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The Alaska daily empire. (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, October 25, 1918, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1918-10-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
“ALL THE NEWS ALL THE TIME”
VOL. XII, NO. 1349.
JUNEAU, ALASKA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1918.
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESS
PRICE TEN CENTS
WILSON SUGGESTS THAT ALLIES
NAME CONDITIONS FOR ARMISTICE
DISASTROUS RETREAT OF GERMANS ACROSS THE OISE
may LCmPOK JFHgHEU.S.il.gY H.yqTERg.X^-.CO
“One can hardly imagine the disorganization which is atteudlL„ the enemy’s retreat,” writes a corre
spondent “Infantry units without means of communication, artillery teams and convoys, arc a,Il fleeing under
the fire of our shells. The disorderly stream is being dammed up with burses, transport, gtfas and lorries,
imeng which our airplanes are dropping tons of bombs. The crossing of tie Oise by the enemy furnished him
srlth a passage of retreat, hut the barrier of the river has now ceased to exist.*
AMERICAN AIRPLANES DEFEAT
GERMAN COLUMNS; CONFOUND
ENEMY; BRITISHREACHING ALL
OBJECTIVES; ALLIES WINNING
WITH THE AMERICANS NORTHWEST OF VERDUN, Oct, 25.—,
The American bombing planes and aerial gunners are playing havoc |
with the enemy troop movements in front of the American lines.
They bombed the enemy troops that concentrated in the region of:
Remonville, where many were killed.
Lieut. Rickenbacfcer, the American ace. downed a Ilun before break
fast yesterday morning.
AMERICAN AVIATORS ASTONISH WORLD
PARIS, Oct. 25.—The great number of American airplanes that are
constantly in service day and night on the American front North of
Verdun, with the Americans and French West of here, and with the
Americans and British in the Le Cateau region is confounding to the
enemy and astonishing to the Allied world. There are literally thousands
of them in service.
CAPTURE 6,000 PRISONERS; GAIN EVERYWHERE
WITH THE ALLIED ARMIES, Oct. 25.—The British have captured
6,0|jj| prisoners and many guns in the operations in the neighborhood oi
Valenciennes. There was heavy figming last night.
The British crossed the Eeaillon river and captured the villages of
Neuville ‘and Saleschei and Neaudlglnes.
They repulsed a heavy German counter attack.
The British yesterday morning resumed the attack between Sambre
at Oise and the Oise Canal and shelled the Germans.
BRITISH SURROUND VALENCIENNES
PATELESS, (Summary of Associated Press), Evening)—The British
smashed the outer defenses, strategically important German lines. South
of Valenciennes, and continue to hammer their way to Mubeque.
The Germans have cut the Scheldt Canal, turning the country into
lakes around Valenciennes.
The Allies are endeavoring to avoid shelling Valenciennes and other
French and Belgian cities, and to capture them by flanking movements.
The French are gaining rapidly at many places on their long front
between Le Cateau and the Champagne.
BELGIAN CAPITAL AT BRUGES
HAVRE, Oct. 25.— The Belgian Government has re-established its
administration departments and has made Bruges the headquarters for
the officials.
BRITISH HAVE
VALENCIENNES
AT THEIR MERCY
LONDON, Oct. 25.—The British
have virtually reached the whole
canal bank Northeast of Valencien
nes. They have the city surround
ed.
The back of the German resistance
has been broken.
The enemy opened the sluice gates
Northeast of the city and flooded
vast stretches of country in an ef
fort to delay the advance of the Brit
ish.
(Continued on Page Two)
AMERICANS ARE
PENETRATING
HUN POSITIONS
WITH THE AMERICANS, Oct. 25.
—The American patrols early yes
terday morning penetrated deeply in
to the German lines in the region
of Grand Pre.
North of Verdun the enemy are
using machine guns and artillery
freely along the entire front.
The fighting is severe, the Ameri
cans overcoming stubborn resistance.
KING AND QUEEN AT BRUGES
DUNKIRK, Oct. 25.—King Albert
(Continued on Page Two)
GSSX&tl-S’ HSTKKjmNC j
v<*ro se: OI3E
CREEL DECLARES
HUN PRACTICES
ARE TUlMAN
Says There Is Proof That
the Germans Crucified
and American Ser
geant Overseas.
LONDON. Oct. 25.—Ceorge Creel
yesterday denied the charges made
by Senator Miles Poindexter of Wash
ington that the Committee on Public
Information is making an effort to
create the impression that the Ger
mans have abandoned the practice
of cruelty towards prisoners and
civilians in occupied territory.
Creel declared that Gen. Pershing
discredited the story printed in St.
Louis newspapers in which a ser
geant with the American Army said
the Germans fed poisoned candy to
children, and gave them explosive
grenades with which tp play.
Referring to* Poindexter’s charges
stating that Sergeant A. Cole, of
Ohio, was crucified by Germans,
Creel said Cole was a member of
the Canadian Expeditionary Forces
and was crucified July 15, 191(1.
MARINE ENGINEER DIES
SEATTLE, Oct. 25. George La
inont, a veteran marine engineer,
formerly with the Alaska Steamship
Company, (lied.
