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Goldsboro weekly argus. [volume] (Goldsboro, N.C.) 1885-1909, July 21, 1892, Image 2

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t.f (ffiltcklg Slrgus.
P 'RT.:HVr St -
J OS. E. ROBINSON,
KMTOIl AND PROPRIETOR.
fintunl w 'the fox (office at Golditboro, A. C
Second Ctus Matter.
'OMianORO, N. C. JULY 21, 1892.
i !'hk Aiious swslu to be a reliable paper
for tho peopican': vU; faiuily Icmocrstic, nud
OtjanriK to discuss no is?:io wherein the peoj)lo'
rirSii-s an at stake. Progressive, abreast of the
imll lilwursen.ieavor to keep pur edi
torial iin i loc vi columns up to tho day and
h.mr. oflr ircul-uioo is rapidly increasing,
n.l wo hopo to soon have the largest circula-
! of y ijiiixu- in Ea-tern North Carolina
DEMOCItATIC N03IINKKS.
FOR PRESIDENT :
G ROVER CLEVELAND,
of New York.
FOU VICE-PRESIDENT:
A. E. STEVENSON,
of Illinois.
STATE DEMOCRATIC TICKET.
FOR GOVERNOR:
ELIAS CAER,
of Edgecombe.
FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR:
II. A. DOUGIITON,
of Alleghany.
Fur Secretary of StaU:
OCTAVIUS COK E,
of Wake.
For Treasurer:
DONALD BAIN,
of Wake.
For Auditor:
11. M. FURMAN,
of Buncombe.
For Snpt-rin'dt Public Instruction:
J. C. SCARBOROUGH,
of Johnston.
For Attorney-General:
FRANK I. OSBORNE,
of Mecklenburg.
For ;adffe of the Twelfth District,
GEORGE A SHUFORD.
For electors at large,
CHARLES B, AYCOCK,
ROBERT B, GLENN,
LABOR ETHICS.
In tho army of workingmen at
Homestead we are told, there are
many expert sharp-shooters, men
who have learned to use the rifle ;
for game is comparatively plenti
ful in the neighboring mountains,
and the workingmen are not so
poor but that they can enjoy a
day's sport occasionally, In fact
the employees of the Homestead
works are not at all a poor class of
men; and It is fortunate for them
and tor the cause of labcr in gen
eral that they are not. Like the
farmers of Concord and Lexington,
they have entered into the present
fight aa much for the sake of prin
ciple as because of the money in
terest at stake. Like the men of
the Revolution again, they are
willing to fight because they know
how--a fact of immeasurable im
portance in the morale of any
body of men.
The result of that ability t.o pro
tect themselves, deplorable as was
the necessity for its use, ia worth
all it has cost. As a first conse
quence we look to the disbanding
everywhere of the lawless army of
Pinkerton guards. Several Statea
have already forbidden their im
portation from other common
wealths, but that is not enough.
The Federal Government must
forbid their very existence as an
organization; otherwise it would
be quite easy for the Carnegie
Company, the Reading Railroad,
the Standard Oil Company, or any
other great corporation to recruit
its standing army of mercenaries
without leaving the borders of any
particular State., Statutes such as
have jbeeir paesAl in New-York,
Ne JeiWjl tladiana aird Massa
chusetts, against- the introduction
of Pinkertdn guards from other
sections do not prevent Mr. Pinker
ton ' from locating a gai rison in
any , pf thoee States ; they only
limit his., powers of mischief, to
noma extend, The United States
must deal with" "the treasonable
usurpation of its ri eis by or
ganized ruffianism.
: We : have contidered thus far
only , the practical side of the pres
ent situation, lor that is the eide
which confronts the friends of jus
tice and the rights of labor. Prac
tically the Carnegie Company has
declared war on its late employee;
it has need armed forces to over"
come tnem: ana it nas been de
feated. The workingmen have
met the illegai .riuvHders as any
commu,nity; would be justified in
meeting an assault , by banditti or
wild Indians. fSo long es the pos
sibility of, another i invasion exists,
so long the defenders, will be; war
ranted in .waging- exterminating
w ir against their assailants. " Amid
.rm8.the laws.: are silent ", so says
the law itself.- The moral aspect
of the case is lost sight of - in the
immediate question ; of meeting
illegal force with just resistance,
but morally the "workingmen are
also in the right. The quarrel is
not essentially so much one of rates
of wages, as of rights of existence.
