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Goldsboro weekly argus. [volume] (Goldsboro, N.C.) 1885-1909, October 27, 1892, Image 2

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FOBLIBHBn BT-
JOS. K. RO BlNbON,
EDI TO U A N D PROPRIETOR
XW 'n Viaus weki to v reliable papet
or th pfwioiean'l the tamlly Democratic, an
bearing to discuss no Issue wherein the people't
rlirhts are at stake. Progressive, abreast of th.
-. w shall alwnys endeavor to keep our edi
torial and local columns up to-vthe day and
hour. Our circulation is rapidly increasing
id we hope to soon have the largest circula
tion mjt iMfr Itlnnn. roil Cm lt
gn.Ur i at tht PnttolRc at OnlUboro.
Second Vlnf Hatter.
JV. 0 at
GOLDSBORO. N. C OCT. 27, .8 2.
DEMOCRATIC NOMINEES.
for president:
OROVER CLEVELAND,
of New York.
fok vice president:
A. E. STEVENSON,
of Illinois.
STATE IKMOOIIATIC TICKET.
t FOR govehnor:
ELI AS CARR,
of Edgecombe.
FOB T T KITTEN AN T-GOYBRNQR '
pTaTTToughton,
of Alleghany.
For Secretary of State:
OOTAVIUS COKE,
of Wake.
for Treasurer
;donali w. bain,
of Wake.
For Auditor:
R. M. FURMAN,
of Himcoinbe.
For
SunerinMt Public Instruction
J C. SCARBOROUGH,
of Johnston.
For Atioi nev-G neral:
;frank 1. OSBORNE,
of MiCklrlibuig.
For J ude of t h
GEORGE A
Twelfth District:
SUUFORD.
For elt-ciors at large:
3HARLES B. AYCOCK,
ROBERT B. GLENN,
ForJCongrefs. Second District,
F. A. WOODARD,
of Wilson.
SKL.F:SIINESS IV POLITICS.
Selfi-hncfs in politics, properly
considered, is but a ead exempli
fication of the fearful depravity
that inheres in po--r humanity and
furnishes abundant capital for
chronic crumb'crp, as welt as
thaniefnl dissemblers.
This should not he 60. And
why For the simple and obvious
reason that a lovt i of his country
ought to be a Jovi-r of all that is
true and fair, whether promotive
of his interest or nt, especially if
good is to accrue to his country
This 6hould be the prime consider
ation, and yet how many, in times
of hitih .political excitement, allow
themselves to he svoyiid by the in
fluence of -facial spoils. There
wai a period in the political history
of our beloved country when this
perverse principle did not obtain
very mnch.
Take the case of the immortal
Washington, who not only risked
his Hie, but his property, also.
Recall the case of Charles Car
roil, oi cjarrouton, wno was re
minded, when he was signing the
D- claration of I'-oependeoce, that
because of not adding his locality
lit wou'd be hard to find, therefore,
lie was in no danger, at. once added,
"of Carrolllon". Noble spirit
was lie, indeed.
iKe gain tne xpression once
made by Henry Clay, when a
candidate for the Presidency; "I'd
rather be right than be President
In those days momy or boodle
did not determine the resnlV
There were no Wanamakers nor
Quays thyn, or if these were, they
had the good luck to remain un-
d .scovcred.
In these modern days of politi
cal contest, how widely different
from thofe of a half century ago.
Cannot this evil be corrected
and men be indued to take
higher view of the elective fran
chise and feel thy importance oi
this great privilege? If so, in that
event, Grovcr Cleveland will be
the next President of these United
State?, taking an evidence the
declaration ol Cbftunccy M. Do
pew, in which he !cst:fiod to his
merit by paying ho was the beet
tipi of trie manhood and noble
citizenship.
As Napoleon was -considered by
Fi nee to be the wAIan of Destiny",
so we regard Grover Cleveland as
iu8taining the same relation to his
(our) country.
Come, fellow Democrats, and be-
stir vtiureeiwpfl Irom now until tLc
1 of v i , f.r both "ho Siatc
.1 r.ntl n- takers, aid if enc-
1 . ' I . . 1 I .1 1
Ui-p:litl :r vm not on iv uuinesi;
vaticii tf our o.uutry, bat a happy
deliverance from the clutche of
these mnnstt rs of political iniquity.
The question then arises : How
can we, as taithiul Democrats, help
to brinjr about this d 6irable re
sult? "We would tnggest that every
man ot ns go to work from now
'till the day of election in henett-
endeavor to win at least oue yote,
it no more. The cause is lust, and
the argument ought to be convinc
ing to every mind capable of eound
discrimination, that in tac btate
and national tickets we have good
and true men, who are above sus
picion in every particular that in.
volves faithful cit''zen.-hip and love
of country.
Ari6e,lfellow Democrats, put on
your armor and fight bravely from
now until the decisive day : of
course we moan by the word armor
a resolute heart and an active
tongue in argument.
THE COUNTY CANVASS.
