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The North-Carolinian. [volume] (Fayetteville [N.C.]) 1839-1861, October 30, 1841, Image 1

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CHARACTER
Ta. INDIVIDUALS;
THE COMMOX PROPERTY OF ITS CITIZENS.
HOLMES & BAYNE, Proprietors.
T JS It. 31 s
the north Carolinian.
Per annum, if paid in advance, &2 50
Do if paid at the end of G months, 3 00
Do if paid at the end of the year, 3 50
Kates of Advertising :
Sixty cents per square, for the first, and thiry cents
for each subsequent insertion.
A liberal deduction M ill be made to advertisers by
the yar.
Court advertisements and Sheriff's sales, will be
. charged 25 per cent, higher than the usual rates
All advertisements sent for publication should have
the number of insertions intended, marked upon
them, otherwise they will be inserted until forbid,
and charged accordingly.
No paper discontinued until arrearages are paid,
except af the option of the E.Iitor.
jSo subscription received for less than twelve
month s J
sCIP'L.etters on business connected with this estab-
iiMiiuicm, nmsi ie aciciressctt uolmes&Uatke,
cases
FAYETTEVILLE, "SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1S41.
Volume 3. Xouiber 140.
all
royal,
to
18
S2
3
1
3
5
3
1
50
00
00
00
01
CO
25
00
00
75
suitors 01 me -orin-uarolmia.n, and in
post-paid.
IC7 Subscribers wishing ti make remittanc s
Iy mail, wdl rememher that thev can do so free of
postage, as Postmasters ar? authorized by law to
frank lettors enclo3i'ng remittances, if written by
themselves, or the contents known to them.
Prices of f ob Work :
HAND BILLS, printed on a medium,
or super royal shee t, for 30 cop es,
For 50 copies,
' Aid for every additional 100 copies,
HORSE BILLS, on a sheet from 12
- inches square, 3U copies,
Over 18 inc hes, and not exceeding 30,
CARDS, large s?c, single pack,
And for every additional pas.k,
Smaller sizes in proportion.
BLANKS, when printed to onler, fir 1 quire,
Anil for every additional qniic, und r 5,
Exceedi:i- 5 quires,
CIRCULARS, INVITATION TICKETS, and
all kinds of BOOK & JOB PRINTING, executed
cheap for CASE!.
THE FOLLOWING
BLANKS!
Kept constantly on hand
AND rOR SALE AT THE
CAROLmiAN orncE : .
CHECKS, on Bank of the State, an J C:ipe
i'Var Bank.
PROSECU FIOX BONDS, Supr. Ct.
MARRIAGE LICENSES
VEND I EXt'O., constables levy
COMMISSIONS to takt-depositions in equi
ty, and fupr. court
APPK-VRANCE' BONDS
AVUIT3, Superior and Co. Ct.
CA. SA. Stinr. Ct.
INDICTMENTS for Affray, and Assault
and Battery, Co. and Sup. Ct.
CER riFIC ATES, Clk. Co. Ct.
JURY TICKETS
(KIDER.S to ovcrserrs of Roads
BASTARDY BONDS
TAX RECEIPTS
"WITNESS TICKETS
EJECTMENTS
PATROL NOTICES
LETTERS of ADMINISTRATION Bonds
Deeds, common,
Sheriff's Deeds,
Constables Ca. Sa. Bonds,
Do Delivery do
Appeal Bonds,
Equity Subpoenas,
Superior Court Fi.
County Court Sci.
vive judgment.
County Court Subpoenas,
Superior Court Warrants,
Bonds for Col'rd. Apprentices
BILLIARD TABLE
For Snli
Apply at this Olfice.
Sipt."25, I84I.-
135-tf.
NEW GOODS AND CHEAP.
FPfiLubscrlber has fcdvedhis fall and vintcr
-U- STOCK OP GOODS, embracing a general
assortment ot , -
STAPLE DRY GOODS,
Fur and Wool Hals, Seletle and Seal-skin
Caps, BlanletSy Shoes, Ilardicare and
Cutler, Crockery and Glass icare,
cu I and icrough 1 JVails,
Swedes and English Iron, assorted,
Trace Chains, Hollow ware, $c $ c. &c.
