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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, November 14, 1916, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
- ,.o. - '?? "ALL THE NEWS ALL THE TIME"
VOL. IX., NO. 1238 JUNEAU. ALASKA, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1916. PRICE TEN CENTS
CAPTAIN OF TORPEDOED STEAMER IS
KEPT PRISONER ON GERMAN U-BOAT
: ? '""A.A'.v sW*r?f! X ?< '
SULZER ADDING
SLOWLY TO HIS
TOTAL PLURALITY
Returns from Three Divis
ions Add Three to Lead
of First Division
Candidate.
ELECTION CLAIMED, 250
The Fairbanks News-Miner
Says Democrat Has
Surely Won Fight
for Delegate.
Sulzer Wick
First Division 2.409 1.891
Second Division 615 787
Third Division 1,626 1.860
Fourth Division 1,559 1,522
Totals 6.209 6.060
Sulzer's plurality. 149.
Senator Sulzer's lead in the race
for Delegate to Congress at press
time today is 119. In a total of 333
votes reported since yesterday he
has made a net gain of 13.
Since the publication of The Em
pire last night returns have been
received from Kake in the First 1
division, which gave Wickershr.m 21
and Sulzer &. making a net Wjck
ersham gain of 13 votes.
Craig gave Sulzer a plurality of 11
"->??voit^v 'lwni lnr 'uVTthi.'al?/ wttee!i
Division 51S. ! i
No additional returns have been.
received from the Second Division, i
Wickersham's lead in that Division I
is 172. ?
Additional returns rrom tne i mru t
Division give Suizer a gain of 54 i
and Wicker?ham a gain of 74, mak- ?
lag a net Wickersham gain of 24. (
Wickersham's lead in the Division i
is now 324. <
Additional returns from the Fourth ,
Division show a Suizer gain cf 8S
and a Wickersham gain of 48, a net
Suizer gain of 40.
In all the Divisions Suizer has
znado a gain since yesterday after
noon of 160 ar.d Wickersham of 147 c
?a net Suizer gain of 13. t
The Fairbanks News-Miner esti
mates that Suizer has won the elec
tion by 225 to 250. a
If Marshall City and Kobuk re
turns prove the estimates of those a
of the Second Division to be correct.
Wickersham's plurality should be
wiped out in the Second Division, c
and give Suizer more than 300 plu- v
rality.
The Valdez Prospector and Fair- ;
bank.. News-Miner are working with
The Empire to get the roturns an! (
nil are at practical agreement. All j
claim Sulzer's election by something =
between 225 and 400 or 500. N
i
SULZER IS SURELY ,
ELECTED DELEGATE
Two telegrams were received by
The Empire yesterday evening and
one this morning from the Fair
banks News-Miner. The election of!
Sulzer by from 225 to 230 is claimed
by that paper.
The News-Miner's first telegram
follows:
FAIRBANKS, Nov. 13.?The vote
of the Fourth Division to date with
Koyukuk, Kuskokwim. Innoko, and
Forty Mile precincts to hear from
is as follows:
Sulzer. 1,329; V.'ickersham 1,512.
The News-Miner's figures which
have been carefully compiled show
the total of all Divisions to be:
Sulzer, 6,027; Wickersham 5,876,
giving Sulzer a plurality of 151.
Sulzer will be electeJ by from 223
to 230 votes. His pluralities In
the Innoko. Kuskokwim and Forty
Mile should offset any plurality that
Wickersham may get in the Koyu
kuk. and the latter district is not
conceded.
LATER FIGURES ADD TO LEAD
Late last night The Empire re
ceived the following telegram from
Fairbanks:
FAIRBANKS, Nov. 13?The Fourth
Division now stands:
Sulzer, 1,559; Wickersham 1,522,
giving Sulzer a plurality of 37 in the
Division, and 171 in the Territory.
Today The Empire received a \
elegram from the News-Miner say- 1
?HP"Tfiat There has*UN?n ho change ,
n the situation. j
WCORM\CK PASSES FREEBURN j
With the returns from Craig, Pet
>r C. McCormick passes James Free
)urn by six votes in the race for
Iteprecentative. However, there are J
i lot of precincts not yet reported1 '
jn the Legislative ticket. There;1
s no doubt about the election of;c
A". W. Casey, Monte Benson and,
Fohn G. Heid. ; 1
j r
MORE OFFICIAL THIRD
DIVISION RETURNS
r
VALDEZ. Xov. 14.?The following c
>fficial returns are announced to
lay: A
Knik?Sulzer 11: Wickersham 43.