THE JfiMPI RE’S classifieds pay.
SECRETARY BAKER ANSWERS WICK’S
“SLACKER'’ CHARGE AGAINST SULZER
Secretary of War Baker has answered Judge
Wickersham’s critcism of Delegate Sulzer for not
joining the Army. The Associated Press service to
Alaskan papers, received by wireless last night, con
tains the following telegram:
NEW YORK, Oct. 23.—Secretary of War New
ton D. Baker believes that Members of Congress can
best serve the country by remaining in office. He
asserts that no more Congressmen will be al
lowed to join the Army.
Secretary Baker s answer could not have met the
situation in Alaska more exactly if he had been in
formed of Wickersham s slanderous assertion that
Delegate Sulzer is a “slacker" because he had not
joined the Army.
SULZER COMING
TO JUNEAU ON
NORTHWESTERN
Delegate Due to Arrive Here
Tonight or Tomorrow;
To Be in First Until
Election Day.
PLEASED WITH THIRD
Mr. Sulzer Has Completed
Canvass of Third; Likes
Outlook; Assured of
Gratifying Support.
Delegate Charles A. Sulzer will ar
rive in Juneau on the Northwestern
due here sometime tonight or tomor
row morning. He sailed on the
Northwestern from Cordova Wednes
day. having completed his campaign
in the Third Division. He will de
vote the remainder of the time before
election, and hia plans will be formed
after ho reaches this place.
Word from Cordova is that the
Delegate to Congress is well pleased
with the results of his campaign in
the Third Division, and with the news
he received from the Second and
Fourth Divisions.
In the Third Division Delegate
Sulzer made a dozen speeches and
met most of the voters In person at
the centers along the coast and
throughout- the * Cook inlet country
Everywhere he received gratifying
assurances of support.
WOMEN ALLOWED
TO TAKE SEAT IN
THE PARLIAMENT
LONDON, Oct. 25.—The House of
Commons has passed a resolution
favoring women sitting in Parlia
meat. This is considered a great
victory by the suffrage party and
is said by them to mark the break
ing up of -old-time prejudices against
women taking part in public affairs
FABRICATED STEEL
VESSELS TURNED OUT
IN RECORD TIME
WASHINGTON, Oct. 25. — The
Marine Boat Corporation of New
York has completed the Agawan, f
5,500\ ton fabricated steel vessel, in
three hundred days. The company
has contracted for 350 more vessels
and it expects to deliver two or three
boats weekly.
SWIMMING CHAMPION
DIES FROM INFLUENZA
AT TRAINING STATION
NEW YORK, Oct. 25. — Harry
Elionsky, long distance swimming
champion of America, died at the
Pelham Hay Naval station of in
fluenza.
He swam a distance of nine miles
without resting.
PRESIDENT WANTS ALLIES TO PASS ON
PROPOSED PEACE TERMS, AND IF AGRRED
TO ASK MILITARY ADVISERS TO DETERMINE
SATISFACTORY TERMS FOR AN ARMISTICE
6WA5HINGT0N, Oct. 25.—President Wilson has informed Germany that he lias transmitted its corres
pondence seeking' 'an armistice and peace to the Al'ud nations, suggesting that if they feel disposed to
grant peace upon the terms indicated, their military advisers and those of the United States would be
asked to submit the necessary terms of an armisticj, such as would fully protect the interests of the
peoples involved. ,, , , , . ., . „
The President says the acceptance of such terms, if offered, would be the best evidence of Ger
many's acceptance of the terms and principles for peace.
The President also said that he doesn’t concede that the principles of a government responsible
to the German people has been fully or permanently worked out, and that the United States does not and
cannot trust the word of those hitherto masters of the German policy.
He gives warning that if the United States must deal with the military masters and a monarchical
autocracy in Germany, the United States must demand now or later, not peace negotiations, but sur
render.
REUTERS SAYS ALL READY TO CONSIDER ARMISTICE.
LONDON. Oct. 25.—Reuters Limited says that as the result of all the recent communications pawing
between the United States and the Central Powers ani transmitted to the Allied nations by the United
States, agreed terms have been reached upon which it is possible to consider an armistice.
Reuters says the naval question, which has never been mentioned between the United Mates ana
Germany in any of the recent peace notes, is of the first importance for being consi ere as a pa ^
the program for an armistice. _____ -
GERMANS WONT
FIGHT FOR THE
KAISER LONGER
•-* ' I
Papers Say if He Must Go
Let Him Go Now; Dem
ocratization of German
States Spreading.
PARIS, Oct. 25.—The Kaiser con
ferred Monday with all of the mem
bers of the government.
The Neuremberg Frankekesche and
the Tagesblad Post, Socialist, say,
the Emperor must not think the
Germans are going to continue fight
ing for several months just to please1
him.
One article says, "If the Kaiser
•nust go, let him go now.”
It is said the Germans are to be
urged by the government to carry
on a defensive warfare to the utmost,
as soon as the reply of President
Wilson is received.
DEMOCRATIZATION SPREADINC
COPENHAGEN, Oct. 25.—A Berlin
dispatch received here says the dem
ocratization of Germany is. spread
ng through the field states.
