OCR Interpretation


Arkansas weekly mansion. [volume] (Little Rock, Ark.) 1880-1884, November 21, 1885, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arkansas State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020670/1885-11-21/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

0. O. JACKO, BuiToa.
vol. ix.
Now Is a Good Time To
SUBSCRIBE FOR THE
ARKANSAS.?-::E- : E:E
■■■ Weekly: Mansion. i
The only Republican paper in the Stale, owned and published by colored
men ana devoted entirely to out raoo.
the Mansion will
Be Sent For
14---Months— 14
Commencing November l«t lor the «nnu»l eubieriplion price *1.60
Btere Is a Ciiance To
to got a good live paper for two months for nothing
WE WILL ALSO GIVE EACH NEW
subscriber a ticket for a chance in the Drawing to take place
•fan. lefth. 1886.
This grand drawing will consist o fa fine Piano or Cabinet Organ
•nd other useful articles. Full parti c nlars of which will be given in a
fnture issue-
Specal Inducements For
CLUBS.
Any person getting up a club of five subscribers and forwarding the a
mount of subscription with their address will receive os a premium the
-Life Os Grant.-
Any person getting a club of ton on thosame temw will receive as pre
miums any two ol the following books:
Life Os Grant, American En
cyclopedia, and Unversal
Household Assistant
802 Main St, LITTLE ROCK.
. ' ’
Mansion Fub., Co.
J. M. Colburn & Co.
ÜBUCHHBTB,
XTE’SKT STORE NEW STOGIE,
HAVB RBMOVED TO TUB
Corner of Main and Seventh Street, Little Rock* Ark.
Removed! Removed!
n[ uiimniiii Fin bboub.
To 121 East Markham Street, Little Rock, Ark.,
WHIM TUSY ARB RTII.I.
Lending Money on all Articles
of Value.
ALEXAMIEK, Proprietor.
the
IRON MOUNTAIN ROUTE
VIA ST. LOUIS IS THE FAVORITE LINE
North and East.
TWO DAILY TRAINS. Feat Tint*. Superior Accommodations.
F. CHANDLER, Gen l Ticket Agt 11. V. TOWNHHBND, Gen l Pa-aagor Agt.
o*x*. t.ctyttr. aixataoußX-
8. L GrHM,
FIRE INSURANCE AGENT,
No. 20C WIKT MARKMAN ITRKIT, LITTLI ROOK, ARK.,
(UnrMenta some of the Oldest and Most Reliable Fire Insurance Com*
P panics in th. United States, vis.:
THE PHCENIX, OF HARTFORD. CONN.
THR HARTFORD, OF HARTFORD, CONN.
THR NATIONAL, OF HARTFORD, CONN.
THR NEW ORLEANS, NRW ORLEANS.
THE N. Y. UNDERWRITERS’ AGENCY, mm.
posed of Germany and Hanover.
I kava alw perfwoUd »rrwnwcm»nU tn In— qrala.l I«m by TORNADOS <*
«IV(1LONBH la tb. Old Fbmnli fir. ln«uranc Company of Hartford. 1 alao writ.
- MIH., on MUL. «• , , ogi rjFiTH
avCOSES STESEIT.
SATIN’a REMOVED
from 414 to 4oe *
MAIN STREET.
Am ... • milling, "hop .tUwh.d U bi. Kon. 11. bu .1— on band
tb. bMt obMpMt m 4 lUMI ol good" r.r *• mmoii, ,iv. bin . mil. B.
mmbM Ik. pUm 40. Nd. I—M.
« WEEKLY
item • ■nwih
LITTLE ROCK, ARK ANSAS, NOVEMBER 21,1885,
MICHBAL KIRBT, CHAS. J. KBA MBH
KZirst <Bc Kramer
——ip rod uce
FRUITS CANDIES, NUTS, EGGS, & BUTTER.
Garden and Flower
z-a-BHKDB/-*-.
' GOODS DELIVERED TO ANY PART OF THE OITY, •<
900 AND 902 MAIN ST., LITTLE ROCK, ARK
Bent Xzx Tlio "WoirXcl
foramorn.ll In M
iLTOMdMinim, th. .troonrt
■—•. Ptrfbct Memcr K—rtnteed and tb. ou., ■i*4at«ly ~f» rt— ®- AII *»’**
W AT*T, AWnS*!MiS
MMJIFM HIS CO., 188 HUM, con.
