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The Alaska daily empire. (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, October 26, 1918, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1918-10-26/ed-1/seq-3/

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FULLER BUNK
Maybe He Can Lea^ Something from His Efforts.
MYER MARCUS
_ . * V' \
1 N I? ??? <1|M? n??nii -.,
teg
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PALACE THEATRE
SUNDAY AND MONDAY
A BEATIFUL WOMAN WEARING BEAUTIFUL GOWNS
A remarkable display of beauty in a photoplay that thrills with
love and intrigue, that abounds in rich setting and
exquisite scenes in Washington, D. C.
William Fox Presents
VIRGINIA PEARSON in
"STOLEN HONOR"
A society draina of love and intrigue
FATIIE NEWS ? AND BIG V COMEDY
"Guffs and Gunplays"
Saturday Night and Sunday Matinee
"THE OTHER MAN"
Featuring HARRY MOREY and GRACE DARMOND and
FLORENCE DESIION
Comedy?HAROLD LLOYD in "HEY THERE"
Comic Cartoon?"THREE STRIKES. YOU'RE OUT"
* '
THEATRE ATTRACTIONS
General News of Local Theatres, Scfeen Stars
and Features
?* ??? w
I
Attractions Tonight
i I
-M
COLISEUM ? "Intolerance," the
great $2,000,000 feature.
PALACE?Harry Morey in ''The
Other Man."
t?? r
Attractions Tomorrow
?
Fl ?
PALACE?Virginia Pearson in a
Fox production.
COLISEUM?Wallace Reid in "The
Squaw Man's Son."
LAST TIME TONIGHT
TO SEE "INTOLERANCE,"
AT THE COLISEUM.
Tonight will be the last chance to
tee "Intolerance," the $2,000,000
production, at the Coliseum. *
Constance Talinadge, the unusual
ly attractive young woman who
portrays the Mountain Girl of Sus
iana in I). W. Griffith's spectacle,
"Intolerance," accomplished what
was considered impossible when
she learned to drive a two-horse
chariot in the incredibly short pe
? riod of two months. Miss Tal
inadge's characterization of the
.Mountain Girl is generally.conceded
[ to be one of the pronounced hits of
iMr. Griffith's mammoth production.
That it was necessary for her to
drive a chariot at break-neck speed
in advance of the hords of Cyrus,
in the vain but heroic attempt to
save the man she loves, Hclshazzar,
and the wonderful city of Habylon
from destruction at the hands of the
Persians, rendered it most essen-|
tial that she master the charioteer's
art.
Miss Talmadge, who is a veritable
daredevil, as well as an all around
athlete, a powerful swimmer and an
accomplished horse-woman, declared
she would prove a proficient char
ioteer within two months. Two
professional charioteers were im
mediately engaged and Miss Tal
madge went at her task with great
enthusiasm, practicing at every
available moment with the unheard
of result that at the cud of her
self-appointed time, she was driving
a two-horse chariot with the same
daring skill and speed of the pro
fessional charioteers. When it is
considered that it requires years of
experience and application for some
of the most experienced horsemen
to learn to drive a chariot, it will
he realized - that Miss Tnlinadge's
feat is nothing short of marvelous.
"THE OTHER MAN"
WILL BE SEEN
AT PALACE THEATRE.
The attraction at the Palace to
night and tomorrow inatince is the
story of a great love found at the
end of "a trill of sorrow," entitled
"The Other Man."
The world suddenly went dark
for I)r. John Stcdmnn when his friv
olous butterfly wife took the step
that forever destroyed Ills confidence
in her. And from a fntnous sur
geon, wealthy, with liveried ser
vants at his command, he beeamn, in
a surprisingly short spare of time,
a penniless outcast, laughed at even
In the slums of a great city. For
the trip down the toboggan was
made rapid by drink and despair.
It had token him year^ to reach the
dignified position of Dr. John Sted
mnn. It took him but a few' few
weeks to hit the lowest level of so
ciety as "Martin West."
And then, treading the shadowy
path of sorrow and humiliation.
