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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, November 21, 1916, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
"ALLTHE NEWS ALL THE TIME" !
? ? ? ?
VOL. IX, NO. 1244. JUNEAU, ALASKA, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1916. PRICE TEN CENTS
GERMANY REPLIES ON SUBMARINE WARFARE
MORE SHIPS ARE SUNK BY U-BOATS
DARING COMMANDER OF GERMAN
CRAFT TORPEDOES STEAMER ON THE
THAMES AND THEN MAKES ESCAPE,
British Steamer Is Sunk in English Channel and
Captain and His Crew Are Unreported?Steamer
from France Arrives at New York and Reports
Engagement With German Destroyer.
LONDON. Nov. 21.?The German submarine activity has in
creased around the British Isles during the last twenty-four hours.
Four English Channel steamers are reported to have been sunk and
reports are coming in of other attempts.
This afternoon the master and the members of the crew of the j
Norwegian steamer Finn landed at the mouth of the Thames river
in theu: life boats .and reported that early this morning they had
been given twenty minutes to leave their ship by the commander of
a German submarine. Despite the fact that while the vessel was ?
practically within sight of the coast, the submarine crew acted boldly,
the crew of the Finn took to the lifeboats and the steamer was tor
pedoed and sunk. The submarine disappeared quickly and British tor
pedo boats were unable to locate it.
STEAMER SUNK?NO WORD OF CREW.
Halifax. Nov. 21.?Advices were received here from London at
noon today stating that the Furaess steamship Rappahannock had
been sunk in the English channel by a German submarine. The re
port says that no word has been received of Captain Garrett nor
his crew cf forty men.
Captain Garret is a citizen of Halifax and the majority of his
crew are Canadians.
ESCAPES FROM GERMAN SUBMARINE.
New York, Nov. 21.?The British steamer Siamese Prince, re
turning in ballast after delivering a cargo of horses at Brest for the
French government, was fired upon without warning by a submarine
off the French coast, according to the officers. Three shots were fired
at the Siamese Prince but the captain zigzagged and escaped the
shots. The submarines abandoned the pursuit as French and Brit
ish torpedo boats arrived on the scene. '
PASSENGERS AND :
CREW ARE SAVED
BY THE BRITISH
American Steamer Ashore ,
on Coast of England
in a Raging
Storm.
??
DOVER. England. Nov. 21.?Fifty
three passengers and the crew of
the American steamer Siberia were j
landed today at Kingsdov.n in life-1:
boats. Seven previous attempts to ?
rescue the passengers an t crew re- .
suited in dire failures and the life!<
savers came nearly losing their own
lives. J
The Siberia went ashore on the'
East Goodwin Sands late yesterday .
afternoon and immediately calls were
sent out for rescue. A terrific sea
was running at the time and it was
not until early thi3 morning that
rescue work wa possible. The gale
still continues and it is believed
that the Siberia will be pounded to
pieces.
DUTCH RAILWAYS
CURTAIL SERVICES
AS COAL SCARCE
COPENHAGEN*. Nov. 21. ? Owing
to the difficulty cf obtaining coal
from England, Germany and Bel
gium. Dutch railways may be oblig
ed temporarily to curtail their ser
vices. Two leading railroads have
taken the necessary measures for
curtailment.
CAPTAIN JOHNSON
TO BRING STEAMER
TO THE PACIFIC
SEATTLE. Nov. 21. ? Captain
John Johnson, one of the best
known Alaskan navigators, leaves
tonight for Mobile to take command*
of the steamer Iienry T. Scott, re
cently purchased by the Alaska S.
S. Co., for the Alaska route. Capt.
Johnson will bring the newly pur
chased steamer through the Pana
ma canal arriving here in April.
"All the News ah tae Time."
STEFANSSON IS
HAVING TROUBLE
WITH ESKIMOS;
NEW YORK, Nov. 21. -Arctic Ex
plorer Stet'am oil hai hail trouble
with the Blond Eskimos, according
o a letter received here today and
uade public by Albert J. SpinJen.
The letter was received from Captain
Kellett. a member of the Stcfansson
sxpedition.
Captain Kellett writes that Stefan-'
son had a flight misunderstanding
>ver certain trade relations and when
in attack of influenza fell on the
"Blondles" the tribe blamed Stefan
ison. The whites in the part fear
:hat if ar.y of the natives die it
ivill prove a serious position for the |
members of the expedition.
THREE HUNDRED DIE
IN EXPLOSION IN A
MUNITION FACTORY!
PETROGRAD. Nov. 21.?It is an
nounced officially that 341 were kill
ed and 667 wounded in an explos
ion at Kakarltza In a munitions
plant.
