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The Nome nugget. [volume] (Nome, Alaska) 1938-????, November 19, 1951, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020662/1951-11-19/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE NOME NUGGET
Published Monday, Wednesday and Friday by the
NOME PUBLISHING CO.
NOME, ALASKA
Telephone: Main 125 P. O. Bex 618
$1.50 PER MONTH * $16.00 A YEAR
E. P. BOUCHER . Managing Editor
Entered as second class matter October 14, 1943, at the postoffice
at Nome, Alaska, under the Act of March 3, 1879.
Nome, Alaska, Monday, November 19, 1951
COMPLICATIONS
— lTr~i II '-ii— -- . . • -'•--Av .'A-. 7L»-'*
WAR FEVER
CHART EeypT
WHERE IS OUR TERRITORIAL HEALTH NURSE?
What has become of our Territorial Health Nurse?
Since some time in September, there has not been a
regular public health nurse on duty here. We are in
formed that the department is trying but unfortunately
trying and doing are two different things.
We recommend in the future that this important
position shall include a proviso that the departing
nurse remain until her replacement arrives.
The Department of Health plays an important
part in the development of the territory but unless it
functions with regularity and to the benefit of the
entire territory, it cannot expect to receive the en
dorsement of those it is supposed to serve.
- -
TAFT’S THREE ISSUES
Senator Taft has chosen for the most part strong
ground in the three issues on which he declares he
intends to campaign for the Republican nomination for
President of the United States. These he states as:
1. Ending the socialistic trend of government.
2. Restoring “integrity and honesty” to the gov
ernment.
3. Redeeming “fatal mistakes” in foreign policy.
The first purpose will appeal strongly to business
people, farmers, and employed workers who believe
that the vigor of the American productive system stems
from individual initiative and wholesome competition.
The trend of the past decade toward more conservative
polices includes also a great many thoughtful persons
who sympathize with certain objectives of the welfare
state, but who recognize that it has encouraged too
much tendency to lean on the government and whp
draw back from such prospects as socialized medicine.
VIEWS AND REVIEWS
William D. Clark, Major, U.S.A., thrice-wounded
in Korea: “Generally speaking, the Chinese Commun
ists don't fight with the same ferociousness of the
North Koreans.”
The secret of being miserable is to have the leisure
to bother about whether you are happy or not.
—Bernard Shaw
Women should shine as statisticians. They are
“naturals” at shaping up figures.—W.O.W. Magazine.
It
Fairbanks Couple,
Lost Two Weeks,
Are Found Alive
FAIRBANKS, (JP) — A two
week trek by a Fairbanks flyer
through wild, frigid interior Al
aska brought the daring rescue
Friday of the woman companion
who had been marooned since
their light plane crash landed on
an icy river bed Nov. 2.
The rescue in a swirling snow
storm came only a few hours
after Bob Rouse, a construction
foreman, stumbled into an Es
kimo village and told of his
friend’s plight.
He had set out soon after the
forced landing at the junction of
the Stony and Holitna rivers, 250
miles west of Anchorage, and
made his way through the snow
bound country 35 miles to the
village of Stony Rover.
The woman who survived the
14 days alone in wild country,
with inadequate food and cloth
ing, and in temperatures which
ranged down to 15 below zero,
was Viola O’Brien, a Fairbanks
cafe cashier. She and Rouse left
Fairbanks for Anchorage Nov. 3
and dropped out of sight.
Miss O’Brien was snatched to
safety by Bob Vanderpool, vet
eran pilot from Alaska’s Crooked
River country. Vanderpool set his
little single-engined plane down
on rough ground during a blind
ing snowstorm, picked up the
chilled woman and flew her back
to Stony River. There she and
Rouse were reported in good con
dition.
Of Allied Prisoners
TOKYO, (/P)—Gen. Matthew B.
Ridgway, Saturday, verified the
communist atrocity killings of
United Nations soldier captives in
Korea and declared “the shock
ing impact of the brutality which
has been revealed should have
been no surprise to the American
people.”
But the supreme allied com
mander in his first comment on
the sensational story that shocked
the world Wednesday, expressed
regret over the way it was dis
closed.
Ridgeway, in a statement, said
all known deaths already had
been reported to next of kin and
that the report had caused need
less anguish among relatives of
those soldiers still listed as miss
ing.
Shortly before Ridgway spoke
out, Peiping radio entered a
blanket denial of the killings. It
maintained that United Nations
prisoners of war were treated
well “despite difficult conditions.”
Then the Chinese communist
radio countered with its own
charges that “thousands and tens
of thousands” of Chinese and
North Korean Red soldiers “who
fell into the hands of the United
Nations forces have been mas
sacred.”
This ran counter to all reports
of United Nations treatment of
prisoners.
Ridgway’s statement empha
sized that there had been no in
tention of withholding the atro
city figures. .“It had been con
cluded some months ago, that at
an appropriate time when the ac
cumulated evidence warranted
and when due coordination had
been effected with the proper au
thorities in Washington, this evi
dence should be made public,”
Ridgway said.
j For That Thanksgiving Dinner \
■/ Broad-Breasted Fur key \
\ . Lots of White Meat ’ >
r
/ - (
• Long Island Duckling \
( Something To Talk About t
) Nice Plump Roasting Chicken \
> '<
) CUT FLOWERS (
/ TUESDAY /
• PICKLES FRESH DATES \
• AND OLIVES AND CHESTNUTS )
t
)
/
) FRUITCAKE
) SUPPLIES
)
/
i
(
}
)
FRUIT )
CAKES )
)
>
)
A
BORDENS AND FRESH FRUIT
S & W MINCEMEAT AND VEGETABLES
NEW CROP OF
S & W NUTS
9
NOME’S HOME OWNED
Truly a Modern Shopping Centre
NOME ALASKA
Santa's Home To
Get Real
<By thk Associaikd Prkss)
The “Pole” part of the North
Pole may have been a misnomer
up to this time but something is
going to be done about it come
December 10.
And if Santa Claus really does
make his home there he’s going
to get such a flood of letters on
that day he’ll need a private
secretary until next Chrismas.
All of which is a way of saying
that the plans generated by
Stan Garson, Point Barrow oil
worker and ex-dishwasher, have
come to fruition. With the aid of
an airline, a newspaper woman
and various other persons and or
ganizations, that is. And without
the help of the U.S. Air Force,
Which wouldn’t have any part of
the stunt.
Garson suggested some time
back that a real pole ought to be
dropped at the North Pole. He
even chipped in $150 of his money
to have a 9-foot, hollow steel cyl
inder constructed and painted like
a candy cane (or barber pole, if
your inclinations are a little less
romantic).
Mrs. Audrey Vance, Fairbanks
journalist and radio announcer,
liked the idea and added a sug
gestion—how about dropping off
some “honest-to-goodness” letters
to Santa Claus. “Fine,” says Gar
son and it was a fait accompli
(look it up yourself).
Alaska Airlines Chairman H. W.
Marshall heard that the Air Force
was taking an uppity attitude
toward the project and offered to
donate one of its four - engined
specials for the 3,200-mile flight
from International Airport, Fair
banks.
• • '
Yesterday, they decided the
steel pole and all the letters the
kiddies of this continent want to
send to Santa Claus, care of North
Pole Nellie (that’s Mrs. Vance’s
miss - nomer), Fairbanks, Alaska,
will visit Santa on Dec. 10.
42.5 X
IRREGULAR FOOD-COST RISES
JUNE 19SO TO JULY I9SI
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FRUITS* SUOAR /MEATS- CEREALS -
VEGETABLES SWEETS POULT. EISH BAKERY PROD PRODUCTS

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