Sandusky, 205. Lessons After- | J
noon or evening. | '
<* ? 4> (
NEW FURNISHED
House For Rent |
$35.00 I
PER MONTH
t
321 12TH ST.
I Apply 319 12th St., or
Robert Scott, Next Orpheum
Phone 157
?BBEOBBaHBEBHBBBaHBnw
? HOUSES & FLATS FOR RENT I
? ?
FOR RENT ? Furnished house
keeping and sleeping rooms, 335
Franklin street. nl9
PRINCESS HALL for rent for pri
vato parties and dances. Rates rea
sonable. Apply tho Misses Sandusky,
at Bcrgmann Hotel or Hall office, nl
FOR RENT?Frestily renovated
two room furnished apartment 3rd
and Gold street, over Sheldon &
McKnnna's store. Also single rooms.
Phono 167. tf.
FOR RENT?Five room flat. Ap
ply Goldstein's Emporium. S13-tf.
FOR RENT, Z ana s-room furnished
housekeeping suites; reasonable. "The
cozy corner of Junoau." Cliff Apart
ments, near Court House. 2-1-lm.
FOR RENT?Four roomed house,
completely furnished with bath, one
block from center of town. Good
view. Apply I'etcr Sandstrom, 2nd
and Main Street. O30tf.
FOR RENT?Furnished front bed
room with bath. Close in. $2.G0
a week. I'honc 1402. 030.
FOR RENT?Furnished rooms al
so housekeeping, $8 per mo and up,
315 So. 2d. nl.
FOR RENT?Five room flat. En
quire 440?E. 5th St. Mrs. Forrest.
?(028-tf.)?
FOUR ROOMS, same floor, suit
able for boarding house, rent rea
sonable inquire, 315 So. 2d, Cor of
Franklin. nl
STORE FOR RENT, formerly oc
upled by Juneau Hardware Co.,
"ront street, phone 303. a3tf
FOR RENT?Furnished house
keeping and single rooms. Inquire
next door A. P. hall. n25
PALM READING I
? ?
PALMIST?Come *o the palmist.
I tell you about work, business, mar
riage and the future. Get your for
:une told. 306 Front Street. 4-5-lm.
SEWING MACHINES, needloo, oils
ind repairs at I. J Sharick's. 5-15 tf
DO YOU KNOW?!
- 4 :
JUNEAU HAS THE BEST j:
Tailor Shop in Alaska:
its !!
Irving Co., Inc.!!
; FRONT AND MAIN 8TS. \ J
TOR SALE I
THE
New Crescent
Hotel
AT ANCHORAGE
Alaska. 25 Furnished Rooms, ^
two Baths and Samplo Room.
Ask any of the Commercial men
who make Anchorage and they
will give you ths Information
you desire. 4
Reason for selling ? Sickness
In family.
F. W. REDWOOD & CO.,
Proprietors,
Anchorage, Alaska
/ *
f TURKISH BATH8 J
HILLSIDE BATH HOUSE?Turkish
Needle, Steam, fhower and tub b&tbs.
Dry and steam heat 218 Front St.
Phone 163. 11-16-tf.
Homo-cooked meals, |30 per mo.,
also rooms, over Juneau Liquor Co.
?nl.
f BOARD and LODGING I
GOOD home cooking and pleasant
rooms at reasonable rates. Mrs. E.
Emmons, Bay View House, formerly
the SL George. Ag7.
JUNK DEALER8
? *
United States Junk Company buys al*
kinds f metals and rubber. J. W.
Felix, manager; Cash Cole's Barn,
Phone 3442. 2-29-tf
+ ?
I PROFESSIONAL I
? ?
<
HARRY C. DEVIGHNE, M.D.
Room? 2, 3 4, Malony Bldg.
Juneau, Alaska
Office 2302?Phonos?Ret. 2303
4 4
4 4
DR. P. J. MAHONE
412 Goldstein Eldg., oUlce phone
822; house phone 823.
Juneau Alaska
? 0
4 ? 4
WILLIAM PALLISTER, M.D.
Physician and Surgeon
Specialist In the treatment of
diseases and deformities of
the eye and ear, nose and
throaL Glasses fitted. Office
Juneau General Hospital.
Phone 600
4 ??4
4
DR. L. 0. 8LC AN E
Offlco Phono?1-4
House Phone?2-9-7
4 -4
4 4
DR. LEONARD P. DAWfcS
Surgeon and Physician
Office First Nat Bank Bldg. ..
Hours 10 to 12 m.; 1 to 4;
and 7 to 9 p. m.
Phono?2Gv2; Res.?260S.
4 4
4- 4
DR. A. J. PALMER
? ? ? ?
Physician and Surgeon
108 Second Street
Office Phono 4f3
4. 4
4- 4
Phono 453.
DR. MARTIN DAMOURETTE
Physician and Su.-geon
Microscopic and Bacteriological
Examinations
San FraLcIsco Bakery Block, j
4 4
4 4
DR. E. H. KASER
DENTIST
1 and 3 Goldstein Building
Phone 66.
Hours 9 a. m. to 9 p. m.
4.
,y 4
DR. E. J. HALFORD
DENTIST
Seward Building
Front & Franklin ? Phono 193
* ?
?fr 4
Phono 176.
WHITE <? JENNE
Dentists
Valentine. Bldg. Juneau
+ *?
+ ?
1 MISS ALBRECHT, Osteopath
Swedish Massage, Medical Gym
nasties. Expert treatment given
In all cases requiring massago ,
diet and mechanical therapeu
tics. Rooms 410 Goldstein Build
ing. Phone 232.
f ? 4
? ?
M. 8. SUTTON
Architect
113 Decker Building
| Phone 111?Juneau, Alaska
?- ?
*? 4
KAZIS KRAUCZUNAS
LAWYER
Offlco New Cain Hotel
> *
j. _4
! Wo still sell new and used 1
heaters and repair stoves at I
reasonable prices.
SANITARY PLUMBI-NG
426 Willoughby Ave. Phono 443. 1
Next to Femmer & RItter j
*
Banking by Mail
No matter where you live, you can have the advantage
of a Bank Account, either checking or savings.
It is safer to remit money by mall than to keep
It at home. Write us for any information you may
wish in this connection.
THE OLDEST BANK IN ALASKA
1.40. SefyrM&a lank
JUNEAU, ALASKA

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