Together with a good assortment cf
GROCERIES.
All cf which will b sold low for CASH, or ex
changed for COUNTRY PRODUCE. Please
give me a call before yuu boy.
CANNON CAISON,
Hay street nearly opposite the Hotel.
Sept. 10, 1841. 133-G.n.
OWEiV HOUSTON,
fSartdle, Trunk, and Harness Maker,
7 13 1AKES this method of informing his friends
-1L and customers, in town and country, that he
has moved buck to his OLD STAND, on Hay
Street, one door below James Baker's Hardware
ti-e, where he may be found at all times, prepared
to do any work in his line on the most reasonable
terms."
KEPAIRING promptly attended to and thank
fully received.
He k-eps constantly on hand an aseortment of
MEWS' JlJS'D LJ1IJJES SADDLES.
ALSO Harness of all kinds, TJridles, Whips,
Collars, Trunks, and every article in his line of
business.
He ou!d take this opportunity of returning his
hanks to those who have patronized him; and hopes
by punctuality to business, and moderate charges
to continue to merit their patronage.
Sept. 4, 1 84 1. 132-tf.
,Ohs' rvcr will copv tiil forbid.
57" OULD respect fully in
Y form his frien js and
I' the Public "cneiully, that he
still conliniic.o to carrv on the
TIN & SHEET IRON
WARE MANUFAC
TORY, at his old Stand,
-- on Gillespie street, a tew
doors Sooth of the Market House.
All orders thankfully received and promptly at
tended to.
October 2, l?41. 136-6m.
FRUIT, SNUFF1, TOBACCO,
"ILT" EPT constantly on hand at the Stpre of 'the
-LTAX. Subscriber, ...
Soft and hard shell Almonds,
Brazil and JWddtira JVuts, Filberts,
liaisons, Pruuts,' Citron, Crackers,
Jtface, Jtultnegs, Cloves, Cinnamon,
Alacaboy and Scotch Snuff',
Smoking and Cheicing Tobacco; 'Mustard.
ALSO, a pood assortment of STUART'S CEL
EBRATED STEAM REFINED CANDY.
W. PRIOR.
October 1G, IS41 138-tf
SUGARS.
!f35 (fMldb PRINCIPE AND HA-
JLWOMy VANA SEGARS7a good ar
ticle for retail, received and for sale at the S:ore of
W. PRIOR.
October 16, 1841. J38tf
ENTERTAINMENT.
IOOIi AT THIS.
Y HOUSE has been thoroughly repaired. I
will keep Entertainment at very reduced pri
ces, and be glad to welcome the return of my friends
and customers. Call and see.
E. SMITHV
Fayettcvi lie, October 13, J 841. 138-tf
M y House is on the corner of Gillespie and Mum
ford Streets, convenient to the Market, and near the
State Bank. E. S. t
VALUABLE LANDS
WILL he Sold, on Saturday the 27th of No
vember next, at his late residence in Cum
berland County, the following valuable Tracts of
LAND, belonging to the Estate of the late Stephen
Hollins worth, deceased:
640 Acres, known as the Kelly Land, and former
ly the property of L. Mallett.
ISO Acre. s, undivided, between S. Boon and J. Jes-
sup, on Harrison's creek.
ISO Acres between Hollingsworth and Barksdale.
SO Acres adjoining the lands of the Widow.
112 do. do. -To'ar.
IOO do. d... Hall.
All of the above Lands will be sold on the day
above mentioned, on a credit of Sis Alonths, with
Notes and approved Security.
ROBERT MELVIN,
G. T. BARKSDALE,
A ministrators of S.Hollingsworth, decM.
October 16, 1841. 13S-tds.
NEW ESTABLISHMENT.
Fa.
Fa,
to re-
MOUNTAIN BUTTER.
rllfc Firkins (assorted.) feonie
verv su nerior. at prices troin
& to 1(5 cents per pound !
for sale by GEO. McNEILL
Nov. 24, 1840.