Japanese-Anodyne.
The Greatest MEM Cures Cholera,
he folllld «> liHrn'in't'h.'Nhl.‘ H’ ’
it, i... ; ■
mi>- |XTEIINAI.
1
a Bottle,
hquri ByDL V. LMl,SoiWip,iri
rant MMBreamissas
J. F. Brucker
1)08 MAIN STBBKT.
BAKER &
CONFECTIONER:
♦All kind, ol u»ku« mil l»r«>'u
mid bo li .<1 at I.OBMAIN Stroot
DR J. M. Co MCUOTHER.
PRACTICING PIIIBICIAN.
AND
SURGEON
Calls attended to at night and day
Pino Bluff, Ark.
C, M. McNeil
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
522 HA IS >T>K>T.
LITTLI BOCK. Ark.
JOHN S AHNICA HALVE
For
Chapped Hand. 01. Ll|>a, Burna’
Favor, Korea, Boil", Boro Nipple"
and things pro|«r«l by
J A JUNUKIND
Pharmno.lt,
LITTLE HOCK - ARK
prick 25 I'K.Ta pm box
W. T. GILMORE.
MABIIACrUK.B A OIAI.BK
in Saddlery &
Harness
Collars, Brldloo, Whip*, haints
Bopalrlaf aad Jsb Work Koallv
Ki< eale I.
411 NAIR OTRKKT, LITTLB RoCK.
HENRY PKIL,
Dml.r In
Fsa/fyGreeer/ee,
LIQUORS,
COUNTRY PRODUCE, ETC.
Pris— — low — any lioiibo in th. city.
Corner Twelfth and Main bU., Liltlo Kock
WILLIAM BLACK,
»Cheap Oroeer,
Corner Thirtrnnth and Tmaa atrooU.
Ff-h Rggt aad ButUr Dally.
Gro-ri- dalirmd at Mark* Ptloso.
’’EDUCATION ANI> INUUSI'RY 18 THB CRB AT BLBVATOB”
Letter frea New Oiieus,
We have received from George
St’’ißon 4 Co, of Portland, Maine,
the well known Art Publishers, a
niagmfleent full length steel en
graving of General Grant. It is
after Anderson's celebrated pho
togra h, which was made while
the general wae still in full vigor,
and represents him in his sturdy,
manly strength, as the people
wish to remember him. It is un
doubtedly, the best portrait ever
mad a of the general.
MAars Stinson 4 Co. are in
need of agents lor several import
ant, popular, now publications,
and oiler inducements that should
be heeded by those in need of
profitable work; those who write
to them will receive free, full par
tioulars.
“Steamboat Landing at N. 0.”
Many indeed are the numerous
sights which are perceived by the
northern visitor when he arrives,
south. In New Orleans, one of
the many beautiful views which
meet the visitors gaze is that ol
the famous steamboat landing.
Its situation lies directly at the
head of the principal street of
New Orleans, via? Canal str ct
To that point and its immediate
surroundings, all boats whether
laden with passengers or freight
steer their way. Boats from all
parts of the United States, can be
continually seen steaming to and
fro cither to secure a landing or
on their way to the place from
whence they had come. During
the day it is almost an impossi
bility to find passage on the levee,
the cause of this being the im
mense trade carried on between
the city and the neighboring par
ishes. Wagons, floats, dray* and
buggies all move in perfect con
fusion, each searching after a
place to pass in order to deliver
their loads or, perhaps, ty transact
rnnio business. At night the land*
ing is illuminated with electric
light, and a steamboat approach
ing the wharf presents to the
eye of the beholder a sight not
easily forgotten. C
The New OHmbn Exponlilon.
Description of the Various Build
ings.
The Now Orleans Exposition,
opened last Tuesday, Nov. 10th,
it is situated In the upper portion
of the Crescent City. It is ac
cessible by both river and rail,
and lies close to the bank of the
MiMiseippi river. Os the numer
ous street railroads in the city,
lour lines have their terminousat
the exposition, thus affording
great accommodation to all visi*
tors to the great enterprise. The
principal buildings ore four m
number, via., The Main and Gov
ernment buildings together with
the Horticultural and Art hulls,
and uro enclosed by a fence ex
tending on each of the four sides
tor a distance of two miles. En
tering the north east side of the
Exposition, the visitor is struck
with awe, for before him stands
an immense building, it is the
Main building. This noted build
ing, the largest under one roof in
the south, which covers an area
of thirty-three acres ot ground.
loa two story structure and in
it |rc exhibited the products of
the world, also the exhibits of the
principal firms, companies, etc.,
of the world. Around tho four
sidoa of this immense building,
are gal lories upon which also, nu
merous exhibits are placed. In
tho centre of tho building, name
ly the Main one, is located th
Grand Music hall, containing sit
ting capacity tor thousands.
