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The Alaska daily empire. (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, November 08, 1919, Image 3

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1919-11-08/ed-1/seq-3/

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POLLY AND HER PALS
Neewah Establishes Mr. Pecan's Innocence
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Palace Theatre
JOHN T. SPICKETT, ManaSer
Juneau, Alaska
OPEN LETTER TO THE PEOPLE
OF GASTINEAU CHANNEL:
Mr. and Mrs. John T. Spickett request your
presence at the opening performance of their
"GIRL ALASKA" Sunday evening. This feature is
distinctly Alaskan, having been filmed on Alaskan
soil, and through our efforts and acquaintance
with those who make the films, was secured for the
first release in Alaska, to be shown at the Palace
Theatre.
Hoping to see you present, we remain,
Yours very truly,
Mr. and Mrs. John T. Spickett
MAE MARSH
in/
™ “AUL
WOMAN”
COLDWYN PICTURES
—IN
“ALL WOMAN”
It's a GOLDWYN.
PATHE NEWS
Fatty Arbucfcle in “The Dodger”
I
Alaska Transfer Co.
i
General Hauling, Baggage i
Coal. Contract Hauling j
Main St. Phone 45 I
i
Pure Milk
Phone 985.
Regular Deliveries.
MENDENHALL DAIRY
SUIT FOR DIVORCE
A new suit was filed today In the
Clerk of the Court's office. It is a
suit for divorce hy Jane Italio against
Max Italio. Both parties live at
Yakutat. They were married in Sit
ka irt 1893. The plaintiff alleged cru
elty. H. L. Faulkner is attorney for
Mrs. Italio.
OPES EVENINGS
From 7 to 9. Dre. White and
Stewart, Dentists, Seward Building.
'Phone 489. adv.
I. J. SHARICK
Jeweler tad Optician
Watches, Diamonds
Jewelry
Bile
A ttractions
at Theaters
COLISEUM—For Sunday night, “The
Great Victory,” or “Wilson or the
Kaiser," showing the fall of the
Hohenzollerns and said to be one
of the greatest productions grow
ing out of the war, along with a
weekly and comedy and current
events. For tonight only, Charlie
Chaplin and Fatty Arbuckle and
Chaplin's wife in the same play,
and William Desmond in “Time
Locks and Diamonds.”
PALACE—For Sunday night and
Monday night, “The Girl Alaska,”
produced entirely on Alaskan soil
and released in Alaska first, a story
of adventures and gold mining and
dance hall scenes, with a back
ground of real Alaska scenery,
along with Pathe News and Smiling
Bill Parsons in “Dad's Knockout.”
For tonight and Sunday matinee.
Mae Marsh in “All Woman”; it's a
Goldwyn, and Fatty Arbuckle in
•‘The Dodger.”
COLISEUM TO HAVE HISTORIC
RECORD PICTURE ON FOR
SUNDAY AND MONDAY.
Nover before hail a oast boon as
gambled, which ran compare In talent
ami brilliancy to that which is seen
In Maxwell Kargcr’s “The Great Vic
tory, Wilson or the Kaiser? The
Fall of the Hohenzollers,” to be
shown at the Coliseum for Sunday
dpa Monday. This great Screen
Classics, fnc. production shows the
tragic and heroic events of the up
heaval of nations—the groat strug
glo and the final dearly-bought vic
tories of the Allies. It shown in
vivid contrast the difference between
the upbringing and the training of
Wilson and the Kaiser—drawing a
parallel of their lives at various ages
and showing how and why their
minds developed in diametrically op
posite directions—making of one a
lofty and deep thinker of whom seif
was last and his country first, and
the other who used his country only
for his own greed and aggrandize
ment—the acknowledged super-egotist
of the world.
j The east of players for this produc
tion is composed of 5.'i stars of the
stage and screen who play the impor
tant characters while hundreds of
other noted players are seen in lesser
j roles. Such names as Frank Currier,
Henry Kolker, Joseph Kllgour, Fred.
C. Truesdell, Margaret Me Wade. Earl
Schenk. Fanny Cogan and Pauline
Dempsy are listed among those whu
make the performance one of unusual
and artistic value.
The story was written by Maxwell
Karger, adapted by June Mathis and
A. S. Le Vino, and directed by
Charles Miller under the persona!
supervision of Maxwell Carger, di
rector general of the Metro studios.
'“THE GIRL ALASKA” IS
SUNDAY NIGHT FEATURE
AT THE PALACE.
Among Iho August releases by
World-Pictures is “The Uirl Alaska,"
the. first and only photoplay ever
made or Alaskan soil .Nothing quite
the same as this, from several stand
points, has ever before boon seen on
the moving picture screen.
This will bo seen Sunday and Mon
day nights at the Palace.
The girl's father bad gone to the
Yukon in the big gold rush and had
never returned. The people with
whom lie had left his daughter have
brought her up to be their servant.
Early one morning, after having
slept In a barrel all night, she picks
up a dirty newspaper and in it reads
of the wonderful opportunities await
ing ambitious young men in the
Alaskan gold country. She appro
priates a suit of boys’ clothing and.
shoving all her gorgeous blonde curls
up under her cap, si aunters down
to the dock where . passenger ves
sel is about to leave for the north
country.
When discovered she, always in her
hoy’s clothes, is set to work cleaning
up the decks. To her rescue comes
a young chap who is also on his way
to Alaska to seek his fortune among
the snowy fastnesses of the land.
In the north country, they buy their
camping paraphernalia and engage