"Martin West" came out Into the
highway Illuminated by the radiant
glow of a pure, unselfish love. To
tell this strange story of adventure
that befell "Martin West" would be
to spoil It?to dull Its powerful nnd
unexpected climax. Hut every hu
man emotlori finds full play In the
unraveling of this far from-ordlnary
photoplay. ? y
"I'M NOT SUPERSTIT10U8"
SAYS VIRGINIA PEARSON.
Miss Virginia Pearson, wi.o Is
starring In William Fox's photoplay
"Stolen Honor," to bo seen at the
Palace Sunday evening, is not sup
erstitious. Oli, dear. no. l?ut ?
Miss Pearson lias two old broocli
cs. One of them has been in her
family thice hundred years. The
other was presented to her by Bert
Heiss, the well-known psychologist,
and it dates back two hundred
years, being the product of an Ital
ian carver.
Now Miss Pearson never acts be
fore the camera unless she is wear
inn these brooches.
V'l am not superstitious." re
marked Miss Pearson during the
making of the "Stolen Honor, "but
strangely enough 1 feel inspired
when I wear the brooches and when
I do not wear litem 1 feel dull and
not at my best.
"1 have often forgotten them en
tirely and appeared for* a seen".
When 1 found I could not do the
scenes as I knew they should he
done. 1 would stop and think. My j
brooches. I'd send for them and
go on with my work with an en- |
tirely different feeling.
"1 believe there are thought j
forces connected with those brooch- j
es. They have in them the directing j
forces that are guided by past i
generations in whose possession,
these brooches were."
ii manors nni 10 .miss t'carson
that she 1??? in good clothes or bad.!
in rags or riches, she keeps these
brooches about her person. Kvi-J
dently she has never lost them ilnr-j
ing the making of a picture be-1
cause?well ilo you remember her
photoplays? All excellent. All sat
isfying. All entertaining.
"Stolen lienor" is .Miss Pearson's
thirteenth picture. If there be any
hoodoo in that number, the crooeh- '
es certainly killed the hoodoo. It's
her best picture.
* i
"TH? SQUAW MAN"
AT THE COLISEUM ,
EOR SUNDAY. i
"Where the Sennett Girlies
RIoom," a comedy, and the play
entitled "Thet Squaw Man's Son,"
will be seen at the Coliseum Sun
day.
Anita King, who in support of
Wallace Reid in "The Squaw Man's
Son" has the distinction of being
the only person in the great film
colony of I>os Angeles who is an of
ficial of that city, having the po
sition of City Mother, in charge of
the hundreds of film aspirants who'
seek success in the west. P.y a I
strange coincidence Miss King plays
the Indian girl in "The Squaw
Man's Son," a character practically L
the same as one v.hich marked her,
first appearance in Lasky produc
tions, in the original photodrama of
"The Squaw .Man."
Hot Apple Pie?homemade, served
at the Luncheonette.
VIRGINIA PB!AHi36N
jPIRJSCLT.XCN YStliOaAM. ?OX
WHAT THE RECORD SHOWS
ABOUT DELEGATE
SULZER
'?Suppose Sulzer had been
Delegate when the Democrat
ic Alexander bill was intro
duced, instead of Wickersham,
what would he the result?
It is possible Mr. Sulzer, who
is a "harmony" candidate
would have fought the admin
istration bill? Hardly."?Ju
neau Dispatch. October 17,
1910.
The Dispatch put a problem
?efore the people of Alaska,
thinking that situation never
would arise. Mr. Sulzer was
elected Delegate from Alaska,
took his seat and was looking
after the interests of the Ter
ritory when the Alexander
Fisheries bill came up. What
was the result? Did Mr. Sul
zer fight it? He did. not with
bluster or an '"extension in
the Record speech," but by
going to Congressman Alex
ander. showing him that the
people of Alaska were op
posed to It and that it was
not to the best interests of
the country. The result of
these arguments by Mr. Sul
zer was that Mr. Alexander
virtually withdrew his bill and
gave way for the bill intro
duced by the Delegnte from
Alaska.
