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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 15, 1917, Image 5

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' THE WEATHER BUREAU
By M. B. SUMMERS
METEOROLOGIST
>
.% ^ ij> .j. .j. <f> 4. >;<
+ +
+ TEMPERATURE ?
? ?
Now that a tnblo of local weather
conditions is published in the papers
it might bo well to explain the mean
ing of some of the terms that are
used.
Probably the weather element that
. is most fumlliar to the public Is the
; temperature of the air We know
that this fluctuates from hour to hour
laud from day to day and from month
to month. Our personal comfort Is
j largely dependent upon it. and we
try to equalize the sensation of tern
! perature by the use of a greater 01
; less amount of clothing and by the
application of a greater or less
quantity of heat to our homes.
We all know that temperature is
"measured" by an instrument called
"thermometer." The principle that
I underlies the thermometer is the ex
' panslon of bodies by the application
of heat. It is supposed to have been
invented about the year 1530, but lit
tle Is known of its early history until
Faherheit, of Dantzig, Germany, In
11714. invented the Instrument that
bears his name. This type, the Fall
i renhelt scale, is used by the Wcath
?' er Bureau in all its work except
that or a researcn cnaraeter. ana also
by the public generally in the Unit
ed States and Great Britain. The
fiducial points of the Fahrenheit
scale are zero and 212 degrees, re
spectively. The latter reading repre
sents the boiling point, of water at
sea level, but it Is a matter of con
jecture as to why Fahrenheit fixed
the zero at the arbitrary point of 32
degrees below freezing. It is sup
posed by seme that he placed it at
what he considered the lowest tem
perature ordinarily reached in an Ice
land winter. At any rate, the scale
is such that there are 180 degrees or
subdivisions between the freezing and
boiling points of water. Perhaps a
better idea of the value of a degree
can be obtained when we consider
that there is a difference of 36 de
grees between the freezing point and
the temperature of the ordinary liv
ing room, or 66.4 degrees between
;he freezing point and our internal
i temperature.
In scientific investigations and re
search work tho Centigrade scale,
invented in 1742 by Celsius, a Swed
j ish professor, is used almost ex
clusively, and Is also in popular use
by practically all nations except the
United States and Great Britain. This
scale is the more simple and sensi
ble. since it begins with its zero at
the freezing point and places the
boiling point at 100
A bill was introduced in the last
Congress providing for the abolition
of the Fahrenheit scale in the Unit
ed States and the substitution of the
Centigrade. The Weather Bureau
as an institution was in favor of
the change, but. since its work is
serving the public, it undertook to
sound public opinion on the matter.
Letters of inquiry were sent to hun
dreds of firms and business houses
throughout the country whoso work
or business involves the frequent use
or consultation of the thermometrie
scale. ' I have not learned the net j
result of this investigation, but I do
know that out of over a score of
such letters sent out by the Phila-J
delphia office, only a small percent
age of replies were in favor of the
change. All admitted the advant
age of the Centigrade scale once it ,
were in general use and thoroughly
understood, but most of them were
afraid of the annoyance and confus
ion that would result for a few years
until the public became familiar with j
the new system. At any rate, the
bill did not pass an! we still boil
our water at 212 instead of 100, and
our bodies are devoid of fever when
our temperature is 0S.4 instead of
It Is needless to say that zero 011,
either scale does not constitute the j
limit of cold, or, in other words, an ;
entire absence of heat. Tempera
tures of fiO degrees below zero, Fah- ,
renheit, occur in the interior of Alas
ka probably every winter, while the
lowest recorded temperature is minus
DO. But the question arises; What
is the limit of cold, or what would ;
be the reading of the thermometer
if it received no heat at all? This;
condition is difficult to comprehend, j
but scientists claim that it exists;
in intesplanetary space, and that the1,
reading is 459 degrees below zero, j
Fahrenheit, or 273 degrees below. I,
Centigrade. That an utter absence
of heat indicates such a low thcr
mometric reading seems to be borne
out by the results of laboratory ex- ,
periments whereby actual tempera- (
tures of 230 below zero Centigrade :
have been obtained.