The opinion here is that Europe is
-.onvinced that Germany must accept
surrender.
ALL MAY VOTE SOON
BADEN, Oct. 25.—The Government,
is considering the abolition of the
three class franchise system, and
making one class to include manhood
suffrage.
SOCIALISTS MAY ENTER
COUNCIL
DRESDEN, Oct. 25.—The German
Crown Council is considering allow
ing Socialists to join the Government
and participate In the Crown Council.
TRAITOR. THEN; TO BE FREE
NOW
LONDON, Oct. 25. —A dispatch
'rom Copenhagen says Dr. Karl Lieb
<necht, former member of the Ger
man Reichstag, who was convicted
snd imprisoned on a charge of at
tempted treason, at the beginning of
he war, will be released soon.
BATTING THE HUNS
GREAT LAKES. III. Oct. 23.
Two of the mo»t highly prized pro
notions announced at the Great
Lakes Naval Training station have
gone to major league hall players,
lohn Paul Jones of the New York
Giants and one of the pitchers for
‘he Great Lakes team this year, and
Verne Clemons, of the St. Louis
Ymerlcans. also a navy player, have
received their third stripe and now
are first class gunner’s mates. The
rating Is one of the most difficult
to attain In the Navy. The big
leaguers are now ready for sea duty.
BRITISHERS SAY
GERMANY CAN’T
HAVE COLONIES
_
Balfour Announces That |
Under No Circumstances
Can German Colonies
Be Returned to Her.
LONDON, Oct. 25.—Secretary of
Foreign Affairs Balfour, speaking to
day, declared In no circumstances is
it consistent with the safety and
unity of the British Empire to allow
the return of the German colonies
to Germany.
ENGLAND CONSIDERS REPORTS
LONDON, Oct. 25.—The British
Cabinet met yesterday, presumably
to discuss President Wilson’s reply
to Germany.
AMERICAN REPLY SENT
BROADCAST
WASHINGTON, Oct. 25.—Presi
dent Wilson’s reply to Germany was
sent broadcast from the Arlington
Naval radio towers, after the official
text was placed on the cable.
If it was not picked up directly
by the great German station at
Nauenit, it was undoubtedly relayed
from other points and must have
reached Berlin yesterday morning.
2,000,000 AMERICANS OVER ’
THERE
WASHINGTON, Oct. 25.—At the
same time that the reply of Presi
dent Wilson to Germany was made
public, the White House announced
that over 2,000,000 American fight
ing men had been sent overseas to
fight in France.
STEAMER MOVEMENTS
and
Mail Information
NOW BOUND NORTH
Spokane 'is due to arrive here
tomorrow niKht.
SCHEDULED SAILINGS
Jefferaon Is scheduled to leave
Seattle tomorrow.
City of Seattle will loavo Se
attle October 29th.
Admiral Farragut, the first ves
sel to leave Juneau for the
Wesward, will leave Seattle
November 8th., and is due to
arrive here November 12th
SOUTHBOUND SAILINGS
Northwestern loft Cordova Wed
nesday. Not reported, but is
due here any time.
Spokane will sail Southbound
on Monday.
HUNGARY AND
AUSTRIA READY
f TC SURRENDER
Though Humiliatinig, Both
Countries Admit They
Are Powerless to Re
sist; Must Quit.
PARIS, Oct. 25.—Reports from*
Budapest say that the Hungarians
intend to apply directly to the En
tente Powers to find terms on which
they Can be granted an armistice.
The report says Austria and Hun
gary are both reconciled to the Idea
of surrender.
Vienna advices say that Vienna is
now threatened with a famine as
the laws regulating food are no
longer enforced.
humiliating but inevitable
BASEL, Oct. 25.—President Wil
son’s reply to Austria is said to have
had an overwhelming effect in Vien
na and Budap it.
A panic was caused In financial
circles.
The note is considered extremely
humiliating for Austria and Hun
gary, but both countries believe they
are powerless to resist, and must ac
cept whatever terms the Allies pro
pose.
UKRAINE REVOLTS
LONDON, Oct. 25.—Reports have
reached here that the Ukrainian min
istry, fathered by Germany by virtue
of the Brest-Litovsk negotiations,
from which German "peace” was
forced on the Ukraines, has resigned
in a body.
Recently there have been many
open revolts against Germans in
charge of Russian affairs, and the
sentiment has been growing.
PROHIBITION IN
STATE OF TEXAS IS
UNCONSTITUTIONAL
AUSTIN, Oct. 25.—The Court of
Criminal Appeals has declared the
Texas State-wide prohibition law un
constitutional. The saino law with
a ten-mile limit for soldiers and
Army camps prevents the sale of li
quor in the larger cities.
RULES LESS STRICT NOW.
CAMP LEWIS, Tacoma, Wash., Oct.
23—"Throwing a soldier into the
guard house" for slight infractions
of discipline is discountenanced at
Camp Lewis and courts martial are
under the ban also except for severe
cases. To bring this to the atten
tion of young officers a memorandum
prepared by the Judge advocate’s of
fice recently was published here.

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