The county joint cauvass between
the uuterrified Democracy and the
puny Third party crowd, who have
been given an open field by their
unsavory confreres the Republican
party bosses in the county held
forth at Dudley Monday, and both
Dr. J E. Person, the old time bolter
and ticket-splitter, and Badge-Col
lector Swinson, of the Third party
ticket, upon whom, by consent and
self-assumption, has devolved the
burden, of the 6peech-making for
their side, were completely "used
up" and so thoroughly rattled by
Aycock, Allen aDd Stevens, of the
Democratic Legislative ticket, that
many of th;ir heretofore adherent;
were openly reclaimed ana many
more given pause for serious reflec
tion upon the untenable policy and
office-seeking voracity of these Third
party leaders, who under the guise
of "patriotism" are sapping with
nefarious designs the foundations of
our iree institutions ana
govern
mental liberties.
But tbe people are waking up al
over the county under the aggressive
canvass of our unterrified and true
Democratic couuty candidates, aud
are coming back to their first love by
the scores at every busting ground
Wayue county is Democratic. He
people are true to the precept3 of
their fathers aud will not desert
them in the hour of peril, though
some may waver ere tue crisis ap
proaches.
Pikeville Letter.
PiKtviLLK, N.C. Oct 24. 1892
Dear Argus: Mr. and Mrs
John D. Ezzell, of Johnston county.
spent Sunday with relatives in ou
town.
Miss Nettie Merritt, of Piukney
is in town on a visit to friends.
Among other improvements in
our little town it has become quite a
cotton market, Messrs. Smith, Scott
& Co. bought 19 bales last Friday
at 7-65, and it was not a very good
day for buying cotton either.
Why don't some of our citizens
here build some houses to rent out?
We have heard of several families
that would move here if they could
get houses to live in.
Rev. C. J. Nelson, of your city,
pieached two sermons here Sunday,
one at 11 a. m., and one at 7 p. m.
Rev. J. T. Edgerton returned home
Sunday from the Primitive Baptist
Association, which convened with
the church at Beaulah, Johnston
county, Friday.
" Direct Evidence.
Editor Argus: Mr. C. A. Bun
dy, of Lemay, P. O., Johnston Co.,
to satisfy himself and neighbors that
the record of Gen, J.B.Weaver, (Peo
ple's party candidate for President)
as shown up in the Atlanta Journal
and the press generally, was not a
pack of newspaper lies, wrote to Pu
laski to know the truth of the mat
ter and received the following letter,
the originrl copy of which is in the
hands of Mr. E. J. Holt, of 'Smith
field, N. C:
"Pulaski, Oct. 8, 1892.
C. A. BunCij, Esq ,
Dkar Sir: Yours of the
3rd inst to hand, and in reply will
say that Mr. D. K. Cox was arrested
at the instance of J. B. Weaver while
at Pulaski, aud treated with every
indignity until paid out of prison
by the cit'zens of this county; and I
am informed by his own son that
when D. K. Cox was living he still
wore upon his ankles the imprint of
the shackles put upon him at that
time. In addition to this outrage
and all others published in the press,
they are but a drop in the bucket to
the whole amount of devilment done
by him during his brief authority
both here and other points in Ten
nessee. Respectfully,
J. B, Stacy.
Death of Mrs. Harrison.
Washington, Oct. 21. List
night passed slowly for the grief
stricken watchers at the White
House. Tbe patient was restless
and nervous, vwith small fiuctua
tions in condition that did Dot
range far on either 8?de from the
general average of extreme depres
sion and exhaustion. trained
nnree was constantly at hand and
the Prerid -Dt and members of his
family had little repose, being fre
qnently in and out ot the sick room
or in communication w'th t. Th
terribio nervous strain on th se
who watch without hope and in
disputing resignation was verj a, -Larai;!.
As tLe u ght waned and
the gray 1 ght of Monday morning
spread over the earth, the vital
force of Mrs. Harriso i was at t'.e
lowest ebb. The President's an
xiety became so acute that he felt
he need of some assurance, no
matter of what character, from
medical authority. co a messenger
was dispatched to the home of Dr,
Gardner, and that physician quick
v responded reacting the Wh te
House at 7 o'clock. So hope'ees
was his report that the President
desired him to remain in the White
House for a tiino. Dr. Gardner,
accordingly, remained and breaks
fasted with the family, ibedav
was clear and crisp and cool and
perhaps the inspiring sunshine and
the dryness of the atmosphere had
somewhat helped the invalid
and acted as a stimulant
The doctor again referred to tLe
remarkable vitality displayed
by the patient and said she had
already surmounted a greater num
ber of critical conditions than any
other patient he had ever attend
ed.
Tedav is the first dav that the
White Houfe has been wholly
closed to the public since Mrs.Uar
rison was taken sick.
Washington, Oct. 21. 6:10 p
m. Mrs. Harrison is still anve,
.Ml 1
but that is all that can be said
one has been sinkink tor some
hours and the end cannot be de
layed long. Dr. Gardner has just
left the White House. He says
Mrs. Harrison may live until 8
o'clock.
At 12:45 o'clock a. m. Dr. Gardner
thought Mrs. Harrison could not
live more than half an hour.
Washington, Oct. 25, 1:10
m. jirs. liarnson is ueaa.
Cleveland aud Pensions.
The cruEade against Mr. Cleve
land to prfiudico soldiers against
him because of his alleged opposi
tion to pensions, is most unjust and
most certainly bring discredit upon
all who make the charge when the
facts are undcrslood. Mr. Cleve
lud sigi.ed more peus:on bills than
any other President since or dur
ing the war. Of special or private
pension bills Lincoln signed 41,
Johnson 231, Grant 536, Hayes
321, Arthur 706, and Cleveland
1,825. President Harris n during
the three years of his term has not
signed half aa many private pen
sions as did Cleveland.