Upon leaving tho Main build*
ing the Government building
next attracts tho attention of tbo
visitor. It is a building some,
what poouiiar to tho Main ono
but notquito so long. In said
building the exhibits of ovory
state in tho Union are exhibited
as well us all tho productions ot
tho different schools and colleges
situated in the United Btatoa.
Examining the different exhibits
of tho various states, valuable
information can be acquired and
the mind of the visitor io con
tinually engaged, in examining
the numorono products of the
different etatoo, with which he
ooomo in contact. Tho visitor’s
attMilon after leaving the Gov
jsi
W. C. FINNEY,
I Doalor in Staple and Fancy
Grocer/ee, Htb,
Gauioninl Country Produce, liny,
Corn, Outs and Bran.
Corner ThirtMiitli and llinu •traoU l a
L)llle'il<H-k. A l * K v •
DR. E. V. DEC ELL,
RKSI’MKS THE PRACTICE <>F HIS
PROFESSION.
Ofllce, Hl4 Main ulroet, near Ninth,
Litllo Kock, ArkaniM.
J, V. ZIMMERMAN,
/eweler, WI “X7I
* Wticheß, ( lock*, etc
All work guarantied, ('all and mm him.
No. ion Baat Markham alroct, Little Kock
—DO
"Affl* NIUDELPNII HIGER
aiJSj’J'ira
fete
ffeofaereef.
Ily Mrt. IIAGKK WKLIX Neatly
Parnuhad K<Mim«,
Board and Lodging.
Fourth atreat.liotwMn Main and Inmialana
UtUa Bock, Ark.
iewinWaohine
mSHOBQUAL
iniiMSnliilitktoCt
-ORANaCj | MAM..»
■WPBnK=3
atom, among whom were 8 B
McCormico, President of the Ex>
position; Direct w General Glenn*
Gov. MoKunery, of La; Mayor of
i New J V Guillotte and
Dr J T Nervan. Tne latter spoke
chiefly 6.tfie changes in the
• south since the war, the benefits
derived from tho abolition of
• slavery, and the increase in agri
i cultural and industrial develop
i meat, ho also insisted chiefly upon
i the advancement of both the
s white and colored rates. This
r being ths end of the ceremonies
k in Mini * Hall, the l band pitted
■ one of its beautiful marches, as-
> ter which the audience quietly
> loft the hall. C-
B Georgia Negroew,
h What an Atlanta Editor Says of
tho Race Question in tho
South—Negroes progress
iug Satisfactorily.
• New York Moil, Nov. 4. Mr.
Henry W Grady, editor of the
Atlanta Constitution, was called
! upon by a Mail and Express re
r porter yesterday at tho New York
i llotel.
t “Do you intend to reply to Mr
> Cable on the negro question
i again ?"
i “No. Mr Cable's first article
in tho Century on the negro of tho
i south created a sensation mainly
- because it was written by a south
t ern man. I was requested by
I that magazine to make a reply,
• tbo editor saying that he pro
) posed to limit the discussion to
one comprehensive reply. In my
I published answer I think I rep
■ resented the sentiment of the
) south. Tbo press wae unanimous
I in its approval, But I was our-
> prised to receive many letters
• from tho north on the subject, dis-
I playing an unusual amount ol
3 knowledge and shrov. duesbim the
t negro question. It showed that
• the northern people were more
■ familiar with tbo negro problem,
. having studied it in all Ito pha-
I sea, than would be supposed. All
» tho letters indorsed the spirit of
> my reply to Mr Cable. I held that
■ the races must develop m the
-south by parallel but separate
i courses, that tbo solution was
i equal accommodation in school
■ and church, yet separate, that
tho mingling of the races in the
' schools and theatres and olso
-1 where created a very bad feeling,
> and neither tho negroes nor tbo
whites desired it. Ono instance
i of this is that negroes separated
. from the northern Methodist
, church which was established in
i the south. Mr Cable wrote hit
i reply after seven months. I shall
i not discuss tho matter further
with him. Ho and I aro abso
lutely a|mrt on tho negro quo*-
, tion. We differ from beginning to
end, ami no amount of discussion
would bring us together or on-
i lighten the public a» to the out
i come. It will lake twenty years
, to decide which is right, and no
i amount of impatience on his part
i or’mine can hasten that demon.