That's the answer to the
Dispatch question.
? ? ? ?
SOLDIERS 8WEET TOOTH
EI, PASO. Tex.. Oct. 26.?Tho
American soldier has n sweet tooth,
tho local depot quartermaster Is now
advertising for 1.225.000 pounds for
tho troops on tho border In tho EI
Paso district. Chocolates are the fa
vorite and 612.000 pounds are wanted.
Lemon drops are next In popularity
arid tho (lovernmont Is asking for
521.000 pounds of those, whllo stick
candy, mixed candy and gum drops
arc also wanted In large quantities.
Give m jour next order for trati*
fer work or coal. Juneao Transfer
Company. Phone 4&.
?
You can keep your
FUEL BILL
at a low figure by using
only our high grade
coals.
Ladysmtih
Nanaimo
PACIFIC COAST COAL
COMPANY
PHOV* 418
"shoesT
HIGH TOP SHOES
For boys, misses and ladies
for the Fall and Winter season.
HUGO HEIDORN
Cor. Mala and Second Srree ts
-
llrcs.ms SUNDAY AND MONDAY - WALLACE REID and ANITA KING in
^The Squaw Man's Son"
A great picture blending strangely the twang and snap of the American West and the pomp and ceremony
.. of the halls of "Old Eneland."
A Mack Sennett^^^^^^-*
Comedy in two
Friend Husband
Starring Charles Murray and
Mary Thurman and the "Ted
dy E;?." Scenes are laid in
the garden where the Sennett
Girlies bloom. A Weekly will
open up this program.
I Last Chance Tonight
The $2,000,000 Production
One Performance at 8:15
>###??m ?i ? ?? ?
- >
Gastineau Gossip
(An Intercepted Letter)
Dear Mary.
Juiictu Is *n the throes ~f a bliz
zartl. It has hern snowing ?n?l blow
ing since tlie first of the week be*
:his morning (Friday) the first Taku
of the year started in?an<l how b
has been i .ging ever sii.ee.
I
Thursday nwmi'ng the rrincess S >
phia hail a sudden inspirutk n and
tried to hurdle YandcrblR ref, get
two-thirds across, liked tiie location,
and decided to stay awhile.
* * *
There has been no boat from the
South for a month of Sundays,
hence no one has any mail and as
nothing has happened here there is
very little to tell you.
* * *
This fa what, one of the last Post
Intelligencers said about Mrs. Ma
hone: f
"Mrs. P. J. Mahone, former '-hair
man of the Red Cross "Chap'er at
luneau. Alaska, has come to cieatttle
to reside while her husband is a ?vay
in service. Mrs. Mahone will con
tinue her Red Cross work as nn as
sistant in the bureau of nur ?"g.
White building. Mrs. Mahone has
lone splendid work in Alaska, She
brings word of the intense patriot
"sin of Alaska people, as weli as the
Natives. The Indians have done
some exceptional knitting for the
Red Cross, she says."
? # ?
Practically tho only entertainments
n Juneau this week have h< ?? i two
splendid movies. "The Kai ? .v the
Beast of Berlin." at th?? Pahice, and
?Intolerance" at the Collbcum* At
the "Beast of Berlin," o^e night
Mime one unintentionally applauded
'he German soldiers when they were
shown marching through Belgium
I never heard such hissing. What
wouldn't have happened if he had
lone it unintentionally."
* * *
It will have to he a pretty small
germ that can sneak into Juneau tc
ipread Spanish influenza. The town
is so carefully guarded that it make*
one fcol that no epidemic will start
here. However, it is being guarded
against, and when it does arrive, ^
it possibly will, Juneau will he pre
pared for it. Governor Itit.gs and
Dr. Sloano arc doing everything they
can to prevent its arrival, though.
* * *
Young America is happy. None of
tho crossings are safe now for the
pedestrian. Every boy and girl in
town has a Bled out on one of the
hills.
* * ?