Moore Creek?Sulzer IS: Wicker
iham 11.
'Rdosevelt - 'Sulzer 16: Wicker-' '
:ham 11*. i F
Sunrise?Sulzer 2, Wickersham 11. E
s
50CIALIST CANDIDATE
LOST SIGHT OF IN RACE s
C
The closeness of the race between
Senator Sulzer and Delegate Wick
?rsham has caused sought of Mrs.
..ena Morrow Lewis to be lokt. The
ndlcatlons are that she received
l handsome vote in the Third Dl r
rision. and that she will have in the 1
rerritory at large something near c
1,500 votes.
? N
GRIGSBY THANKS |f
PEOPLE OF THE )
FIRST DIVISION (
\
Wm. A. Kolzheimcr, secretary <
of the Democratic divisional com- 1
mittee for the First Division, re
ceived a telegram Sunday from
George B. Grigsby, extending his
thanks to the committee and the
people of the First Division for
the fine support given him here.
Mr. Grigsby carried the First c
Division by a handsome plurality,
and is grateful for the "magnifi
cent work and support" that he '
got. 1
' i
COMPULSORY WAR
ECONOMY TOUCHES
GERMAN CLOTHING .
GENEVA, Nov. 14. ? Compulsory
ivar economy in Germany has spread
:o clothing. A Berlin dispatch says
:hat after Wednesday no person may
suy new clothes without proving the
>ld ones worthless. Men are to be
illowed two suits yearly an! the
vomcn three.
EMPIRE ads nave thousands of
eaders.
?a i
}
STEAMER MOVEMENTS
and Mail Information
NOW BOUND NORTH
' Admiral Watscn is expected
[ from the south Thursday.
Will have four days' mail.
Humboldt sailed from Seattle
yesterday. Will be due here
Friday. Has two days' mail.
SCHEDULED SAILINGS
? Jefferson is scheduled to sail
1 from Seattle tomorrow.
Prince Rupert i3 scheduled to |
sail from Vancouver Thurs
day night.
Princess Sophia is scheduled
to sail from Vancouver Sat
urday.
City of Seattle is scheduled to
} sail from Seattle tomorrow. i
SOUTHBOUND SAILINGS I
Northwestern is expected from t
the westward at any time. Is 1
delavel by heavy storms. c
Admiral Evans is expected from a
the westward tomorrow. .May \
be delayed by storms.
:: a i
SULZER CARRIES CRAIG.
KETCHIKAN. Nov. 14.?The re
turns from Craig follow: Sulzer
33. Wickershain 23, Cobb 40. Crlgs
by 11, Schofleld 2, Greeno 1, Heck
man 27, Tanner 24, Anderson 17,
Arola 21, Baylcss 10. Benson 11
Casey 20, Connors 28, Fahey 2,
Freeburn 28, Heid 22, Helsing 3,
MeCormack 41, Early 25, liurlbut
10, dry 43, wet 9, for 8-hour law
47, against 3.
Slinkan cast only S votes. Thtvo
are no reports here.
PRESIDENT MAY
MAKE CHANGES
IN HIS CABINET
Unofficial Reports Are
Given Out That Men
from the West to
Be Favored.
MORGENTHAU~ HAS SAY
President's Policies for
Second Term Will Be
Same as First With
One Exception.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 14. ? That
changes will be made in President
Wilson's cabinet after next Marchj
and that there is a great possibility
of western men being offered posi
tions in the new cabinet was the j
information given out today from un- i
official sources.
Henry Mcrganthau. in an Inter-,
view with the representatives of the
various news agencies and corres
pondents here today, said that un
doubtedly there would be some'
changes in the cabinet and that
the places would probably be filled
with men from the west.
It was announced the day follow- j
ing election, that Secretary of War
Saker would resign next Spring, he
stating at the time that he accepted
:he position for one year only and
that when that period was up he?
would return to the practice of law
n Cincinnati.
The other changes contemplated
lave not been made public as yet.
?
SWEET'S NAME SENT IN
WASHINGTON. Nov. 14. ? The
lame of Edwin F. Sweet was sent
o the President today by Secretary 1
if Commerce William C. Redfield,
or re-appointmcnt as assistant sec
retary. Mr. Sweet resigned in Au
lust to run for Governor of Michi
jan but he was defeated. Secretary
Redfield desires that he again be 1
nade assistant In the Department
>f Commerce. | 1
VILSON'S POLICY WILL
BE SAME AS FORMERLY
M
WASHINGTON, Nov. 14.?Accord- <
ng to officials in his confidence. ?