SO
Feb.
POTATOES.
bushels potatoes.
geo. McNeill.
12, 1841. 103-tf
TT flAVR a fcw COTTON GINS unsold at Hall
JL & Johnson's, Fayett ville. They will be sold
. ,tn.orl t- ri-rf at six monl hs credit. A liberal
discount will be made forcash powELL
Au-ust IS, 1841. 131-Sm
BUCKWHEAT FLOUR !
For sale by
Nov. 24, 1840.
GEO. McNElLL.
IS
PISH!
BARRELS CUT HERRING.
15 Barrels Whole Licrr ns
10 Half Barrels Shad. Bcin expected by
the Henrietta Line. For sale by
GEO.
May 28, 1841.
McNeill.
118-tf
THE "'SUBSCRIBER, OfTers for
sale, at the Store lalt ly occupied by Alessrs Benbow,
& Co., 011 Hay Si reef, a variety of
ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN
COLOGNE and FLORIDA "WATER, BEAR'S
Gi! EASE and OIL. ANTIQUE OIL, POM A
TUM, CIRCASSIAN and COLD CREAM, X
MAKliOW, PRESTON SALTS, EXTRACTS,
SHAVING SOAPS AND CREAMS; II AIR,
CLO TH, TOOTH, and FLESH - BRUSHES;
POWPER PUFFS and BOXES; RAZORS; PEN
and POCKET KNIVES; SCISSORS; SHELL
SIDE, DRESSING and POCKET
COMBS,
Steel Pens; Pocket Books; Backgammon Boards;
Dice Boxes, Batlledoors and Birds, Gentlemen's
Drossinj: Cas. s; Hooks and Eyes; Fishinff Lines
and Hooks; Percussion C;ips, (ribbed and p'ain;)
Matches; SnefT and -Tobacco Boxes; Plated Corks,
for decanters; Maib!rs; Slates and Pencils; Wafers;
Note Paper; Son Glasses; Teething Rings; R.
Hemninff & Son's drilled eyed Noodles; Silver
Thimbles; Silver Ever-pointed Pencils: Black snaps;
Glass Inkstands and Ink; Q,uills, &.c. &c.
ALSO
A good assortment of
VIOLINS, FLUTES, AND FIFES,
Violin Bows, Strings, Bridges, and Screws;
Clariouett Heeds; Tuning Forks, and
JSTnsic Boxes.
All of which will be sold cheap f r CASH.
W. PRIOR.
October 10, I S4 1. 1 38 tf-
NEW GOODS.
V H HE Subsc:ibers are now receiving by the late
JL arrivals from the North, their FALL AND
W INTER SUPPLY OF MERC II A N DIZE, con
sisting of a Iare and general assortment of
HARDWARE AND CUTLERY,
Hats and Shoes. Bonnets, and Um
brellas, Foolscap and J. etter Pa
per,
Urugs
and Medicines,
State of North-Carolina,
MOORE COUNTY.
Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, Jlu-
gust Term, 1841.
Cornelius Dunlap, Petition for partition of
Vi" c u i Lands.
James Dunlap & oihers ) , ,
IT appearing to the sat.sfaction of the Court, that
John McCrimmon and wife Sarah, Jacob Cagle
and wife Margaret, William Lewis and wife Ann
John Phillips, Mary Phillips, Matthew Deaton and
ivife Sarah, Nathan Wallas and wife Mary, Martha
. -..: Tnhn MrCrimmon, defendanis in
this case, are not inhabitants 01 un o.c,
nrt ordered! That publication be made in the North
fnr ii wepks. notifvinif said d-Jetio"ants
lo appear at the next Court of Pleas anduiuarier
Pensions to be held for said county, at the Court
House in Carthaee,on the third Monday m Novem
ber next, and plead, answer, or demur to said pe
tition, or the same will be taken pro confesso as to
them.'and heard accordingly.
Witness, Alexander C. Curry, Clerk of oor said
Court, af office, in Carthage, the third Monday rn
August A. D. 1841, and of American Indepen
dence the sixty-sixth.