Among the forms of thermometer,
used by the Weather Bureau in its
daily worn are the "dry bulb," maxi
mum and minimum. All are of stand
ard pattern and have been calibrat
ed with the graduations etched on
the glass?a detail that is one of the
ear marks of a good thermometer. 1
The "dry bulb" is used to tell the !
current temperature, while the maxi- '
mum thermometer indicates automati- i
cally the highest reading that has .
occured since the instrument was 1
last set, and the minimum the low- !
est The "dry bulb" and maximum .
thermometers are mercury instru- .
ments while the minimum is filled 1
with alcohol and is provided with :
a little metallic Index that floats In
the school and that 1ms tho peculiar
property of automatically traveling
toward lower readings on the scale
and never In tho opposite direction.
As mercury freezes at a tempera
ture of 40 degrees below zero, ther
mometers of that type are of no ac
count during a part of each winter
in the Interior of Alaska, and for
temperatures below that reading the
alcohol Instrument must be used. He
cording thermometers of various
types are also In use.
An erroneous popular Idea Is that
the temperaturo of moving (windy)
air Is lower than that of still air.
The fallacy ot" this can be easily
demonstrated by any one with the
use of two thermometers. Expose
one of them on the windward side
of the* tree, or building in which
there is no artificial heat, and tfic
other on the leeward side. There
wlil be 110 difference between the
readings, unless, indeed, the instru
ment exposed to tho wind reads
ciightly higer than tho other, due to
the friction of the moving air on
tho bulb. Of course, the sensible
temperature Is lower in the wind
than in quiet air, because the wind
[drives the air through our clothing
to the surface of the body, which, by
erason of perspiration, acts as a
' wet bulb" thermometer, with tin
consequent lowering of the teaipeia
ture by evaporation.
LOCAL MEN FORM
A CORPORATION TO
ENGAGE IN FISHING
A closed corporation, bearing the
name of the Icy Straits Packing Com
pany, lias been formed by J. C. Me
Bride, Herman T. Tripp, li L. Faulk
ner, B. L. Thane Smd Richard Wul
zen. .Mr. McBride Is the president,
H. T. Tripp, vice president and H. L.
Faulkner, secretary-treasurer. The
company's capital stock is given at
$ 100.000.
This morning President J. C. .Mc
Bride said: "The company is a
closed corporation None of our
stock is for sale in the open market,
and we intend to engage in a gen
eral trap business during the earning 1
summer and to erect six fish traps
on sites which we hold and have al
ready made contracts with canneries 1
for the output of our traps.
"At the present time we are com-j
pleting a large pile driver for our i
own use. In addition we are building
two scows and are installing a 55
horse power engine in the has boat
Dolphin. She will be used as one of
the trap tenders, and we will also
use the gas bout Lillian. We do
not Intend to engage in any cannery ,
business at this time."
SMITH SELLS OUT
HIS PERSEVERANCE ,
AUTOMOBILE LINE
-
Marry Smith, the veteran Perse- j (
verance stage liner, today disposed j<
of his Buick and Ford passenger 1
cars to E. Scatagilin and John Gan- J'
ero and retires from the local stage '
line field. Both Messrs. Scatagilin }
and Garnero are well known and .
will keep the efficiency of the line,
when the road is passable again, up t
to the same standard of excellency t
as maintained by .Mr. Smith. Mr. t
Garnero is part owner of the Ken- i
tucky Bar and stage line ead- \
quarters will bo maintained there:;
and at Burford's corner. Mr. Smith 1
will go south within the next two '?
months, in the meantime breaking in ;
a man on the big Jeffrey quad. c
t
WATSON'S TRIAL PROCEEDS
The jury was secured this morn- '
ing to hear the trial of Sam Wat- '
son, accused of having sold v.-hiskey j
to natives. The taking of evidence .
was started this morning and it is! i
thought the trial will be finished this |
afternoon.