'resident Wilsorf will follow the
ame policies in his second term i
is he did in his first, save possibly, |
i revision of the tariff, if the facts c
lathered by the commission at the
lose of the war, justify it.
IAMPAIGN FUNDS WILL
NOW BE INVESTIGATED '
I
WASHINGTON, Nov. 14.?The Ad- J
ninistratlon leaders announced today
hat the Senate will investigate the
:ampaign expenditures when Con-j
iress meets next month. j ^
WELCOME INVESTIGATION j!
NEW YORK. Nov. 14.?The Re- J
>ubliean National Committee will ?
welcome the fullest investigation of.'
svery penny spent by it, declared;
Chairman Willcox this afternoon I
when informed that steps for a Sen-;
itorial investigation had already |
?een taken.
HUGHES RESIGNS j:
<
OTTAWA, Nov. 14.?Gen. Sir
5am Hughes, minister of militia, re- j
tigned today at the request of Pre
nier Borden. Gen Hughes has not:
jeen in sympathy with the Prc-i
nier's policy and friction has con- 1
itantly been caused.
The EMPIRE?all tne news all thei
'me, when it !s iew?..
~ -
JUST THINK?
It Is Only
41 DAYS
Before Christmas!
HOUSE GONTROL
STILL MATTER 2
OF BIG INTEREST
Mine Districts Are Yet
Uncertain, According
to Congressman
Doremus.
INDIANS FOR WILSON
Count of Votes in State
of Minnesota Going
Slowly; California
Little Changed.
WASHINGTON. Nov. 14. ? Con
gressman Frank E. Doremus, of Ml- i
chigan, a member of the Democratic
National committee, declared today
at the White House that the con
trol of the next House was still in
doubt. He said that the Democrats i
are certain of 212 votes, the Re
publicans 211 with nine districts
still in doubt.
INDIANS VOTE FOR WILSON 1
WASHINGTON, Nov. 14. ? The .
Minnesota Indians voted solidly for <
President Wilson for his re-election 1
and that is why the state vote Is '
so close, said Gus II. Beaulicu, of 1
White Earth. Minnesota, reservation
today.
"Mrs. Wilson is a descendant of
Pocahontas and -we wanted to keep 1
our cousin In *Hie White House for t
four years more," he declared. (
t
HUGHES STILL HAS SLIGHT !'
LEAD IN MINNESOTA
ST. PAUL, Nov. 14. ? With1
ileven precincts still missing for !'
the states at large, Charles E. !'
Hughes is still leading with 201 !
rotes in his favor over Wilson.
SOLDIER VOTE AWAITED.
ST. PAUL. Nov. 14.?3 p. m.? r
Hughes' plurality is now 155 with
the votes of 500 soldiers to yet be '
heard from. v
SAN FRANCISCO RECOUNT. '
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 14.?The
Tew changes so far in the official
>ount of the votes of last Tuesday's
dection have resulted in favor of (
'.Vilson. This announcement was j.
nade here at noon today after re- ^
jorts had been received from vari- ,
>us cities.
FRAUDS IN IDAHO.
BOISE. Nov. 14. ? Widespread c
'rauds in the election last week I
ire being charged because the vote 1
n the state was 35,000 more than t
wo years ago. i a
LOSES BY ONE VOTE. '
LAKE VIEW. Ore., Nov. 14. ? !t
SV. Lair Thompson, president of the t
senate in the last Oregon lcgisla-jc
turo was defeated for re-election as
Senator by one vote, according to 11
the ofllcial returns. o
? ? > fi
PICKS TIME TO QUIT.
PETROCRAD, Nov. 14.?General C
Kuanda, who is Rumanian represen
tative at Russian military hcad
luartcrs, and a personal friend of f
King Ferdinand of Rumania, de- >'
blares that in his opinion the war v
tvill terminate in the autumn of'-'*
1917. jl
? m - r
* * 0
I STOCK QUOTATIONS I
' ? s |
NEW YORK, Nov. 14. ? Alaska '
Sold closed today at 12.
American Zinc at 56.
Butte and Superior at 66
Ray at 33%.
Utah Copper at 11S%.
Chlno at 68%.
Copper metal was quoted at 29.
rc
! WEATHER REPORT?24 Hrs I ?