136-6t
A. C. CURRY, Clerk.
EXECUTED W I T H DESPATCH
At this Office.
Paints and Dye Stuffs, Sad
dles, Bridles, &c. &c.
CROCKERY AND GLASS WARE,
Blacksmith's Tools, Hollow Ware, t$c $-c.
Also, a large assortment of
GROCERIES
Of all kinds ; all of which will be sold at the lowest
prices for Cash, Back-country Produce, or on credit
for approved notes. The Stock is very heavy, and
worthy the attention ot Country Merchants and the
public in
Teneral.
J. C. & G
FayettrviMe, Sept. 25, 1S41
. D. ATKINS.
Foot of Havmount.
136-y.
NEW FIEM.
THE Subscribers have connected themselves in
the Mercantile Business, under the firm of
J. C. A C K- ATKINS. They intend keep-in"-
a larjreand ffcneral assortment of Merchandize,
atwholesalc and retail. They will be found at the
old Stand of G. IJ. Atkins, where they wish to see
their friends and customcrs.
G. D. ATKINS.
Fayetteville, Sept. 25, 1S4I. 136-tf.
We hav j'ist printed a parcel of Blank Indict
ments for trading with Slaves. Give us nCall.
,ncn 0 HOLMES & BAV'NE.
Sears' Pictorial Illustrations
of the
BIBLE,
A ID VIEWS IN THE HOLY LAND WITH
Fu Au AND INTERESTING LETTER-PRESS
Descriptions
CHIEFLY EXPL,.1JJlTOHY OF THE V-
and of the numerous jjassages connected with
the (Geography, J'utural History ty- Jinliqui-
tiesofthe SJ1CHED S (JlilL Tu HE S.
THE FOLLOWING WOJIK HAS BKE.N COMPILED
FROM THE
LONDON PICTOKIAL RIIST..I3
WHICH SELLS IN THIS COUNRY FOR j 1 S tO
5ei copy ;
dp-Eve i y man, Woman and child in the United
States, who possesses a Hible, will surely furnish
tbornselves with the following beautiful series o
Scripture Illustrations.
200 Victorial Illustrations
. OF THE lilBJ.E,
AND
VIEWS IN THE HOLY LAND.
iEW, CHEAP, AN I) VALUABLE PUBLICATION.
Four hundred pastes, 8 vo., Fine Paper, Handsome-
ly Bound, Price vuly two dollars. The subscriber
respectfully invites the attention of Clergymen,
Teachers of Sabbath Schools, Heads of Families,
and Booksellers, throughout the U. Statos, to the
above New, Cheap, and Splendidly Illustrated
Work. Published and for sale, at No. 122, Nassau
Street New York City. Its features are better de
fined by the title:
TWO HUNDRED PlCTORAL ILLUSTRATIONS OF
THE SCRIPTURES,
CONSISTING OF
Views intlie Holy Land, ,
Torrether with man' of the most remarkable ob
jects mentioned in the Old and New Testaments,
reorese ntinsr sacred historical events, copied from
celebrated pictures, principally by the old mas
ters. the Land-c ipe Scenes, taken fiom original
sketches made on the spot," with full and inter
esting Letto.--Press descriptions, devoted to an
explanation ot the objects mentioned in the sa
cred toxt.
On examination this will be tonne! a very pleas
ant and profitable book, especially for the perusal
of ounr Peoph-, abounding in the most vamabl
information, collected with grt at care, from the br-st
and latest sources. It may, very properly, be desig
nated a common rdace book for everv thinir va! ua
b!c, relating to ORIENTAL MANNERS, CUS
TOMS, &c. &c. and comprises within itself a com
plete library of religious and useful knowledge. A
volume like the present, is far superior to the Com
mon Annuals it will never be out of date.. CCP'It
is beautifully printed in new on primer type
handsomulv bound in musun, gilt, and lettered
and is, ileeidediv, the best and cheapest publication
(for the price,) ever issued from the American 1'ress
ICJA liberal discount made to wholesale pur
MJPersons in the country, wishing to act as
airents, may obtain all the necessary information,
by addressing their letters to the subscriber, No
122, Nassau Street. N. York City.