The jury secured to try the case t
consists of J. H. Stanflcld, A. M. 1
White. ('. W. Spear. J M. Miller. I. J
D. Carpenter, Louis Scott. Mark
Smith, A. C. Williams, Khvood Me
t'lain, John Olds, William Sbipman, [
and L. J. Bruner.
HOSPITAL NOTES t
J. E. Johnson, shoe-maker, was ?
operated on recently at St Ann Hos
pital by Dr. P. J. Ma hone. The op
eration was a major one, hut the pa- j
tlent is recovering nicely. $
Al. Johnson, of the Perseverance ?
mine force, underwent a major op- ?
eration at St. Ann Hospital yester- '
day. Dr. P. J. Mahone was the sur- J.
geon in charge. j
ADVERTISED LETTERS
Letters remaining uncalled for in j,
the Post office at Juneau, Alaska.
Feb. ltth, 1917. Purtlcs wishing
same, should call for "Advertised t
Letters," and give date of list: 11
Hllmar Bye, Miss Aline Merger, 3
G. A. Bettes. (:t), Mrs. Harry Bark- 1!
ley, James Duggan, P. G. Duncan, J"
Thomas Driscoll, Miss Selina Eric- j,
son, Alfred Ericson, Frank Geodtec, /
Tun Hira, Mrs. Lammie Huston, WU- t
Ham Hannigan, Jack Kaskor, Mrs. c
Lena Johnson, C. J Lundgren, Miss|'
\nna Lindsay, John Martin (2), Mrs. f
T. Norton, Capt. Cyrus Orr. Billy j
Patterson, Harry Scott, Mrs. L. Simp- v
ion, G. H. White, Dived Ward. 15
C. C. J. NOW POOBAH.
Carl C. Johnson, one of the lino
typcrs of The Empire, 806ms to be
the fnctatum of the Capital City
Hand. Up to last night ho had been
president of the band, Charles Rog
ers, who has been secretary and
treasurer, is leaving the city, and j
last night Mr. Johnson waB elected
to the placo of Mr. RogerB, and I
now being president, secretary and I
treasurer.
i t i
K BIG FIGURE IN FRANCE
rrry/r - uu /?!
tPOUARD ^ v
USRRIOTT
Kdouard Herrlott lias boon taken
into the new French Ministry to
take charge of the Transport and
Supply Department. The wisdom of
the appointment has not been ques
tioned, for probably no other man
of France has a more complete ,
grasp of the million details of
municipal war administration.
"American visitors say he Is the
French Roosevelt. To me he seems
less noisy," says one of his eulogists.
"His big, quiet head has room In it
for many things, from belles-lettres '
to the smallest details of war work."
Insurance that Insures your other
Insurance ? Three-In-One. Ask for ;
particulars. It. It. Stewart, (lastin- I
?au Hotel. fl2. <
? (
I
SPECIAL NOTICE I
To the people of Juneau, Douglas, ;
rrcadwell and Thane:?During Feb- t
ruary only, a special price of $3.00 <
ii year for tho Seattle Star; (I months (
$1.00; 3 months $1.00; 1 month j
35c. Subscriptions taken at the (
Butlcr-Mnuro Drug Co., Recce L.
Brewer, Special Representative. ,
Today's News Today?in Empire.
\
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR ?
PATENT i
No. 03484 J
t
UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE, <
runeau, Alaska, December 22, 1916. <?
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that t
r. C. Hallum, whose post office ad- [
Iress Is Juneau, Alaska, In behalf ?"
>f himself and his co-owr.crs, P. E. v
lallum and A. O. Voycn, has filed 3
;n application for patent for the s
odo mining claims and millsites f
Known and designated as the Hat- '
urn Group and also known and des- f
gnatcd as the Norman Taku Group, I
?ltuatcd on Moun* Juneau and on
he southerly slope thereof, on the
lorthwesterly side of Gold Creek and c
ipproxinutely one (1) mile north >
roni the Port Office at Juneau. A1 J.
iska, In tlic Harris Mining District r
funcau Recording Precinct, Terr! -
ory of Alaska, and described by [
he field notes and official plat on ],
ilo in this office as Mineral Survej j.
x'o. 1048 A. & B. Said group of
daims consists or the following lv.de )
uining claims and millsites towit* .(
Jack Pine. Ground Hog, Rambler, t
daplo, American Flag, Hemlock, c
tichland, Lakcma, (also known as ,.