SEATTLE FIRM MAY
GET CONTRACT FOR
A SCOUT CRUISER
WASHINGTON, Nov. 21. ? The
Seattle Construction & Dry Dock
Company's bid of $490,000 for one
scout cruiser, was the lowest re
ceived and Secretary of the Navy
Daniels Intimated that thp western
r-ompany would probably be award
ed the contract.
*
j STOCK QUOTATIONS
NEW YORK. Nov. 21. ? Alaska
Gold closed today at 12*1.
Alaska-Juneau at 7.
American Zinc at 63%.
Butte & Superior at 72%.
Ray at 36%.
Utah Copper at 126.
Chino at 70%.
Copper metal was quoted at 32%.
I 'Phone It to The ismplre. No. 374.
?*4 #^? ?*? #J? ?*?
+ 4"
+ NORWAY MAY ADOPT +
* FOOD TICKET SYSTEM +
? *.+
? COPENHAGEN. Nov. 21? +
<? The Royal Provisions Commis- ?>
<? sion of Norway has unani- +
? mously decided that the ticket +
+ system should be instituted +
+ immediately to meet the food ?>
+ situation throughout the Na- +
+ lion. +
?> +
+?*?>>*********+
ULTIMATUM IS
HANDED TO THE
GARRANZA MEN
Secretary Lane Tells the
Commission of Ways
for Settlement of
Border Troubles.
PIFFLING* l\IOW AT END1
ATLANTIC CITY. Nov. 21. ?
The Americap Commissioners to
day gave the Mexican commission
ers what is understood to be the
last opportunity for an amicable
settlement of the problems.
Secretary Lane informed the Car
ranza representatives that the Am-1
erican puntitivo expedition would be
withdrawn within a reasonable
time under conditions that would
not impair the dignity of the Am
erican government or leave unpro
tected the territory just south of
the border now patrolled by the:
Americans. He outlined that the
American government is prepared
to guard the long lino of the
frontier and to run down and
punish* any marauding hands that
attempt to cross into the United
States.
Secretary Lane made it clear that
this government would not tolerate
any restrictions on 'the pursuit of
bandits by the American troops.
COMMITTEEMAN OF
MINNESOTA CALLED
BY DEATH TODAY
ST. PAUL. Nov. 21. Chester A.
Condon, of Duluth, Republican Na
tional Committeeman from Minne
sota, died today of pleurisy.
LONDON. Nov. 21.?Lord Rother
mer's second son, Lt. Hon. Vere
Sydney Tudor Harms-worth, was kill
ed in action. Harmsworth wa3 a
nephew of Lord Northclit'fe.
PARIS. Nov. 21.?Mrs. Hayden, wi
dow of the late Major James It. Hay
den of Seattle, and mother of Colonel
John S. L. Harden, U. S. A., died
here tiiis afternoon.
BALTIMORE. Nov. 21.?Bishop Al
pheus \Y. Wilson, of the Methodist
Episcopal Church of the South, died
last night.
THIRTY MILLION IS
PLACED IN CANADA
TO PURCHASE GRAIN
WINNIPEG, Nov. 21.?"The Brit
ish government placed today $30,000,
j 000 with chartered bank3 with which
to pay for the purchase of grain
for England.
EXPORTS^ ALASKA
FROM SEATTLE FOR
OCTOBER WERE LARGE
SEATTLE, Nov. 21.?The United
States customs collectors' October
report, completed today, shows ex
j ports of the district of Washington
as $11,916,051, and the imports $13.
528,674. The exports to Alaska were
valued at $2,383,995.
NORWEGIANS GO TO
ORIENT TO JOIN SHIPS
SEATTLE, Nov. 21. ? The com
manders and subordinate officers for
four Norwegian steamships building
in Japan arrived from Norway today
| and will sail tomorrow for the Or
! lent on the Inaba Maru.
m m 9
: EMPIRE "ads" pi.y.
WILSON WILL URGE
PREPAREDNESS
IN BUSINESS
IN MESSAGE
Washington, Nov. 21.?
A call to the American bus
iness men that they pre
pare to meet the unprece
dented trade conditions
after the war is to be the
keynote of President Wil
son's message to Con
gress. The President be
lieves that the country's
industries can do a max
imum amount of work
only when there is a mini
mum of industrial unrest.
His message will empha
size this appeal to the
employer, to the employee,
for more co-operation,
more confidence in each!
other and less tendency
of class feeling.
It was stated here this
afternoon that the Pres
ident is not expected to
ask Congress to place an
embargo on food exports.
GERMAN OFFICER IN
BELGIUM CONTINUES
HIS CRUEL WORK
LONDON, Nov. 21 .?The
olliccr responsible for the
deportation of the Belgians
to Germany under orders
recently issued, was the
same officer responsible for
the execution of Miss Ca
voll, Ix>rd Creighton stated
in the House of Commons
j today.