ROBERT SEARS, Publisher.
9 n ? 9 9
Clergyman, Superintendents and Teachers
of Sabbatb Schools, ICJAgents of Rebsisus
Newspapers, and Periodicals, I Postmasters,
& Book-sellers, throughout the conntryrare lespcct-
fullv requested to act as our agents.
EC30 teller will be taken from the office unless
y-ost paid. ' " 1
To Publishers of Papers throughout the U S.
A Jfewsvapers or JWagazints, copvine the above
entire, without any alteration or abridgement (m
cludinr this notice,) and ffivinc1 it twelve inside in
sertions, slia'l receive a copy f the work (subject lo
their order,) bv sending direct to the Publisher.
Sept- 4, 1841, I32-I2t.
SADDLE AND HARNESS MAKING.
THE Subscriber begs leave to inform the publ c,
that he has commenced the above business on
Market Square, next door"f Mr James R. Gee's,
where he will ke p constantly on hand and for sale,
Carriage, Barouche, Sulky, Carryall, and Wagon
HARNESS,
SJLDDLES, of every quality and price,
TRUNKS AND WHIPS.
In short, every article usually found in a Saddler's
Shop. Persons wishing to buy, would do well lo
call and examine -his work before purchasing else
where, as he is detei mined to sell VERY LOW
FOR CASH, or on the usual time to punctual cus
tomers. He hopes by strict attention to his busi
ness, to merit a portion of public patronag?.
tCT" REPAIRING of every description in his
line promptly attended to, and moderate charges
made. J. S. RABOTEAU-
Sept. 29, 1841. I36-3M.
PLOTO IGXiXi.
Blunt's Creek mill has been
thoroughly repaired.
Wheat will he received and
ground with despatch. For terms
apply to GEO. McNEILL.
Etl Cash paid for wheat.
Nov. 20, 1840. -
Klank Warrants,
State and Civil, with and without judgments, just
printed and for sale at the Carolinian Oince, where
all kinds of Blanks are kept for sale. Will our
friends give us a c ill ?
NEW AND CHEAP GOODS
J. & J. KYLE
HAVE just received by the last
arrivals from the North, a large and
splendid assortment of
DRY -GOODS.
iimong which are
Superior c!oihs and Cassimeres ; Saftinets :
Kentucky Janes; white, red, and screen Flannel,
4 and 6-4; JVlennos, r rench and Jinglirh ; 2100
eces Calico; plain Muslins; Bishop Lawns;
Irish Linens. Liwns and Diapers; Bolting Cloths,
sown and bleached Domestics, from 3-1 to 6-4;
with many other articles. All of which, beinir
bought at the lowest Package price, am offered at
reduced prices, by Wholesale or Retail, for Cash,
or to punctual Customers on the usual time.
September 6, 1841. i34-tf.
X.A2MZP OIL.
First quality WINTER pressed
For sale by GEO. McNEILL.
December, ISlh.
MISS BINGHAM'S SCHOOL
"IC10R YOUNG LADIES was opened on Men
day, the 4th inst.
October 16, IS 11.
133-4t
GREEN STREET SCHOOL
131STRS H ART will open her School on Monday
Ifil the Uth inst., in Uks Mouse recently occupied
bv James Kyle. -'Oct.
4, IS If 137-3C
S"J?.TJ?1
O barrels Camps' refined Syrup.
O barrels New Orleans TREACLE.
For sale by GEO. McNEILL.
December, 18th.
NOTICE.
t l CI E Subscriber having inclosed a lot and erec-
M ted Shelters directly on Hay-Mount has
opened it tor the use of wagoners tree of charge.
J (Jo ti.1 tl fc. JJUrMIM.
October 23, 1841. 139-4t.
Christian Missions in Liberia.
Liberia is perhaps better supplied with the
Gospel, than many places iu Christendom.