Manager F.rick has determined to
break up the iron-workers' union.
As he said in his ultimatum; "If
this contract at $23 is not signed
by June 24, midnight, we will not
deal, with the union any more. We
will employ, each man separately,
And will pay no attention to the
union ".
The issuing of this ultimatum
was but the first step in his avowed
determination to destroy . the Am
algamated Association of work
ingmen. Nobody will . deny that
labor anions sometimes work hard
ship to indiyiduals, bat such in
stances are rare, and the benefit to
workiagmen at large far exceeds
any possible injury v to private
rights. One may concede the ab
stract right of -a State to leave the
Union, without denying the higher
right of the Union to prevent se
cession .forcibly; ; because . .the se
cession of one or , more members
would have brought ruin to all.
The .workingman's union is his
capital. - Without its protection he
is at the mercy of his employer.
The theory that a man may do
what he likes arith his own " is
not tenable in this era of great in
dustrial enterprises. Thirty years
ago a man might do . what he liked
with his own horse,with his his own
child, with his own "cuffy"; but
a better civilization has taught him
that he no longer holds that
"right." It is conceivable that a
billionaire, or a body of them,
might today become owners of a
whole city. Does any sane person
contend that ia such case they
would be justified in burning down
that city, provided Jtkey --chose to
indulge in the pastime!
The men who "own" the Home-i
stead steel works owe something to
the laws under which they have
waxed rich and insolent. The
protective tariff lias certainly been
kind to them. .Under its fostering
influence they have .been, enabled
to divide many : millions i among
themselves, i They t. may have a
legal right to shot down "their
mills, to "let the' 'works crumble
and waste away into the river with
the rains," as 'their friend Pinker
ton declareejbut the people of
Homestead can stand that if the
Carnegie Company can. What
they cannot stand, and -what the
people of the whole country will
support them in. resisting, is the
trampling on their rights by a horde
of mercenaries at the dictation bi
arrogant capital. They have won
their Lexington. They , can wait,
even if it takes seven ; years, for
their Yorktown.
STATE NEWS
Raleigh Chronicle; The elec
trie lights, in all save the business
part, are being removed and in a
few days the "tombstone gafr
lights will undertake to make
darkness visible. There will be a
howl later on.
Greensboro Patriot: On yes
terday while the vanguard of the
wire-pullers assembled in knots
about the hotels, preparatory to
the meeting of the Republican
Convention tosday, some of tho
leaders of the People's party (so
called) were noticed shaking hands
among them one gentleman
prominently spoken of as a candi
date tor a btate omce.
Burlington Herald: On Mr,
Jim Teague's farm, about a mile
from town, have been found indi
cations that point to rich deposits
of gold ore. " Mr. James Jones, an
old miner, is at the head of the
proiect, and has leased the prop
erty for a term of vears. -The
shaft has been sunk about sixteen
feet, and several gold-bearing
quartz have been taken out. This
is thought to be what will prove
a rich find.
Morganton Herald; A. great deal
more hay will be made in Burke
th;s year than ever before, Mr. J.
A. Lackev has a field of timothy
on his farm near Morganton, conn
taining twelve acres, from which
he cut a crop ot nay that was a
stunner. The timothy heads were
from 8 to 12 inches in length. Our
armers are learning that tMi ii
as much money in raising hay . .id
cattle as in anything else' their
farms can produce.
. Wilmington Star; The Comp
troller of the Currency has declar
ed another 15 per cent, dividend
for the depositors of the First Nab
tional Bank, which suspended last
November. When this is paid
it will make 30 per cent, re
ceived by depositors, more already
than a great many expected to get.
