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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 10, 1921, Image 5

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1921-02-10/ed-1/seq-5/

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Si tNTIFIC STUDY
OF AIR NEEDED TO
PERFECT AVIATION
Whims and Fancies of Elem
ents Must Be Known Be
fore Flying Entirely Safe.
WASHINGTON, D. C., Feb. 10.
The “ocean of air", which followers
of aviatioK believe will someday be
filled with great air liner* plyimr
their way from city to eitv on regu-|
lar schednles, must be studied from1
a meteorological standpoint and the i
whims and fancies of the elements
must be reduced to easily tinders*ood.
data before the dream 'if worldwide
commercial aviation can become a
reality, according to C. Le Roy1
Meisinger, Government meteorologist
here.
Mr. Meisinger, in a i-ape,- discus
sing the effects of air conditions on
commercial aviation, says that mete- j
orology is the mainstay of aviation, |
regardless of the confidence a pilot [
may have in liis motor and in hi* I
plane.
The “ocean of air”, he says, son
stantly is changing, and does not
contain steodfast currents, sucli as
the Gulf Stream and the Japanese
Currents which are found in oceans
of water. He pointed out that evert'
the prevailing belief that far above
are strong westerly winds which
never change sometimes is shocked
by facts revealed through scientific
study of aerial conditions.
Because- at the constantly chang
ing conditions of aerial routes
through which , the air liners of the
future will travel, Mr. Meisinger de
clares that before big commercial
aviation companies can operate on
a large scale, great masses of data
on air conditions at all times < f the
year, in all places and under all
circumstances, must be gathered.
He suggested placing consulting
meteorologists on the staffs of all
aviation companies, these m ;ti to j
study the air as it affects aviation
and to decide daily what altitude I
and what route a plane should take j
from one city to another.
Air conditions are so changeable,
Mr. Meisinger says, that a plane j
traveling between the same two!
points might 'have to take a differ
» . T
1 MARBLE SLABS AND UNITS
| We male them—in any size, or |
I shape, plain or veined.
I CONCRETE PRODUCTS I
I MFG. CO. 1
| Willoughby Ave. Juneau. I
■-:-■
OLD AND NEW CHAMPIONS IN RING.
Joe Lynch (left), shaking hands with Pete Herman (right) just before the battle that gave j
Lynch the world’s bantamweight championship. The fight took place on December 22 at
Madison Square Garden, New York city. , i^.. * . J
ent routes almost every day in
order to make the trip with the least
danger. Also a plane flying from
New York to Chicago might find
a certain route the best, while one
traveling from Chicago to New York
on the same day might find that
another and entirely different route
was more favorable.
Some of the things which airplane
dispatchers, or traffic managers, on
aerial commercial lines ,will have to
consider, he says, are speed and di
rection of the wind in the area to
be traversed, the frequency of low
clouds and fogs, the frequency and
intensity of thunder storms, the
vertical temperature distribution, the
normal values of precipitation at
flying fields and the effect of atmos j
photic pressure on aerial instru
ments, particularly the altimeter.
The changing conditions in the!
air make it impossible to gather th
necessary information in a single
pathfinding flight over an area he
continues, hut by gathering data in
numerous flights at all times of the
year and under all circumstances,
a system of averages could he de
vised which would aid greatly in dis
patching planes over aerial routes.
SEALS TO PLAY GOLF
AS PART OF TRAINING
MONTEREY, Cal., Feb. 10.—Golf
may be made a part of the spring
work of the San Francisco club of
the Pacific Coast Baseball League
when the squad comes here for the
1921 training season.
Recently the Del Monte Hotel, near
here, announced that a tournament
for the players would be held and
prizes would be given for the best
driving, approaching and putting.
Charles Graham, manager of the
HOCKEY STAR UNABLE
TO RESIST LURE OF
PUCK AFTER QUITTING
SEATTLE. Wash., Feb. 10.—Out
of retirement, Fred (“Cyclone")
Taylor, long considered the best
player in tho Pacific Coast Hockey
Association, came recently to heir
his old club, Vancouver, retain its
position at the head of the percent
age column.