Includino- Cape ijalnias, Liberia has a popu
lation of two thousand five hundred colonists,
all told. The town and settlements of Mills
bur, Caldwell, and New Georgia, Monrovia,
Marshall, Edina, Bassa Cove, Be.xley, and
Sinou; the wholft having about two thousand
colonist inhabitants, and the Maryland Colo
ny at Cape lalmas, with five hundred set
tlers. At and in the vicinity of those towns, the
various christian denominations spend annu
ally not less ihau sixty thousand dollars iu
missionary operations; supporting twenty or
more foreign missionaries, and a great num
ber of colonists as preachers, teachers, and as
sistants. The education of youth, is princi
pally if not wholly in the hands of the mis
sionary societies, as also the supplying the des
titute and needy.
Methodist E. Mission. The mission
ary society of the Methodist Episcopal Church,
has mission houses, school houses, and church
es in nearly every town in the Colonies, aud
several houses and churches in native towns:
in all twelve or thirteen churches, five school
houses, eight mission houses, several rented
dwellings and school rooms, eleven schools,
one seminary and twenty or more persons,
the most of whom are heads of families, in its
employ.
Membership, nearly one thousand.
Baptist Church. The Missionaries of
the Baptist denomination have concentrated
their efforts in and around Edina, where they
have a fair, membership, mission houses,'
schools aud a press for publishing the Scrip
tures in the Bassa language, which they have
already translated. They have a flourishing
school of native youths. The Baptists have a
church at Millsburgh, Caldwell, New Georgia,
Monrovia, Edina, Bassa Cove, a missionary
at Bexley, and we think a small society at
Cape Palmas. The Baptist churches above
named, except at Edina, and Bassa Cove,
support themselves with a praiseworthy zeaL
without foreign aid.
Membership, three hundred.
Presbyterian Mission. The Presbyte
rians have a flourishing mission at Fair Hope,
Cape Palmas, under the superintendence of
the Kev. J. Leighton Wilson. The mission
buildings at Fair Hope, include dwelliugs,
school houses, churches and other houses for
the press, resideuce of the pupils, &c. At
that place there is a school with nearly thirty
boys aud twenty girls, all natives; many of
whom have made great proficiency, and a num
ber have &om time to time left the establish
ment with a fair education. Mr Wilson with
the assistance of the Protestant Episcopal mis
sionaries, has published several elementary
school books, also a dictionary, and is now
engaged getting a part of the Holy Scriptures
through the press; all the above having been
translated into the Grey bo language. They
have mission stations at the native towns,
Rocktown and Fishtoivrf, and prospering
schools at each. These stations are near
Cup-3 Palmas.
The Presbyterians have a church at Mon
rovia, Edina and Fair Hope: the two former
supported by colonists.
Membership, about fifty.
Protestant Episcopal Mission. This
mission is located at Mount Vaughaii, Cape
Pol mas, and having two native stations at
some distance, called - Graway, aud Cavally.
The mission buildings are said to be (for we"
have never visited Cape Palmas) commodi
ous aud elegant. They are comprised iu
dwellings, church, school houses, &c. &c
The schools at Mount Yaughan, Cavally, and
Graway, are flourishing. The mission gene
rally is prosperous and 'greatly prized by the
citizens.
The Episcopalians have no churches or
schools in the colony except those above men
tioned. Their operations are quite exten
sive,and all concentrated around Cape Palmas.
Membership not known say thirty.
JLfrictfs Luminary.
The Niger Expedition.
The object of the expedition is to proceed
up the Niger, with a view to obtain accurate
geographical knowledge and surveys, and to
form treaties with the various chiefs in its
route, for the suppression of the traffic in slaves,
& the establishment of a legitimate commerce.
The immediate objects of the Society are,
1st, to make the Africans acquainted with the
inexhaustible riches of their own soil, and to
sedulously divert their attention to its cultiva
tion, on a system of free labor. To convince
them, moveover, of the uumeasurable superi
ority of agriculture and innocent commerce,
even in point of profit over the slave trade,
which excludes them.