i stration, In my first article I
entered a protest against the
■ south being committed to tho
. views of Mr Cable by the words
i put in her mouth. I could not
k make that protest more positive
. by repeating it, and find no other
, reason for continuing tho contro-
I versy. The history of races to
that they diflerentitate but never
i amalgamate."
k “Are tho negroes prosperous
i and progressing "
i “They aro, beyond a doubt.
, Many of them aro largo landown
i era. They have thoir churches,
I lodges, and they oven Lave their
society graded. Tho main test of
I thoir society is respectability,
i Thoir society squabbles originate
1 generally between tho mullattooo
and blacks. In Augusta they had
a disagreement on that issue, and
in Big Bothel Church in Atlanta,
tho high-toned members wanted
thoir preacher removed because,
as he claims, be was little and
b'ack.' They had a church trial
and the little preacher was oue
tal nod. The nogro question is
settling iteelt fester than any raoo
question was ever settled! Oar
i psper will shortly public ha sense
of artiJeo on succeoefal negro
termers, giving the names of thoos
whose oueoees bee been meet a>
able, aad the returns now In
make a fine showing. A negro
ernment Building to turned to
the Art Hall. The building, a
one-story stucture, is completely
iron, and the master pieces of the
many distinguished artists aro
therein exhibited.
Tbo Horticultural Hall is next
mot with. Thio Hall to complete
ly constructed of glass and meas
ures about 860 feet long by 60
feet wide. In the centre stands a
glass tower, beneath which gushes
fourth a beautiful fountain with
which the various plants are
sprinkled. Besides these four
buildings, there also is situated a
grand base hall stand and an ex
tensive stable for tho numerous
race horses. Tho grounds aro also
beautifully laid out, and from one
building to another long walks
have been constructed, which
makes a visit to the New Orleans
Exposition indeed very interest
ing. C.
Opening of the New Orleans Ex*
position.
Joyful indeed appeared Now
Orleans on Tuesday, November
l()th. It was the day y, upon
which the doors of tho groat
World's Fair was thrown open to
the public. Early in tho morns
ing the luminous sun unveiled his
mantel ot brilancy, and during
tho entire day his dazzling rays
wore cast on all sides. The ob
servance of the day was like that
of other grand celebrations held
in Now Orleans, to which thou
sands flock from all parts of the
world to witness. It was a gen
oral holiday among all. All
houses of business suspended com
mercial transactions and tho
school boy and girl were granted
a holiday iq order to participate
in tho opening of tho great enter
prise. Tho ceremonies opened
with a grand juirade through tho
principal streets of the Crescent
city, to which all societies, organ
izations and the like wore ten
dered a most cordial invitation.
Many indeed participated and
succeeded in making the parade
one of the most interesting of its
kind over witnessed in Now Or
leans for some time past. It con
sisted chiefly of the military both
white and colored, the firemen
and numerous other organisa
tions and societies established in
tho city. At 10:80, tho parade
started, and after passing through
the business portion ot the city,
embarked for tho great Expos
tion. The fleet consisted of seven
large boats, and during the em
barkation at both places ria:, at
tho steamboat landing and at the
Exposition, n<> sound was audible
except that of tho booming of tho
cannon and tho blowing of whis
tles. Having arrived at thealeam
boat landing and at tho Exposi
tion, tlio procession moved toward
the Grand Muaio Hall, situated
in the centre of tho main
building. This groat hall was
decorated with flags of all na
tions, while tho gallery balustrade
was decked in horixontal •trijwa
of red, white and blue. As has
been previously said this spacious
hall contains sitting capacity for
thousands, and during tho oere>
monies this wilderness of chair*
was constantly occupied At tho
entrance of this groat ball, bung
an immenco banner bearing the
following, “North Central and
South American Expooition,
Greeting." So great was the
crowd, that oven tho largo stage
was crowded with remarkable
personages, in the rear of which
stood the famous Exposition band.