Nor is Mr, Cleveland's approval
of pensions confined to private
pennons. In 1SS6 ho approved
the act inc:easiri the pensions of
over 10,000 maiinod veterans rom
$21 to $30, 30 to $30, and from
37.50 to $15 per month. Iu the
same year he sigiK-d a general bill
which increased to pensions of $80,
000 w dows of so'diers from $8 to
$12 per month, and by the hu
inane and extraordinary efforts of
the Democratic Commissioner of
Pensions these extra pensions of
widows were issued without any
expense to claimants, lie also
signed a general law amending the
records of the War Department as
to the charge of detertion and re
lievins thousands of veterans who
are embarassed in their applica
tions by technical errors ot the reo'
ord. He also signed a general act
benefiting over 30,000 survivors
and widows ot the Mexican war
Mr. Cleveland is assailed because
he vetoed the dependent pension
bill, bi t he simply obeyed public
sentiment expressed with great
e'earnese and emphasis against that
proximate measure. Jvery ltepub
lican newspaper ot prominence in
Philadelphia demanded the veto
of that bill and heartily sustained
the president for doing so. The
Press, tho Inquirer J.h.e Telegraphy
the Bulletin and the Ledger of
this city all united in denouncing
the measure as a reproach npon
honest veterans, and as eiraply the
creation of pensions sharks who
desired to plunder tho government
in the name of patriotism; and net
only did the united press of this
city demand the veto of that bill,
but the soldiers of this city who
gave any expression on the subject
declared against the approval of
that measure. Only two Army
Posts of this city took formal and
positive action on the subject, and
they declare it to be the duty o
the President to veto the bill in th
interests of the honest ycterons of
the land.
President Cleveland naa never
shown any other than the heartiest
sympathy with the honest soldiers
ol the country, but he has Btood
like a rock against the abuse of our
pension system for the benefit of
camp followers and skulkers who
demoralized the army in war and
disgrace onr soldiers in peace. He
demands that the pension roll
be a roll of honor ; that
it shall be held exclus
ively for those who have honestly
and heroically served their country
and deserve its fostering care. All
honest soldiers who merit a place
upon the pension roll he heartily
welcomes, but he is a terror ' to
fraudulent eoldieis as he is to job
bers and profligates and thieves of
every class and condition, and un
der his administration no such can
plaudcr the people of the na tion
-Phila. Times.
Tlie celebrated remedy Salvation Oil is
recommended by experienced veterinary
surgeons as just the thing for the stable
and cattle yard.
Captanof Police, Phillip J, Barber, of
Baltimore, Ma says: salvation ou nas
been used at our station the past winter
for rhumatism, neuralgia pain in the back
etc, and I have yet to meet with your
equal, It is the best,
THE WINNIE DAVIS INCIDENT.
1
Got. Northern Investigates Tom Wat
son's Charge Against Mr Cleveland,
Augusta Evening N'ws.
A week or more ago the JNews
criticised T in Watson for his un
called-for attack upon Grover
CieveUud in charging that the ex-
President r fused to let his wife
meet Miss Winnie Davis in Rich
mond at the unveiling of the Lee
monument.
Gov. Northtrn, ot Georgia was
attracted by the editorial of th:s
paper on Watscn and he had a
personal interview with Dr. J.
William Jones, an eminent Bapr.
tist preacher, a brave Confederate
survivor, aud a nistonan who is
well known as the author of the
history of Gen. liobert E. Lee and
ako Jiff. Davis volume, and who
is the best iuformed man in Geor
gia about ti is alleged snubbing ot
the .Daughter of'tho Contederacr.
ihe Governor had Dr. Jones,
who uvea in Atlanta and holds a
p sition of assistant corresponding
s cretary ot ttic Home Mission
Board of the South Carolina Bap
tist Church, reduce the interview
to writing, aud Gov. Northern has
sent the manuscript to Major J. C,
C. Black. Dr. Jones statement
to the Governor is ae follows :
"1 take pleasure in pitting in
writing a statement which 1 made
in conversation with yon concern
ing the alleged refusal Of President
Cleveland to allow his wife to
meet Miss Winaie Davis and to be
introduced to Iter himself. For
while I do not take any active part
in politics, save to try always to
discharge my duty as a citizen and
a Christam to vote right, I feel
that facts in my possession will
fully refute this slander npon Pres
ident Cleveland and that I should
not be silent concerning it.
''Mr. Cleveland himself and ex
Governor Lee, of Virginia, have
denied these statements very em
pnatically. 1 give you in more
detail exactly what occurred as it
came under my personal cogni
zance.
"In October and Navember,1886
Mies Winnie Davi, the 'Daughter
of the Confederacy,' was for six
weeks a guest at my house, in the
city of Richmond. She weut from
my house to soeud two weeks with
Mrs. Lee, at the Executive man
sion. several days anerwards
r-i ii a.
President Cleveland made his
visit to Richmond on the occasion
of the agricultural fair.lt had been
arranged originally that Mrp,
Cleveland eh. mid accompany him
but at the last moment it was de
cided that his oniciai duties at
Washi gton would prevent him
troni doing im-ro man to come
down to Richmond on the early
morning train, remain several
hours, and return to Washington
the same evening. Mrs. Cleveland
was sick at the time, and when the
1 resident decided to make so
hurried a 'rip the family physician
advised that she should not be sub
jected to the fatigue of the trip or
the excitement ot the crowd. Jbor
this reawon alone, as Mr. Cleve
land Btated at time, Mrs.Cleveland
did not go to Richmond and did
not have an opportunity of meeting
Miss Davis.