2. To instruct the natives in agriculture
and practical science, by cultivating small
portions of land as models fcr their imitation,
to distribute agricultural implements, seeds,
plants, &c, to introduce local and other im
provements, aud to suggest and facilitate the
means of beneficially exchanging the produce
of Africa for the manufactures of Europe. ,
3. To examine the principal languages of
Africa, and reduce them, when possible, to a
written form.
4. To investigate the diseases of the cli
mate, and loeal peculiarities of Africa, for the
benefit as well of natives as of foreign resi
dents and travellers, to send out medicines
and practitioners, and thus to separate , the
practice of medicine from the horrid supersti
tions now connected with it.
5. To co-operate by every means in its
power with the Government expedition to the
Niger, to report the progress, assist its opera
tions, calculate the valuable information it
may communicate, and generally to keep a!ive
the interest of Great Britain in the suppres
sion of the slave trade, and the welfare of Af
rica. Liberia Herald.
Every one who has written a paragraph for
publication is aware that it is exceedingly
difficult to come the sentimental. " He of
she who attempts it runs altogether too many
risks. On oue hand, there is danger that he
or she may be drawn into the whirlpool of
silliness; on the other, he or she may go to'
pieces upon the rock of stupidity, it is so very
difficult to preseive a happy medium. See
how successful the editor of the Buffalo Free
Press has been in escaping both Scylla and
Charibdis. We have rarely seen a purer
specimen of sentimentalism:
"The wheels of time go swiftly round, arcd
the way the dirt flies is a caution. Another
summer is gone dog days are nearly used
up, and ere long the bleak winds will,, be
whistling at our windows. Harvest hath
passed, and now is seed time: the late rains
are replenishing the famished eaith, and
punkius are in excellent order. We love a
big, yellow,- wide-ribbed clever-looking pump
kin ! It makes us t'aiuk of all the delights of
munchiuir into a thick, delicious pie. Pump
kin pies are our especial and particular de
light. Who's got any they want' to dirpose
off?
Political.
A convict in a bad box.
A desperado named James C. Cole, who
had before graduated in the state prison, was
on the 3d of August, 1S40 sentenced to the
state prison for 15 years, for an aggravated
case of robbery in the 1st degree, (called high
way robbery) in presenting a loaded pistol to
the breast of 9 broker in Greenwich street,
and crying out "your money or your life."
In the state prison he was employed in box
making, and planed off and fitted up an old
sugar box, driving nails through the edge of
the top and breaking off the points and also
putting wooden buttons under the lid so as
to turn into small furrows in the sides and
made small holes to let in the air. Having
secured the aid of two convicts, on Friday
after dinner he marked the box, directing it to
J. Line, corner of Pike and Madison streets,
and getting into it and doubling himself Up,
secured the lid, and was carried to the wharf
to be put on board the sloop Fanny, for New
York, the convicts by mistake putting the box
on the end with his head downwards. In
this state he continued for half an hour, when
he was canied on board the sloop and she set
sail with Mr Lent, one of :iie prison keepers,
on board, who knew nothing of the convict
in the box. The sloop, when a few miles on
her voyage, was injured iu her sails by a
squall, aud had to putback to Sing Sing lo
rent, wnere inc Keeper leu ner, ana me re
pairs completed, the sloop resumed her voy
age towards the cilv.
On the passage, the box was placed iu the
cabin near the stove, aud used as a seat by
those on board, and became so tremendously
hot that Cole fainted twice with the heat and
confined air, and came near suffocating.
Meanwhile, the keeper, who lauded from the
sloop at Sing -Sing, hearing of the escape of
Cede, aud having seen the box on board, right
ly supposed he bad stowed himself in it, aud
taking the first steamboat, arrived in the city
before the sloop, which he boarded as soon
as it touched the wharf, and knocking off the
lid of the box, there found Cole, doubled up,
nearly dead, and so stiffened by his position
that when hauled out he was unable to stand
lie was carried to the City prison, aud there
locked up until Saturday afternoon, when he
was put on board a steamer iu irons, and ta
ken by the keeper back to Sing Sing, to
serve out the remaining long years of his term
of imprisonment, and to taste the bitterness
of a terrible flagellatiou for his unsuccessful
attempt to escape. .V. Y. Sun.