.aclccma), Arimlldla, (also known as j f
Vrmildia, Armildo, Armllda, AnUMtlw
11a, Ami lde), Monitor, Queen, Uma- vj
ilia, Omega, Laekcma Fraction, and j
donitor Fraction lode claims and
Ille No. 2 and IIlie No. 3 Millsites.
Said claims by the said survey are
led to United States Location Moil- N
iment K'o. 3, which is situated in
.ntltude 5S? IS' north and Longitude s'
34? 25' 30" west, and consists of a '
vooden post in a mound of stones ?
ltuatcd on the east shore of Gas- f
ineau Channel, just above the road .
o the cemeteries and approximate- j!
y one-half mile northwesterly of '
he Post Office at .mnoau, Alaska. .
Said claims and millsites are more
ully described r.s to metes and
lounds as follows, to-wit:
Ailmildia Lode Claim
Beginning at corner No. 1 whence ?
J. S. Location Monument. No. 3 bears
I. 33? 38' 36" W. 5378.3 ft., thence
4. 21? 19' W. 1500 feet, to Corner 1
Co. 2. thence N. 70? 59' E. COO ft. .
o corner No. .3, thence S. 21? 15'
1. 1500 ft. to corner No. 4, thence
>. 70? 59' W. COO ft. to corner No.
, the place of beginning, contain- ti
ng an area of 20.573 acres. Mag- n
ictlc variation 33? 00' E. to 31? 30' n
2. d
American Flag Lode Claim ^
Beginning at corner No. 1, iden- V
ical with location corner and cor- 5
icr 4 Arimlldla Lode previously do- "
cribcd, whcnccU. S. location Mon- 1
iment No. 3 bears S. 37? 12' W. C
86C.7 ft., tbence N. 21? 19' W. 1500 8
t. to corner No. 2, Identical with R
ocation corner and corner No. 3 If
irimildin I.odo previously described, L
hcnce N. C3? 48' E. 242.00 ft. to 4!
orner No. 3, Identical, with loca
ion corner, thence N. 49? 58' E. 340 1'
t. to corner' No. 4, Identical with Cl
scatlon corner, thence S. 21? 19' E. n
438.9 ft. to corner No. 5. Identical ft'
dth location corner, thence S. 49?
8' W. 594.6 ft. to corner No. 1, tho
place of beginning, containing an area
of 18.771 acroB. Magnetic variation
33* 10' E. to 32" 10' E.
Richland Lode Claim
Beginning at corner No. 1, Identi
cal with location corner and cornor
No. 5 American King lode previous
ly described, whence U. S. Location
Monument No. 3 bears S. 38* 22' W.
0-147.0 feet, thence N. 21* 10' W.
1438.0 ft. to corner No. 2, identical
with location corner and corner No.
4 American Flag Lode previously
described, thence N. 40* 08' E. 474.1
ft. to corner No. 3, identical with
location corner, thence S. 47* 16' E.
232.7 ft. to corner No. 4, identical
with location corner, thence S. 21?
10' E. 1105.2 ft. to corner No. 5,
identical with location corner, thence
S. 40* 58' \V. 581.6 ft. to corner No.
1, the place of beginning, containing
an area of 17.011 acres. Magnetic
variation 33* 10' E. to 31* 30' E.
