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The Nome nugget. [volume] (Nome, Alaska) 1938-????, February 17, 1941, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020662/1941-02-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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Oldest Newspaper In Alaska. “The News Of The Dav In Pictures” Member Of The Associated Press
TOE NOME NUGGET
VOL. 43. No. 21. NOME, ALASKA, MONDAY, FEB. 17, 1941. Price per TOpy 1W
Turkey & Bulgaria Enter Into Pact
Yugoslavia to Pursue Course Favored by Germany
Hurricane and Fire in Spain , lake 30,000 Homeless
NON - AGGRESSION PACT IS
RELIABLY REPORTED SIGNED
BY TURKEY AND BULGARIA
UNDATED. Feb. 17 (£>) — The
last big obstacle to a German
march through Southeastern Eu
rope to the Mediterranean was
apparently removed as reliable
informants in Sofia reported that
Bulgaria and Turkey reached a
non-aggression pact and the assur
ance that Turkey will stand aside
and may be the keystone to fit
together all the military and dip
lomatic preparations that Ger
many has made for the Balkan of
fensive. There is not much Bul
garia or Turkey could do about
it if Germany decided to s nd an
army through them to reach the
Dardanelles or Greece, but Tur
key has the power, at least to con
test the Nazi onslaught, if it
chose to. The Turks' have long
b^en the storm center of the
war power politics.
The Germans used dip’omatic
pressure to keep Turkey on the
sidelines and the British made
Turkey a potential ally by pledg
ing aid for the defense of Turkish
integrity. So far Turkey has been
an enigma like big, neighboring
Russia. Neither have made a
clear-cut stand on what their
course would be in the Nazis, al
ready perhaps 600,000 strong in
Rumania, received orders to
march.
British sources acknowledged
the accord means to sharp blow
to British influence in the Bal
kans. Seme diplomatic observers
felt that the odds against Greece
will become so great, her victor
ies over Italy, notwithstanding,
that the mere threat of a German
b 0w# might force her to capit
ulate.
FIRE IN WAKE OF HURRICANE
FORCES 39,030 PERSONS FROM
HOMES IN SPAIN 62 ARE DEAD
MADRID. Feb. 17, </P) — The
San Sebastian radio reported that
30.000 persons were forced from
their homes by gigantic fires
which swept Sant Binder yester
day and today in the wake of a
disastrous hurricane which claim
ed at least 62 lives in Spain and
Portugal. The flames are still
blazing but the fire fighters are
believed to be gaining the upper
hand. Among the hundreds of
buildings reported destroy d and
damaged in the Day of Biscay
port citv wa the Bank of Spain,
cathedral, government revenue
office and customs house.
The losses by fire, which meag
r reports by way of ships’ radio
in the harbor said, were started
wihon. an explosion occurred
aboard an oil tanker moored in
,he harbor. It was estimated be
tween 9 and 13 million gallons of
oil in the tanker blaze w re re
ported bown into the city by a
high wind.
iirilish Hint
Their Saboteurs
Are In Italy
*
UNDATED. Feb. 15 HP) — The
bare>. hints that some British
parachutist sabateurs are still
hiding at the foot of the Italian
boot, to seek to strike a crippling
blow at the home front of Brit
ain’s Fasict foe, emanated from
ihe British ministry of informa
tion.
It was said uniformed troopers
n an unspecified number were
dropped recently in southern It
aly with instructions to “dem
lish certain objectives connected
with ports in that area, and some
have not returned to their base."
The Utahans said yesterday
hat ah the British were captur
ed.
It was also announced that the
UAF fired oil installations at the
p rt and works of Gelsenkirchen
the inland port for Duisburg in
xiuhrport in western Germany.
An authorized spokesman in Ber
in said the British flew over 22
communities but attacked only
one intensively.
UNDATED, Feb. 15 HP) — Pre
mier Dragisa Cvetcovic of Yugo
slavia and his foreign minister
returned to Belgrade from Ger
many after a three-hour confer
ence with Hitler yesterday. Both
refused to make a statement but
sources close to the premier in
dicated that Yugoslavia will pro
bably adopt a course more in ac
cord with German desires.