. j
' Boy, why don't you go to school?' Be
kase, sir, Daddy is afeared that if I learns
every thing now 1 shaut have any thing to
learu veu 1 comes to go to the academy,"
Pipe Laying.
It is the current, and it is difficult to doubt
that it is the correct, impression that the elec
tions in many of the States last fall Were' ma
terially affected by extensive' pipe laying
frauds on the part of our opponents. It is
firmly believed that in a number of instances
the hard cider victories were achieved solely
by such base means, and many are satisfied
that the election of Qen. Harrison was se
cured by this species of treason to the catrsef
of republicanism. It is now evident that a
flood of light is likely to be poured upon the
subject: The Glentworth exposures in re
ference to-previous elections, are known to
the people, and have satisfied them as to' tho
nature of the enemy - they have to deal with,
but more is coming which bears directly on
the point at issue. It was positively charged
at the time that most atrocious frauds were
committed in the west, and the Cincinnati
Enquirer, in speaking of a late democratic
meeting in that city has the foHoVving impor
tant testimony :' ,
"Mr Wilkins, of Butler county was the
principal speaker and his developemehts of
the system of pipe laying and fraud, by which
the Democracy of this county were defeated,
were listened to with great attention. Of the
" colonizing " in this county, from the south
ern portiou of Warren, Mr W. said ho spoke
upon the information of ethers, in which' ike
most implicit confidence might be placed.
Of the same system in Butler, carried into
effect to defeat Air Weller, he spoke from his
own personal knowledge.' Mr Wilkins gave
this fraud upou the elective franchise, and the
deceptions practised by the federal leaders
upon the people, in relation to measures of
great national policy, a his reasons for de
serting the federalists, and joining in rho sup
port of democracy. They form the justifica
tion of hundreds, who are adopting the same
course. Mr Wilkins was" warmly applauded
during tho course,- and at the close of his re
marks." On this the Ohio- Slatesfrnalr remarks
"Mr Wilkins was an active committee
man of Butler county, is a lawyer of leading
talents, and his statements are worthy of alt
confidence.
" Awhig who took an active part in these
elections, said iu this city, that he knew of
an arrangement to make a difference ol seven
hundred votes in Hamilton county, and that
Dr. Duncan was as fairly elected to Congress
as ever any one could be. The fact is, we
have never doubted that the Democrats of
Ohio were defrauded out of the election last
fall, by the most monstrous system of frautT
and villany ever concocted by the most aban
doned race of men on earth.
" A whig of this city says he knows of
pipe-laying from this county rate Pickaway
last year, and hints pretty strongly that he
could tell of worse acts than that. Is it any
wonder, then, that thousand of whigs, on
sober reflection, are deserting such a party
aud uniting with us, to save our histitutkms
from ruin and disgrace. Pennsylcanian.
Cost of a Whig President for one year.
Three month's salary was drawn by Genl.
Harrison as soon as he entered upou the du
ties of his office, $6,250
Besides which he ree'da years salary, 25,000
His funeral expenses' amounted to 3,0S3
The ajrpropriatiou" for new furniture 6,000
Making the neat lillle sum of $40,333
This is the sum expended on Harrison for
one month1 services as President. f We add
to it, Tyler's salary for 11 months, viz. $22,
916 53, the cost to the country of the first
year of a Whig President amounts to the enor
mous sum" of SIXTY-THREE THOU
SAND TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY
FOUR DOLLARS AND SEVENY-TWO
CENTS! This is economy 'with ven
geance! Tennessee Sentinel.
The Wbigs seem to be puzzling themselves
with attempts to define " Webster's position,"
Clay's position," and their own " position."
This remines us of a dialogue between the
captain and mate of a pinky, when they were
beating about in the bay in a thick fog, and
fearful of goiug ashore. ' What would our
wives say, if they knew where we are V saiJ
the' captain. "Humph!' I shouldn't mind
that," replied the Ynate, if we only kuew
where we are outselvcs Boston Pest
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