??? ???
AFFILIATION!N
LABOR CIRCLES
IS CONTEMPLATED
Railroad Brotherhoods
May Join With the
Federation of
Labor.
TO BETTER" CONDITIONS
BALTIMORE, Nov. 21. ? Affil
iation of the American Federation
of Labor and the four bis rail
road Brotherhoods for effecting a
general betterment of labor was
urged today before the convention
here by the Brotherhood heads
and President Samuel Gompers.
"We must hang together or we
| will hang separately," W. G. Lee,
spokesman for the Brotherhoods,
declared.
"It is a groat comfort to know,"
Gompers said, "that the time is not
far distant when the great Bro
therhoods will be a part of the
American Federation of Labor."
t
JUST THINK?
There Are Only
34 DAYS
Until Christmas!
V. ,
??? ?%* ?*? ?|? ?)? ?*? ?|? ?j* ?j?
+ *
+ GREEK CABINET WILL *
+ NOT OBEY ENTENTES +
I* 4
+ LONDON. Nov. 21.?A Cen- *
4- tral News Dispatch from Ath- +
4- ens declares that the Greek *
4- Cabinet has refused to grant *
+ the demand of Admiral Four- 4
4- net representing the Entcnto +
* Allies thr.t tho German, Bui- +
4- garlan and Turkish ministers +
4- be requested to leave tho 4
+ capital. <
4? 4*
#J? ?J? *** ?$? ??? *|*
ALLOWS
KEEP ON HEELS
OF THE TEUTONS
Retreat From Monastir
Is a Complete Rout
According to the
Rome Advices.
VILLAGES ARE CAPTURED
ROME, Nov. 21.?The retreat from
Monastir of the German and Bul
garian army to the north is a ter- :
rifle route according to wireless ad
vices here. The Entente Allies'
troops are pursuing the retreating
Teutonic forces and have occupied :
several villages north of Monastir i
and have also taken many prisoners.
' i:
LONDON, Nov. 21.? Continuing,
their pursuit of the defeated Ger
man and Bulgarian troops on the ;
Macedonian front, the Serbians have
captured several villages and taken
a great number of prisoners accord-1
Ing to Reute,"8 Saloniki correspond- j
ent. Reports say that the Germans i
and Bulgarians have received re-in
forcements and arc offering a se
vere resistance.
The Rumanian forces in South-!
western Rumania have retired in;
the face of the Austro-German at
tacks, according to an official state
ment issued today by the Russian '
War Department in Petrograd. !
The troops of the Allies are press- '
ing the Germans and the Bulgarian 1
rear guard detachments to the North '
of Monastir, according to the offic- '
ial announcement on the progress of j1
hostilities given out by the French '
war office this evening.
BRITISH SYNDICATE
MAY PURCHASE THE |
REUTER'S AGENCY
LONDON'. Nov. 21.? Negotiations
are under way for the purchase of
the Reuters Telegram Company by
a British syndicate.
GERMAN MERCHANT
IS HEAVILY FINED
FOR GREAT OFFENSE
BERLIN', N'ov. 21.?A merchant in
Hamburg, Germany, has been fined
2,000 marks for one of the most re
markable offenses yet recorded
against the pure food laws. A "liv
er sausage" sold by him for 2 marks
and 20 pfennigs a pound wns found
on analysis to contain macerated
rubber, finely ground hair and gela
tino. There was neither liver nor
other flesh or fats in the sau-sage.
AEROPLANE RECORD
FOR ALTITUDE HAS
BEEN BEATEN AGAIN
PARIS, Nov. 21.?World record
for lofty aeroplano flight has been
achieved when Lieut. Guido Guidl,
of the Italian army, attained height
of 25,800 feet at Milan in flight
which occupied one hour and flfty
sevon minutes.
TROUBLE FOR THOSE
WHO PUT PRICES UP
IN CANADIAN TOWNS
MONTREAL, Nov. 21.?Combin
ing to enhance prices of necessar
ies of life has been made an offense
by the Canadian government. Pen
alties arc $5000 fine or two years'
imprisonment. No person may ac
cumulate or withhold from sale
necessities beyond amount reason
ably obtained for the person or
firms, houshold or business.
GOVERNMENT OF GERMANY MAKES A
GENERAL DENIAL OF REPORTS SENT
OUT REGARDING U BOAT ACTIVITY
United States Embassy at Berlin Is Given Full Re
port on the Sinking of Three Steamers by the
Undersea Craft Operating at Points Along the
Coast of England and France.
BERLIN, Nov. 21.?The United States embassy here today re
ceived the German government's reply in regard to the sinking of
the British steamer Rowanmore, on which were six Americans, as
members of the crew, and three other steamships, alleged torpedoed
recently by German submarines.