Ending at 3 p. m. Today:
" o o " 1
' Tuesday, November 14th t
Maximum?39. t
Minimum?38. j I
Cloudy?Rain. | J
Precipitation?.54. in. | :
a H a
RUSSIANS ARE
ACROSS DANUBE
AT TWO POINTS
Russian Fleet Has Also
Resumed Bombardment
of Constanza on
the Coast.
SERBIANS "WIN VICTORY
Teutonic Forces Are in
Retreat; Central Force
Being Rushed Upon
Rumanians.
PETROGRAD, Nov. 14?Tho Rus
sians have crossed the Danube into
Dobrudja at two points south of
Tcernavoda and the Russian fleet
has renewed the bombardment of
Constanza. These advices are ac
cording to information received by
wireless by way of Romo.
GERMAN BOATS SUNK
PETROGRAD, Nov. 14.?An offic
ial statement today says that a ma
jority of the German vessels which i
took part la3t Friday in tho bom
bardment of tho Gulf of Finland,
were sunk. The number engaged is
tot known.
SERBIANS WIN VICTORY
PARIS. Nov. 14. ? The Serbians
lave won a brilliant victory over
he -Germans and Bulgarians In the
Vrnn district, southeast of Monas-;
ir, the war office announced today. |
riie Serbians, supported by French j
irtillery, forced the Teutonic allies j
o retire a distance of two miles, j
rhey captured 1,000 horses. The re-'
rect -of tho German-Bulgarian forc-i
?s was compelled after a battle of
wo days. I
FIGHTING ON SOMME '
WITH THE BRITISH ARMY IN
?'RANGE, Nov. 14.?Severe fighting
ontinues before Beaucourt and Sur
\ncre on tho north bank of the
?iver and on the high ground mid
ray between Serre and Beaucourt.
!ur Ancre is on tho west road link- j
ng these two villages. j
TRIPLE VICTORY IS WON 1
LONDON, Nov. 14. ?Yesterday's '
rlple victory of the Allies was won j
iy Gen. Halg on the Ancre, Russian
Jeneral Sakaroff on tho Dobrudjn, '
ind French General Sarrail on the
^erna.
GERMANS ADMIT LOSSES
BERLIN, Nov. 14.?Germany's War
>ffioe today announced the loss of
leaumont, Hamel and St-I'ierro vil- 1
ages to the British. "Our stub- |
?orn resistance caused us an import
,nt loss," the statement said.
LONDON, Nov. 14.?Redoubled cf
orts are being made by tho Aus
rians and Germans against the Ru
uanians, says a Router's Bucharest
orrespondent.
Tho powerful Teutonic reinforce
nents have been sent to the region
if Orsava on the Danube. In Hun
ary, near the Rumanian border,
lghting is also as severe as at the
wo points in the Carpathians at
Mtanices nnd in the Jlul valley.
IN THE TRANSYLVANIA
BERLIN, Nov. 14. ? The Russian
orces have retired from the Cyorg
o mountains In Northern Transyl
ania to tho Rumanian frontier as r
result of the German and Austro- f
lungarian attacks, says today's Ger- c
nan official statement, to the south 1
f Tulghes. s
SOLD WEATHER I
COAL SHORTAGE !
GETTING FRANCE
PARIS, Nov. 14.?With cold weath
sr already at hand, France faces
i coal famine. Labor troubles in
Sngland and Wales have cut down
he production there, but Great Bri- (
aln was burdened even without i
his handicap, ns she has been com- '
>elled to supply Italy and France t
is well as her own tremendous ?
lccds. The coal fields In France <
ire held by the Germans.
CAPTAIN CURTIS OF COLUMBIAN
TAKEN ABOARD SUBMARINE WHICH
OPERATING OFF SPANISH COAST
Is Kept for Several Days in a Prison-like Cabin and
Is Then Finally Put Adrift on the Ocean and Pad
dles to City on the Spanish Coast ? Captain of
Other Steamers Which Have Keen Sunk Are On
Board Submarine?Name of Marauding Craft is
the "U-49."
CORUNA, SPAIN, Nov. 14. ? Captain James Ciirtls, of the American
Hawaiian Steamship Columbian, sunk last weok off the Spanish coaot by a
German submarine, arrived here after being kept aboard the torpedoing
boat for five days and then put ashore in a most peculiar manner. The
arrival of Capt. Curtis also confirms the previous report thst a German sub
marine was responsible for the disaster to the Columbian.
Captain Curtlo paddled ashore himself this forenoon In a small canvas
canoe which he saved from the Columbian and which was taken aboard
the submarine when he was placed on the submersible.
The German submarine which did the torpedoing was the U-49.