"So far as the statement that
Mr. Cleveland himself ra fused to
he introduced to the Daughter of
the Confederacy,' the slander is
abundantly refuted by these facts:
Governor L'.e stated to me at the
time, and reiterates in his card,
that when he met Cleveland at the
depot and escorted him to the Fair
Grounds, one of the first questi-ns
hu asked h'm after getting in the
carriage was. w here is JVlies Ua
vis? Being told by the Governor
that she was then at the Fair
Grounds, the President leplied
'Well, I want you to introduce me
to her at the very earliest oppor
tomty, as 1 want to pay my re
spects. Arriving at the grounds
President Cleveland was received
with defening applause ane given
a grand ovation. After making
the noble speech which he
made npon the occasion, the
VJ6t crowd surged forward and
shook him by the hand; and in the
midst ot it he turned to Governor
Lee and said: 'You have not yet
introduced me to Miss Davis.' Gov
ernor Lee replied: 'She is on the
other side of the stand, but I will
bring her and introduce her.' 'No,'
said the President, 'I will go to
her.' They made their way through
the crowd. Governor Lee intro-
ducedthe President of the United
States to the Daughter of the Con
federacy,' and he gave her a re
spectful and very cordial greeting
saying that he was 'delighted to
meet her.
"That evening Governor Lee
gave President Cleveland a grand
reception at the Executive Man
soin. I was present and chanced to
be talking with Miss Winnie when
the time came for the presidential
party to go to their train and re
turn to Washington. Mr. Cleve
land came out of the room in
which he was across tbe hall into
the room wh re the 'Daughter of
the Confederacy was being given
a splendid ovation by the old sol
diers and others who were present,
and making his way through tbe
crowd and very politely bid her
adieu. I remember as distinctly
as if it had been yesterday tbe
language he used. He said: 'I re
gret to say. Miss Dayis, that my
duties call me back to Washington,
and I am obliged to : tear myself
away from the good people of Rich
mond; I came, therefore, to say
good-by, and to express the pleas
ure with which 1 hare met you,
and the hope that I may have the
privilege of again Beeing you in the
future.' His whole manner waB that
of a mau s'n -e-o aud earnest in
what lie said,Tnd not f r. aV.i-.p a
myre forma! Kpeech."
lLus another canipa gn ;e is
naikd.
20 Car Leads
Fresh Coods.
One Car Meat,
One Car Arrow Ties,
One Car Seed Rye.
One Car Flour,
Oue Car Fine Salt,
One Car Choice Timothy Iluy.
One Cai Rock Lime,
One Car Laths,
Oue Car Rice Meal,
Onp Car Sugar (all grades)
One Car Bagging,
One Car Heavy Bags,
One Car Coffee,
One Car Bran,
One Car Coarse Salt,
One Car Mixed Hay,
One Car Plaster aud Cement,
One Car A'l Salt,
One Car Fed Oats,
Oue Car Cow Feed.
ALSO
Rump Pork, Hams, Lard, Starch,
Pepper, Rice, Matches, Brooms,
Soap, Soda, Tobacco, Snuff, Empty
Grain Sacks, Buckets, etc. All above
for sale at rock bottom prices by
B. M. Privett.
Wholesale and Retail Grocer and Cotton
f'-rmmission Merchant.
69 cents.
call your special
attention to a
line of
CORSETS!
5 hooks, extra lgth
in DRAB AND
WHITE,
WHICH WE
ARE NOW
AT
OFFERING
69 cents.
.... Weil & Bros. J
80, 82, 84 and 86,
W. CENTRE St.
PIANOS AND ORGANS
C. H. ABBOTT,
PUACTI'JAL TUNER and IlEPAIREIt.
C. II. Abbott, Piano and Organ Tuner,
recently returned to GoUls!oro :md will
be in town for scverat da3 s.
Instruments Tuned, Repaired and R -gu
lated.
References from Manufacturers, also
residents of Goldsboro. Satisfactory work
manshiD Guaranteed rates reasoDabl'
No charee for callinsr at residence and
making estimates for necessary repairs.
r3?Orders left at Goldsboro Music
House and L. D. Giddens Jewelry Store.
Sept 28, 3ta
Weekly Arrivals
i
Lime, Plaster,
Cement and L.atlis.
Best Bock Lime
Ou the Market.
B. M. Privett.
I will attend at the following named
times and places for the purpose of col
lecting Taxes for the year 183a.
Fork Township Piney Grove. Fri
day October 7th-
Grantham's Township Grantham's
Store, Saturday, October 8th.
Broaden Township Mount Olive
Wednesday, October 12th.
Indian Springs Township White
Hall, Friday, October 14th.
New Hope Township New Hope
Church, Saturday, October 15th
Saulston Township Hoods Swamp
Church, Monday, October 24th.
Nahunta Township Sauls X Roads,
Tuesday, October 25th.
Nahunta Township Fremont, Wed'
nesday, October 26tn.
Great Swamp Township Sasser's
Mill, Thursday, October 27th.