It consists of fifty pieces and is
beaded by tho famous Prof. G
D’Aqum.
All being seated, tho band
struck up an overture and tho
orchestra and chorus in a grand
buret of harmony, lifted thoir
united voices in tho national air.
“Hall Columbia.** It being fin
ished, was greeted with wild ap.
plause, and Io no other city In tho
Union, perhaps, could this hymn
have received a more hearty
woioomo. Bi lon co onoo mom be
ing restored, Rev. Dishop J N
Galloher, of La., being introduced
by tho Master of Common 100,
opened the ceremonies in Music
Hall by prqyer. The opening
prayer being finished, tho fiimous
band played another eoleetloa, af
ter which eovoral opooelmewom
made by many diotingutohod or*
SUBSCRIPTION 11.50 A YEAR.
NO. 21.
never sells land—he acquires it all
the time. In ono section of Geor
gia the whites became alarmed
and feared the negroes would buy
too much land. The grange (a**
organisation of farmers) mot and
passed a resolution that no farmer
would sell land to a negro. The
negroes organized and deter
mined to leave the country: The
Grange soon recindcd their reso
lution. The crops in tho south
this year are the best ever known.
The people are prosperous, happy
and quiet. They aro improving
their homes, bailing up cities,
and the farmers are improving
their stock and implements. Ver
ily the prosperous era of tlie New
South has set in."
Arkadelphia News.
As I see nothing in your volu
ble paper from this place of unu
al vineyard. I thought it would
not be anything amiss to drop a
few brief hints regarding our
town and county, to begin, we are
now preparing for the A M E
Conference which meets hero next
Wednesday, when we all wish to
have a good time, Presiding
Elder Winstead’s wife is lying
very low and not expected to
live. Mr. and M«D A Robin
son of Pino Bluff are hero to ac
company her back to the Bluff.
Tho election went off quiet hero,
but few voting. (I mean the col
ored) owing to the death of coun
ty Judge J W Wilson, another
had to bo elected in his stead.
Callaway and Flaneagin were the
candidates for the position, both
democrats. By some means or
other, it was noised abroad that
Flanagin had said that il ho wbh
not elected by white votes, ho did
not care a d—n for the negro
votes. When tins camo the to
■ ears of tho sunburnt sons of toil,
they with one accord said, Calla
way shall have it, and ho got it,
The negro holds tho baluaco of
power in Clark county, ns has
been shown in this case. Wish
ing tho Mansion a loug life and
its editor much success.
Yours; X YZ.
Hon 8 II Holland, one of Chi
cot’s richeit farmers, gave us a
pleasant call lost Wednesday,
looking well! He reports tho
crops turning out very well, be
yond the farmers expectation.
Mr. D A Robinson of Pino
Bluff gave us a pleasant call last
Tuesday on route homo from Ar
kadolphia, where ho was accompa
niod by his wife visiting Mrs Jon
nlo Wihstoud,who is lying aFtlio
point ot death, when they arriv
ed there. .She expecting her to
pass away every moment. She
is the wife of ono of the leading
ministers of the A M E church
wo hope oho may soon recover.
Rev G E Tower, of Morrilton,
gave ns a pleasant call hint 'I uos
day, and subscribed for tho Man
sion. Ho is one of tho loading
ministers of this state, and a groat
educator. Ho took tho loud in
raising dollar money in tho last
A M E Conference hold at Au
guota a few weeks ago, and is also
appointed ono of the Trustees of
Wilberforce. Tho conference
could not have made a bettor so
lection. Hois a thorough going
minister and will not leave a
stone unturned. He '• » K rOftt
worker among our young people.
Natke
The Arkansas Annual Confers
once of tho C M E church in
America will bo hold nt Milos’
chapel U M E church, beginning
Doc 2,1886, and continuing until
Dec Bth IW6. Tho public aro,cor
dially invited to attend.
Tho following programme will
bo the service at tho A M E Zion
church, on Sunday. Elder W 8
Ungford of the M E church will
preach at 11 a m,and Elder B P
Johnson L L D, of the C M K
church, at 8 p m.
Elder G E Tower, passed
through the city, en route to Hot
Springs last Tuesday, to spend a
lew weeks for his health.
Charlie Straws, onr “devil" ie
vsry tend of printing and w
make a good printer someday,

xml | txt