Mr. w.o. u 13. .tfooin6on, re
ceiver of the bank, will pay out
this dividend as soon as the checks
can be made out, and in a few
days the bank employes expect a
rush.
Rocky Mount Argonaut: We
learn that hundreds of men in
Nash, who expected to support
the Third party, have abandoned
the concern,-since the nomination
made last Saturday. . This is but
the beginning. Where is the man
who would yote for Lunce Lord
for the Legislature in preference to
Nick Boddie? Of course they are
ashamed of the . nomination, , and
will not vote. the ticket, but, come
back and support the . grand old
party through which alone they
can hope tor the reuet tney need
and ought to haye
RuleicrTi ' - JVmmt- Observer: " - The
suggestion that the cornerstone' of
the proposed Uon federate monu
ment be laid during the Raleigh
Centenial meetsjwith general favor,
and indeed it seems to us that it
would be eminently appropriate.
It is entirely practicable and even
in case .the funds for the entire
monument are not raised by ,that
time, there is no reason why the
corner stone should not be laid
then. It thh is determined upon
and the fact is given general pub
licty we doubt not that large bodies
of troops from Maryland, Virginia,
South Carolina and other Southern
States, and certainly the - entire
State Guard of North Carolina
would come to honor the occasion.
It could be made a great . day in
the South.
Mountain-FedBeel
Gity Market.
FINEST BEEF
Ira. tla.e CJtt3T
o .
Lamb, Mutton, Pork, Sausage
AND ONLY THE FINEST AT
Sam Cohen & Son's
CITY MARKET.
For Rent.
A two story 6 room dwelling
new on East Centre street
Apply to . ,. ; -.
MRS. E. A. COGDELL.
June 25, '92. tf.
o ;
IfirMkSfiwhra Wastage
r - . DIRECT LIKE,
-iTRYWBEKIiY TRIPS.
In order to rnak more convenient and
economical use or the vessels nnw employed
iu me nurm uaroiina service, ana tnus to
Better Serve the Interests of i
the Clyde. Line and Old IMminlon Steamship
Vtnnvaaf njtepynciuaea to merge tneir re
spective lines between Newborn, N. C, and
Norfolk, Vs., into one line, thus giving pas
senger and truck shippers three trips each
week- Jotwee.n,iiewberi and Norfolk via
wasninirTon.
; NODYANCE IN RATES.
" On and 'after Monday., July 4, 1892, uatil
xuriner notice, tne .
Staamer Jtewberfl, Cap t. Sontkgate
; Steaierinola; Capt. Boyfl,
" -y . '' -AND
SteamerAlMniuTls.OaSt.BtioQuS
Will sail from NorfolR, Va.. for Newhem
direct, every Monday. Wednesday, and Fri
day, i a. m., making- connection, with the At
lantic and North Carolina Kailroad and thi
Witter Lines on Neusc and Trent river.
Ketuminsr. will sail from Newlmrn for Nor
folk, Va., Mondays, Wednesdays and F. idays
at js in., (nonnj maKinir con ection
at Norfolk with The Old Itnv lino.
for Baltimore. The Clyde Line, for Pliiladel-
Snia, me Jia liomimoc sieaiiifnip uo , for
ew York, The Merchants' and Miners' Line
for Providence and Boston, and The Water
Lines for Washington. I). C, and Richmond,
va., mug givioi? an tut water route to an
Northern and Eastern rjoints.
Also connection made with the C. & O. K.
Sq and N. Be w. it. a for tho West.
Passengers will find a good table, comfort-
aDie rooms, ana every courtesy and attention
wlil be paid them bv the officers.
Order all goods, care of N. N. & W. Direct
tane, ixonoiK, va.
8. H. GRAY, Atrent,
New Bern. N. C
f U2.d-tt.
WHEN TO BUY !
When you caa get goods at the iolow
ing Low, Cut Prices:
CoflFee lbf to 25 cents, Sugar 5 cents,
vinegar ao cib per gaucn, Kice 5
ctB lb., starch 5 eta ll, Good 3
cts lb, 1 lb Baking Powder
10 cts, 24 hundred
Matches 10 cts.