Umatilla Lode Claim
Beginning at corner No. 1, iden
tical with location corner, whence
U. S. Location Monument No. 3
bears S. 45* 30' W. 5377.6 ft., thence
N. 50* 10' W. 1124.0 ft. to corner
No. 2, Identical with location cor
ner and corner No. 1, Arimildia Lode
previously described, thence N. 70'
50' E. 600 ft., to corner No. 3, iden
tical with location corner and corner
No. 1, American Flag Lode, and
cornor No. 4, Ariroildla Lode, pre
viously described, thence S. 50? 10'
E. 1124.0 ft. to corner No. 4, Identical
with location corner, thence S. 70*
50' W. 600 ft., to corner No. 1, the
place of beginning, containing an
area of 13.230 acres. Magnetic var
iation 33* E. to 32* 10' E.
Maple Lode Claim
Beginning at corner No. 1, Iden
tical witn location comer and cor
ner No. 1, American Flag Lode, cor
ner No. 3, Umatilla I.ode and Cor
ner No. 4, Arimildia Lode, previous
ly described, whence U. S. Location
Monument No. 3 bears 3. 37* 12' W.
58CG.7 ft., theuco N. 49" 58' E. 594.G
ft. to corner No. 2, identical with
location corner and corner No. 1,
Richland Lode and corner No. 5,
American Flag Lode, previously de
scribed, thencj S. 50" l'J' E. 1124.9
ft. to corner No. 3, identical with
location corner, thence SJ. 49" 58' W.
594.fi ft. to corner No. 4, identical
with location corner and comer No.
I, Umatilla Lode previously describ
ed, thenco N. 50" 19' ' 1124.9 ft.
to corner No. 1, the placo of begin
ning, containing an area of 15.108 J
acres. Magnetic variation 33" 10' !
E. to 32' 10' E. ;
Jack Pine Lode Claim
Beginning at corner No. 1, identl- '
^al with location corner and corner 1
No. 1, Richland Lode and Corner J
No. 5, American Flag Lode and Cor.
Maplo Lode, previously described, !
whence U. S. Location Monument .
No. 3 bears S. 38? 22' W. C447.9 ft., !
ihence N. 49" 58' E. 681.G ft. to '
corner No. 2, identical with location ,
corner and corner No. 5 Richland
.ode previously described, thence S. J
i0? 19' E. 1124.9 ft, to corner No. t
1 Identical with location corner,
hence S. 49? 58' W. 581.6 ft. to
.?omer No. 4. identical with location
?omer and corner No. 3 Maple Lode '
irevlously described, thence N. 50" J
19' W. 1124.9 ft. to ccrner No. 1, j
:ho place of b. ginning, containing '
m area of V 778 acres. Magnetic 1
variation 33" 10' E. to 32" 00' E. <
Rambler Lode Claim
Beginning at corner No. 1, identical
vitli location comer and corner No.
!. Jack P ne Lode and corner No.
> Richland Lode previously described,
whence U- S. Location Monument
4o. 3 bears S. 39? 19' W. 7018.0 ft., <
hence N. 49? 58' E. 570.7 ft., to *
:orncr No. 2, identical with location
lorner, thence S. 49? 17' E. 1121.4 ft.
o corner No. 3, identical with loca- t
ion corner, thence S. 49? 5S' W. 1
150.1 ft. to corner No. 4, identical ?
vlth location corner and corner No. T
Jack Pine Lode pieviously de- '
cribed, thence N. 50" 19' W. 1124.9 (
t. to corner No. 1, place of begin- '
ilng, containing an area of 14.239 r
ores. Magnetic variation 32" 00' c
2. to 32" 10' E. j?
Omega Lode Claim ?
Beginning at corner No. 1, identi- j(
al with location corner and corner p
Co. 3, Itambler Lode previously de- ^
cribed, whence U. S. Location Monu- t
nent N'o. 3 bears S. 48" 33' W. c
G51.1 ft., thence X. 49" 58' E. 247.8 c
t. to corner No. 2, identical with ^
?cation corner, thence S. 57" ? IS' j
2. 1531.8 ft. to corner No. 3, identi- 5
al with location corner, thence S. ..