Pikeville Township Pikeville, Fri
day, Octobor 28th.
Stoney Creek Township Sioney
Creek Church, Saturday October 29th.
Goldsboro Township Goldsboro,
Monday, October 31st.
W. T- DORTCH,
Tax Collector.
Goldsboro N. C, September, 15th, 1892.
Id. 3s w. 2w.
NOTICE!
Having Qualified as administrator with
the will annexed, on the estate of Joe A.
Parkes. deceased, all persons holding
claims against said estate are hereby noti
fied to present them for payment to the un
dersigned by Nov. 1st, 1893, or this notice
will be pleaded in bar oi tneir recovery.
JML. Li. LiXjUj.
Administrator.
Oct 15, '92. (1 a week for 6 weeks.)
Lost:
A bay horse mule with rings around his
lees. Was driven to tioldsboro last Fri
day. Cart has wooden axle. Informa
tion erughtby
TUKNER HOWELL,
2ta. , . Shine, N. C
IT 18 A DUTY yon owe youaaelf and fan.
Sly to sec the best value for your money.
Economize In your foctwear by purchasing
W. 1.. Douglas Hhoes, which represent the
T value for prices a.fcktd, as thousands
will testify.
Kr'IAaE NO SUBSTITUTE.
L. DOUGLAS
S3 SHOE
THE BEST SHOE IN THE WORLD FOR THE M0NE7.
A f en nine sewed shoe, that will not rip, fine
calf, seamless, smooth inside, flexible, more com
fortable, stylish and durable than any other shoe ever
sold at the price. Equals custom made shoes costing
from $4 to 5.
ana a; tiana-eewen, nnecairsnoea. Tho
most fitvlish. easv and rliirahln RhnAi pvpf onlrl
at the price. They equal fliio Imported shoes coating
from $8 to $12.
0 SO Police Shoe, worn by farmers and all
P w others who want a good heavy calf , three
soled, extension edge shoe, easy to walk ln( and will
ncrp me ieeu ury turn w .triii.
D SO Fine Calf, S.'25 and 82.00 Work-
wmmm 1 ns men's Shoes will dve more wear for the
I money than any other make. They are made for ser
vice, ine increasing eaies snow tnab worjungmeu
have found this out.
pnuQ) Si.OO ana Yonths' Sl.75 School
DwVO Shoes are worn bv the bova every
where. The most serviceable shoes sold at the prices.
I nliAI S3.0O Ilancl-Aewed.
Mietftea are made of the best Donirola. or fine !n.1f. na
desired. They are very stylish, comfortable and dura
Die. inej$3.wsnoe equaiscustom maaesnoes costing
from $4.00 to $6.00. Ladies who wish to economize in
heir footwear are finding this out.
flantinn. W. Ij. DoucTas' name and th tmMoa ta
stamped on the bottom of each shoe; look for It
wnen you Duy. iteware or aeaiers attempting lo sub
stitute other makes for them. Such substltutlonsare
fraudulent and subject to prosecution by law for ob
taining money under false pretences.
luiASi isrocuton, luaes. aoiavy
06 .LriTC.
QOLDSBORO, N, C.
toibuy k mm
m WHEEE 'TIS MSE."
z
I
rn
JO
CO
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m
CO
D. W. HURTT,
Merchant Tailor!
QOLDSBORO, N. O.
B. FONVIELL
s
N
t. B. FONYiELLEJ
E
A
4 (
A
Lreadiii
S
L
Grower.
S
A
C
T
VT ST.-..-
GOLDSBORO, tf. C
B
R
OUEI.1SK
E
A
JjpiIIS 1ERAND OS"
Flour lis been giver
up. by all who use It, to br
the very best on the market
Give it a tial Miitl be con
viice.l tliat it lias no equal
A
N
O
D
N4
R
L
Y STOCV OP GKOCKK
1
ie is complete 111 every par
ticular, and I am better pre
pared to meet the demands!
of 'lie public tli an ver le-
fore. Mv prices are in accord
c
witli tlie liard times, and ifj
O
you would gave money give
me a call.
F
F
T
E
A
o
I. B. FOHVIELLE
F
Grocer
-WAI NUT ST., -.
GOLDSBORO. N. C
THE GROCER.
Notice,
A. & N. C, R. R. CO., 1
Treasurer's Offi e, v
Newbern, N. C, Sept. 8, 18U3. )
DIVIDEND OF 2 PER CENT
on the capital stock cl tbe Atlaiuic ar.d
North Carolina Railroad (Jompaty will
be paid at the Treasurer's othce, on and
alter the first dy ot October, 1892, to
stockholders of record on the 22nd 01
August, 1895J. F. C. K03ERTS,
Treasurer.
.2J
w.
noon
FOHVIELLE.
OOLiJUSBOKO ilAKKETS.
Corrected Dally by B. t. Privett
Wholesale Priviil-r. til lrlr!
O5lor.
OOCTNTRY I'HODCCR.
Cttcn...... 7.35
'iam.1 -. " l'-H
ide'. - 9 S! 10
hou'ders . . . ' f' 9
Uird 9 10
ffoddsr 90 'i 1 tfl
Corn, 65 fa! tv)
ileal 60 t 65
Peas . .. - 80 1 00
Peanuts.... . 65 70
Oats...- ...... . 45a50
Skits in a 11
'-taiclena 15 a 20
fiees Wax .... .... 20 28
liden ... 3 ixt
For nobby suits suits that have all the
essence ot tailor maae suits you wiu
have to get ours.