Taylor, probably the oldest player
on any of the Association clubs,
said at the close of the 19°0 series
that he was through with ice hockey,
and for five weeks tliis year he
watched the game from the bench.
Put the “ice bug” appeared and a
fortnight ago ho got out his togs and
skates and last week appeared at
his old position at center.
A crowd of 8,000 roared a greet
ing to Taylor when he appeared in
his first game, played at Vancouver
against Victoria. The “old bald
headed master” was himself and to
his work was credited Vancouver's
victory. *
STRANGLER LEWIS’ WIFE
DEFENDS THE HEADLOCK
SAN JOSE, Cal., Feb. 10.—De
fense of the headloek wrestling hold
which has been barred by Jack
Curley, New York wrestling pro
moter. was voiced here recently by
Dr. Ada Scott Morton Frederick, I
wife of Ed (“Strangler") Lewis,
who won the world’s wrestling cham
pionship mainly by the use of the
prohibited hold.
Scientifically, Dr. Frederick anal
yzed the headlock as a “twin brother
to nitrous oxide anesthesia, some
thing which ‘puts ’em to sleep but
doesn’t permanently hurt them.’ ”
“The headloek is no more danger
out than the ‘scissors’ or the ‘toe
hold,’ ” Dr. Frederick said. "It
simply puts the opponent to sleep
for a little while. The brain is
protected by its bony covering from
serious or permanent injury from the
hold. The 'scissors’ on the other
hand, is likely to do permanent in
jury to the wrestler internally.”
Lewis invented the headlock, his
wile said. After several recent bouts
in the East his opponents have re
mained unconscious for several min
utes.
BOXING SCHEDULED
STANFORD UNIVERSITY, Cal.,
Fab. 10.—Boxing teams of Stanford
University and the University of
California meet in their annual tour
nament March 11. according to pres
ent plans.
Seals, is a golf enthusiast and be
lieves tiie sport will help to put the
players into good physical condition.
AS FINE RUBBER GOODS
AS THE WORLD PRODUCES
So you know tliat a druggist selects
rubber quality exactly as he selects
drug quality? Every hot water
bottle or fountain syringe or other
rubber article in our stock is per
feet in every way—made oi new, live acuve
rubber. If it is the perfect goods you want,
buy here and know.
BRITT’S PHARMACIES
Seward Street Front Street
HOW LONG SINCE YOUR WATCH
WAS CLEANED?
Don't wait for it to stop or you may spoil an
accurate timekeeper.
This is the time of the year to have it over
hauled as we have leisure time for those nice
finishing touches that makes a perfect job.
The above refers also to the family clock.
We would prefer to have you bring it here but
for the sake of a good timepiece take it some
where. -
GRUEN I
THE NUGGET SHOP
SIMPSON & WRIGHT
SPECIALS
THIS WEEK
In Addition to Our Specials for Last Week
Amocat Corn.25c a can, $2.50 a dozen
Blue Karo Syrup, No. 10s . $1.00 each
Peaches and Apricots, No. 10s.95c each
Sardines, California pack, S. & W. oval tins .. . .25c
Try Our Fresh Butter and Eggs, Swift’s Premium
Hams and Bacon
CALIFORNIA GROCERY
Phone 478 Free Delivery
CLEARANCE SALE
gx Nelson’s Shoe Store gx
OPEN
EVENINGS
IN ORDER TO MAKE ROOM FOR SPRING GOODS WE ARE OFFERING AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES THE FOLLOWING MERCHANDISE: SOCIETY BRAND SUITS
AND OVERCOATS, RAINCOATS, OUR ENTIRE STOCK OF FLORSHEIM SHOES, ALSO OTHER STANDARD MAKES OF HIGH GRADE SHOES AND VARIOUS OTHER
LINES OF MEN'S FURNISHINGS.
SOCIETY BRAND CLOTHES
Our Pledge to You
When you buy a SOCIETY BRAND Suit or Overcoat
it must give complete satisfaction.
If you have been putting off buying a Suit until
Clothes get Cheaper—Don't Miss this Sale.
Society Brand Suits—Regular Price $60, $85, $70.