9? 58' \V. 211.0 ft. to corner No. a
, identical with location corner, i,
hence N. 65" 52' W. 294.0 ft., to
orner No. 5, identical with location
orner, thence N. 56" 54' W. 1252.1
eet to corner No. 1, the place of c
eginnlng, containing an area of
.362 acres. Magnetic variation 32* d
0' E. *
Hcmiock Lode Claim
Beginning at corner No. 1, identi- c
al with location corner and corner ?
?0. 4 Itambler Lode and corner No. ?*.
Jack Pine Lode previously de- *'
cribed, whence U. S. Location Mon- 9
ment No. 3 beare S. 48" 2C W. ^
101.5 ft., thence N. 49" 58' E. 550.1 11
t. to corner No. 2, identical with ^
?cation corner and corner No. 3. *
iamblcr Lode and corner No. 1, J
Imega Lode previously described, "
hence S. 50' 54' E. 1252.1 ft. to c
orner No. 3, identical with location 3
orner and corner No. 5 Omega Lode
reviously described, thence S. 49" c
8' \V. 51S.8 ft. to corner No. 4, c
lentical with location corner, thence a
L 58" 16' W, 1261.5 ft. to corner P
to. 1, place of beginning, containing M
4.701 acres. Magnetic variation 32" R
0' E. a
IT
Ground Hog Lode Claim
Beginning at corner No. 1, iden
ical with location corner and cor- 3
or No 4 Jac'c Pine Lodo and cor- ^
er No. 3 Maple Lode, previously g
escribed, whence U. S. Location E
ianument No. 3 bears S. 4S' 18' _
V. 6519.7 ft., thence N. 49" 58' E. '
81.6 ft. to corner No. 2, identical ^
dth location corner and Cor.
Hcmiock, Cor. 3 Jack Pine and tl
or. 4 Rambler Lodes previously de- ^
cribed, thence S. 58" 16' E. 1261.5 n
:. to corner No. 3, identical with a]
?cation corner and Cor. 4 Hemlock jj
ode previously described, thenco S. i<
9" 58' W. 499.8 ft. to corner No. y
, identical with location corner,
lenco N. 61* 43' W. 1289.4 ft. to g
orner No. 1, the placo of begin- \
ing, containing a., area of 14.872 k,
cres. Magnetic variation 32" 10' E.
Queen Lode Claim F
Beginning at corner No. 1, identi L
cal with locution corner and corner
No. 4 Umatilla I/Odo and corner No.
4 Maple Lode previously described,
whence U. S. Location Monument
No. 3 bears S. 48* 08' W. 5925.3 ft.,
thence N. 49* G8' E. 594.6 ft. to cor
nor No. 2, identical with location
corner and corner No. 3 Maple Lodo,
corner No. 4 Jtck Pino Lodo and
corner No. 1 Grot'.i.d Hog Lode pre
viously described, thence S. 61* 43'
E. 1289.4 ft. to corner No. 3, identi
cal with 1 nation corner and corner
No. 4 Ground Hog Lode, previously
described, tbencc S. 49* 58' W. 259.2
ft. to corner No. 4, identical with lo
cation corner, thence N. 74* 09' W.
1447.3 ft. to corner No. 1, the place of
beginning, containing an area of
11.743 acres. Magnetic variation 32*
10' E.
Lakema Lode Claim
Beginning at corner No. 1, iden
tical with location corner and cor
ner No. 4, Queen Lode previously
described, whence U. S. Location
Monument No. 3 bears S. 58* 29'
W. C809.3 ft., thence N. 49* 58' K.
1277.8 ft., to corner No. 2, Identical
with location corner and corner No.
3 Hemlock Looo and corner No. 5
Omega Lode previously described,
thence S. 65* 52' E. 294.0 ft. to cor
ner No. 3, identical with location
corner and corner No. 4 Omegr. Lodo
previously described, thence S. 49*
58' AV. 1277.8 ft. to corner No. 4
identical with location corner, thence
N. 65* 52' W. 294.0 ft. to corner
No. 1, the place of beginning, con
taining 7.762 acres in area. Mag
netic variation 32* 10' E.