That other steamers have been sent down was the information also
given out by Captain Curtis to the Spanish government officials here.
Captain Curtis in relating the incidents surrounding the sinking of
the Columbian statee that the submarine hove in sight, word was passed
to those on board the American 6teamer that she wa6 to be sunk and
the crew of the Columbian hastily lowered the life boats and pulled
away. The U-49 fired two torpedoes at the Columbian which sank im
mediately. The crew was left in the lifeboats, supplied with short ra
tions, and told to pull in a certain direction, which would put him on the
Spanish ccast..
"I was taken aboard the submarine," said Capt. Cu'tls. "Hardly had
I been taken below before we submerged. I was taken into the small
quartermaster's cabin where I found the captains of the 3eatonla and
the Balto, which had been sunk previously. After me came Captain
Nielogscn of the Fordalen.
"The cabin was very small. There wa3 a folding table and folding
:hairs, three bunks and everything was permeated with the odor of
benzine. Thc-c was r.o communication with the exterior and the cabin
was absolutely dprk^ day and night.
"We wore led in the moriflng with a fevw morsels~^f_black bread,
i cup of cocca and a small portion of bad butter. At noon we were
served with a stew, canned meat, and soup. For dinnor we had coffee
>r tea and black bread with butter or marmalade.
"The hours we spent In this narrow prison were long and dita
jreeable.
"The captain of the submarine was a man about 36 years of age,
while his grew of forty sailors were all very young. They were all
;lothed in :uii3 of glossy leather.
"Between the operations of the submarine we were all allowed to go
>n the deck of the submarine for a smoke. The crew watched us
irmd with revolvers, why, I do not know for we were not within sight
>f land nor were we strong enough to try to take possession of the sub
narine. When we v/ent below and into our cabin, we were left alone
ind the crew put aside their arms.
"I do not know how many vecsels were sent down while I was
iboard the submarine but I do know that some were dispatched judg
ng from the remarks made by the crew in German, of which language
possess enough knowledge of to grasp some of the words.
"Early this morning, I was awakened and told to come on deck. In
he darkness I could see my little canvas canoe tied to the conning
owcr rail and not far distance away could sec lights on shore. The
:aptain told me to get Into my canoe, which I did, and extending his
land, spoke in rather good English satisfaction at meeting me and ex
jrcsslng the hopes that I would reach shore cafely, which I did."
Captain Curtis stated that he did not know what became of the
ither captains on board the U-49 but that they would undoubtedly be
anded in a similar manner at some port, possibly off the coast of
rrance.
mm WEATHER
IN SEATTLE; A
COLO WAVE ON
Temperature Is Dropping
in Oregon; Colorado
and Wyoming. Have
Cold Spell.
SEATTLE, Nov. 14.?'This city is
lot experiencing any cold wave as
h reported elsewhere along the
oast towards the Interior. Today
t is 30 above zero and the sun is
hining brilliantly.
PORTLAND, Nov. 14.?Reports
rom eastern Oregan state that the
empcrature is dropping and three
>clow zero is registered in the ma
arity of the places.
DENVER, Nov. 14.?From 10 to
!0 degrees below zero is registered
.hroughout Colorado.
SHERIDAN, Wyo., Nov. 14.?It
s 26 degrees below zero here to
lay. The blizzard has subsided and
lie snow storm has abated.
TURKISH PRISONERS.
KIEFF, Nov. 14.?The first batch
if Turkish officers recently taken
)rlsoncrs in Bukowina and Gallcla
ias been brought to Kieff. Before
he war a great number of these
jrisonern were bakers and shopkecp
;rs and had never received any rcg
llar military training.
MAN IS CHASED
2,000 MILES; IS
THEN ARRESTED
Suspect Is Captured in
the East After His
Arrival There
from Alaska.
PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 14.?After
! a chase of mere than 2,000 miles,
| lasting more than two years, detec
tives have arrested Fred Van Burem
25 years old. Ho was found in one
of the powder plants at Penn's
Grove, N. J., and brought to this
| city* to await a hearing on next
1 Monday.
It Is understood the arrest was
made on instigation of the American
Bankers' Protective Association.
According to the story Van Buren
told after his arrest, he originally
came from Germantown and was 'a
graduate of a civil engineering
school. The detectives say charges
have been made against him in var
ious towns in Ohio, Indiana, Ne
braska, and Western States.
For a time he was in Alaska, and
it was upon his return from the
north a few months ago that tho
detectives picked up the trail.
EMPike aas nave thousands of
readers.

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