Sale Price $45.00, $48.00, $55.00
Society Brand Overcoats—Regular Price $60.00.
Sale Price $47.50
NOTE:—This Sale includes our entire stock of over
100 SOCIETY BRAND Suits and Overcoats, no old
stock, no odds and ends, whether you buy the first or
the last Suit or Overcoat at this Sale, you get new
clean merchandise.
20 per cent off—Raincoats—20 per cent off
Our entire stock of high grade Waterproof RAINCOATS
20 per cent off during this Sale
PATRICK MACKINAWS SPECIAL $19.50
, PURE SILK HOSE—$1.25 Values
Special—6 pair—$5.00
FIBER SILK HOSE—S5c Values
Special—6 pair—$3.50
SILK-COTTON MIXED FINE HOSE
Special—6 pair—$3.50
SHOE BARGAINS
This lot consists of over 100 pairs of high grade shoes
in black and brown; lace and button; nearly all sizes
will be found here. Regular Prices $10.00 to $12.50.
Sale Price $7.75
Heavy Wool Work Pants
150 pairs of heavy wool work pants. The famous
Keytsone and Mclvlillen Brands
20 per cent off during this Sale
Fine All-Wool Dress Trousers
Ti.e Dutchess and Keystone makes in blue serge, light
and dark grays and browns
20 per cent off during this Sale
_ WINTER AND DRESS C^PS
$3.00 and $3.50 values, special . $2.50
WOOL STOCKING CAPS
$2.00 values, special $1.50
WOOL SWEATER VESTS--KHAK1
Special S3.25
HEAVY ALL-WOOL SWEATER COATS
$15.00 value, special $12.50
ARROW BRAND HANDKERCHIEFS
Special. 2 for 25 cents
£INE MERCERIZED HOSE
Special. 6 pairs $2.50
9 Silk Ties
$1,00 values, special .. $ -75
1.50 values, special 100
2.00 values, special . 1-50
2.50 values, special . 2.00
’ HIGH GRADE SILK CRAVATS
$3.00 and $3.50 values, special . $2.50
CROWN SUSPENDERS
$1.00 value, special . 50 cents
~WOOL JERSEY SWEATERS
Special . $4.00
SILK KNITTED SCARFS
$4.00 Values, Special $3.00
5.00 Values, Special_ 4.00
ARROW BRAND SILK COLLARS
Special . . 50 cents
Wool Underwear
TJie Dunham Mills heavy all-wool two-piece underwear
Sale Price $7.00 Suit
COLLINS HEAVY NATURAL WOOL TWO-PIECE
UNDERWEAR
Sale Price $4.00 Suit
COOPER S HEAVY UNION UNDERWEAR
Sale Price $4.00 Suit
COOPER S LIGHT UNION UNDERWEAR
Sale Price $3.00 Suit
Heavy Wool Work Shirts
WOOL WORK SHIRTS IN GREY, BLUE, GREEN
AND 0. D—ALL SIZES
$5.00 Shirts, Sale Price .$3.65
5.50 Shirts, Sale Price .. 4.25
6 50 Shirts, Sale Price .... 4.85
7.00 Shirts, Sale Price 5.25
7.50 Shirts, Sale Price 5 50
Crown Army Shirts, Special . 5.00
Crown Stag Shirts, Special . 7.00
Dress Shirts
Big Assortment of Green Hood and Arrow Brand Shirts.
All Sizes. $3.00, $3.50, $4.00, $4.50 values.
Sale Price $2.25
Shirt Bargains
100 Fine Dress Shirts with military and flat collars.
All sizes. $3.00, $3.50, $4 00 values,
Sale Price $2.15
GOOD COTTON HOSE
All Colors—Special, 6 pairs $1.25
BLACK WORSTED HOSE
Special—6 pairs—$3.50
BACHELOR'S FRIEND HOSE—All Colors
Special—6 pairs—$2.50
Regular Price $15. to $16.50
SALE PRICE $12.50
FLORSHEIM SHOES
No belter Shoes - Better than most Shoes
Biggest stock of men’s shoes in Alaska
Regular Price $15. to $16.50
SALE PRICE $12.50

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