WENDELL WILLKIE MEETS WINSTON CHURCHILL
W? 3——muilBIWJ —■—————-- ■£?<?>: -
IIUMI ||MI———ii—Mil. Ilni ill —IIIIWHIHI ||||II'1II|IHIIIII1I1II1III1I11 nil III'
Wendell Wiilkie (left) shook hands with Prime Minister Churcliill in London and had lunch with the
British war leader. In center is Eddy Gilmore of the Associated Press London staff.
LORD HALIFAX PAYS RESPECTS TO SECRETARY HULL
mrnm
am' •
First official act of Lord Halifax as he assumed du ies of British Ambassador tin Washington was a
call on Secretary of State Cordell Hull (right). II dii'ax had just handed a sheaf of papers to Hull.
Hull remained in Washington when the President a c.ndoned custom to greet Halifax and bring him
ashore aboard the yacht Potomac.
FIRST FATALITY IN7 ACTION
OCCURS TO AMERICAN EAGLE
SQUADRON, WITH THE RAFi
LONDON, Feb. 15 (JP) — The
first fatality in action in the Am
erican eagle squadron, fighting
with the RAF, occurred with the
death of Edwin Orbizon, ag d 23
of Oklahoma, who was killed
while chasing a German plane,
on a training flight.
He was buried in a village
churchyard close to the flying
station. The squadron adjutant;
said. “Everybody thought highly j
of him and h took to a fighter
as a duck takes to water.’’ One
other American member of the |
squadron was killed previously
in a flying accident. i
German I lotila
Claims 14 Ships
BERLIN, Feb. 15 i(/P) — The
flotilla of German warships
which w re reported in the last
two days with the sinking of 14
British ships, in one convoy left
one vessel afloat to serve as a
rescue ship for the other crews,
DNB news agency said. All the
merchantmen w re armed and de,
fended themselves vigorously,
but no German ship was hit. A
DNB reporter on one of the Ger-;
man ships said the fight was so j
quick and decisive that after the I
first ten minutes five of the Bri- j
itish ships were in a sinking con-1
dition. The attack was made Sun j
dav off Portugal.
Greeks (.rack
Down on Fascists
UNDATED, Feb. 15 UP) — The
Greeks reported cracking down
on Italian, lines at several points
in Albania.
Japanese In The |
Americas Told
War Not Likely
TOKYO, Feb. 15 UP) — The cab I
inet information bureau advised
Japanese residents in North and
South America not to be alarmed
“at the irresponsible sensational
reports in increasing tension be-'
tween Japan and the United
States” asserting it is not war
ranted to jump to a hasty conclu
sion as “any such eventuality as .
war.”
British Occupy
Important Port :

i <
CAIRO, Feb. 15 </P) — After
long artillery preparation, the}
British announced the occupation .
of the important point of Chaisi- <
maio in Italian Somaliland.
You can’t pilow a field by turn- j
jng it over in your mind. |«
Spring Floods
And Storms
Ravage Europe -
BERN, Switzerland, Feb. 17 (JP)
—Spring floods and storms rav
aged the breadth of Europe and
already killed or injured hun
dreds of persons from Portugal
to Yugoslavia an extending in a>
lighter degree through the Dan
ube Valley to the Black Sea.
Belgrade reported that Yugo
slavia’s Lake Seuteri was rising
and seven buidings are already
under water at Batehak.
Floods destroyed many dwelli
ngs and threatened others as
Rumanian Territorial waters for
15 miles north and south of Con
stantia were declared dangerous
’or navigation.
['apt. Bangs, Form
er Nome Skipper
Dies In Seattle
_
SEATTLE. Feb. 15 i(/P) — Capt.
•’rank L. Bangs, aged 85, former
naster of the trading ship J. P.
\bler of Nome, died yesterday
it his home here. A Masonic ser
vice will be held Tuesday.
He was a watchman for the
>ort of Seattle for several years
mtil his retirement 8 years ago.
fe is survived by a son, Norval
if Seattle.
There is only one excuse for
var and that is protection against
omething worse than war.
From the very beginning man’s
>rogress has been the result of his
lesire to live beyond his income.

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