Tho Juneau Chapter of the Red
Cross had Its actual meeting this
wcok and reelected the executive
committee. Tho heport made by
Mrs. Willis, chairman of tho Chap
ter production, was splendid. The
Juneau Chapter has mad" 77,000 arti
cles during the last year, hut In
cludes everything from moss puis,
T-bnndngcs. and hospital rlhrts to
Chi 1st mas boxes and refugee dress
es. Mr. Sh.iftuek reported that the
total collections of tho Chnpter dur
ing tho last year have been $41.
035,27.
* ? *
That reminds me. Alaska nib
scribed more than 'wo and n fourth
times her quota to tho Fourth Lib
erty Jxian.
And, I guess that that Is ntl.
HOT FOUNTAIN tmiNKS?Cake,
pie, candwlches and co/Toe; after
theatre specials served at tho Ltin*
cheonette.
? ? +
'Phone It to The Empire, No. 374,
AN EXHIBIT OF
NATIVES FROM
ALASKA THERE
!Description of Display Con
tained in Indian Collec
tion at University of
Washington.
SJ'ATTl.E. Wash., Oct. 26.?Camb
I hng sticks, r-iunJvd, smooth and num
| bored in neat little figures, sha
j man's ceremonial rattlers, carved In
giotesque figures and painted gaudily
I m red i.nd yellow are among the
jlnlinket Indian collection in the Uni
versity of \\ "tshington Museum. This
Ohibi' h.ts hoc it Impiuvtrd steadily
si.ice its installation a few years ajjo
I and now it is said to bo unsur
passed.
The collection shows the notable
use made by the Thlinkets of totem
ic characters in decoration of their
horn gravo posts and even of the
clothing and tools. Instances are
mastodon ivory clubs used for killing
salmon after the fish had been
caught on bone hooks. The finely
J colored club heads have been carved
to represent the bear, whale, shark
and heaven, all tmneic symbols.
It was the Thlinket, the Haida and
Tsinshian tribes of Southern Alaska
who originated the use of animals
for designs in decoration, it Is said,
and from the use of animals has
come the use of symbols, and finally
mo Huauiauun 01 me animal rigures
to tho .- pace to be filled. The stylo
of th. Indian decorators in all in
stances shows a nice sense of bal
*nce. The lines are never regular,
the surves are "crowded" in a pe
culiarly forced manner.
1 To tfco carved figures color usu
?li; Is added. Several totem poles
i!> the ? olleetlon are gay and bright
figures, and the totemlc designs^ ap
(?lied to blankets, hats, treasure box
es and ceremonial robes are colored
in brilliant tones. The minerals used
for the colors are ground up in small
stone dishes, mixed with water and
salmon spawn and applied with
small wooden paddles. Stiff brushes
of porcupine quill also are used. %
Basket wo'', of the Thlinket In
dians is remarkably firm and pliant,
l ev of tho weaves aro thought un
worthy of decoration, and nearly all
the buff and brown basketR have
ornaments of geometrical design. To
temlc figures used to decorate tho
conic. 1 hats aro varied cleverly to
suit the shapes of the headgear.
? ? ?
TO ORGANIZE LATINS
. BLKNOF AIKKS, Oct. 25? South!
America la to bo organixed for Y.
M. C. A. war work along the same
line? as tho Kuropean countries. The
War Work Council of the Young
Men's Christian Association In New
York has appointed Jay C. Field of
the Buenos Aires Y. M. C. A. to
act us Field Secretary In South
America In which capacity he will
look after tho entertftinment of Unit
ed St.it? H ?ullors whenever they land
at any South American port.
THE MOST IMPORTANT
QUESTION
"What ma?t I do to be
saved? Acts 16:30.
THE DIVINE ANSWER:
? BELIEVE on the XOBlf
JESUS CREIOT hiid thou
?halt be saved.'' Acta 16 :>1.
"For there it NONE OTHER
name under heaven given
Iraonq men, whetehy ve
iUST be taved." Acta 4:11
I HAVE YOU BELIEVED I
i ? ? -

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