EINSTEIN CLOTHING CO i
I'M I'll M'.'.f"? Ru!? 0 0.
CONDENSED SCHEDULE.
J 3 Li'iiiC'l MAY tt. liS4
TKAINS GOING SOUTH DAILY.
Lv Richmond
6 Oil pui
i;t pm
5 13 pm
o 10 pm
10 lopui
4 UU pm
ti U I pm
6 15 p:u
7 pui
10 pui
tS 2 1 pm
Bai-kvillt
tiv Keysville
Ar U.tn-'ilto
Ar ii-ee.';stoio
liv Goldsboro
ir R tleitfh
Ur ttaicidi
Lv Durham
Ac Greensboro
l,t Winston-Salem.
Greunsooro
i'lOZb pji
Vra.uisbury..... ..
1:2 18 u.iu
"2 3ain
- B 00 am
it iiiatus villa
Ar Asaewlle
Ar Hot Springs . ...
uy oausDury
12SainW08,)u.
.i.r SpartaaOurg.. .
Ar Greenville
Ar Atlanta
AruarioLU)
u irj am
5 (XI am
6 10 ii oi
1- i pin
2 iO am
5 iZ aui
9 37 aai
L.v Ouat lotte .... ..
Ar Columbia.
Ar Augusta
THAINS GOING .VO.KTH DAlfcT.
No 10
7 00 pui
11 lOpm
3 10 am
S 50 pm
t 40 am
7 t.0 ..rn
8 '1 am
' 4 30 pm
y 00 am
2 50 am
t 0- am
& 'oi rnii
10 -'i am
'11 iO aiu
10 .iU am
la 21 pm
1 23 pm
1 pm
3 05 p;i;
10 'i am
12 10 pm
'i IS pci
3 31 pm
5 30 pi''.
No la
8 i5 am
13 t.
5 15 :ti
8 05a'i.
6 in un.
6 3J pm
6 lo pu.
l-3i;u
3j1u.
7 08 p.i.
8 05
8 35 on.
iO Z p..
M3 iO ....
13 11 a .
3 0 J an
3 0vl .n:
1 6 to m
1- 3J pm
1" 45 pm
12 4. aD
4 15 -.n
4 57 .vr
7 10
Lv Augusta
L.v Columbia
ArCliarlotto
Lv A Uanta
ArCharlotte
Lv Char lot I e
Araaliabury
Lv Hot springs
LvAstieviUe
Lv tateavillo
ArSalisbury
LvSaliabury
Ar Greens txro
Ar Winsion-daltHi
Lv Grnati.boro
Ar Durham
Ar Raljii;b
Lv It h
Ar Goldsboro
Lv Greensboro
Ar Danville
Ar Koysvilie
Vr Burkvlllt-
Ar Richmond
Daily. t Daily except Sunday,
t 1ST W KEN WEST J'OINT Jt KlUUMUM)
Leave West Point 7.50 a. m., daily, and i.fr
x. m., daily except Suuilay aud AlouJny; ai
rive llichmond 9 05 ana 10.40 a. m. Keturunu
eave iiiubmond H.lo p. ui., and 4.45 p. in., danj
except Sunday; arrive Weal Point 5.00 u
1 UU p. in.
aiSTWiiEN KlLriMOND AND UA LB! U i'
VIA rs.14VtjVlI.LE.
L.eive Kichmond 3.20 p. m, daily; leave eye
vilie 5.55 a.m., arrive Oa lord 8.08 a. m., Huu
lerton9-30a.nl Durham .3.i a. in., Ka'ei.y
0.40 a. m. ieturuinj leavs Kaleigb 8 15 p. m
iaily Durham 9 3o p. in., Henderson 9.30 p.m.
JxtorU 10.5'J p. m.- arrivo Keyaville 1,05 a. -u
liiolim jud 7.1o a. in.
Pullman Pallace riloupiuif Cars between
ttiolimond aud lia.eih ou above traius,
liied tr.iiud leave Ke svllle dally, ejeec.
Sunday. 9.10 a.m.; arrives Durham e.40 p. vu
Lieavcs Durham 5.15a. ui. daily except SunUaj
trnves UA-IorJ 7.45 a in.
Additional tmiu leaves Uiford daily excep
Sunday 11:05 p n ., arrive iien-
lersou 11.59 p.m. Keturumif leav
leuuerson i.00 a.m., daily eiuep bunda
a rive Oilord S.OO p, m.
Viishiuiiton aud ciou' h western Vesti ui
Li uiteu oycratoa between Washington nu
Atlanta daily, lt-avea tV lohingtou ll.oO P. v..
Danvili- 5.5'J A, M.. Greeusb.-ro J.i.9 A. M.
ialisoury 8,38 A. M., Cnarlotte 9 40 A. j.
trriven Atlanta 3 06 P. Al. Keturn-na. .e-.-v?
Atlanta i.4o P. Al., iJnariolte a.io P. Si.., inii.
jur iO.31 P. Ai.. Grevisburo 13.00 P. 1 ; a
riys Diuvill-- l.3o A, Ai., Lynuh'ju g i. 10 A
vV atiiuKLon -..bs- A. M.
i'urouxu Punman Siteper New ITork U
e w Or.eaus, also butiveen WasLnuirioii ai;f
iempBiS, via Atlanta aud biru.ingham.