Lackema Fraction Lode Claim
Beginning at corner Xo. 1, Identi
cal with location corner, whence U.
S. Location Monument Xo. 3 bears
S. 61* 33' W. C780.3 ft., thence X.
25? 28' W. 3C4.0 ft. to cornor Xo.
2 Identical with location corner and
corner Xo. 1 I.akema Lode and cor
ner Xo. -I Queen Lode previously de
scribed, thence N. 57? 59' E.. 1436.5
ft. to corner No. 3, Identical with
location corner, thence S. 25? 28'
E. 6G.C ft. to corner Xo. 4, identical
with location corner and corner Xo.
3 Lakema Lode and corner Xo. 4
Omega Lode, previously described,
thence S. 4G? 37' W. 1500.0 ft, to
corner Xo. 1 the place of beginning,
containing an area of 6.940 acres.
Magnetic variation 32? 10' E.
Monitor Lode Claim
Beginning at corner Xo. 1, Identi
cal with location corner, whence U.
3. Location Monument Xo. 3 bears
3. 62? 48' W. 5712.0 ft., thence N.
26* 26' W. 1500 ft. to corner Xo.
2, Identical with location corner and
corner Xo. 4, Umatilla Lode and
corner Xo. 4 Maple Lode, and cor
icr Xo. 1 Q. cen Lode previously
lescribed, thenco S. 74? 09' E. 765.5
rt. to corner Xo. 3, identical with
ocatlon corner, thence S. 26? 26' E.
1500 ft. to corner No. 4. Identical
,vith location corner, thapce N. 74?
19' W. 765.5 ft, to corner Xo. 1, the
Mace of beginning, containing an
irea of 19.502 acres. Magnetic var
ation 32? lu E.
Monitor Fraction Lode Claim
Beginning at corner No. 1, whence
J. S. Location Monument No. 3
icars S. 68' 3S' W. 5915.5 ft., thence
12? 10' W. 363.2 ft. to corner
S'o. 2, identical with location cOf
icr, thence S. 74? 09' E. 400 ft. to
corner Xo. 3, Identical with location
corner and corner Xo. 4 Monitor
.ode previously described, thence 3.
12* 10' E. 365.2 ft. to corner Xo.
I, identical with location corner,
hence X. 74? 09' W. 400 ft. to cor
ler No. 1, the place of beginning,
:ontaining an area of 2.960 acres.
Magnetic variation 32? 10' E.
Hlie No. 2 Millsite
Beginning at corner Xo. 1, iden
ical with cor. Xo. 10, S. A. H. Sur
084, Cor. Xo. 2 Sur. 158 and Cor.
Co. 3 Sur. 159, Last Chance Placer,
vhence U. S. Location Monument
Co. 3 bears S. 72? 20' W. 3732.8
t., thence North 414.9 ft. to corner
Co. 2, thence East 481.8 ft. to cor
icr No. 3, identical with location
orner, thence South 338 ft. to cor
icr No. 4, Identical with location
orner, thence S. 61? 04' W. 94.3
t. to corner No. 5, identical with
ocation corner, and Cor. 12 3. A.
I. Sur. 1084, Cor. 2 Sur. 158 and
Jor 3 Sur. 157 Last Chance Placer,
hence S. 67? 04' W. 211.9 ft. to
orner No. 6. identical with location
orner and cor. 11 S. A. H. Sur. 1084,
,'or. 2. Sur. 157 and Cor. 3 Sur. 158
-ast Chance Placer, thenco N. 75?
4' W. 210.5 ft. to corner No. 1. the
lace of beginning, containing an
rea of 4.352 acres. Margnetic var
itlon 32? 10' E.
Hile No 3 Millsitc
Beginning at corner .Jo. 1 Idcntl
al with location corner and corner
lo. 1 Hlle No. 2 Mlllslte previously
escribed, whence U. S. Location
lonument No. 3 bears S. 73* 00'
V. C215.9 ft., thence N. 338 ft. to
orner No. 2, Identical with location
orner and corner \o. 3 Hlle No. 2
llllslte previously described, thence
last 523.7 ft. to corner No. 3, ldentl
al with location corner, thence
outh 475.2 ft. to corner No. 4 iden
leal with location corn ,r and Co
fo. 2 Sur. 153 and Cor. No. 3 Sur.