In regard to the steamer Rowanmore, the German government
denies that the submarine fired on the lifeboats containing the crew.
The government maintains that the men on the Rowanmore owe their
lives to the precautions taken by the Germans and the skill by
which the latter carried out their operations.
An emphatic denial is made to the reports that the crew was
not given time to escape in the lifeboats and substantiates this state
ment with the fact that the members of the crew saved their personal
baggage.
Regarding a second seamer reported sunk by a submarine the
German government denies that a U-boat was responsible for the
disaster and claims that a floating mine was struck.
In the case of the liner Antwerpan. the third vessel, the govern
ment says this craft was destroyed in full accordance with the rules of
international law.
The German government also asks why Americans continue to
sign on as members of crews of vessels owned and controlled by nations
or firms of nations which are at war with the Teutonic powers?
"The United States Embassy here will send the German reply im
mediately to Washington, D. C.
DEUTSCHLAND
SAILS ON HER
RETURN TRIP
NEW LONDON, Conn.. Nov, 21.?
Hie Gorman submarine freighter
Deutschlcnd sailed down the Thames
river this afternoon leaving the pon
ooned enclosure at 3 o'clock. Capt.
Paul Koenlg stated that all repairs,
which were slight, had been complet-.
3d and he was In first class shape;
for his second dash across the At-f
lantlc. Several boats accompanied
:lie Deutschlan.l down the river and
out to sea.
MILLIONS ON DEPOSIT
IN SEATTLE BANKS
SEATTLE, Nov. 21. ? The
Comptroller's call sent out at noon
found the National banks of Se
attle carrying deposits of nbout
$405,000,000.
VOTES FROM SOLDIERS
CHANGED FROM WAR
CRY, VOTES FOR WOMEN
LONDON, Nov. 21.?Mrs. Emme- j
line Pankhurst, English suffragette!
leader, has changed her battle cry j
of "Votes for women' 'to "Votes!
for soldiers." She is giving active
support to the movement to have
Parliament pass a law enabling sol
diers and sailors on duty away from
homo to vote in any parliamentary
election held before the war ends.
NEW YORK'S TURKEY
TO SELL AT 47 CENTS
NEW YORK, Nov. 21.? Scarcity
>t turkeys and chickens for Thnnks
iving with unusually high prices
was .predicted at Wallabont Market,
Brooklyn. The wholesale price for
turkeys was 40 and 4 7 cents. Chick
ens were quoted at 28 and 30 cents
a pound. An old quotation sheet
published twenty-flve years ago, un
earthed at the market, showed thnt
\t that time turkeys wore selling at
j cents a pound and chickens at
from 4 to G cents.
PLUMBERS TO RE-FORM.
WASHINGTON. Nov. 21.?The de
partment of justice has been ad
? Ised that the directors of the Na
lonal Association of Master Plumb
tb, which has been under attack
is violating the Sherman law, have
>assed a resolution by wlflch the
?ntlro plan of operation and by-laws
of the organization aro to be revised
to meet the government's criticisms
REPRESENTATIVE
MAKES A FLIGHT
TO WASHINGTON
Pennsylvania Man Goes
to Congress to Take
His Seat in His
Aeroplane.
WASHINGTON. Nov. 21.?0. D.
Bleakley, of Pennsylvania represen
tative-elect, made an aeroplane flight
from Philadelphia to Washington in
his own biplane piloted by Sergt.
William C. Ocker, of the army avia
tion corps.
Mr. Bieakley declared that he was
the first man to come to Congress
by aeroplane.
The machine circled over Washing
ton monument several times before
alighting.
AMERICAN WOMAN
PRESENTED TO EMPRESS
TOKYO, Nov. 21. ? Mrs. Ollic
James, wife of the prominent Amer
ican, was presented to the Empress
this afternoon.
:: a
I
STEAMER MOVEMENTS I
and Mail Information
NOW BOUND NORTH
Princess Sophia will be due
fro mthc south tonight. Has
mall.
] Alameda sailed north from Ket
chikan this morning at nine
o'clock and will be due here
tomorrow morning. Has mall.
SCHEDULED SAILINGS
| AI-KI Is scheduled to sail from
Seattle tonight.
Admiral Evans sailing has been
postponed. Is now scheduled
to sail Friday.
Humboldt is scheduled to sail
from Seattle Friday.
Jefferson Is scheduled to sail
from Seattle next Monday.
City of Seattle is scheduled to '
sail from Seattle Saturday.
Prince Rupert is scheduled to '
sail from Vancouver Thursday
night.
SOUTHBOUND SAILINGS
Mariposa is scheduled to sail
southbound at 11 o'clock to
night. Takes mall.
| Admiral Watson Is scheduled to
sail southbound Friday.
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