No9. 9 and i3 uouaejt at K:cuino'id froi;
nd to West Point, and ilal lmore dailyjicep'
.Sunday.
BLEEPING CAR SERVICE.
On Trains 9 and 10. Pullman Bullet .iioeDt,-
XKfoua Atlanta una New liork, Danville anc
AUUS E&,
On 11 and 12, Polimin isuSet Sleeper ly
l.woen Uichuioud and Danville
and Puiiin-Li nutlet Slee;
jr bev VM'a New ifora, WaBin igt jn ar-i-uo-tvi.
via Diuviiie, SaiisDuryand Ah:
Hit, and Puiimau Sleepers between WasS.
ntun and Atlanta.
uu trains w and 13 Pullman paiace Sleupiu
-.rs u- wau tiaieih anu ASQ.jViiie.
H. lic.rtK Lili Y , superiut uci'-u
iticn uoud. V
V A, Turk, Ass't. bej, Pass. Agu
unariotte, A. c,
. W . II. Green, Gcn'i M'gr, Auauia, ua.
Jas. L. i'ayior, ueu. Pass. Ageu;,
Atiaiita, Vt
Soi llu ie. 1 raffl..- Mau&ger,
A tlanta.
'iLMiAiilON i WiXDj'- R. ilaail BraocS es.
N lit-, S K. i -CliKilULL.
'I KAilii iiOlNo SOUTH.
No. 27 ' No. 41
FastMail Daily.'-J
Dail . Sunday.
543 p m 8 00 a n.
6 06 7 09 a m
6 bb'p'ic I!"".'.!!.""
7 UC p n 7 40 a 11
i iTTTTTTTTT
I
7 40 p ml 830 a n
9 30 a d
8 40 p 11 I HU n
955 p rrU3S a n
Cat
id May 31,
llrt'3.
c a
2. a
Lv Weldon..
Ar Uoeky M
i330 p rn
1 40 p m
Ar Taiboro...
v Tarboro...
318 p in
13 58 pm
313pm
Ar Wilson
!jV Wilson
Ar Selena
Vr Fayettevilto..
TiV Goldsboro. ...
Lv Warsaw
'v Magnolia
r Wnmington...
2LH) " m
3 3 p m
5 30 p m
315 p m
4 15 p m
4 37 p m
6.1O p m
NO. 15 DAILT.
TRAINS GOING NORTH.
2 x S2 . No. 101
oailyei.
3 35 am 915 an 130 p n.
1 54 10 57 a 111 6 02 p n
1111 a in 615 p IB
3 55 am 1305 p m 7 10 p m
..... . . !'o J a m
:I3 t a1
13i0 p m
3 35 a m 1258 p m 804 p m
4 03 130 p m 839 p m
30a 2 18 p m
13 6s p m
5 05 a n-- I 3 56 p a. .0 00 pm
Lv Wilmington
jV Magnolia
Lv Warsaw. ...
.r Holds bo ro...
Lv Fsyetteville.
Lv Setma
Ar Wilson
Lv Wilson
Ar Koclty Mount.
Ar Tarboro.
IiV Tarboro.
Ar Weldon..
Tralti on Scotland Nccii Uraucb Kjad ieavp
Weldon, i (Hi p m., Halifai 4 33 p m; arrives
Scotland Neck at 5.15- m.. Greenville 6 5i
p. m.. Kinston 8,00 p. m. lletuining leaves
iviuston T.lfl a. m.. Greenville B 25 a m. Arrivt
Halifax at 11 Od a in.. Weldon 1136 a m, dailj
except Sunday.
Trains on Washington Branch 'eave Wash
inctiin 7.1X1 a. ra.. arrives A & H. Junction 8 4
u m returning leaven A. & K. Junctio 740
o. m arrives Washington 8.45 p. m. Dany
BicrBt Sundar. Connects with train- on
Albema-le and iialeigb U.K., and ScoUai.d
&eck iiranch,
Train leaves Tarboro, N. C, via Albemarle
3c Raleigh railroad, daily except Sundiiy, 4 4
p.m. .Sunday 300 p.m. .arrive Wiiliarusion, N.
n. 7 03 d . m .. 20 d. m. Plymouth 8 30 p n.
i 20 p m. Returning leave Plymouth dail)
except Sunday, d 00 a m., sunaay woo am
wuiiamston, 7 3d a m.. 9 58 a. m., arrive Tar
i irr 10 40 a. in 11 20 a m.
TrnlnR nn Soiithr.rn Division. Wilson and
Fayetteville branch leaves Fayetteville 6y
p. m., arrive Rowlsnd 7 13. p. m. rteturbiiig
leaves Rowland 7,35 a. m., arrive rayttte
vilin l 'll. m. dailv except Sunday.
"I'lratnon Midland, N . C, Onnoii leaves Golds
boro. daily except Sunday, 6 00 a. m.. rrive
smithaeld, 7 30 a. m. Returning leaver Smith-
tteld, 8 00 a. m.. arri e Uoiasooro, 9 30 a. m.