TOBABCO 15 TO 60C.
Tinwaie of all kinds going cheap. Come
ana see my new (Jlaisware, Berry
. Sets, etc. Plates 25 cts, Knifes
and Forks 50 cts 6et. Pants
Cloth 10 cts yd. Calico
3 to 7 ct.i yd. Y'd
Domestic!) 5c.
SHOES SHOES SHOES
Children's Shoes 20c to f 1.15 per pair
Ladies' Shoes 85c to $2.50, Ken's
95c to $3.00 per pair. Trunks
, and Valises at almost any
price. 24 Envelopes -5
cts, Socks 5 Cts.
BOYS' PAf4TS 20 Cts.
Wire Buckle Suspenders 20 cts, Men's
T1 . a tr ... ib ti r-r.
ruu iruui uuc to j.tKj per pair,
Has. Hen's and Boys', from 10
cents to $1.25. Stockings
5 cents, Lamps 15
cents to $1,25.
Cll and see and b convinced.
F. B. Edmundson.
marll-tf.
wnnninT?"
JUL UWUJ.LLV j
ONE AND ONE HALF MILES FROM
UNCOLNTON. N. C.
ELEVEN HUNDREn FEET ABOVE THE SKI
A charming place to spend a summer
holiday. Health-giving air pure spring
water; flower rdecked fields and wooded
hills; excellent table ; comfortable rooms,
Three trains, with mails, daily.
, TERMS
Per month of 28 days . ... . $20.00
Per week . , . . ... . . 6.00
For particulars as to rates for children,
families, etc., address
Mrs. J. M. Richardson,
" WOODSIDE",
May 17, Lincolnton, N C
SOUP ! SOUP !
Try a box of our celebrated
and popular brand of Toilet
Soap, -
"Miller i Shannon's Bouquet".
This soap we have made es
pecially for our own trade,
being white, perfectly pure
and exactly the soap for the
nursery. 3 cakes in a box for
25 cents, or 10 cents a c-ke.
MILLER & SHANNON.
(Wren Cry for Pitcher's tutorial
LOSiHG jJY ALE
Immense Reductions
Made in Prices.
H. WEIL
Notice to Farmers!
WE AKE AGENTS FOB
LEE'S AGRICULTURAL LIME
That stands higher to-day than eycr
Uetore. We also sun best quality
Heavy Weight Rock Lime for
? Building Purposes.
O-
Seed Oats and Rice
And groceries of all kinds. Timothy
Hay, Wheat Bran and Kice . Meal.
Try one sack of Rice Meal and
see if it is not the cheapest
. and best foodjfor stock
jou ever tried.
RESPECTFULLY,
HENRY & M. L. LEE
New Styles
PERCALES I
at 10 and 11 cts.
NEW STYLES
-is
Challies, Chailies.
at 5 cents.
NEW STYLES
-IN-
Shirting Prints
at 5 cents.
Just Received
AT .
H. WEIL & BROS.,
80, 82, 84 and 86.
W. CENTRE St.
eat
& BROS.
Ginii's6rcery .
JjTAVISG RECENTLY CHANQFP
my business to that of Groceries exclu
sively, I invite the public to stek my
corner store,on John and Market streets,
when in need of
Fresh Groceries,
IS. C. Hams,
Spring Chickens
AND
QOUNTRY PRpDpCE.
I keep a full stock of everything.
When you can't find anything you want
anywhere else, be sure you will find it
at my corner grocery. Respectfully,
J. T. GINN.
apl-12-tf.
CI0LDS10E0
MARBLE a WORKS
D. A. Grantham, Proper,
East Centre Street, Between St. Jumps
' Hotel and. Messenger Opera House.
-O-T
Monuments, Marble Slabs,
and Solid Tombs
Iu all designs and artistic carving?. Also
Marble signs &nd Iron Fencing
Our work is the Best
We challenge competition
And invite correspondence.
Kespectf ,i.ly,
D. A. GRANTHAM,
mar.24

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