a native guide to take them out to the
gold region.
One day, as they are passing down
stream, along the foot of a moil
strous glacier, part of the face of
the mountain of snow and ice crum
bles. with a frightful roar, down upon
them. The girl, her pal. and guide
are overwhelmed by the sliding mass,
and their boat is crushed as though
it were made of paper. The guide
is killed.
After they have bruried him, the
two pals again travel toward the gold
country, this time on foot, for they
no longer have a boat. Day after
day they climb mountains, descend
into valleys, skirt around rivers, un
til at length the young chap is take;
ill with fever and is unable to move
forward. The girl 13 wild with anx
iety and at a loss as to what to do.
At last she falls on her knees and
prays, and then as though in response
to her prayer she sees a thin, just
visible stream of white smoke com
ing up from amidst the tall trees in
the valley at her feet. It is the cabin
of an old miner and adventurer who j
has spent many years in this wild.!
alluring north country.
He shelters the two pals and fin j
ally, after a terrific struggle of weeks)
and weeks, the old man and the girl t
to health. It is then arranged for!
manage to restore the young follow;
the two them to remain with the j
old man and work h'.s claim.
The last act of the old man’s life i
is to leave his entire claim to th'
girl and her pal.
The young man is dumbfounded to j
loarn his pal is a girl, but she is
such a charming and beautiful child
‘hat he cannot resist falling in love
with her and then marrying her. j
The old man's claim is soon found
to contain an immensely valuable
gold mine, and so everything end*
happily for the young follow and j
"The Girl Alaska.” i
__ , i
FATTY ARDUCKLE AND
CHARLIE CLAPLIN AND LATTER’S j
WIFE ALL SEEN AT COLISEUM.
Along with William Desmond to i
night In "Time Locks and Diamonds"!
will be seen Fatty Arbuckle and I
Charlie Chaplin and Chaplin’s wife, j
making up a double bill at the Coli-)
seum of exceptional merit.
Wliliam Desmond in "Time Locks
and Diamonds” has the role of a
gentleman crook, and is supported by j
players who are what is known a: !
the screen celebrities. A stirring \
drama of society and the under'
world in which a gentleman crooi1 ■
“goes straight” and wins life’s greai
reward.
A two-reel comedy will also b.
show'll featuring both Fatty Arbuckle
and Charllo Chaplin. The comedy |
alone is worth the price of admission
Not only is Chaplin himself in to
night's bill, but his wife, Mildred Har
ris Chaplin, has a prominent part In
“Time Locks and Diamonds’’ at the (
Coliseum for tonight only.
“ALL WOMAN” GIVES
MAE MARSH BIG ROLE.
Mao Marsh's marked success in
dramatic rules such as she played In
"The Pace In the Dark” Induce
Goldwyn to offer her In still stronger
parts. It Is with special pleasure
that Miss Marsh i» presented in
“All Woman,” by E. Lloyd Sheldon
at the Palace theatre tonight and
Sunday matinee Aa Susan Sweeney.
(Continued on Pag# Six)
I
SUNDAYAND MONDAY
More Than Thirty Actors cf National Fame Appear In Screen’s
History of War, Supported by 2,000 Others.
1 ft
j
3 k V 8)[email protected] 8
fjj The Management of the
Coliseum offers a Product
lion that has been seen in
the States for weeks and
in some places a solid
month, and a production
that will be held by the
War Department as a his
torical record of the war.
€J The Management fur
ther states that a picture
that is shown for any
length of time in the States
is well worth bringing to
Juneau to show before the
public, as we are sure that
anyone who sees it will be
more than pleased as it
has been a record break
er wherever it has been
shown.
C We do not state that v/e
book pictures before they
are shown Outside as it
would take the whole
year’s proceeds of The
Coliseum to pay for this
picture as a first-run pro
duction.
€f Even though it is a sec
ond run picture we pay a
considerable sum for it,
and therefore must have
a slight raise in admission
prices for it.
tj This is a big picture,
made in a big way to ap
peal to the millions; and
remember that the amourft
we pay to show it is mere
ly a trifle to the amount
which it costs to produce.
€f Not a picture of jum
bled up scenes—But One
with a Plot.
this amazing' piodudtioiat
Admission Prices
Adults . 50c.
Youths . 30c
Small Children .... 10c.
Loges . 75c.
Tonight
_Only
Time Locks and Diamonds
with WILLIAM DESMOND
And a Two-Reel—
Arbuckle Chaplin
COMEDY ENTITLED
“A Knockout”
This is a comedy made before Chaplin be
came famous. But it is in A-l condition and a
'omedy that it a comedy. Not only is Charlie Chaplin in tonight’s show
but hit wife it playing a prominent part in the feature—a cast of the
greatest actors and actresses will entertain you for a solid hour and three
quarters—A Knockout Feature and a Knockout Comedy—This makes
a Show That is a Show.
- - ,
Keeping at It
IN CLASSIFIED ADVERTIS
ING • keeping at it” is some
times quite as important as
making the first effort. If a
single publication of your ad
ALWAYS brought your result
the tasks of life would be so
easy that they would scarcely
interest us at all.
- 3
Try a Classified in the Alaska
Daily Empire. w
--,
i

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