Train on Nashville branch leaves Rocky Ml
at 5 15 p. m., arri vok Nashville 5 55 p.m., Spring
Uopeti 30 p. m. Returning leaves spring lion
8 00 a. m., Nabviiie 35 a. m., arrive kock
Mount 9 15 a- m., daily, except Sunday
Train on Ol-.nton branch loaves Warsaw fo
'iintjn .iAtlv. oxwM. Sunday. 6 20 p. m. n
11 15 a. m. K turning leaves Clinton at 8 2f
a. ai. and 3 10 p. m.. connecting at Warsaw witl
'ioi. 41, 10.33 HP.d in.
southoon??i trait on t uson r Byonev;ii
Brunei, is X:-. -51- Norihboundis No. 50.Dail'
except Pnndsy
Train Mo. 27. South, and U North, will stop
only at Kocky lou it, Wnno- , Goldsboro and
Afarnoiia.
Trait. No. "8 makes close connection at W'-.
Ion for ail co'nts North, daily. Ail rail v-
Richmond, and daily, except Sunday via Bi.
Lino, also at Rocky Mount daily exceott'un
Ja . with Nor oik and Carolina rfailroad fo
Norfolk aed all pcints North via Norfolk.
JOHN F. DIV1NK, Qet-'ldup'
J. R. KRNLS", Gen'l Manager.
T. M. BwisaSOM. Traffic Manager.
Engraving
Mr. L. D. Giddens,
Jr., a graduate of
Parson's Horological
Institute, La Pcrte
, t9 prepare! rodo all kinds of plain
i n(f tancv ensmvinst at -
L. L. GIDDENS' Jewelry Establishment.
West Centre Street
iflaie&MCaroIMR. P
Time Table No. 22.
TO TAKE EFFECT OCT. 17, 1890.
TRAINS GOING EAST.
STATIONS. No. 51 No I t
LEAVE. i. M. A. M.
Goldsboro 3 30 6 30
Best's 3 56 7 05
LaG range 4 09 7 30
Falling Ureek 4 23 7 53
Kinston 4 40 8 30
Caswell 4 55 8 55
foveT 5 05 10 02
Core Creek 5 19 10 36
Tuscarora 5 35 11 05
Clark's 5 41 11 41
Newborn 6 08 3 00
Riverdale ... 6 39 8 42
Croatan 6 44 3 50
Havelock 6 56 4 13
Newport 7 16 4 42
Wild wood 7 24 4 55
Atlantic .... . 7 28 5 01
Morehead City. 7 43 5 21
Atlantic Hotel 5 28
Morehead Depot P. M
.
TRAINS GOING WEST.
STATIONS. No. 50.f No. 2.f
leave. A. M. A M
Morehead Depot 6 25 7 00
Atlantic Hotel 7 15
Morehead City 6 47 7 27
Atlan-ic 6 58 7 62
Wild wood 7 01 8 05
Neewport 7 13 8 27
Havelock 7 33 9 04
Croatan 7 47 9 33
Riverdale 7 52 9 46
Newborn 8 30 1 30
Clark's 8 48 2 13
Tuscarora 8 58 2 30
Core Creek 912 300
Dover 9 28 3 40
Caswell 939 405
Kinston 9 53 5 00
Falling Creek 10 06 5 30
LaGrange 10 25 6 04
Best's 10 40 6 34
Goldsboro 11 10 P. M.
No 50, passenger daily excrpt Sunday.
connects with W. & W. train bound
N2rth, leaving Goldsboro 12 10 p. m., and
R. & D, train West, leaving Goldsboro
at 4 p. m.
No. 51. passenger, daily except Sun
day, connects with R. & D. trin, arriving
Goldsboro 3.05 p. m., and W. & W. train
from the North at 3.10 p. m.
tNo. 1, Mixed freight and passenger
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
tNo. 2, Mixed freight and passenger
Monday, Wednesday and Friday.conr
with W. & W. through freight, North
bound, leaving Goldsboro at 11.10 p. m.
S. L DILL.
Snneri ntendiwit
Closing Out ! !
An entire stock
of Dry noods
Clothing, Boots
and Shoes, Hats,
Etc., at and below cost.
We mean business.
Come and see
for
yourself, and if 3'ou
are not satisfied
don't buy. Our
entire stock is on
The Market.
The Goods must
be ?old. The money
must come. Now if
you want to look
out for your own
intererest, come
at once and make your selections
C Kepn fit Co.,
Fast Centre Street, Goldsboro.
Don't
BE DECEIVED!
c
HONEST COMPETION
Is the life oi trade, and we
Guarantee price as well as quality
Of goodp.
We keep the beet the market
Affords and wonld call
Especial attention to the
BESTON ESRTH
A BRAND OF FLOUR
We have control of for this city.
Tho-e who have not tried it
Ought to and be convinced
That there it noue better.
Onr line of
TEA, COFFEE A1TDSPICES
is complete:
Try onr new brand of Coffee
Just received, Said to be
The best in the world.
A nice selection of
CANNED GOODS
And everything kept in a
EIRST CLASS GROCERY.
We iuvite you to come to see ns.
Bizzell Bros. & Co.
Wholesale and Retail Fancy Grocers. .
April 27-92.
PHOTO GALLERY !
Having moved my Photograph Gallery
to my new place of business, which has
been fixed up in excellent style, I am bet
ter prepared than ever to do first-class
work. Being situated on the ground floor
witli no steps to climb, makes my Gallery
one of the most conveniently arranged in
the State. ,
Respectfully, -
1 A. A: MILLER,
Photographer and Dealer in Photograpn'c
Supplies.

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