54 Last Chance Placer, thence N.
8? 56' W. 206.2 f:. to corner No. 5,
Itntlcal with location corner and
orner No. 2 Sur. 154 and Cor. No.
Sur. 155 Last Chance Placer,
ience N. 52" 26' W. 262.7 ft. to
orner No. 6. identical with location
orner and corner No. 2 Sur. 15.?
nd Cor. No. 3 Sur. 156 Last Chance
laccr, thence S. 61? 04' W. 129.2
t. to corner No. 1, the place of be
inning, containing an area of 4.611
cres. Magnetic variation 32" 16
Adjoining Claims
The adjoining claims are the Dora
rd and St. Paul Lodes Sur. 545 on
lie Northeast of the Omega, the
tone Cabin, Ston<# Cabin No. 2 and
lureka Lodes, unsurveyed, Wm. Eb
er, reputed owner, on the South
ast of the Lackema Fraction; the
fo.'s 1, 2, and 1 Mammoth Lodes,
has. Goldstein, ct al, owners, on
to Northwest of the Richland,
merican Flag and Arimildia Lodes,
jspcctively; Survey No.'s 156, 157
nd 15S Last Chance Placer on
le South and S. A. H. Sur.
)84 on the West of the Hlle No. 2
[illslte; and Survey No.'s 154, 155,
ml 156 Last Chance Placer on the
outh of the Hilo No. 3 Mlllslte.
ny other adjoining claims are un
sown. C. B. WALKER,
Register,
irst publication, Dec. 28, 1916.
ast publication, Feb. 26, 1917. ,
GROCERIES
?AT?
MODERATE PRICES
Cj You can save money by ordering in quantities. We
make special prices when you order by the case.
Bring us your order and let us figure on it.
^======================= I
SPECIAL FOR A FEW DAYS
Naval Oranges, 20c a dozen ? Canned Peaches, reg
ular price 30c, special price 25c
EL J. Raymond S Go.
Open Evenings Until 10 o'Clock Phone 28
w- '
I Second Iflancl Materia! I
? : *
A
| Pulleys, ) ater Wheel Equipment t
| Small Blowers, Etc. i
I !NQUIRIES?SOLICITED I
0, ?
I Alaska-Gastineau Mining Co. |
? ALASKA MEAT COMPANY '?'? "???'" ?
WHOLESALE AND RETAII. BUTCHERS
X Manufacturers of all kinds of Sausages. Our Earns and ?
X Bacon are Home-Smoked. I
Rate* Reasonable Third ana Han-la Street. Juneau
iheBERGMANN
Newly built and newly furnished, mod?;rn In all respects, ste-m
heated, electric lighted, hot and cold water In every room; bath on
every floor, Including a shower bath. Sanitary conditions perfect.
Dining Room In connection.
TO those desiring to install new
bathrooms of the latest sanitary
type, we recommend Standard"
built-in baths and pedestal lavatories.
Let us {live you complete plans ana
estimate calling for these fixtures installed -
with lirst grade work?it means a per- .
manently satisfactory equipment.
G. K. GILBERT
114 Second St., Phone 353
"S*.ar:dii\r "Cirlulc" Hub
fUSTONlPS OP THIS
BANK
ih OBTAIN M
?MK
V:
PERFECT
/?prj jlWIw:
I BUKWARK of strength lies |
| in a strong directorate. While |
| this bank is one of the most pro- |
E gressive financial institutions in this portion of the |
= territory, yet it has always been managed in the |
E most conservative and prudent way. Safety is E
E made a matter of first consideration and its treat- E
| ment of its depositors is always based on friendly E
| business relations and sound banking principles. f
I First National Bank I
1 OF JUNEAU. |
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